Installing OpenFOAM

Installing OpenFOAM
Installing OpenFOAM®
• To install OpenFOAM®, you will need a working Linux distribution.
• The easiest way to install OpenFOAM® is by downloading a precompiled
binary (Ubuntu Deb Pack, Red Hat RPM Pack and Suse RPM pack are
available).
• By the way, you will need internet access and administrative privileges.
• To install OpenFOAM®, just follow the instructions given in
http://www.openfoam.org/
• If for any reason the instructions given in http://www.openfoam.org/ do not
work for you, we are going to give you our instructions.
• The instructions are exactly the same as the one you will find in
http://www.openfoam.org/, we only added a few tips and additional
comments.
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Installing OpenFOAM®
• The way we do it, is by compiling the latest source code release from the Git
repository.
• Those willing to compile the source code can receive regular updates by
downloading the Git repository distribution of OpenFOAM®. Known as 3.0.x,
this version is managed and updated daily by the OpenFOAM® Foundation
and can be conveniently pulled (updated) using the Git revision control
system.
• It is possible to do a native installation of OpenFOAM® in Windows and Mac
OS X, but we will not discuss it.
• If you work under Windows or Mac OS X, and do not want to go through the
hustle and bustle of partitioning your hard drive to install a Linux distribution,
you can install a virtual machine.
2
Installing OpenFOAM®
• If you want to install a virtual machine, you can check these versions:
• VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org/). Open source.
• VMware Workstation Player
(https://my.vmware.com/en/web/vmware/free#desktop_end_user_compu
ting/vmware_workstation_player/12_0). Free.
• We recommend VMware Worstation Player.
• After installing the virtual machine, simply install any Linux version.
• Then install OpenFOAM®.
• The following instructions should work with Linux OpenSUSE 42.1 (and
maybe with older versions).
• During this installation, we are assuming that you are using bash shell and
that you have the newest gcc compiler and libraries.
3
Installing OpenFOAM®
•
We tested these instructions on 5/7/2016 and using
OpenSUSE 42.1
•
We strongly suggest you not to copy and paste these
instructions in the terminal, as it might experience
some difficulties interpreting the end of line character.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Installation prerequisites
Remember, in these installation instructions we are assuming that you have OpenSUSE 42.1
(or a newer version), you are using bash shell and that you have the newest gcc compiler
and system libraries.
• Using the graphical interface (the easy way), launch yast and search for the
following packages:
• git, cgal-devel, gmp-devel, python-devel, lapack-devel, gsl-devel,
cmake, boost-devel, gnuplot, mpfr-devel, openmpi-devel, glu-devel,
libQtWebKit-devel, libqt4-devel, qt4-assistant-adp-devel, qt4-x11-tools,
devel_C_C++
• You will need administrative privileges.
5
OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Installation prerequisites
Remember, in these installation instructions we are assuming that you have OpenSUSE 42.1
(or a newer version), you are using bash shell and that you have the newest gcc compiler
and system libraries.
• Using the terminal (the hard way) :
• $> zypper install -t pattern devel_C_C++
• $> zypper install git cgal-devel gmp-devel pythondevel lapack-devel gsl-devel metis-devel
• $> zypper install cmake boost-devel gnuplot mpfrdevel openmpi-devel glu-devel
• $> zypper install libQtWebKit-devel libqt4-devel qt4assistant-adp-devel qt4-x11-tools
• You will need administrative privileges.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Downloading the source code
• Download OpenFOAM 3.0.x source code. In the terminal type:
•
$> cd $HOME
•
$> mkdir OpenFOAM
•
$> cd OpenFOAM
•
$> git clone git://github.com/OpenFOAM/OpenFOAM-3.0.x.git
• If the git protocol does not work, it means that your computer is behind a
firewall that is blocking the relevant TCP port (9418). In such a case proceed
as follows:
•
git clone http://github.com/OpenFOAM/OpenFOAM-3.0.x.git
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Downloading the source code
• As soon as you finish downloading OpenFOAM-3.0.x, do the following:
• $> cd OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• $> git pull
This will update the source code installation which is already up-to-date. This is done to test that git pull is working.
• Now download the ThirdParty package from the terminal:
• $> cd $WM_PROJECT
•
$> wget -c http://downloads.sourceforge.net/foam/ThirdParty3.0.1.tgz?use_mirror=mesh -O ThirdParty-3.0.1.tgz
• Extract the ThirdParty package in $WM_PROJECT and rename it as follows:
• $> tar xzf ThirdParty-3.0.1.tgz
• $> mv ThirdParty-3.0.1 ThirdParty-3.0.x
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Environment variables
• Let’s setup the environment variables.
• The environment variable settings are contained in the
$HOME/OpenFOAM/OpenFOAM-3.0.x/etc directory.
