Technical Principles 6.0 - center

Technical Principles 6.0 - center
Desigo™
Building automation system 6.0 SP
with supplements for Desigo Insight SP2
Technical Principles
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Building Technologies
Copyright
Copyright
Technical specifications and availability subject to change without notice.
© 2015 Copyright by Siemens Switzerland Ltd
Transmittal, reproduction, dissemination and/or editing of this document as well as
utilization of its contents and communication thereof to others without express
authorization are prohibited. Offenders will be held liable for payment of damages.
All rights created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or design patent
are reserved.
Issued by:
Siemens Switzerland Ltd
Building Technologies Division
International Headquarters
Gubelstrasse 22
CH-6301 Zug
Tel. +41 41 724-2424
www.siemens.com/buildingtechnologies
Edition: 2016-09-20
Document ID: CM110664en
© Siemens Switzerland Ltd, 2015
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Table of Contents
1
About this Document............................................................................. 9
2
2.1
2.2
System Overview ............................................................................... 10
Management Level ....................................................................................11
Automation Level .......................................................................................13
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
Room Automation ......................................................................................15
Desigo Open .............................................................................................16
Workflow and Tools ...................................................................................16
Topologies .................................................................................................18
Communication Principles..........................................................................20
Data Maintenance......................................................................................23
2.9
Views ........................................................................................................28
3
3.1
Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming ............................................ 32
Coverage of the Technical Process............................................................32
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
Coverage of the System ............................................................................34
Main Tasks ................................................................................................36
Tools for Different Roles ............................................................................40
Working with Libraries................................................................................40
Working in Parallel and Subcontracting ......................................................41
Workflow for Primary Systems ...................................................................42
Workflow for Room Automation Classic......................................................43
3.9 Workflow for Desigo Room Automation ......................................................43
3.10 Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) ..........................................................44
3.11 Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)........................................................................45
3.12 Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT) .....................................................51
3.13 Generate Graphics for Management Station ..............................................53
3.14 Programming in D-MAP .............................................................................53
Siemens
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
Control Concept ................................................................................. 56
Control Concept and Control Blocks...........................................................61
Local Control Design .................................................................................69
Superposed Plant Controls ........................................................................72
Closed-Loop Control Strategy ....................................................................88
Desigo Room Automation ..........................................................................96
5
5.1
5.2
Technical View ................................................................................. 113
Standard Plant Structures ........................................................................113
Technical Text Labels ..............................................................................118
6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
Global Objects and Functions ............................................................ 121
Ensuring Data Consistency ......................................................................121
Roles in the System .................................................................................122
Life Check ...............................................................................................123
Time Synchronization ..............................................................................124
Examples of Global Objects .....................................................................125
7
Events and COV Reporting ................................................................ 129
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7.1
7.2
7.3
Sources and Causes of System Events ................................................... 129
Routing System Events............................................................................ 130
Sources and Causes of COVs ................................................................. 130
7.4
COV Reporting ........................................................................................ 130
8
8.1
Alarm Management ........................................................................... 134
Alarm Sources ......................................................................................... 134
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
Alarm Example ........................................................................................ 136
Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response .................................... 140
Alarm Response of the Function Blocks ................................................... 148
Alarm Functions....................................................................................... 156
Alarm Management by Notification Class ................................................. 158
Alarm Routing over the Network .............................................................. 162
8.8
8.9
8.10
8.11
Alarm Queuing ........................................................................................ 164
Common Alarms ...................................................................................... 166
Alarm Suppression .................................................................................. 167
Alarm Message Texts .............................................................................. 169
9
Calendars and Schedulers ................................................................. 171
9.1
9.2
9.3
Schedule ................................................................................................. 172
Calendar.................................................................................................. 177
Wildcards ................................................................................................ 178
9.4
Alarm Messages ...................................................................................... 178
10
Trending .......................................................................................... 179
10.1 Trend Functions....................................................................................... 179
10.2 Editing Parameters .................................................................................. 181
10.3 Processing Trend Data in the Management Station.................................. 182
11
Reports............................................................................................ 183
11.1 Desigo Insight Report Viewer................................................................... 183
11.2 Desigo CC Reports .................................................................................. 184
12
Data Storage .................................................................................... 186
12.1 Data Categories.......................................................................................186
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
Program Data .......................................................................................... 186
Libraries .................................................................................................. 187
Project Data............................................................................................. 188
Plant Data ............................................................................................... 189
Data Transfer Processes ......................................................................... 189
Texts ....................................................................................................... 191
13
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
Network Architecture ......................................................................... 192
BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)........................................................... 192
LonWorks Architecture (ALN) .................................................................. 205
KNX Architecture (ALN) ........................................................................... 207
KNX PL-Link Architecture (FLN) .............................................................. 208
DALI Architecture (FLN)........................................................................... 209
14
Remote Access ................................................................................ 211
14.1 Remote Access Methods ......................................................................... 211
14.2 Choosing a suitable Access Technology .................................................. 212
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14.3 Technical Details .....................................................................................213
15
Management Stations ....................................................................... 215
15.1 Desigo Insight ..........................................................................................216
15.1.1 User Functions..........................................................................216
15.1.2 Main Components .....................................................................220
15.1.3 Access and Security..................................................................221
15.1.4
15.1.5
15.1.6
15.1.7
15.1.8
15.1.9
Alarm Management ...................................................................222
Installation, Setup and Engineering ...........................................224
Graphics Library .......................................................................225
Graphic Generator ....................................................................226
High Availability Solution ...........................................................226
Desigo Room Automation Integration ........................................228
15.2 Desigo CC ...............................................................................................228
15.2.1 User Functions..........................................................................230
15.2.2 Main Components .....................................................................232
15.2.3 Access and Security..................................................................233
16
16.1
16.2
16.3
15.2.4
Event Management ...................................................................234
15.2.5
15.2.6
Installation, Setup and Engineering ...........................................235
Graphics Libraries .....................................................................238
15.2.7
15.2.8
Graphics Engineering................................................................239
Virtual Environment ...................................................................240
Automation Stations.......................................................................... 241
Device Object ..........................................................................................242
Device Info Object ...................................................................................243
Error Sources and Monitoring Functions ..................................................244
16.4 Operating States......................................................................................245
16.5 Data Storage ...........................................................................................249
17
17.1
17.2
17.3
17.4
17.5
17.6
17.7
17.8
17.9
17.10
Logical I/O Blocks............................................................................. 251
General Functions ...................................................................................252
Input Blocks .............................................................................................267
Output Blocks ..........................................................................................270
Value Objects ..........................................................................................273
Value Objects for Operation .....................................................................276
Addressing the I/O Blocks ........................................................................276
Discipline I/Os..........................................................................................287
Reliability Table .......................................................................................288
Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt] ...............................................................290
Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus ....................................295
18
Room Automation ............................................................................. 301
18.1 Desigo Room Automation ........................................................................301
18.1.1 Configurable .............................................................................302
18.1.2 Programmable ..........................................................................308
18.1.3 Rooms and Room Segments ....................................................312
18.1.4 Central Control Functions and Grouping....................................313
18.1.5 Desigo Room Automation and the Management Level ..............314
18.1.6 Desigo Room Automation and the Automation Level .................314
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18.2 Desigo RXC............................................................................................. 314
18.2.1 Product Range Overview .......................................................... 316
18.2.2 RXC Applications ...................................................................... 318
18.2.3 RXC and the Management Level............................................... 320
18.2.4 RXC and the Automation Level ................................................. 321
18.2.5 Mapping LonWorks in the LonWorks System Controller ............ 321
18.2.6 Groups in the LonWorks System Controller ............................... 322
18.2.7 System Functions ..................................................................... 324
18.3 Desigo RXB ............................................................................................. 325
18.3.1 Product Range Overview .......................................................... 326
18.3.2 RXB and the Management Level............................................... 327
18.3.3
18.3.4
RXB and the Automation Level ................................................. 327
RXB Applications ...................................................................... 327
18.3.5 Mapping RXB in the PX KNX System Controller ........................ 328
18.4 Desigo RXL ............................................................................................. 328
18.4.1
18.4.2
Product Range Overview .......................................................... 330
RXL and the Management Level ............................................... 330
18.4.3
18.4.4
18.4.5
RXL and the Automation Level .................................................. 331
RXL Applications ...................................................................... 331
Mapping RXL in the PX KNX System Controller ........................ 331
19
Desigo Open .................................................................................... 332
19.1 Integration on Management Level ............................................................ 333
19.1.1 Desigo Insight ........................................................................... 333
19.1.2 Desigo CC ................................................................................ 334
19.1.3 SX Open ................................................................................... 335
19.2 Integration on Automation Level............................................................... 336
19.3 Integration on Field Level......................................................................... 338
19.4 Integration on Room Level ....................................................................... 339
20
Solutions for Critical Environments ...................................................... 340
20.1 Desigo Insight Pharma Solution (DIPS).................................................... 340
20.2 InfoCenter Suite....................................................................................... 342
21
21.1
21.2
21.3
Data Evaluation and Reporting (ADP/CC) ............................................ 346
Advanced Data Processing (ADP) ........................................................... 346
Budget Monitoring ................................................................................... 348
Linking with Desigo Insight....................................................................... 348
22
22.1
22.2
22.3
22.4
22.5
22.6
22.7
Desigo S7 Automation Stations........................................................... 350
Product Range Overview ......................................................................... 351
System Limits .......................................................................................... 353
Alarm Management ................................................................................. 353
Control Concept....................................................................................... 355
Desigo S7 Block Library........................................................................... 356
Operating States...................................................................................... 357
Error Sources and Monitoring Functions .................................................. 357
23
System Configuration ........................................................................ 359
23.1 Technical Limits and Limit Values ............................................................ 361
23.2 Networks ................................................................................................. 362
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23.2.1 Desigo Room Automation System Function Group ....................364
23.3 Devices ...................................................................................................367
23.3.1 PXC..D/-U Automation Stations / System Controllers.................367
23.3.2
23.3.3
23.3.4
23.3.5
23.3.6
23.3.7
23.3.8
23.3.9
LonWorks System Controllers ...................................................369
Automation Stations with LonWorks Integration .........................370
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D) ......................................370
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS1) ...............370
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS2) ...............371
PX KNX Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D) .......................................371
TX Open Integration (TXI1.OPEN) ............................................371
TX Open Integration (TXI2.OPEN) ............................................371
23.3.10 Number of Data Points on Desigo Room Automation Automation
Stations 372
23.3.11 Number of Data Points for PXC3 ...............................................373
23.3.12 Number of Data Points for DXR.................................................374
23.3.13 PXM20 Operator Unit ................................................................375
23.3.14 PXM20-E Operator Unit ............................................................375
23.3.15 PXM10 Operator Unit ................................................................376
23.3.16 PXA30-W0 and PXA40-W0 Web Controller Option Modules......376
23.3.17 PXA30-W1/W2 and PXA40-W1/W2 BACnet/IP Web Controller
Option Modules .......................................................................................376
23.3.18 PXA30-W1/W2 BACnet/LonTalk Web Controller Option Modules
377
23.3.19 PXG3.W100 Desigo Web Server...............................................378
23.3.20 PXG3.L and PXG3.M BACnet Routers ......................................379
23.3.21
23.3.22
23.3.23
23.3.24
23.3.25
PXG80-N BACnet Router ..........................................................379
SX OPC ....................................................................................380
Desigo CC ................................................................................380
Desigo CC with Desigo Room Automation.................................381
Desigo CC with PX Subsystem .................................................381
23.3.26 Desigo Insight General Limits....................................................382
23.3.27 Desigo Insight Terminal Server .................................................384
23.3.28
23.3.29
23.3.30
23.3.31
23.3.32
23.3.33
23.3.34
23.3.35
23.3.36
23.3.37
23.3.38
23.3.39
23.3.40
Desigo Insight with Desigo Room Automation ...........................384
Desigo Insight with PX Subsystem ............................................384
Desigo Insight with Visonik DCS ...............................................385
Desigo Insight with Integral NCRS Controller ............................385
Desigo Insight with Integral NITEL Interface ..............................385
Desigo Insight with Unigyr .........................................................386
Desigo Insight with OPC/SCADA Subsystem ............................386
Desigo Insight Pharma Solution ................................................387
Desigo Connect ........................................................................387
Desigo Reaction Processor .......................................................387
ADP/CC ....................................................................................388
InfoCenter .................................................................................388
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) .......................................................389
23.3.41 Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT).....................................389
23.4 Applications .............................................................................................390
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23.4.1
24
24.1
24.2
24.3
Peak Demand Limiting (PDL) .................................................... 390
Compatibility..................................................................................... 391
Glossary .................................................................................................. 391
Desigo Version Compatibility Definition .................................................... 392
Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics ................................................ 393
24.3.1 Compatibility with BACnet Standard .......................................... 393
24.3.2
24.3.3
24.3.4
24.3.5
24.3.6
24.3.7
Compatibility with Operating Systems ....................................... 395
Compatibility with SQL Servers ................................................. 396
Compatibility with Microsoft Office ............................................. 397
Compatibility with Web Browsers .............................................. 397
Compatibility with VMware (Virtual Infrastructure)...................... 398
Compatibility of Software/Libraries on the Same PC .................. 398
24.3.8
24.3.9
24.3.10
24.3.11
Hardware and Firmware Compatibility ....................................... 398
Backward Compatibility ............................................................. 399
Forward Compatibility ............................................................... 399
Engineering Compatibility..........................................................399
24.3.12 Compatibility with Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) ............. 399
24.3.13 Compatibility with InfoCenter..................................................... 399
24.4 When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0............................................................. 400
24.4.1
24.4.2
24.4.3
24.5
24.6
24.7
24.8
24.9
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Management Level Desigo CC.................................................. 400
Management Level Desigo Insight ............................................ 400
Automation Level Desigo PX / Desigo Room Automation .......... 401
24.4.4 Desigo TX-I/O ........................................................................... 405
24.4.5 TX Open ................................................................................... 405
24.4.6 Desigo RX ................................................................................ 405
24.4.7 Libraries.................................................................................... 406
Upgrade to Desigo V6.0........................................................................... 406
24.5.1 Upgrade Management Level ..................................................... 406
24.5.2 Upgrade PX / Desigo Room Automation Automation Level ........ 408
24.5.3 Upgrade RX Room Automation ................................................. 411
24.5.4 Upgrade PX (CAS) Libraries ..................................................... 411
24.5.5 Upgrade TRA Libraries ............................................................. 411
Siemens WEoF Clients ............................................................................ 412
24.6.1 Desigo Software ....................................................................... 412
24.6.2 Third-Party Engineering Software.............................................. 412
Migration Compatibility.............................................................................412
Hardware Requirements of Desigo Software Products ............................. 413
VVS Desigo V6.0 ..................................................................................... 415
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About this Document
1
1 About this Document
Revision history
Version
Date
Changes
Section
V6.0
2016-03-17
Revised for Desigo V6.0
Entire manual
V6.0 SP
2016-09-20
Revised for Service Pack V6.0
23, 24
V6.0 SP2
2017-05-31
Revised for Desigo V6.0 SP with supplements for Desigo Insight SP2
11 Reports: 11.1
15 Desigo Insight: 15.1.5
23 System Configuration: 23.3.26
24 Compatibility: 24.3.2, 24.3.3, 24.3.5,
24.3.6, 24.4.2, 24.5.1
IT security
Building automation and control systems such as Desigo are increasingly
integrated into a building's IT infrastructure and will often also be remotely
accessible. Besides using the IT security features of the various products, it's very
important to implement an IT secure integration into the site's IT infrastructure. For
guidelines for such an IT secure integration, see IT Security in Desigo Installations
(CM110663). These guidelines are binding and must be implemented in every
Desigo project.
Furthermore, the usual rules and best practice procedures from the IT world must
also be observed to achieve a high protection level for the building automation and
control system and the customer's IT infrastructure.
Cyber security disclaimer
Siemens products and solutions provide security functions to ensure the secure
operation of building comfort, fire safety, security management and physical
security systems. The security functions on these products and solutions are
important components of a comprehensive security concept.
It is, however, necessary to implement and maintain a comprehensive, state-ofthe-art security concept that is customized to individual security needs. Such a
security concept may result in additional site-specific preventive action to ensure
that the building comfort, fire safety, security management or physical security
system for your site are operated in a secure manner. These measures may
include, but are not limited to, separating networks, physically protecting system
components, user awareness programs, defense in depth, etc.
For additional information on building technology security and our offerings, contact
your Siemens sales or project department. We strongly recommend customers to
follow our security advisories, which provide information on the latest security
threats, patches and other mitigation measures.
http://www.siemens.com/cert/en/cert-security-advisories.htm
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2
System Overview
Management Level
2 System Overview
The Desigo building automation and control system has three levels:
● Management level
● Automation level
● Field level
Management
level
Management station
Desigo CC
Desigo Insight
@
Automation
level
Desigo PX
System controllers
Automation stations
BACnet/IP
Desigo TRA
Desigo RX
KNX
Field level
Sensors
Valves
Symaro
Acvatix
Figure 1: System hierarchy
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System Overview
Management Level
2
2.1 Management Level
Operation and monitoring
The key functions at the management level are operation and monitoring of the
plant, including:
● Graphics-based operation of the plant
● Cross-site alarm generation and alarm transfer
● Maintenance of a long-term log
● Storage and graphical display of trend data
● Graphics-based operation of time schedules
● Display, navigation and modification of data objects, which are displayed in a
hierarchical tree structure
● Visual monitoring of the operation of primary plants (monitoring to reduce
energy consumption and wear and tear)
● Visual monitoring of the rooms (HVAC, lights and blinds)
● Reporting function including energy reports
● Centralized time control and calendar functions
● Event program: Triggering system reactions based on system events
What is operation and
monitoring?
Operation and monitoring encompasses all the interaction between a user and the
plant via the building automation and control system.
Task
Activity
Observing the operational status of the plant or
building
Reading current values of all process variables, data objects and parameter
settings
Receiving and acknowledging alarms
Overview of all pending alarms
Recording and analyzing trends
Observing the operational status of the building
automation and control system
Overview of failed automation stations and network interruptions
Manipulating the operational status of the plant or
building
Modifying parameter settings (for example, setpoints of control programs)
Signaling of anormal hardware or software states in an automation station or in
the associated field devices
Setting values for physical outputs of automation stations
Modifying system and management objects, especially calendars and time
schedules
Table 1: Operation and monitoring
Devices for operation and
monitoring
The following devices let you operate and monitor the system:
● Desigo management stations Desigo Insight and Desigo CC, both either locally
and/or with web operation
● ADP/CC for evaluating long-term recorded operational data, energy amount
metering, consumption monitoring, and generating reports
● PXM touch panels and operating devices
● PXWeb for operating PX automation stations via a web client
Operation and monitoring
types
There are four operation and monitoring types:
● Generic operation
● Limited (station-specific) generic operation
You can limit the generic view to one or more selected automation stations
(including alarm display).
● Engineered (project-specific) operation
You can generate a project-specific view in the engineering phase.
● Limited (user-specific) operation in the management station
Management stations
Desigo Insight can be installed as a desktop, server or web application.
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2
System Overview
Management Level
Desigo CC can be installed on one computer, with full server and client
functionality, or on several separate computers. Web Clients, Windows App
(ClickOnce) Clients and installed Clients can be added.
Remote desktop
Desigo Insight can be installed as a terminal server and then supports remote
engineering and configuration in addition to operation and monitoring.
Desigo Web
Desigo Web is a web solution for operation and monitoring via Desigo Insight.
Remote engineering and configuration is not supported.
Remote management
Management stations can operate and monitor the automation level via a public
network.
Data analysis
Offline applications, such as integrated energy reports from Desigo Insight or the
ADP/CC software package for Desigo Insight let you analyze data, for billing,
energy optimization, statistics, etc.
The management stations can be linked to Simatic S7, the Sinteso FS20 fire
protection system, and third-party subsystems, such as programmable logic
controllers (PLCs) for electrical applications.
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System Overview
Automation Level
2
2.2 Automation Level
The Desigo PX automation system meets all the requirements for the control and
monitoring of heating, ventilation, air conditioning systems and other building
services. Desigo PX with its programmable automation stations and graded range
of operator units is a scalable and open system.
D-MAP programming
language
The starting point for the engineering of the application functions is the range of
user-friendly application blocks and function blocks in the D-MAP (Desigo Modular
Application Programming) programming language. D-MAP is optimized for
applications for technical building installations and is based on the IEC 1131
standard. The graphical user interface of the Xworks Plus (XWP) [➙ 45]
engineering software ensures an efficient approach.
System functions
All PX automation stations have comprehensive system functions, such as alarm
mangement, time schedules, trend histories, time synchronisation, global data
distribution, and life check, that work completely autonomously.
BACnet communication
for maximum openness
Devices on the automation level communicate with each other and with the
management station and the operating devices via the BACnet protocol.
The use of BACnet/IP or BACnet/LonTalk underlines the openness of the system
and allows the easy integration of systems and components from third-party
manufacturers.
Automation stations and system controllers
PX Modular
The Desigo PX range of programmable modular automation stations provides
maximum flexibility for controlling and monitoring building services. Comprehensive
system functions, such as alarm management, time schedules and trend histories,
meet all requirements for technical building installations.
The PXX-Lxx extension modules let you connect LonWorks devices, RXC room
controllers and third-party devices.
The PXX-PBUS extension module lets you integrate PTM IO modules.
The PXA40-T/Wx option modules provide functions, such as web operation.
TX-I/O
Desigo TX-I/O modules provide the interface between PX Modular and the field
level devices, the actuators and sensors.
A range of configurable and flexible I/O modules are available for signalling,
measuring, metering, switching and controlling.
Some modules can be manually operated according to ISO 16484, and have an
LCD display with configurable LEDs.
The integrated isolating-terminals facilitate the hardware test during commissioning.
TX Open
TXIx.OPEN lets you integrate third-party systems, such as M-Bus meters, pumps
(Grundfos, Wilo) and variable speed drives (Siemens G120P), and connect
intelligent aggregates, for example, chillers, via the Modbus protocol.
PX Compact
The Desigo PX range of programmable compact automation stations with
integrated I/Os provides optimized solutions for small to mid-sized technical
building installations. Comprehensive system functions, such as alarm
management, time schedules and trend histories, meet all requirements for
technical building installations.
PX Open
PX Open system controllers let you integrate third-party devices via Modbus, MBus, KNX and other protocols. System functions, such as alarm management, time
schedules, trend data storage and flexible programming are available.
Operating devices
The various operator units in the Desigo PX range cover all the various
requirements in terms of location and function.
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2
System Overview
Automation Level
PXG3.W100 web interface The PXG3.W100 web interface lets you operate and monitor PX automation
stations that are engineered in the PXG3.W100. It is the system interface for the
PXM40/50 touch panels. It allows the homogenous operation on-site via PXM40/50
and remotely via a standard web browser.
PXM40 and PXM50 touch
panels
The PXM40 (10,1") and PXM50 (15,6") touch panels let you operate several PX
automation stations and monitor technical building installations in technical rooms.
The touch panels can be mounted in control cabinets. They are used in
combination with the PXG3.W100 web interface. Its user interface is optimized for
touch handling. If a fault occurs, a text message or email can be sent via a PXC
Modular (IP version).
PXM20/PXM20-E network
capable operating units
The network capable PXM20 and PXM20-E operating units let you operate PX
automation stations connected to a BACnet network.
PXM10 local operating
unit
The PXM10 operating unit lets you locally operate the PXC automation station it is
connected to. The device has a user friendly single button operation with an LCD
display.
PX Web
The web solution in PXC Modular (BACnet/IP) together with the PXA40-Wx
optional module allows the generic operation of all values of the PX automation
stations from a web client. If a fault occurs, text messages or emails can be sent.
You can set up a graphical operation with a supplied tool.
See Desigo PX Automation system for HVAC and building services - System
overview (CM110756).
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Room Automation
2
2.3 Room Automation
The room automation is part of the automation level. The room automation
includes devices for the control functions within a room.
In addition to the long-standing RX room controllers, the new Desigo Room
Automation PXC3/DXR2 room automation stations are also available.
The PXC3/DXR2 room automation stations have the following functions:
● Measuring, controlling and processing of I/O signals
● Logging trend data
● Monitoring process variables and generating alarms
● Acknowledging and resetting alarms
● Monitoring process variables for value changes
● Exchanging data with clients and other automation stations
● Monitoring hardware and software functions and generating events in case of
faults or errors
● Processing BACnet access for operation and monitoring of one or multiple
clients
● Handling errors, for example, during data point exchange
The PX automation stations carry out coordination functions (Desigo Room
Automation system functions), such as time synchronisation, life check, scheduling,
etc., for the room automation stations.
Desigo supports the following communication technologies:
● BACnet
● KNX technology
● DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface)
● LonWorks technology (only for RX)
Desigo Room Automation (PXC3..)
In Desigo Room Automation freely programmable PXC3 room automation stations
control the room climate. The Desigo Room Automation product range integrates
several disciplines (HVAC, lighting, shading). A room automation station can cover
several rooms. The room automation stations are integrated seamlessly into
Desigo PX and the management level via BACnet/IP.
Buttons, sensors, and actuators are connected to the PXC3 room automation via
TX-I/O modules or KNX PL-Link modules.
The KNX interface of the PXC3 room automation stations allows the direct
integration of devices with KNX PL-Link and KNX S-Mode in Desigo Room
Automation. KNX PL-Link is fully compliant with the KNX standard. The PXC3
room automation stations support plug and play functionality with automation
device detection. Devices with KNX PL-Link are parameterized with the Desigo
tools. The KNX commissioning software (ETS) is not needed.
The PXC3.. room automation stations have an integrated web server for IP
communication with QMX7.E38 touch room operator units. Engineering access is
available via the web interface.
A subset of the available TX-I/O modules can be used with the PXC3 automation
station.
The DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) bus of the PXC3...A room
automation station lets you integrate lighting.
The PXC3.E16A room automation station is tailored for lighting applications. It has
an on-board DALI interface for integrating up to 64 ECGs (electronic control gear).
Desigo Room Automation (DXR2..)
The DXR2 room automation stations let you automate heating, ventilation, air
conditioning, shading, and lighting for rooms.
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Desigo Open
The room automation stations communicate with each other and other system
components via BACnet/IP (DXR2.E…) or BACnet MS/TP (DXR2.M...).
The room automation stations support different I/O mixes, protocols (KNX S-Mode
and KNX PL-Link for IP and KNX PL-Link for MS/TP) and power supplies
(240/24V). Operating devices, buttons, sensors, and actuators for lighting and
shading can be connected to the room automation stations via KNX PL-Link.
The room automation stations contain preloaded applications, but are also freely
programmable. A comprehensive library of proven, standardized applications is
available.
The DXR2.. room automation stations have an integrated web server for IP
communication with QMX7.E38 touch room operator units. Engineering access is
available via the web interface.
Desigo RXC and RXB
The RXC and RXB room controllers control the room climate in individual rooms
and important parameters of the applications can be configured.
The RXC room controllers and the bus room operator units (QAX50/51)
communicate via LonWorks. The RXB room controllers communicate via KNX.
The LonWorks system controller (or a modular PXC50/100/200..D automation
station) or the PX KNX system controller connects the room automation devices to
Desigo PX and the management level and assumes coordination functions for
room automation (grouping, scheduling, demand signal exchange, peer-to-peer,
etc.).
2.4 Desigo Open
Desigo Open lets you integrate devices and systems from different manufacturers
into the Desigo system.
Desigo Open supports various protocols, for example, OPC, Modbus, KNX/EIB,
LonWorks, M-Bus, KNX, DALI, etc. for integrating energy monitoring, fire security,
access control and security, power distribution, refrigeration machines, pumps,
meters, variable speed drives, ligthing and blinds, etc.
Regional companies can use Software Development Kits (SDKs) to develop their
own solutions.
Integration on the
management level
Desigo Insight Open lets you exchange information between the Desigo Insight
management station and third-party systems and devices.
Desigo CC uses BACnet, Modbus, OPC, S7 Ethernet, SNMP, and RESTful web
services to exchange data with third-party systems.
SX Open is a configurable third-party system - BACnet/IP gateway that allows the
data exchange between third-party systems and the Desigo system with Desigo
Insight in an IP network.
Integration on the
automation level
PX Open system controllers let you integrate third-party devices on Modbus, MBus, KNX and other protocols, by converting all data into standard BACnet objects.