• If you are running bash or ksh (if in doubt type echo $SHELL), source the
$WM_PROJECT_DIR/etc/bashrc file by adding the following line to your
$HOME/.bashrc file:
• source $HOME/OpenFOAM/OpenFOAM-3.0.x/etc/bashrc
• Then type in the current terminal window:
• $> source $HOME/.bashrc
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Environment variables
• If you are planning to use the MPI distribution that comes with OpenFOAM®, in the
file $WM_PROJECT_DIR/etc/bashrc look for the entry export WM_MPLIB and
made the following modification
• export WM_MPLIB=OPENMPI
• If you are planning to use the system MPI distribution made the following modification
(default option),
• export WM_MPLIB=SYSTEMOPENMPI
• You will need to install the system MPI distribution.
• If your MPI distribution is not installed in the default location, add the MPI path entry
at the very end of your .bashrc file.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Checking your system before compilation
• After installing the source code and all the dependencies, you need to check
if your system is ready to build the sources, to do so execute in the terminal
the foamSystemCheck script, in the terminal type:
• $> foamSystemCheck
• If any critical software is missing or needs updating to a newer version, install
the required software before proceeding to the building stage.
11
OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Building OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• If the previous check passed, we can now compile OpenFOAM-3.0.x.
• The compilation process can be quite lengthy, if your computer has more
than one processor you can compile in parallel by setting the
WM_NCOMPPROCS environment variable, in the terminal type:
• $> export WM_NCOMPPROCS=NP
where NP is the number of processors you want to use.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Building OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• Now go to the OpenFOAM-3.0.x installation directory $WM_PROJECT_DIR
and execute the build script Allwmake, in the terminal type:
• $> cd $WM_PROJECT_DIR
• $> ./Allwmake
• In principle this will build everything.
• After compiling OpenFOAM-3.0.x, we need to compile the Paraview
module and the PV4FoamReader module.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Building OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• At this point and if you did not get any error during the building process, you
should have a fully working installation of OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• You can start to use OpenFOAM but you will not be able to use paraFoam (a
Paraview fork).
• Paraview is the third-party software used for post-processing in
OpenFOAM®. Its compilation is automated using the script makeParaView4
located in the ThirdParty-3.0.x directory.
• To compile Paraview, execute the following commands:
• $> cd $WM_THIRD_PARTY_DIR
• 4> ./makeParaView4
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Building OpenFOAM-3.0.x
• Then you need to compile PV4blockMeshReader and the PV4FoamReader
plugins. From the terminal:
• $> cd $FOAM_UTILITIES/postProcessing/graphics/PV4Readers
• $> wmSET
• ./Allwclean
• ./Allwmake
• At this point and if you did not get any error during the building process, you
should have a fully working installation of both OpenFOAM-3.0.x and
Paraview/paraFoam.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
• To check your installation, execute the foamInstallationTest
script from the terminal.
• If no problems are reported,
Congratulations, you have a fully working
installation of OpenFOAM-3.0.x and Paraview
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Testing you installation
• Create an user directory in the $HOME/OpenFOAM directory, in the terminal
type:
• $> mkdir -p $FOAM_RUN
• Then from the terminal:
• $> cd $FOAM_RUN
• $> pwd
• Then you should see your current working directory, which should be:
• $HOME/OpenFOAM/USERNAME-3.0.x/run
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Testing you installation
• Now copy OpenFOAM® tutorials to your user directory. In the terminal type:
• $> cp -r $FOAM_TUTORIALS $FOAM_RUN
• Now go to the tutorials directory. In the terminal type:
• $> cd $FOAM_RUN/tutorials
• $> ls –al
(just to take a look at the directory organization and to verify that the information was copied)
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Testing you installation
• Run the first example case of incompressible flow in a lid-driven square
cavity:
• $> cd $FOAM_RUN/tutorials/incompressible/icoFoam/cavity
• $> blockMesh
• $> icoFoam
• $> paraFoam
Enjoy and happy CFD
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
Updating your OpenFOAM-3.0.x source code
installation
• To update OpenFOAM 3.0.x source code installation, from the terminal:
• $> cd $WM_PROJECT_DIR
• $> git pull
• $> ./Allwmake
• When you recompile the updated source code installation, you do not recompile the
whole installation, you only compile the updated files. If you want to compile a clean
installation after an update, from the terminal:
• $> cd $WM_PROJECT_DIR
• $> git pull
• $> ./wcleanAll
• $> ./Allwmake
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OpenFOAM® installation – Linux option
To compile OpenFOAM-3.0.x doxygen
documentation
• This step is optional.