Integration on the field
level
TXIx.OPEN lets you integrate third-party systems, such as M-Bus meters, pumps
(Grundfos, Wilo) and variable speed drives (Siemens G120P), and connect
intelligent aggregates, for example, chillers, via the Modbus protocol.
2.5 Workflow and Tools
The Desigo tools cover parts of the technical process and parts of the Desigo
system:
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Workflow and Tools
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
2
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) lets you plan the system and determine
the quantity during the sales phase.
Xworks Plus (XWP) lets you engineer, commission and service Desigo PX
system components.
ABT Pro and ABT Site (Automation Building Tool) let you engineer,
commission and service Desigo Room Automation (BACnet) system
components.
RXT10 lets you commission and service RXC room controllers.
PX KNX-Tool lets you commission and service PX KNX.
Desigo Insight Graphic Generator (DIGG) lets you automatically generate
Desigo Insight plant graphics using information from the System Definition Unit
(SDU) and XWP.
System Definition Unit (SDU) lets you define application texts in different
languages.
PX Open MONITOR lets you debug PX Open programs.
TX Open tool lets you configure and commission TX Open modules.
BIM tool lets you:
– Commission TX-I/O modules and the Bus Interface Modules (BIM)
– Simulate programs without I/O modules on the test rack
– Configure the colors of the I/O status LED on the TX-I/O modules
Desigo Automation Level Migration Tool lets you copy engineering parameters,
such as I/O addresses, texts, data point parameters, PID controller parameters
and trend objects, of a Visonik controller to a PX automation station.
Desigo Point Test (DPT) lets you test data points for field devices and PX
automation stations during commissioning.
Preloaded applications
Some automation stations contain preloaded applications, but are also freely
programmable. A comprehensive library of proven, standardized applications is
available and can be used instead of the preloaded applications.
XWP to PXC
communication
XWP communicates with the PX automation station via BACnet/IP or
BACnet/LonTalk. The CFC or Parameter Editor can communicate online with the
PX automation stations. This is a useful aid both for commissioning and testing the
automation stations, and for operation and monitoring. The pin values and some
attributes of the compounds and blocks can be modified online.
To commission a Lon-based PX automation station, XWP must be connected to
the same LonWorks network as the automation station. The program or program
changes can be downloaded via BACnet router or PTP connection, which can also
be used for monitoring and operation. The functionality to configure and
commission the BACnet router is integrated in the XWP Network Configurator.
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Topologies
2.6 Topologies
Small system
Web client
@
PXM40/50
Touch panel
BACnet/IP
Ethernet
PXC50/100/200-E.D TXM1..
PXC12/22/32-E.D
TX-I/O
Modular
TXI..
PXG3.W100
TX Open
Web interface
Compact
Integration
PXM10
Figure 2: A typical small system on BACnet/IP
PXM20
BACnet/LonTalk
PXC12/22/36.D
PXC50/100/200.D
TXM1..
TXI..
Modular
TX-I/O
TX Open
Compact
Integration
Figure 3: A typical small system on BACnet/LonTalk
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Topologies
Medium system
Desigo
Management station
PXM40/50
Web clients
Desigo touch panel
BACnet/IP
10660Z35en_01
Ethernet
PXC50/100/
200-E.D
TXM1..
TXI..
TX-I/O
TX Open
PXG3.W100
Web interface
PXG3.L
Modular
Router
PXC12/22/36-E.D
Compact
PXC001-E.D
PXC001-E.D
System controller
System controller
Integration
PXM10
Integration
Operator unit
BACnet/LonTalk
TXI..
TX Open
PXC12/22/36.D
Compact
KNX
Integration
DXR2.E...
Third party
devices
RDF/RDG
QAX5...
Thermostat
°C
°C
QMX3
AQR25..
Room units
Room
sensor
Figure 4: A typical medium system
Large system
E-Mail
Desigo
Management station
PXM40 / 50
Web clients
BACnet
Desigo touch panel
Third-party system
@
DSLModem
BACnet/IP
PXC50/100/
200-E.D
TXM1..
TXI..
TX-I/O
TX Open
Modular
PXC12/22/36-E.D
PXG3.W100
Web interface
PXG3.M
PXG3.L
BACnet
Third-party
integration
Router
Router
Compact
PTM-I/O
10660Z34en_01
DSLModem
PXC001-E.D
PXC001-E.D
System controller
System controller
Third-party
integration
Modules
PXC50/100/
200-E.D
integration
TXM1..
TX-I/O
Modular
PXM10
BACnet/LonTalk
Operator unit
DXR2.E
PXC12/22/36.D
Sinteso
CERBERUS PRO
BACnet MS/TP
Compact
Desigo TRA
Third party
devices
RXB
PXC3...
TXM1..
Modular
TX-I/O
DXR2.E...
DXR2.M
QAX5...
KNX
DALI
Third-party
devices
QMX7.E38 Touch
room operator units
KNX
° C
° C
° C
° C
° C
° C
RDF/RDG
QMX3
AQR25..
QMX3
AQR25..
AQR25..
GAMMA pushbutton,
Thermostat
Room units
Room
sensor
Room units
Room
sensor
Room
sensor
presence detector etc.
GLB/GDB...1EKN
RXM21/39.1
VAV compact controller
Fan coil unit I/O boxes
Figure 5: A typical large system
PX site
PX site is a means of structuring large PX projects. Desigo room automation
stations are not part of a PX site.
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Communication Principles
In a PX site one PX automation station is defined as the primary server and all
other PX automation stations are defined as backup servers. Every automation
station can be defined as the primary server.
The primary server carries out system functions, such as time synchronization, life
check and the distribution of global data:
● Time synchronization: The primary server distributes the current time to the
backup devices.
● Life check: The backup servers detect the failure of the primary server and the
primary server detects the failure of the backup servers. If a server fails, an
alarm message is sent. If the primary server fails, another automation station
must be defined manually as the primary server.
● Distribution of global data: Global objects are available on all PX automation
stations. The primary server synchronizes changes, for example, calendar
object, notification class object, that are made on the primary server to the
backup servers.
Handling a PX Site in
Desigo clients
When PXM20/PXWeb starts, it searches for all primary servers and offers a log in
to the PX site.
A Desigo management station site can contain several PX sites and third-party
devices. The management station registers itself as a global alarm recipient for the
PX site on the primary server.
2.7 Communication Principles
Desigo uses open communications to connect various technical building systems
based on open and standardized data interfaces:
● BACnet is used from room automation to the management level
● KNX®, DALI, EnOcean® and LonWorks® are used in room automation and
decentralized secondary processes
● M-bus, Modbus, OPC, MS/TP, and other interfaces are used for connecting
third-party devices and systems
BACnet
BACnet (Building Automation and Control Networks) is a communications protocol
for building automation and control networks. BACnet ensures the interoperability
between devices from different manufacturers. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BACnet.
VendorID
Each BACnet device has a VendorID to identify the manufacturer. The VendorID
for the Siemens BACnet system devices is 7.
BACnet over Ethernet/IP
Applications on the management level (for example, Desigo Insight file server) can
interact via standard IT network services concurrently to BACnet services.
Desigo supports BACnet/IPv4 and BACnet/IPv6 (via PXG3.M/L router). IPv6 to
IPv4 is NOT compatible. The parallel operation of IPv4 and IPv6 is possible with
the use of a PXG3.L/M BACnet router. See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6.
Network performance
The performance of the network depends on the following criteria:
● Number of devices on the bus
● Segmentation of the topology via routers (for LonTalk bus)
● Number of simultaneously active clients (PXM20, management station, PX
Web)
● Peer-to-peer communication resulting from distributed PX applications
● Other communications services using the same transmission medium, where,
for example, office communication on a separate VLAN share the same IP
trunk
● Application download on the network
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Due to these factors, which can vary widely from project to project, it is not possible
to make any generalized statements about network performance. If the specified
product quantities are adhered to, performance is adequate.
If the network performance is not satisfactory, the following actions may help:
● Use the same automation station for items of equipment with frequent process
interaction.
● Divide the network into segments via BACnet router and an Ethernet/IP
backbone.
● Isolate the automation station from the network when downloading an
application.
BACnet and IP network
structuring
BACnet supports various application services which are transmitted to all BACnet
devices (broadcasts). Global broadcasts are blocked by the IP router. BACnet
solves this problem by using a BACnet Broadcast Management Device which
ensures that IP broadcasts only appear in one IP segment. The logical BBMD
functionality can be configured in every BACnet router and in every PX automation
station with BACnet/IP. One BBMD can be configured per BACnet/IP port. Devices
with BBMD must have a static IP address.
BACnet over MS/TP
MS/TP stands for Master Slave / Token Passing. Each device on the link is
considered the master when it has the token. If it does not have immediate need to
use the token, it passes the token along to the next device. All devices on the link
which do not currently have the token are regarded as slaves, and listen to any
messages the current master may have for it. As all devices take turns being
master, the link is effectively peer-to-peer.
Use of other network
technologies
IP networks (besides the other technologies mentioned above) provide the network
infrastructure Desigo devices are connected to. In case a Desigo installation is
spatially distributed (for example, several buildings on a campus, multiple branches
in a country) the connection of these local IP networks (LANs) normally is done
using a Wide Area Network (WAN) or a point-to-point transmission line. These can
be based on non-IP technologies but typically are transparent for IP traffic. In this
way, all the BACnet devices connected via an IP network can communicate with
each other.
Client/Server
A BACnet device can assume two different roles within a system, the role as a
server and the role as a client. These roles are defined as follows:
● Client: A system or device which uses another device via a BACnet service
(service request) for a specific purpose. The client (for example, management
station, PXM20 operator unit) requests a service from a server.
● Server: A system or device which responds to a given service request. The
server (for example, PXC automation station, Desigo Room Automation room
automation station) performs a service for a client.
Most system devices in Desigo can act either as a client or as a server, but they
normally each carry out their more typical role. An automation station is normally a
BACnet server, which supplies process data to other system devices (for example,
PXM20). The automation station can also act as a client, when it, for example,
subscribes to a process value from another automation station.
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Communication Principles
PX automation station
(BACnet server)
Management station or PXM20
(BACnet client)
D-MAP program
Process and
configuration
data
Application
process
(Visualisation)
BACnet objects
BACnet protocol
Figure 6: Distribution of client/server roles
Desigo Touch and Web and PX Web are not BACnet clients. The associated
operator units (PXM40/50 or browser) are web clients.
BACnet standard device
profile
The BACnet standard defines several device profiles that simplify to judge (and
test) a device's capabilities against a specified function set. Desigo always tries to
work with such profiles and prove their fulfillment by independent test laboratories
and respective BTL logos and BACnet certificates.
● The PXC3 and DXR2 room automation stations comply with the B-ASC
standard device profile.
● The PXC automation stations comply with the B-BC standard device profile.
● The Desigo Insight and Desigo CC management stations comply with the BAWS standard device profile.
For a complete list with additional details, see BACnet Protocol Implementation
Conformance Statement (PICS) (CM110665) and the products page of the BIG-EU
website (www.big-eu.org).
BACnet protocol version
Desigo is based on BACnet protocol versions 1.12 and 1.13:
● The management stations are based on version 1.13.
● The PXC3 and DXR2 room automation stations are based on version 1.13.
● The PX automation stations are based on version 1.12.
● PXM20 are based on version 1.12.
In BACnet, it is the BACnet client which ensures the backwards compatibility. As
a rule of thumb, a management station should thus have a BACnet revision that is
at least the same as all of its connected BACnet servers.
AMEV guideline
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Desigo complies with the AMEV guideline BACnet 2011 Version 1.2 with the
following profiles:
● Desigo Insight and CC: AMEV profile MOU-B
● Desigo PX: AMEV profile AS-B
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Desigo room automation
BACnet is used to exchange information between PX automation stations and
DXR2 and PXC3 room automations stations and the management station.
Desigo RX
The Desigo RXB room automation range communicates via KNX S-Mode (EIB)
and the RXC room automation range communicates via LonWorks standard.
Restrictions for LonWorks
A LonWorks network cannot be segmented with LonWorks routers, as the
message length for BACnet is 228 bytes for performance reasons. Commercially
available LonWorks routers do not have sufficiently large buffers for this length. No
other media (power lines, infrared, etc.) can be used either.
For performance reasons, we do not recommend the operation of LonWorks and
BACnet devices on the same LonTalk cable.
2.8 Data Maintenance
A running Desigo system contains various categories of data, each with different
requirements in terms of consistency, period of useful life and visibility. The data is
distributed throughout the system, with each category having a unique origin.
There is no central data maintenance in the Desigo system. The system data is
distributed on all devices throughout the network, but is primarily located in the
automation stations.
During the sales, planning, engineering and commissioning phases, project data is
created. Part of the data is loaded into the system, while another part is toolspecific and used, for example, for documentation of the project.
System data is:
● Process-data and parameter settings
● Archived data
● Configuration and description data
● Metadata
● D-MAP program
● Graphics and masks
● Libraries
● Offline trend object values
Process-data and parameter settings
Process data
Process data is data generated by the physical process in the building using a
process control algorithm. Process data represents the process variables, such as
a temperature or a damper position.
Parameter settings
Parameter settings are function parameters, settings, setpoints, etc. which are
defined for each plant or project and which affect the way in which an application
works. Parameter settings can be modified during operation.
Process data and parameter settings can be accessed within the system via
BACnet objects, for example, Present Value [PrVal] and Status [StaFlg], if the
associated mapping is enabled in the engineering phase.
If process data is used by several automation stations, the data origin is the
location where the physical variable is measured (for example, outdoor
temperature) or generated (for example, the control signal from a time schedule).
Copies are updated on an event-driven basis after a short delay.
The PXM10 local operator unit does not have its own means of storing process
data.
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Displaying process data
and parameter settings
To display process data and parameter settings mapped to BACnet on clients, only
one copy of the data needed for current operation and monitoring is stored. The
Desigo system does not store complete copies of process data or parameter
settings. The data (copy) required by a client is normally updated via the BACnet
protocol on an event-driven basis and with a short time delay.
All process data and parameter settings, even those that are not mapped to
BACnet objects (engineering setting), can be monitored and operated in Xworks
Plus (XWP). BACnet clients only see what is available via BACnet.
If several clients modify the same process data, the last change is accepted.
Volatile and non-volatile
process data and
parameter settings
The majority of the process data is volatile data, which is recalculated when the
automation stations are restarted. However, certain process data is retained even
after an automation station restart, for example, self-adaptive control parameters,
run-time totalizers, etc., which are specifically identified as such in a function block.
Even in the event of a program change, this non-volatile process data remains in
memory and can be read back with XWP.
All parameter settings are non-volatile, that is, they are retained in the event of a
power failure.
Readback
All non-volatile PX process data and parameter settings can be read back into
XWP. However, parameter settings in the PXM20 operator unit cannot be read
back into a tool.
Global parameter settings
Some parameter settings are identical in all automation stations, for example, date
and time, calendar function blocks and Notification Class function blocks. To
ensure consistency, they are held in global objects which are automatically
replicated in the system.
Archived data
Setting parameters can be logged and archived. Archived data illustrates the
response of process or system variables or events over a time period. For example,
trend data can be moved from the trend database into archive files. Archived data
are typically lists of one or more of the aforementioned variables and are preferably
stored and processed on the management level. Only small amounts of data are
archived at the automation level. Such data is normally forwarded to the
management level.
Ensuring consistency
Archived data only requires a consistency check in cases where it has been moved
from one application to another, for example, from the automation level to the
management level. The data origin is not deleted until a check has been carried
out to ensure that the data has been transferred in full. This data is stored in the
non-volatile memory.
Irregularities in the logging of archived data are recorded in the data itself.
The life of the data is determined either by the user or by a configurable application
which automatically condenses or deletes this archived data.
Configuration and description data
Configuration and description data is data which is defined for a specific system or
project and only affects the appearance and response of the plant for operation
and monitoring purposes. Some configuration parameters are tool-specific and
control the options in XWP (for example, connection allowed / not allowed, etc.).
Most configuration parameters, however, are mapped to BACnet and are available
to the clients. Typical data in this category is COV increment, operating limits,
access level, descriptive text, engineering unit, etc.
This data is defined during engineering and always originates in the tool itself.
Normally, the data is predefined with likely default values or even generated
automatically from the context. This data is static and cannot be modified during
operation. It is therefore not subject to consistency problems, and may be
duplicated elsewhere in the system (for example, on the management station) to
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improve performance. If engineering changes are made, you must ensure
manually (through data import) that the copies are identical to the original data in
the engineering tool.
This data cannot be read back from the automation stations, and must therefore be
stored with the project data.
Metadata
Metadata is project-independent data from standard BACnet objects (for example,
analog input, schedule, etc.) which needs to be known by a tool or a client, for
example, texts for predefined BACnet enumeration, maximum size of arrays, datatype information, fixed operating limits, etc. The metadata is loaded into the
relevant clients or tools at HQ and (except texts) cannot be modified after delivery.
Text, like the text for BACnet enumeration referred to above, must be localized
(language translation) and distributed to the clients and tools. This is part of the
localization process.
D-MAP program
The D-MAP program is an executable program, and contains instances of the
function blocks with the associated process data and parameter settings, the
configuration and description data and the interconnection and order of processing
of function blocks.
The D-MAP program can be modified during operation either by reloading the
complete program including any changes, or by delta (differential) loading. Delta
loading only reloads the changes.
The D-MAP program is generated in XWP/ABT from the information in the program
charts, compiled and downloaded into the automation station.
Libraries (LibSet)
The Desigo Library Set (LibSet) is a set of mutually interdependent libraries that
belong to a given Desigo system version.
ABT
PXC
Desigo Insight
Solution Library TRA
Preconfigured PXC3
App. types for DXR2
Application functions
Function blocks
Inputs & Outputs
Networked devices
Text catalog
PXC00(-E).D
PXX-L11/12
Firmwareblocks
Firmwareblocks
Symbols
PX KNX
E.g. global texts:
- TD short name
- TD descriptions
- ...
RXB/RXL
RXC
Firmwareblocks
*
For RXB Applications:
PXC00-U with dedicated
firmware version and
option modul PXA30-K11
needed. No I/O modules
possible.
PXE
Figure 7: Libraries (LibSet)
The library contents are continuously extended. Every LibSet Extension of Desigo
(LED) is a comprehensively tested collection of solutions covering all the
necessary parts of the Desigo system.
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Data Maintenance
The LibSet version number defines which LED runs on which system version. The
first part of the version number represents the applicable system version.
A LED includes the latest library per automation station type (PXC, PXC00(-E).D,
PXX-L11/12, PXKNX) for the latest Valid Version Set.
New LEDs are delivered at regular intervals. The individual LEDs are consecutively
numbered (LED0 to LED16).
LibSet version number
Version number
DESIGO Libset counter: 02,04,06,08,10...
DESIGO-LibSet-HQ-230020-02
System version (for example, 230 for DESIGO V2.3)
Figure 8: LibSet version number
Desigo LibSet consists of various libraries for all system levels:
● Desigo Insight library
● Shared text library for PXC, PX KNX, PXE, PXR
● PXC library
● PXKNX library (RXB)
● PXE library
● PXE SCL library (Structured Control Language)
● PXR library
● RXC library
● Library to monitor primary plants
● Library for collaboration between Desigo PX and Desigo Room Automation
● ABT library (Desigo Room Automation Solution Library)
LibSet version number
and LED
When a LibSet version number is released (new LED), the incremental part of the
version number is increased accordingly, for example: Desigo-LibSet-HQ-41008010 > Desigo-LibSet-HQ-410080-20
The remaining numerical values in the decade (for example, 11 to 19) can be used
by the RCs for localization versions.
If the version number changes, the LibSet number is reset to 10 again. If the scope
of the Desigo application changes, the LED number is also incremented, for
example: LED02 > LED03
The following table shows the relationship between LED and LibSet version
numbers and an overview of current and planned application content for the
Desigo LibSet. The necessary Desigo Insight genies are included.
LED
Description
LibSet version number
Date
LED00
Basic application content for LibSet
Desigo LibSet-HQ-220031-02
August 2003
LED01
PXC: Additional applications for ventilation and heat generation
and distribution
Desigo LibSet-HQ-220031-04
October 2003
LED02
All RXC applications for refrigeration generation and distribution
Desigo LibSet-HQ-220041-02
December 2004
LED03
PXC: Applications for refrigeration generation and distribution
RXC: Additional combined applications (INT..)
Desigo-Libset-HQ-220041-06
March 2004
LED04
PXC: Air quality and domestic hot water applications and recovery Desigo-Libset-HQ-220041-08
function after power failure
LED05
RXB room automation
PXC: District heating application
Temperature cascade / Humid supply air control
Field test version for peak load program
LED06
PXC: Additional applications for ventilation and domestic hot water Desigo LibSet-HQ-230010-02
Desigo Insight: Update to genie library for Visonik, Unigyr and
Integral
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LED
Description
LibSet version number
Date
LED07
PXC: Additional solutions for ventilation facilities, refrigeration
plants, heating functions, heating plants and universal functions
Desigo-Libset-HQ-230010-06
November 2005
LED08
PXC: Like LED07 and compounds for QAX, RX
DI: Genies for lab management integration
PXR: Compounds for Lab Management integration
Desigo-Libset-HQ-235040-02
November 2005
LED10
PXC: Heating degree days, three-point actuator, storage
management, adjustment of humidity control
Desigo-Libset-HQ-235040-04
July 2006
LED11
Like LED10 and RXB and RXL integration solutions
Desigo-Libset-HQ-236040-02
July 2006
LED12
PXC: Solution for combined heating/cooling circuit, room model,
quality monitoring of control circuits, leakage suppression
PX/KNX: New integration compounds
Desigo-Libset-HQ-237030-02
February 2007
LED13
PX Open compounds
Desigo-LibSet-HQ-237070-02
December 2008
LED14
PXC: Additional applications for ventilation facilities,
heating/refrigeration circuit, heating circuit
Desigo-LibSet-HQ-400210-10
March 2009
Desigo-LibSet-HQ-236050-04
Heat storage tank and trend
LED15
PXC: Energy-efficient application AirOptiControl for ventilation and Desigo-Libset-HQ-410090-10
air conditioning plants
April 2010
Compounds to integrate Grundfos and Wilo pumps
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System Overview
Views
LED
Description
LibSet version number
Date
LED16
PXC: CAS21 (HVAC)
Desigo-Libset-HQ-500204-10
March 2012
Desigo-Libset-HQ-500260-10
October 2012
Desigo-Libset-HQ-510xxx-10
Summer 2013
Desigo-Libset-HQ-51SPx-10
March 2014
Compound for Desigo Room Automation demand signals,
compounds for pumps and fans based on PTM16.xx
PXC: CRS01 (Collaboration Room Solutions)
Compounds for Desigo Room Automation collaboration
PXC: MON01 (Eco monitoring)
Monitoring compounds und standard solutions for monitoring
primary plants
ABT (Desigo Room Automation):
- TRA02_V5.0_HQ_ABT1.0 (for firmware TRA V5.0)*
- TRA03_V5.0_HQ_ABT1.0 (for firmware TRA V5.1)*
Basic library for integrated Desigo Room Automation room
solutions (HVAC/Lighting/Shading)
-TRA01_QMX3V5.0_V5.1_HQ_ABT1.1 (firmware TRA V5.1)*
Like TRA02/TRA03_V5.0_HQ_ABT1.0 (see above) plus room
units QMX3.P34, QMX3.P34, QMX3.P37, QMX3.P02 with V5.0
functionality like with QMX3.P36
LED17
PXC: CAS22 (HVAC)
Integration variable speed drive G120P
LED20
PXC:
Ventilation & air conditioning: Extensions for night ventilation,
room temperature monitoring, predefined trend objects, timer
function, temperature and humidity control, outside temperature
controlled heating and cooling function, fire control
Heating: Extensions for hot water coordinator.
PX KNX: CAS09
Integration RDG/RDF/RDG
ABT (Desigo Room Automation):
- TRA01_V5.1_HQ_ABT1.1 (for firmware TRA V5.1)*
VAV application extensions, chilled ceiling and fan coil application,
boost heating and optimum start/stop, air quality applications,
extended support for QMX3/AQR25
LED21
PXC:
- MON Library changed Compounds:
SetRlb-Pin at KPI is set, if there is invalid information
- This state is displayed in EcoViewer, All Observers are now
changed to reduced I/Os
ABT:
- TRA03_V5.1SP_HQ_ABT1.1
- Extended support for QMX7
Table 2: LibSet version number and LED
Key:
*
Desigo CC
The PXC3 room automation station supports several firmware versions independent of the
functional content of the application library.
The application libraries for Desigo CC are delivered as extension modules for the
respective system versions. For information about compatibility, see Desigo CC
System Description (A6V10415500).
2.9 Views
There are four views:
● Technical view
● User view
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Views
●
●
2
System view
Program view
PXM20
Site
BACnet
objects
Technical View
Technical View
Room
Technical View
Blinds
protection
Storen1
Storen2
Storen3
Storen4
Figure 9: The technical, user, and program view in the building automation and control system
Technical view
The technical view illustrates the technical building services equipment, such as
HVAC systems and associated elements, in the building automation and control
system. The technical view is always present and can be used as a substitute for
the user view if the user does not have his own user designation.
User view
Freely defined and
structural user view
The user view is optional in a project. The user view is based on user designations,
for example: PL7’FL3’ELE”HEAT.STPT
The structure and syntax of the user designations can be defined for each specific
project and customer. Example of a structure: Installation/building/room/plant
element/signal
User view via the User
Designation (UD)
Desigo supports different user views, depending on the application:
In Xworks Plus (XWP) a User Designation (UD) can be entered for function blocks
or compounds in addition to the Technical Designation (TD) and description. This
entry is carried through in the system and can be evaluated by clients. The UD
allows customers to use their own preferred designations for the plant without
changing the technical structure. The UD can be used in the management station
in addition to the TD. The detailed view in the PXM20 operator units shows the UD
as information.
User Designation for
Desigo Room Automation
You can define the user view for Desigo Room Automation as follows:
● Define a structure for the user view
● Copy Desigo Room Automation objects into the user view
● Define UDs that can be used as object names
System view
The system view shows the standard system hierarchy (BACnet view):
● Network, topology
● Device and third-party device view
● Flat representation (no hierarchy) of all BACnet objects in one device
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Views
The system view provides access to all BACnet devices (including third-party
BACnet devices) and all BACnet objects. A third-party client displays this view of a
PX device.
The system view is used in the PXM20 only for third-party devices.
Program view
The engineering and program view corresponds to the XWP/ABT view. The
structure is matched to the automation station. Within an automation station, the
view is program oriented: nested CFC charts (compounds) and function block
instances.
Views and users
The views reflect the differing needs of their users. The following table shows the
users of the system and the type of view each might prefer.
Per
User
Technical view
User view
System view
Program view
1
Operator (without technical
training)
Main view
Main view
No access
No access
2
Operator (with technical training)
Main view
Main view
Occasionally
No access
3
Engineer (management station),
User (PXM...)
Main view
Main view
Occasionally
No access
4
Service engineer, Siemens
service engineer
Main view
Rarely
Rarely
Main view
Table 3: Views and users
Flexible object name / device ID engineering
You can flexibly generate the object name during engineering in XWP. This is
called the Free Designation (FD). However, the FD has no inherent hierarchical
structure, which makes it tedious to engineer and lowers its helpfulness to orientate
in larger buildings. It should thus be considered as a naming type for very special
purposes only.
Flexible object name engineering causes a greater engineering effort and must
thus be requested specifically by the customer.
Each BACnet object has an object name for identification on the BACnet network.
This object name must be unique within the automation station. The Technical
Designation (TD) is used as default for the object names. The TD is a technical
identifier and is used to identify the plant and associated elements in the technical
view.
You can select how the object name is created for each standard BACnet object.
This especially applies to BACnet multivendor projects, where a special object
name structure is required.
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Flexible name selection (TD, UD, FD)
for each object
Technical Designation (TD)
B’Ahu10'TSu
ObjectName = TD
B’Ahu10'TSu
User Designation (UD)
Areal_Geb1'L10-B01
ObjectName = UD
Areal_Geb1'L10-B01
Free Designation (FD)
My’’Crazy/Name1
ObjectName = FD
My’’Crazy/Name1
Figure 10: Object name engineering
Defaults and rules
The following defaults and rules apply when you engineer the object name in the
XWP Hierarchy Viewer:
● The Free Designation (FD) can be max.69 characters.