• To compile Doxygen documentation, from the terminal:
• $> cd $WM_PROJECT_DIR
• $> ./Allwmake doc
Note: You will need to install doxygen and graphviz/dot
• Have in mind that compiling the Doxygen documentation is time consuming
and it will take a lot hard drive space, so it is easier to access the information
online http://cpp.openfoam.org/v3/
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• If you work under Windows and/or Mac OS X, and do not want to go
through the hustle and bustle of partitioning your hard drive to install a
Linux distribution, you can install a virtual machine.
• If you are looking for a virtual machine, you can download VirtualBox
(https://www.virtualbox.org/) or VMware Workstation Player
(https://my.vmware.com/en/web/vmware/free#desktop_end_user_compu
ting/vmware_workstation_player/12_0). Mac and Windows versions are
available and they are open source/free.
• After installing the virtual machine, simply install the guest operating
system, namely, the Linux version of your preference.
• If you want to know it, we use OpenSUSE.
• To install OpenFOAM®, just follow the instructions given in
http://www.openfoam.org/ or the previous instructions.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• To avoid compatibility issues during the course, we highly advise you to
install our custom made Linux version. It is a fully working Linux
OpenSUSE 42.1 version (with KDE 4), that you can modify or update to
fit your needs.
• You can download the virtual machine distribution or an ISO distribution
from this link
https://susestudio.com/a/XrxjaO/joel-s-opensuse-leap-42-1-kde-4-desktop
• We regularly update the distributions.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• This Linux version was created with CFD applications in mind for CFD
users. It comes with many CFD, CAD, mesh generation, visualization,
numerical libraries, optimization, plotting applications, and text editors
pre-installed. It also comes with all the compilers and libraries necessary
to compile most of the applications.
• This is a light Linux distribution and is already configured to seamless
run OpenFOAM® and all applications to be used during the course.
• To install the virtual machine you will need at least 50 gigs of hard drive
space and 2 gigs of RAM memory.
• If you want to exploit Linux to its maximum potential, it is better to install
a full distribution.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• If you choose to install our Linux distribution, extract the image in a
directory of your convenience and launch VirtualBox or VMware
Workstation Player.
• In VirtualBox or VMware Workstation Player create a new virtual
machine, follow the instructions and install the Linux image you just
extracted (the .vmdk file).
• After installing the virtual machine, do not forget to change the settings
according to your hardware. Also, remember to enable 3D acceleration.
• Remember, to install the virtual machine you will need at least 50 gigs of
hard drive space and 2 gigs of RAM memory.
25
OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• After finishing the installation, run the virtual machine (the first time it
boots it will take some time).
• If you are using VirtualBox you will need to install the guest additions
tools (you will find them in the menu bar under Devices).
• Reboot and voila you are done.
• There are many applications preinstalled, just to name a few:
OpenFOAM®, salome, dakota, pyfoam, swak4foam, blender, fipy, gmsh,
gnuplot, helyx-os, maxima, openscad, openvsp, octave, paraview,
Python, valgrind, xflr5.
• By the way, we have tested the virtual machine with vmware fusion,
vmware player, parallels and VirtualBox.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• After login in, you will find the OpenFOAM® installation in the following
directory:
/home/cfd/OpenFOAM
• The default user is cfd.
• All the environment variables have been already setup.
• Add this point you can start enjoying OpenFOAM® (and OpenSUSE
Linux distribution).
• By the way, do not forget to check the .bashrc file to know all the
aliases and environment variables defined.
27
OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• Remember:
Accounts
Default User:
Password:
cfd
cfd
Root User:
Password:
root
linux
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• If you choose to install another Linux distribution, just follow the default
installation instructions.
• We recommend you OpenSUSE Linux distribution, but it is up to you.
• After installing the virtual machine, do not forget to change the settings
according to your hardware. Also, do not forget to enable 3D
acceleration.
• By the way, during the installation of the virtual machine you will need the
installation DVD or the image of the Linux distribution you chose.
29
OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• Also, you will need to manually set the size of your virtual hard drive.
• If you are planning to do a minimum Linux installation and doing some
small runs using OpenFOAM®, we recommend you to use 20 gigs.
• In any case, you can set any size you want according to your hardware
limitations.
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OpenFOAM® installation – Virtual machine option
• Installing OpenFOAM® on Windows and MacOS –
Virtual machine
• After finishing the installation of your Linux distribution, run the virtual
machine (the first time it boots it will take some time) and if it is needed,
install the guest additions tools.
• Reboot and voila you are done with the Linux distribution installation.
• Now proceed with the OpenFOAM® installation.
• As you will be doing a clean OpenFOAM® installation, just follow the
instructions that you will find in http://www.openfoam.org/.
• If for any reason the instructions given in http://www.openfoam.org/ do
not work for you, try to follow the previous instructions.
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