● Only ISO-Latin-1 code points from [32..127] and [160..255] may be used. This
excludes all characters from [0..31] and [128..159]. These ISO-Latin-1 code
points are identical to Unicode code points.
● No lead or post blanks [32] may exist and object names containing only blank
characters are not possible.
The FD values and the object name selection are transferred automatically to the
automation station or exported to the management station during compiling or
loading in the CFC.
The CFC Editor checks during compilation if the object name is unique for each
automation station under the following rules:
● The same resulting object name may exist only once per automation station.
This also applies to the device object that must be unique in the BACnet
internetwork.
● The resulting object name may not correspond to a TD of another object in a
Device. The TD is used to resolve BACnet references.
Exceptions for object
name assignment
Object names cannot be engineered in CFC charts or compounds. These elements
always define the TD and the object name is always the same as the TD.
Special blocks, such as Heatcurve and Discipline I/Os generate reduced value
objects in the background whose object name per default is the TD during
compilation.
Free definition of the
Device ID
The device ID (the object ID of the device object) can be freely defined. Range:
0…4'194'303
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Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming
Coverage of the Technical Process
3 Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming
The Desigo tools cover parts of the technical process and parts of the Desigo
system.
Main tools
The most important tools are:
● Desigo Configuration Module (DCM): For designing the Desigo system in the
sales phase
● Xworks Plus (XWP): For engineering, commissioning and servicing Desigo PX
system components
● Automation Building Tool (ABT): For engineering, commissioning and servicing
Desigo room automation system components
Special tools
There are also special tools, for example:
● Tools for configuring and commissioning specific product families, such as
RXT10 for the configuration of room devices on LON
● Tools for specific tasks, such as the AL Migration Tool for the migration of
legacy system components to Desigo PX
See Automation level migration, Engineering manual (CM110776).
3.1 Coverage of the Technical Process
The Desigo tools are used in the technical process, especially for designing the
system in the sales process, for engineering, commissioning, and servicing. The
tools have interfaces to specific tools of the regional companies, such as tools for
designing electrical wiring diagrams.
Which processes do the
tools cover?
The Desigo tools cover the entire technical process from sales to service:
● Sales
● Planning
● Engineering
● Installation
● Commissioning
● Service
For service operations the Desigo tools support remote data access to project data
via Branch Office Server (BOS). SSP provides the service platform.
Figure 11: Technical process
Europe
Sales
Planning
STST
•
DCM
•
Engineering
Installation
Commissioning
Service
XWP
•
•
•
•
ABT
•
•
•
•
Table 4: Coverage of the technical process by Desigo tools
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Coverage of the Technical Process
USA
Sales
Planning
STST
•
DCM
•
Engineering
Installation
Commissioning
Service
ABT
•
•
•
•
Apogee tools
•
•
•
•
Desigo tool
•
•
•
Table 5: Coverage of the technical process by Apogee and Desigo Tools
Sales
DCM supports system design and quantity determination during the sales process.
Price calculation, offer preparation and tracking, and invitation of tenders are
supported by country-specific tools.
Planning
The planning tools are country-specific and comprise the following:
● Network planning, design and documentation
● Cable planning and design (network cables, field device cables)
● Texts for equipment plates
● Building planning (system components in the building, room segmentation)
● Plant planning and documentation (plant schematics, function description)
● Planning of the groupings for Desigo Room Automation
● Order lists
Engineering
Most of the Desigo system components are engineered offline, before they are
commissioned. This way you can verify and document the configuration (for
example, for the uniqueness of addresses), and define work packages for
subcontracting.
XWP and ABT are Desigo engineering tools and allow the following:
● Engineering the primary equipment, room automation, BACnet router
● BACnet references for the integration from/to third party systems
● Interfaces to ElektroCAD, Pharma Validation
● Exports for documentation
● Export for management station engineering
Desigo CC is engineered in Desigo CC and Desigo Insight is engineered in Desigo
Insight:
● The tool export generates information for illustrating the generic operation
(technical hierarchy, User Designation hierarchy)
● The tool export contains information for efficiently generating graphics
(mapping functions to genies and supergenies in Desigo Insight and symbols
and graphic templates in Desigo CC)
● Graphics are engineered in the management station engineering editor
Installation
XWP and ABT allow the following:
● Creating order lists that can be used for ordering the devices
● CAD export for connecting to ElektroCAD for designing control cabinets
● Parallel working of several subcontractors/engineers in a project
● Creating pack and go's for commissioning and the point test for subcontractors
● Loading configurations
● Creating commissioning data point lists
Commissioning
XWP and ABT allow the following:
● Commissioning of the systems (loading programs, program function test)
● Online trending during commissioning
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Coverage of the System
●
●
Service
Diagnostics during commissioning
Parallel working of several commissioning engineers in the project
XWP and ABT allow the following:
● Data access to Branch Office Server (central engineering data management of
the regional companies)
● Data security (reading system data in the engineering database)
● Remote engineering and operating, diagnostics and error recovery via an
external network connection
3.2 Coverage of the System
The Desigo tools cover all levels of the Desigo system except the management
stations:
● Xworks Plus (XWP) covers Desigo PX.
● Automation Building Tool (ABT) covers Desigo Room Automation.
Figure 12: XWP and ABT cover almost all levels of the system
Tools for Desigo PX
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The following tools are used for Desigo PX:
● DCM: For designing the system and determining the necessary quantities
● XWP: For configuring and commissioning BACnet routers
● LNS Tool: For loading applications into the RXC controllers
● ACS: For configuring, commissioning and operating Synco and RXL/RXB
devices
● PX KNX Tool: For configuring the KNX side of the PX KNX system controller
● AL Migration Tools: For migrating Unigyr, Visonik and Integral to Desigo
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Coverage of the System
3
Figure 13: Tools for Desigo PX
Tools for Desigo Room
Automation
Siemens
The following tools are used for Desigo Room Automation:
● DCM: For designing the system and determining the necessary quantities
● XWP/ABT:
– For configuring, programming and loading PXC3 room automation stations
– For integrating KNX devices into Desigo Room Automation (on KNX PL
Link Bus)
– For engineering and commissioning PXC3, TX-IO, In-Room Bus DALI and
KNX PL Link
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Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming
Main Tasks
Figure 14: Tools for Desigo Room Automation
3.3 Main Tasks
What's covered by the
Desigo tools?
The Desigo tools let you design, document and maintain Desigo systems, that is,
you design and document technical configurations and programs for the Desigo
system.
What's NOT covered by
the Desigo tools?
The following processes and products are covered locally by SSP or VAPs and not
by the Desigo tools:
● Sales: Offer preparation and tracking
● Planning/Engineering: Network planning and design, floor plan, cabling,
designing control cabinets, designing electrical wiring diagrams, creating rating
plates, validating pharma systems
● Project management: Ordering devices, project planning, claim management,
project task planning
● Service management: Service database for devices, network planning, remote
service platform
Sales support
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) supports the calculation of the Desigo
configuration for the sales process.
You can verify if:
● The Desigo configuration is technically correct, that is, the solution that was
sold can be implemented with Desigo
● The system limits have been taken into account, that is, the number of possible
devices and functions in the network is verified
● The quantity is correct, that is, correct device types for the automation and
room functions, field devices, accessories and licenses
● Services are correctly calculated
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Main Tasks
●
●
3
The design for the review with the customer is well documented
Prices are correct (regional companies can add their prices to the DCM
database)
Configuration and programming
The configuration and programming flexibility of system devices depends on the
product or product family. Some devices contain preloaded applications and
connections only to specific periphery device types.
You can configure and parameterize the devices offline or partly online with a
configuration tool. You can replace the preloaded applications on some devices in
the project.
You can freely program some devices. To create loadable applications, you can
use libraries to assemble project-specific solutions.
Degree of standardization
and flexibility
The following table shows engineering methods by degree of standardization and
flexibility:
● Level A: High degree of standardization with predetermined flexibility
● ...
● Level E: Low degree of standardization with very high flexibility
Solutions with a high
degree of standardization
Solutions with a high degree of standardization are:
● More efficient to configure and commission than freely programmed solutions
● Easier to maintain, because the functions are verified and well documented
Solutions with a low
degree of standardization
Solutions with a low degree of standardization, that is, freely programmed solutions,
are:
● More laborious to create and document
● More error-prone than verified solutions
● Harder to maintain in the service phase, because they do not adhere to the
standard and are often not as well documented as verified solutions
The intermediate levels B, C and D allow you to choose a solution with the right
balance of flexibility and standardization.
Standard
High flexibility
Level
Description
Library
Example
A
Solution Browser in
XWP
Locked CAS solutions AHU10
B
Solution Configurator
in CFC, CAS library
CAS solutions,
aggregates,
components
AHU10, fan, valve
C
CFC programming,
CFC library
Charts, blocks
CAS library with
charts
D
CFC programming,
solution creation
Charts, blocks, LMU
(Library Maintenance
Utility), simulation
RC library
E
CFC programming,
SCL block creation
CFC, SCL, simulation, HQ library
LMU, development
tools
Engineering Effort
Low
High
Table 6: Desigo PX
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Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming
Main Tasks
Standard
High flexibility
Level
Description
Library
Example
Engineering Effort
A
Application selection
Application type
Standard, VAV
Low
B
Application
assembling
Application modules
Blind, radiator, light
C
Application creation
XFBs
VAV
D
Application
engineering
CFC FB's
Regional specialties
E
Development
All levels
All
High
Table 7: Desigo Room Automation
Level A
You can create solutions with the available options and variants with little prior
training and detailed knowledge.
The device is preconfigured and can be configured for the specific project. The
functions are predefined. You can configure the application using options and
variants. You can set the function of the application and the peripheral devices with
a configuration tool. The solutions are delivered by HQ as verified and documented
solutions.
Level B
The device can be configured for the specific project. You can assemble the
application using library elements. This is a major advantage of the Desigo
application libraries. Even though assembling a solution is relatively easy, the
functions of the solutions are powerful. Using many options and variants, you can
customize the standard solutions to your project requirements.
Level C
The device is preconfigured and can be configured for the specific project. You can
assemble the application using library elements. You can program the application
with default function modules with predefined interfaces. You can program using
simple programming functions.
Level D
This level offers full flexibility, but requires detailed knowledge of the application's
structure, the programming tools, BACnet and the Desigo system functions. You
can program in CFC (Continuous Function Chart) with basic function modules. You
can use all available programming functions. You must ensure that the programs
you develop fit together regarding execution, priorities, auto-connecting in the tool,
interface usage, etc.
Level E
This level offers full flexibility, but requires detailed knowledge of the application's
structure and the programming tools. You must ensure that the functions of the
program work. You must ensure that the programs you develop fit together with all
elements in the library and that they are well tested and documented. You must
take care of the compatibility, the versioning and the library packaging.
Creating a technical hierarchy
The technical hierarchy is the BACnet view on the Desigo system. It is based on
the plant-related structure in the building. This hierarchy is defined during
engineering. In special cases, if the customer requires it, the technical hierarchy
can be built according to a plant-specific structure defined by the customer (user
designation).
This lets, for example, the customer in the management station view the building
according to this structure:
● Building topology (area, building, floor, plant, plant section, etc.)
● Naming in the system (names according to technical hierarchy, user
designation or free designation)
Creating loadable components for the automation stations
The result of the engineering are loadable configurations:
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Main Tasks
●
●
●
●
3
Configuration of the automation station: Network configuration (IP, LON, MS
TP addresses), BACnet configuration (BACnet name and BACnet ID)
Application: I/O configuration and setting parameters or program (for
programmable automation stations)
Operating language: When you load the configuration, the operating language
for the generic operation is also loaded
Firmware: For system upgrade or bug fixing
Creating the configuration of operation
The system devices can be operated locally, over the web, on a touch panel or a
management station. Operations can either be generic (without additional
engineering) or dedicated (with additional engineering via favorites or operating
graphics).
● The generic operation is based on the technical hierarchy. It must not be
engineered.
● The room operation can be configured.
● Favorites are a simple grouping of operable elements in a summarized view.
This view can also be generic, for example, as a favorite in ABT-SSA, or it can
be engineered, for example, as a favorite for PXM20.
● The graphic operation must be engineered.
Installation, test and commissioning
An I/O configuration must be loaded for the point test. An application program is
not always loaded with the configuration.
You can carry out a point test with an application program if the application
program can be turned off during the point test. This way you can carry out a test if,
for example, a central security function would prohibit you from operating the I/O,
for example, if a central security function does not allow lowering the blinds.
The test protocol can store which points have passed the test and which points
have an error.
Creating local documentation and project documentation
The tools have two types of documentation:
● Local documents (work documents, simple templates, Excel exports) can be
used to, for example, verify results. You can, for example, export them to Excel
and add additional data to them.
● Project documentation (template with logo, author, table of contents, etc.) can
be attached to the customer documentation either in printed form or as a PDF.
Managing project data
You can manage project data in three ways:
● Local project data management - You can save project data locally, that is, on
the local computer or on a share.
● Project data backup - You can create project data archives to, for example,
locally save the intermediate status of engineering data.
● Project data on the Branch Office Server (BOS) - You can store project data on
a BOS. This allows:
– Data storage on a server, incl. data backup
– Control of project data access, through login data
– Checking project parts in and out for working on engineering data in
parallel
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Desigo Workflow, Tools and Programming
Tools for Different Roles
3.4 Tools for Different Roles
In a project different roles are responsible for different tasks. Based on these roles,
there are various tool packages with different functions and licenses.
Role
Description
Application area
Application Engineer
Can reprogram applications on a project-specific basis.
System and room automation
Design Engineer
Can carry out a project.
System and room automation
Can select and configure solutions from the library.
Commissioning Engineer
Can commission solutions,
System and room automation
Can configure applications online.
OEM, Installer
Can carry out a project.
Room automation
Can select, configure and commission solutions from the
library.
Electrical Installer
Can load configurations.
System and room automation
Can configure devices.
Can test points.
Balancer
Can balance rooms regarding air and water supply.
Room automation
Table 8: Roles
Tool
Tasks
Application /
Adv. OEM
Design /
Installer
Commissionin
g Engineer
XWP
Create projects and reports, design
networks, BOS
ABT Site >
Projects
Create and open projects
ABT Site >
Building
Create building structure and
grouping hierarchy
ABT Site >
Configuration
OEM, Installer Electrical
Installer
•
•
•
•
•
•
Configure applications, mass create
devices
•
•
•
ABT Pro
Configure HW, edit applications, CFC
(TIA), debug
•
•
ABT Site >
Startup
Device discovery, persistence of
readbacks, set up nodes, load web
pages, ABT-SSA for KNX PL-Link,
MS/TP
•
•
ABT Package
ABT-SSA Access
via role and
password
Point Test
Operate and monitor
Balancer
Balancer
•
•
•
•
•
Simple GUI
XWP ABT
ABT
ABT Site
ABT Site not
licensed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ABT Site not
licensed
•
ABT-SSA
Table 9: Tools for different roles
3.5 Working with Libraries
Libraries ensure efficiency and quality.
HQ libraries
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There are HQ libraries for every engineering level. HQ libraries:
● Allow you to work efficiently
● Are verified
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Working in Parallel and Subcontracting
●
●
●
●
3
Are well documented
Are based on a text data basis that allows you to switch the language in
engineering, that is, the library is language neutral
Are versioned
Can be installed with the library setup
RC libraries
Based on HQ libraries, you can create country-specific RC libraries that cover
country-specific function requirements.
Project-specific libraries
Project-specific libraries are based on HQ or RC libraries and contain components
with the specific settings needed in the project. This lets you use reuse already
configured solutions in the project.
3.6 Working in Parallel and Subcontracting
Project data management
during parallel working
Project data management for the Desigo tools allows several users to work in
parallel in different phases of the customer project, for example:
● Several users are engineering and commissioning in the same project
● Parts of the project are outsourced to subcontractors, for example, for the point
test
To ensure the consistency of the project data, parts of the project data are stored
on the Branch Office Server (BOS). This way several engineers cannot modify the
same data elements of the data basis at the same time.
Check-in/Check-out
mechanism
The check-in/check-out mechanism ensures that when several users are working
in parallel during engineering, commissioning or service, they cannot make
changes to the same automation station. This way no inconsistent data can be
created.
To quickly transfer project data, the data is compressed before it is sent from the
computer to the server. The data is managed on the Branch Office Server. The
project creator transfers the data from his local hard disk to the server.
In large projects the data can be moved in two steps:
1. Step: Part of the project is transferred from the Branch Office Server to a
computer in the plant.
2. Step: Parts of the transferred project can be transferred to local computers. This
is called a sequential check-out.
Parts of the project, such as the building or network topology are checked out in
read-only mode, so that all users always have the project overview.
Working in parallel during
engineering
Several users can work on different automation stations in the same project at the
same time. To do this, data is transferred from the central data storage on the
Branch Office Server to the local hard disks. For example, individual automation
stations are being commissioned at the customer's site while some automation
stations are still being engineered at the office.
Working in parallel during
commissioning
Several users can work on different automation stations in the same project at the
plant at the same time. To do this, the components to be loaded are transferred
(Pack & Go), so that the user, for example, can load the configuration or program
and then perform the point test. The test results are saved in the automation
station and can be viewed and transferred back to the engineering database by the
commissioning engineer at any time.
Working in parallel during
service
A service technician can connect with the plant by remote and make changes. To
do this, data is transferred from the Branch Office Server to the local hard disk.
After the technician is done, the changes are transferred back to the Branch Office
Server, so that the project database is up-to-date again.
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Workflow for Primary Systems
Subcontracting
Project-specific solutions can be developed outside the project organisation and
specific tasks, such as configuration and point test can be outsourced to
subcontractors.
If you outsource specific tasks, make sure that:
● The work packages for the subcontracting can be easily transferred to the
subcontractor
● The subcontractor's work can be documented
● The changed data can be transferred back to the engineering database
3.7 Workflow for Primary Systems
Figure 15: Workflow for primary systems
XWP Project Manager
Create project:
● Create project
● Check project in on Branch Office Server (BOS) and define access to project
● Define project defaults
● Create control cabinet topology (local specification of the automation station,
for example, control cabinet view)
XWP Hierarchy Viewer
and XWP Network
Configurator
Create project structure (the building structure is system-oriented):
● Create project structure
● Create building topology (building, building parts, etc.)
● Create system topology (sites)
● Create network topology (XWP Network Configurator, third party devices,
router, computer)
● BACnet references from third party devices and between primary system and
room (demand signals, supervisory)
● ACP (passwords for accessing the automation stations)
XWP Point Configurator
Create systems:
● Define systems (systems, system sections, components, data points) (solutions,
data points, I/O modules)
● Configure the operations (XWP Hierarchy Viewer)
– configure the generic operation
– Configure the project-specific operation (favorites)
CFC & Simulation
Program and configure:
● Program in CFC
● Define points in the I/O Address Editor
● Parameterize in the Parameter Editor
● Define alarming and trending
DNT and DPT
Test and commission:
● Export data to the management station
● Download firmware (upgrade if necessary)
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Workflow for Room Automation Classic
●
●
●
●
●
XWP Report Manager
3
Load configurations and programs
Carry out point test
Debug in CFC (if necessary)
Create commissioning documentation (local reports)
Specialties:
– Integration (TX Open Tool, BIM Tool)
– AL Mig (AL Mig Tool)
– Simulation
Create documentation:
● Create project documentation
3.8 Workflow for Room Automation Classic
See Desigo Xworks Plus Overview of Workflows (CM111000).
3.9 Workflow for Desigo Room Automation
Figure 16: Workflow for Desigo Room Automation
XWP
Create project:
● Create project
● ACP (passwords for accessing the automation stations)
ABT Site > Building
Create Desigo Room Automation project structure (the building structure is roomoriented):
● Create building topology (buildings, floors)
● (Optional) Create user-specific building topology (UD structure)
● Create network topology (define address ranges)
● Create documentation (XWP Report Manager)
ABT Pro and ABT Site >
Configuration
Create project library:
● Program automation stations (ABT Pro)
● Create templates for type-based automation stations (ABT Site > Configuration)
● Create templates for room control units
ABT Site > Building
Create instances in the building:
● Create automation stations, or rooms, based on the project-specific library per
floor
● Edit room parameters
ABT Site > Startup
Commission:
● Configure and load automation stations (node setup)
● Carry out point test (ABT-SSA) (subcontracting)
● Parameterize (ABT-SSA)
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Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
3.10 Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) lets users, who work in sales or project
execution, design the building automation and control system.
See Desigo Configuration Module (CM110752).
DCM can be installed and operated autonomously (without a permanent
connection to a server) on a desktop or laptop under Windows 7 or Windows 8.
DCM is automatically updated with the latest data if installed correctly by using the
provided setup program, keeping the suggested installation path, and if an
online/network connection is available. The updated data can also be updated
regionally or dependent on a user to reflect relevant requirements.
Field of application
DCM calculates the required materials for an installation from raw system data,
such as data points, panels, and building and plant structures.
You can use DCM to conduct analysis of variants after defining and completing the
installation structure by generating copies and then subsequently changing the
hardware specifications. If prices are stored in DCM, you can also compare prices
to find the best possible device for the money. You can copy the devices calculated
in DCM from the price lists or export them as an Excel file to calculate a bid.
Flexibility
You can enter the data directly into DCM or import it as an Excel file for the
automation and Desigo Room Automation level.
The structure in DCM is hierarchical, but you can customize the structure according
to your requirements.
Management level
The required software licenses for the selected functions, devices, integrations and
data points are calculated on the management level. The licenses are listed and
the required software units are calculated.
Calculations can be made for new installations and for upgrades and migration. To
calculate upgrades and migration, you can import existing license keys. The import
provides the exact installed basis and explicitly allows additional, required licenses
and software units.
Devices for the Desigo Web Interface are also determined on the management
level. The calculation is based on the number of data points to be integrated in the
web interface and by the number of desired touch panels.
Desigo Room Automation
level
The Desigo Room Automation level lets you create highly complex building
structures with the sublevels building, floor, zone, room, and room segment for
Desigo Room Automation.
The required hardware is calculated from the specified functions and/or data points
and/or KNX PL-Link and KNX devices. The specification follows a model function
set that is then assigned to the structure within the Desigo Room Automation level.
In addition, multiple model function sets can be created in a project and each of
them assigned as needed. A structure at the Desigo Room Automation level may
have multiple, assigned model function sets, and a model function set can be
assigned to different structures. As Desigo Room Automation often uses the same
structures and functions, you can indicate a multiplier on each sublevel within the
Desigo Room Automation level.
Automation level
At the automation level you can calculate the required hardware based on
specified data points.
You can choose and calculate many variants using presettings. Variants include,
for example, the automation station type or I/O module type, larger automation
stations, or if plants are to be distributed among multiple automation stations. You
can also consider other criteria, such as available panel sizes.
Room automation
You can choose solutions with LON and/or KNX. You can choose predefined
solutions with drag & drop and then equip them with the required field devices. This
way you can create a sample room and replicate it as required.
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Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Third-party devices
3
You can integrate third-party devices with protocols, such as LON, KNX, ModBus,
M-bus or OPC, on all levels.
3.11 Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
You can edit project data in the Xworks Plus Editors.
See Getting Started: Desigo Xworks Plus (CM110629).
Xworks Project Manager
The Xworks Project Manager lets you:
● Create, open and archive projects
● Check in/out project data for parallel engineering from the Branch Office Server
(BOS)
● Define PXC automation stations, control units and management stations. The
automation stations are not engineered here, but only used in the
documentation and considered during the network check.
● Define rough network overviews (network data) and control cabinet
assignments (panel data)
● Define further project data, data and automation stations for RXC, RXB, RXL
and Desigo Room Automation
● Create control cabinet assignments, that is, group automation stations to
control cabinets. This way you can export data and create documentation per
control cabinet.
● View locally available projects. There is no connection to the Branch Office
Server (BOS) in this mode.
● View the properties of an object, for example, a network, an automation station,
etc.
Figure 17: Xworks Project Manager
Xworks Point Configurator
The Xworks Point Configurator lets you define the functions of an automation
station. You can insert solutions for the object plant, plant section, aggregate and
component into this technical hierarchy. You can configure prebuilt verified
solutions using options (leaving out) or variants (options). After you select and
configure the solution, the program is automatically created.
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Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Figure 18: Xworks Point Configurator
The Solution Browser lets you select and configure a plant.
● The tree view shows all selected objects of the plant.
● The configuration view shows all possible options and variants for the selected
object.
● The data point window shows all I/Os of the selected object.
You can configure I/Os and I/O modules and connect I/O channels with the I/Os.
You can design the integration of the room automation and the third party
integration. The import function lets you integrate third party data points on the
automation level. You can import data point information via a standardized
interface (SDF format). The BACnet reference browser lets you address BACnet
references. You can import BACnet references via a standardized EDE import file
(CSV or XLS format).
Xworks Hierarchy Viewer
The Xworks Hierarchy Viewer lets you verify the technical hierarchy of an
automation station or entire project. Conflicts in the technical hierarchy are
displayed.
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Figure 19: Xworks Hierarchy Viewer
The Xworks Hierarchy Viewer shows the technical hierarchy per PX and the
technical hierarchy as it is shown, for example, in the generic view on the
management station.
You can define the user designation (UD) and the free designation (FD). You can
define the structure of the user designation with the field lengths and the
separators and assign the data points in the structure of the user designation. You
can verify the consistency of the user designation and free designation in the entire
project and assign the technical designation (TD = default value), the user
designation (UD) or the free designation (FD) to the object name (ON).
Xworks Network Configurator
The Xworks Network Configurator lets you define the network topology. You can
define LON, IP networks and network segments, assign and address automation
stations to the corresponding segments, and define automation stations and
routers.
You can define several sites in a project. The network check verifies all sites in the
project. You can verify all automation stations that have been defined in the
Automation Building Tool (ABT) for correct and unique addresses, and document it
in the network report.
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Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Figure 20: Xworks Network Configurator
Programming in Xworks Plus
When the technical hierarchy and the automation station are defined, and the I/Os
are configured and addressed, you can create a program that corresponds to the
selected and configured solutions from the Xworks Point Configurator.
If you use the solution library, you do not have to program in CFC.
Workflow
The workflow for creating programs usually runs as follows.
Workflow in the Xworks Point Configurator
● Select PXC hardware (compact or modular)
● Select and configure solutions
● Configure data points: data point type, signal type and conversion type to field
device
● Create and change programs
Workflow in the CFC Classic editor
● Define timer program
● Parameterize alarm behavior and I/Os
● Provide data signals for the energy exchange between different plants
● Transfer plans (create programs)
● load programs
● Carry out commissioning
● Test programs
● Create documentation: data point lists, device plaques, commissioning lists,
print parameter lists, etc.
CFC Classic editor
The CFC Classic editor (Continuous Flow Chart) is a graphic tool tor creating plans.
The CFC Classic editor lets you create and change programs. A CFC plan consists
of function blocks and connections.
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Figure 21: CFC Classic
The CFC Classic editor shows all blocks that are used in the program, nested
plans, all available CFC block libraries and the selected plan with the plan
interfaces to other plans. This view is available offline for programming and online
for checking the signal flow. The CFC Classic editor lets you compile programs,
that is, create loadable programs.
Additional editors
In addition to the graphic programming, you can configure the programs in the
following editors:
● Parameter Editor: Lets you parameterize attributes.
● I/O Address Editor: Shows all I/Os of an automation station.
● Plant Control Editor: Lets you configure the plant controls for ventilation and
energy generation.
● Solution Configurator: Lets you configure solutions, that are from the CFC
library or have been generated from the Xworks Project Configurator.
● Simulation: Lets you simulate programs of a modular automation station
without hardware on the computer.
● Alarm display: Continuous update and local caching of all alarm status changes
during commissioning. Lets you view, acknowledge and reset alarms.
Xworks Report Manager
The Xworks Report Manager offers comprehensive customer documentation and
supports project staff during project handover. The customer can check the
documents and after handover the customer is supported during operations, for
example, when handling alarms and interruptions.
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Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Figure 22: Xworks Report Manager
You can select one or more automation stations for the documentation, per
automation station, plant or system node. You can select document templates and
verify reports in a preview.
Desigo Point Test (DPT)
Desigo Point Test lets you test data points during commissioning of a Desigo PX
automation station. To carry out a data point test with configured I/O modules, you
must download the I/O configuration file for the modular PX automation stations in
the empty PX automation station.
BIM Tool
The BIM Tool is used for TX-I/O modules that are integrated with a BIM on
automation stations. The BIM was used on old automation stations for integrating
I/O modules.
TX Open Tool
The TX Open Tool lets you configure TX Open modules. You can define the TX
Open integration and commission the TX Open modules. To commission TX Open,
load a configuration into the modules with the TX Open Tool.
See TX Open Tool online help (CM111005).
RXT10 Tool
The RXT10 Tool lets you configure and commission RXC controllers.
In RXT10 you can select and configure the RXC applications. Then you define the
assignments in the rooms. After the room types have been tested, the applications
are multiplied and commissioned. Then you integrate the room automation (PXR).
Create the building hierarchy and design the rooms on CFC data. Finally group the
system functions and commission the PX application.
PX KNX Tool (Room Automation)
See chapter Room Automation.
Room Automation RXL
See chapter Room Automation.
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3
HVAC Integrated Tool (HIT)
HIT lets you design HVAC plants. HIT lets you to select and document any HVAC
control device as an individual product or in a system configuration. Using its
library of over 300 preconfigured HVAC applications for standard controllers
(Synco™, Sigmagyr™, RXL and RXB) HIT generates a comprehensive
specification including plant diagram, list of material, technical documentation for
each device, and pricing.
3.12 Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT)
The Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT) is used for engineering and
commissioning Desigo Room Automation.
XWP in the Desigo Room
Automation project
Project data storage in a Desigo project is handled by Xworks Plus (XWP), that is,
you can create a customer project in XWP and check it in to the Branch Office
Server (BOS) using Xworks Project Manager. XWP is also used in the Desigo
Room Automation project to carry out the network check and to create the network
documentation. Some project reports, which also encompass the Desigo Room
Automation automation stations are created in XWP.
ABT Site > Projects
In ABT Site > Projects you create projects and define project settings.
ABT Site > Building
In ABT Site > Building you create building topologies. The topology shows the
assignment of room segments and rooms to floors and buildings.
You can define the grouping hierarchies for the central functions and assign the
grouping members to the grouping masters. You can create a user designation
with a user hierarchy.
ABT Pro
In ABT Pro you program automation stations (project-specific solution). ABT Pro
contains the CFC Plus editor for programming in CFC.
Figure 23: ABT Pro
ABT Pro shows:
● The automation station objects
● The hardware view of the automation station
● The properties of the selected object
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Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT)
● The project-specific library
● Installed libraries
In the ABT Pro editors you configure room applications, rooms and BACnet objects.
In the CFC Plus editor you can program with CFC blocks. The CFC plan contains
CFC blocks and connections. A CFC block library is available. ABT Pro is based on
the Siemens TIA portal.
Figure 24: CFC Plus
ABT Site > Configuration
In ABT Site > Configuration you configure preloaded application types or projectspecific types.
ABT Site > Startup
In ABT Site > Startup you scan networks, load configurations and read back
parameters.
Figure 25: ABT Site > Startup
ABT-SSA
In ABT-SSA (Setup & Service Assistant) you commission I/Os and carry out the
point test.
See Desigo TRA - Setup & Service Assistant (CM11105).
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Generate Graphics for Management Station
3
In ABT-SSA you can:
● Assign network points (DALI to device), make points available
● Test if the points work
● Define parameters, for example, time, desired value, default value, etc.
3.13 Generate Graphics for Management Station
In Xworks Plus (XWP) and Automation Building Tool (ABT) you create data for the
graphic generation.
Engineering in XWP and
ABT
The compile function in the CFC Editor creates an export file in the background for
import into the system database of the management station.
The Desigo Insight Graphic Generator [➙ 226] uses the following information from
the XWP and ABT data:
● Plant structure with site, plant, plant section, aggregate and component
● Technical Designation (TD), family, name, locations, number of stages,
technology
● Library name of the solution
By matching the selected solution with the genie library, you can almost
automatically create Desigo Insight graphics, based on the information above. The
degree of automatisation mainly depends on the trade type.
The Desigo Insight engineering environment generates the graphics. The data for
generating the graphics from local libraries is created in XWP and ABT. This data
is available in the Object Viewer.
In the Desigo Insight Graphic Generator you can create plant graphics with copy &
paste with the objects from the Desigo Insight Graphics Browser. The tag name is
copied from the Object Viewer into the genie field. You can edit existing graphics in
the Graphics Builder with an Excel macro. No data is written back from Desigo
Insight to XWP.
3.14 Programming in D-MAP
Programming is based on D-MAP principles (Desigo Modular Application
Programming), where you assemble blocks into compounds and then you build
hierarchically structured solutions using those compounds.
● In Xworks Plus (XWP) you program in the CFC Classic editor.
● In the Automation Building Tool (ABT) you program in the CFC Plus editor.
The CFC editors have a different look and feel. Their basic functions and basic
library blocks are almost identical.
Programming in XWP for Desigo PX
The Program View describes the concepts and elements on which D-MAP is based:
libraries, compounds, blocks, variables, data types and attributes.
The P&I diagram
Siemens
The Program View is based on the P&I (Process & Instrumentation) diagram. The
P&I diagram illustrates the plant and the associated instrumentation in the form of
a principles diagram.
The following figure shows a simplified P&I diagram of a partial air conditioning
system. The heating coil and its components, including the automation station
sequence, are encircled.
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Programming in D-MAP
Figure 26: P&I diagram of a partial air conditioning system
XWP
XWP is the programming tool for the PX automation station and incorporates all
system elements. XWP shows the structural view of the system with the plant,
partial plant, aggregates, and components, and, for example, the compound
functional unit for a valve.
Figure 27: Structural view (left pane) of the system and compound for a valve (right pane) in XWP
Programming in ABT for Desigo Room Automation
In Desigo Room Automation, the application architecture comprises the following
elements:
● Hardware configuration: Description of device configurations of the PXC3
automation station
● BACnet description with field device configuration for TX-I/O, PL-Link and DALI
● Automation program: Application description comprising application functions,
I/Os and CFC charts
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Programming in D-MAP
This division lets you define application functions or CFC charts independent of the
hardware. The division is also reflected in the loadable units in the tool.
The program view describes the basic concepts and elements for programming for
Desigo Room Automation: Libraries, CFC charts, blocks, variables, data types,
configuration extensions and attributes.
In Desigo Room Automation, a program contains the application function (for
example, the lighting function), the associated CFC charts (for example, the chart
for manual control), and the I/O blocks (for example, the luminaries and buttons).
Primary
I/O
I/O
I/O
Prim
Prim
Prim
PX
Central
Central
Central
PXC3
DXR2
PXC3
DXR2
CenGen
CenGen
CenGen
CenGen
CenGen
CenGen
CenGen
CenHvac
CenHvac
CenHvac
CenHvac
CenHvac
CenHvac
CenHvac
RCoo
RCoo
RCoo
RCoo
RCoo
RCoo
CenLgt
CenLgt
CenLgt
CenLgt
CenLgt
CenLgt
CenLgt
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
RHvacCoo
RLgtCoo
Room
RHvacCoo
RHvacCoo
RHvacCoo
RHvacCoo
RHvacCoo
RLgtCoo
RLgtCoo
RLgtCoo
RLgtCoo
RLgtCoo
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
CenShd
CenShd
CenShd
CenShd
CenShd
CenShd
CenShd
Reference
room
RShdCoo
RShdCoo
RShdCoo
RShdCoo
RShdCoo
RShdCoo
Scene
Room Segment
Room Segment
Room Segment
Room Segment
Room Segment
Hvac
Lgt
Shd
Room Segment
Hvac
Lgt
Shd
Room Segment
Hvac
Lgt
Shd
Room Segment
HvacRoom
Lgt
Shd
Segment
Hvac
Lgt
Shd
Segment
Hvac RoomSegment
Lgt
Shd
Hvac Room
Lgt
Shd
Room segment
PXC3
DXR2
Hvac
Hvac
Hvac
Hvac
Hvac
Lgt
Lgt
Lgt
Lgt
Lgt
Lgt
Lgt
Shd
Shd
Shd
Shd
Shd
Shd
Shd
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
TR
Brgt
Grouping
Direct reference
Psc
Figure 28: Desigo Room Automation program elements
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Control Concept
Programming in D-MAP
4 Control Concept
Supply chain model
In building automation and control, media, such as warm water, cold water, warm
air, and cold air are generated using energy, such as oil, gas, and electricity, and
distributed to consumers.
Each medium can be assigned a supply chain. The supply chain starts at the
generation or handling of the medium. The distribution system then transports the
medium to one or several consumers. A supply chain for building services systems
comprises the following links:
Figure 29: Supply chain for a hot water plant
Consumers
The consumer supplies the energy contained in the hot water medium to the room
as per the requested demand (for example, via a radiator).
Distribution
The distribution system transports the medium from the producer to the consumer
and adjusts it to the individual requirements (minimum losses).
Production
The production consists of a boiler where hot water is treated by means of energy
(for example, heating oil, gas) and provided to the process.
Supply chains of various
media
The following illustration shows a schematic view of the supply chains for the
media air, hot water, and cold water with their respective production (treatment),
distribution (for example, heating circuit, pre-control), and the consumers.
The supply chain for the medium electricity, which normally begins at supply or at
production, if electricity is produced on-site (for example, cogeneration plant,
photovoltaic) is also shown.
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Figure 30: Supply chains for the mediums air, hot water and cold water
A tree structure opens to the right for the individual supply chains. In other words,
one or more generators supply multiple primary controllers and each primary
controller for its part supplies one or more consumers or other primary controllers.
From the air supply chain point-of-view, air treatment is a part of production
(handling). From the hot water and cold water point-of-view, air treatment (or air
heater/cooler) belongs to consumption.
The air supply chain comprises the central air treatment plant, optionally
supplemented by pressurization control and air posttreatment.
Supply flow
In each supply chain, the medium flows from the producer, through the distribution
system to the consumer. This flow within the supply chain is referred to as the
supply flow.
Supply chain structure
A supply chain consists of at least one producer and one consumer. It can also
have multiple chain links, that is, producers, distributors, and consumers, and be
structured as follows:
1. One producer with one distributor and one consumer.
2. One producer with two distributors in series and one consumer.
3. One producer with two distributors in parallel and two consumers in parallel.
4. Multiple producers, distributors, and consumers in parallel.
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Figure 31: Design of supply chains
Producer
In practice, however, there are often multiple producer units, for example, boilers
with the same or similar power, or a mixture of different units, for example, boiler
combined with a solar plant and cogeneration plant (usually with additional storage
units).
Logical producer
From the distributor and consumer point-of-view, there is only one single producer
within the supply chain, the logical producer, with exactly one supply point as the
interface to the distribution network. This logical producer knows nothing about the
structure of the distribution network and the connected consumers. Also, neither
the distributor nor the consumer knows whether the producer consists of one or
multiple units.
Distribution components
The distributor or distribution transports the medium within the supply chain. In this
process, energy losses and energy consumption of pumps and fans is to be kept to
a minimum.
Conversion
Conversion (transformation) of the medium, for example, in a heat exchanger, is
assigned to a supply chain of distribution. A change of temperature (for example,
pre-control in the heating circuit) is also seen as conversion. Pre-controllers can be
arranged in series (cascading).
Consumers
The following consumers, for example, belong to the various supply chains:
Supply chain
Consumers
Hot water
Air treatment and air posttreatment (heating register)
Radiators (radiator, convector)
Floor heating, domestic hot water heating
Cold water
Air treatment and air posttreatment (cooling register)
Cooling surface (chilled ceiling)
Air
Air posttreatment (dampers)
Electricity
HVAC consumers, other consumers
Table 10: Supply chains and consumers
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Coordinator and
dispatcher
In addition to the three chain links producer, distributor, and consumer, there are
the logical links named coordinator and dispatcher.
Supply chains for a room
You can define different consumer needs for a room, such as heat, refrigeration
and fresh air.
Heat demand
The hot water supply chain exists for heat demand. The medium hot water is
prepared in hot water generation and distributed via a heating circuit. The heat is
emitted to the room as needed via a heating surface. If air is the carrier of heat, this
is done via pre-control and air posttreatment.
Refrigeration demand
The cold water supply chain exists for refrigeration demand. The medium cold
water is prepared in cold water generation and distributed via a cooling circuit. The
refrigeration is emitted to the room as needed via a cooling surface. If air is the
carrier of refrigeration, this is done via pre-control and air posttreatment.
Fresh air demand
The need for fresh air is met by the air supply chain, where the medium is
produced by the air treatment plant, distributed via the ducting, possibly adjusted to
differing requirements of the room by an air posttreatment plant, and transferred to
the room via air outlets.
HVAC application architecture
The HVAC application architecture contains an overall view of typical heating,
ventilation and air conditioning plants with distributed applications and is based
very strongly on the supply chains (energy and substance flows) in building
services systems.
● The mutually standardized exchange and re-use of HVAC-relevant demand
and coordination signals is possible in distributed applications.
● The HVAC application architecture structures the HVAC functions into
meaningful units, interfaces and functional mechanisms.
● The HVAC application architecture is scalable and independent of product and
communication standards.
HVAC system view
Siemens
The consideration and definition of the HVAC application architecture and its
functionality gives rise to the HVAC system view, which comprises:
● Plant (primarily HVAC plants)
● Operator interventions
● Functional units
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Figure 32: HVAC system view
Plant
A plant consists of partial plants, aggregates, and components, which, as a rule,
form a supply chain with the chain links producer (here: boiler), distributor (precontrol, heating circuit), and consumer (radiator).
Operator interventions
Commands are executed at each link of the chain through operating interventions
via HMI commands. The impact on the plant (or the process) takes place via the
corresponding function unit and automation station.
Functional units
Functional units represent the software map of chain links and plant elements. The
functional units contain all control, monitoring, and limiting functions that are
necessary for operation.
Information signals
Energy demand information can be passed on implicitly via the medium within the
supply chain, for example, if the hot water supply temperature falls because of a
rise in heat consumption, more heat energy must be produced.
Information can also be represented by an explicit signal and transferred via a
signal path (for example, via a bus). The following explicit signals have been
defined in the Desigo system:
Explicit signals
Signal flow
Application
Demand signal
Consumer to producer
A plant functional unit communicates its demand (that is, operating mode, set
points) to another partial plant functional unit in the direction of the producer. The
demand signal eventually arrives at the producer.
Operating signal
Producer to consumer
A plant informs the downstream plants about its currently effective operating state.
This signal is only used as an exception and is therefore switched depending on
the situation.
Override signal
Producer to consumer
The producer demands a certain operating mode from a consumer. Forced
signals are more the exception than the rule and are therefore not implemented in
sample plants. Forced signals are used for solar plants and wood furnaces among
others, where the minimum heat production cannot be controlled.
Table 11: Information signals
In addition to the functional units, there are two further elements that belong to the
supply chain on the software side:
● Coordinator: The coordinator combines the demand signals of downstream (to
supply flow direction) plants and delivers a resultant demand signal to the
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●
4
upstream plants. The coordinator also signalizes the operating state of the
upstream plants to the downstream plants.
Dispatcher: The dispatcher determines the demand signals for the producers
on the basis of the resultant consumer demand signals. It decides which and
how many producers must be activated.
Figure 33: Example of a sequence control
4.1 Control Concept and Control Blocks
The Desigo control concept is a set a rules that determine in general terms the
principles governing all control, reporting and monitoring operations and the
switching interventions in the Desigo system. The rule applies to block-internal
control (priority array) and to functional interactions among participating blocks.
This specifically deals with:
● Structure and design of control as function blocks
● The hierarchical assignment of the function blocks among themselves
● The function hierarchy within the control chain for the function blocks
● Processing operational and fault messages
● Interventions in monitoring functions
● Impact of emergency switching
The open loop control strategy is based on the exchange of predefined signals
between functional units. Each functional unit is an image, or memory map, of an
actual element of the plant, for example, ventilation or boiler plant.
Control functions
Siemens
The open-loop control functions required for a given element are locally an integral
part of the functional unit (for example, the increase, after a time delay, in the
speed of a multi-stage fan, or the demand-based switch-on of a boiler). In each
functional unit, various possible requirements are prioritized and evaluated. The
resulting operating mode is then passed on to the elements or subordinate
functional units. The functional unit already incorporates the I/Os needed for the
physical data points.
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Structure control functions
In this way, complex control and monitoring functions of a plant can be logically
subdivided to allow for clear assignment of the function unit or the real element of
the plant. The higher-level control concentrates on the control and monitoring of
the overall plant, while the sub-control function units assume internal control and
monitoring of the given elements for the function unit.
Standardization of control
functions
Moreover, plant security and available was increased through standardized control
and monitoring functions which would result in considerable expense using
conventional methods.
Standardized control and monitoring functions:
● Unambiguous selection of operating mode
● Uniform fault-related shutdown
● Comprehensive status monitoring
● Switching sequence for ventilation systems
● Output stage control for heat generating plant
● Reporting of local intervention
● Avoidance of unnecessary attempts at switching
● Prevention of inadmissible switching operations
● Protection of plant by preventing switch-on or switch-off
Blocks bound by the control concept
The following table shows the blocks that are optimized for control tasks.
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Function
Block name
Task in the control concept
Prioritization of influencing
variables
ENSEL_BO
Collect information for the selection of the resulting plant operating mode. All
superposed information are processed by priority resulting in the plant being
turned on or off, for example, smoke extraction switch, frost protection, scheduler
program.
ENSEL_MS
The blocks are primarily used on the hierarchy level plant/partial plant, but may
also be reasonably used, for example, in aggregates.
Command control
CMD_CTL
Superposed control block for sequence control. The block ensures that individual
plant aggregates are switched on or off sequentially in a certain order. The block
monitors aggregates and can send alarms. It is optimized for controlling air
handling plants, but can be used for other applications. The block is used on the
hierarchy level plant/partial plant.
Power control
PWR_CTL
Superposed control block for power control. The block is used for control and
monitoring of the performance of a number of energy producers (multiple boiler
systems, refrigeration machines). Depending on the request power demand,
energy produces are switch on or off in stages. PWR_CTL is optimized for
controlling heating and refrigeration plants. The block is used on the hierarchy
level plant/partial plant.
I/O blocks with control
functionality
BO
Output blocks implemented per BACnet standard and therefore including a priority
mechanism (priority array) that is well suited for control tasks. The priority array
[PrioArr] be used through data flow interconnections and BACnet commanding.
Moreover, the block integrate the following control functionality:
MO
AO
- Motor control (pump, burner, etc.), one- to four-speed [BO, MO]
- Fan control, one- to four-speed [BO, MO]
Value blocks with control
functionality
BVAL
MVAL
AVAL
Rotation block
ROT_8
Value objects or value blocks are implemented per BACnet standard and
therefore includes output blocks via the priority mechanism. These blocks are
referred to as data points that can communicate within the system with the I/O
modules via BACnet. These blocks are primarily used as the communication
interface between superposed control [CMD_CTL, PWR_CTL] and the
aggregates.
The Rotation block switches the operating mode on and off for a maximum of
eight functional units in accordance with a selected mode of rotation (sequence or
hours run). The change of operating mode is based on demand, hours run,
occurrence of a fault or manual intervention (override).
The block is used to process the functional units (for example, aggregates or
components) as a function of run-time or faults. These blocks are used, for
example, for double pumps, that are changed over based on runtime.
Table 12: Blocks bound by the control concept
Control hierarchy
Control hierarchy is the map of the functional assignment and linking of those
function blocks included in the control concept for a plant. The structure of the
control hierarchy is subject to certain rules. A distinction is drawn between higherlevel plant control and local control of the functional units.
Superposed control
Within the hierarchical structure, higher-level control functions are typically
assigned to the partial plant level. All the variables which are influencing factors on
the overall plant are weighted and combined to give the effecting plant operating
mode. In respect of each of the possible plant operating modes, a control strategy
can be defined for each underlying functional element. This makes it possible to
develop specific plant scenarios, such as fire control, smoke extraction, frost
control, on/off-switch control.
Local control
Within the hierarchical structure, local control of the function elements is typically
assigned to the partial plant level. The main function of local control is to respond
to faults. The functional unit itself determines how the outputs are to be controlled
in the event of a fault. Interlocks between functional units (for example, damper/fan)
must be implemented locally. Local control prevents the risk of damage to plant, in
the event that the command control parameters are set incorrectly.
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The control hierarchy in the following figure considers only the example application
for ventilation.
DmpShofEh Ag:DmpShof
FanSu
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
On
On
EnCrit
ManSwi Cp:Ml
MI
EmgOff
On
On/P14
DmpShofOa Ag. DmpShof
ErcRo DmpShof
On/P14 Open/P14
OpSta
En
En
En
En
SmextEh
SmextSu
EmgOff
E,U
BI
SmextEh Cp:BI
E,U
BI
En
E,H
M
Sequence table
En
On
En
AO
OpMSwiCnv
Ax: DMUX8_BO
BVAL
FbVal
E,H
EnPgm
PrVal
MI
ValPgm
OpSta
OpModSwi Cp:MI
BO
Frost
KickDmp
Dstb
SmextSu Cp:BI
TSu
SpErcTSu
EnSfty
BI
EnCrit
E,U
ValSfty
SmextPrg
CMD_CTL
EnCrit
FireDet Cp:BI
EnCrit
OpSta
PltCtl Cp: CMD_CTL
FanEx
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
A-Transport
PrVal
En
En
O&M
TSu
EnSfty
MVAL
On
ValSfty
OpModMan
Cp:MVAL_OP
PrVal
Frost
EnPgm
PrVal
TOa
En
DefVal:Off
En
BVAL
PrVal
On
AO
FbVal
En
E,H
ValPgm
OpSta
Sched
Cp:BSCHED
Dstb
BO
KickDmp
PrVal
Figure 34: Control hierarchy in a sample ventilation plant
I/O block functions and interfaces
The I/O blocks are the most important blocks in the Desigo system. In addition to
controlling the hardware, they are responsible for numerous control and monitoring
functions. They enable otherwise complex functions to be implemented with just a
small number of blocks. The following table shows the main functions and
interfaces of the I/O blocks.
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Function
Inputs
Stop transmission OoServ
of input signal
Priority
mechanism
Local override
Alarm value
monitoring
- Limits
- Reference
values
- Monitoring
periods
Switching delays
Switching action
Description
AI
AVAL
•
Out of service
AO
BI
•
•
BVAL
•
BO
MI
•
•
MVAL
•
MO
•
•
DefVal
Default value
•
•
•
•
•
•
PrioArr
Priority array
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ovrr
Override
•
•
•
•
•
•
OvrrVal
Override value
•
•
•
•
•
•
EnAlm
Alarm enable
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
HiLm
Upper limit
•
•
•
LoLm
Lower limit
•
•
•
Nz
Neutral zone
•
•
•
RefVal(s)
Reference value
•
•
•
•
•
TiMonOn
Monit. time
switch-on
•
•
•
•
•
TiMonOff
Monit. time
switch-off
•
•
•
•
•
TiMonDvn
Monit. time
deviation
•
•
•
•
•
•
DlyOn
Switch-on delay
•
•
•
•
DlyOff
Switch-off delay
•
•
•
•
TbTiDly
Time delay table
•
•
•
SwiKind
Switch kind
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Normal (motor)
Release
command
Trigger
Switch
Switch with delay
Table 13: Control and monitoring functions of the I/O blocks
Function
Outputs
Description
Feedback
monitoring
PrVal
Present value
FbVal
Feedback value
Reliability
monitoring
Rlb
Reliability
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fault monitoring
Dstb
Fault
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Transitional state
•
•
•
•
•
•
SftyActv
Safey priority
Active
•
•
•
•
•
•
CritActv
Critical active
•
•
•
•
•
•
PgmActv
Program active
•
•
•
•
•
•
PrPrio
Present priority
•
•
•
•
•
•
Status monitoring TraSta
Priority
monitoring
AI
AVAL
•
•
AO
BI
•
BVAL
•
•
•
BO
MI
•
MVAL
•
MO
•
•
•
•
Table 14: Control and monitoring functions of the I/O blocks
Function
Inputs
Stop transmission of OoServ
input signal
DefVal
Siemens
Description
AI_RED
AO_RED
BI_RED
BO_RED
MI_RED
MO_RED
Out of service
Default value
•
•
•
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Function
Inputs
Description
Priority mechanism
PrioArr
Priority array
•
•
•
Local override
Ovrr
Override
•
•
•
OvrrVal
Override value
•
•
•
EnAlm
Alarm enable
HiLm
Upper limit
- Reference values
LoLm
Lower limit
- Monitoring periods
Nz
Neutral zone
RefVal(s)
Reference value
TiMonOn
Monit. time switchon
TiMonOff
Monit. time switchoff
TiMonDvn
Monit. time
deviation
DlyOn
Switch-on delay
DlyOff
Switch-off delay
TbTiDly
Table for time delay
SwiKind
Switch kind
•
•
•
Alarm value
monitoring
- Limits
Switching delays
Switching action
AI_RED
AO_RED
BI_RED
BO_RED
MI_RED
MO_RED
- Normal
- Release command
- Trigger
Table 15: Control and monitoring functions of the I/O blocks
Function
Outputs
Description
Feedback
monitoring
PrVal
Present value
FbVal
Feedback value
Reliability
monitoring
Rlb
Fault monitoring
AI_RED
AO_RED
BI_RED
BO_RED
MI_RED
MO_RED
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reliability
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dstb
Fault
•
•
•
•
•
•
Status monitoring
TraSta
Transitional state
•
•
•
Priority monitoring
SftyActv
Safety priority
Active
•
•
•
CritActv
Critical active
•
•
•
PgmActv
Program active
•
•
•
PrPrio
Present priority
•
•
•
Table 16: Control and monitoring functions of the I/O blocks
Priority mechanism
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Within the Desigo PX system, the BACnet priority mechanism is used for the I/O
output blocks and in the value blocks. This priority mechanism provides a series of
prioritized levels at which intervention is possible, for use with the control functions
in HVAC plant and the associated components.
The following priority levels are available with blocks AO, BO, MO (and blocks
AO_RED, BO_RED, MO_RED) and AVAL, BVAL and MVAL.
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Level
Application
Description
Safety level
Life safety
The safety level is assigned the highest priority and is used for the protection of
people and equipment. This is where local safety switches and emergency OFF
buttons are wired or superimposed commanded, for example, smoke extraction
control or frost control.
Plant safety
Operator level
Local manual intervention
Superposed manual
intervention
Automatic level
Local control
General BACnet commanding
The operator level is where components are overridden manually. Here, for
example, the PXM20 operator unit, for example, may be used to force the output
of an I/O function block. This operation overrides all operations at a lower priority
level.
The automatic level is used for local control functions and for superposed BACnet
commanding.
Table 17: Priority mechanism
The following figure illustrates the structure of [PrioArr] and the influence of local
and higher-level control.
Priorities 1, 4, 7, 15
Priority 6
Priorities 2, 5, 8, 14, 16
Local control
Control within block
Higher control
via data flow interconnection
via BACnet command
AO
BO
MVAL
CMD_CTL
e.g. emergency stop
1
PWR_CTL
Life safety
2
3
e.g. anti-icing
protection
ValCrit / EnCrit
Critical value
5
6
e.g. local manual
switch
Monitoring hours
M. station
7
Manual operation
ValOp / EnOp 8
9
13
Local control
Program control
14
15 ValPgm / EnPgm
General BACnet command
16
PrVal
Figure 35: I/O block interface with [PrioArr]
Local override
The override switch overrides the block's switching value and determines in this
way the switching value for the field device. Local override has priority over an
active manual operation at the same time, that is, priority over local override.
Status monitoring
[AO, BO, MO, AVAL, BVAL, MVAL]
The process is monitored via the feedback signal, and in the case of switching
blocks, also via the ramp-up and ramp-down parameters set in [TbTiDly]. If the
feedback value deviates from the present value [PrVal] and the delay in [TbTiDly]
has not yet expired, the process is in a transitional state. The status monitoring
function shows the status at the transient state [TraSta] output. This output can be
used to switch on any subsequent components.
Feedback monitoring
[BO, MO]
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Monitoring feedback may be based on a data point or a purely internal to the block
based on the feedback time parameter.
● Feedback data point available [FbAddr:] = Address
Monitoring is based on the feedback signals. The delays can be defined with
the time parameters for switch-on [TiMonOn], switch-off [TiMonOff] and opencircuit [TiMonDvn]. If the feedback signal [FbVal] deviates from the output value
[PrVal], an OFFNORMAL alarm will be triggered (provided the alarm function is
switched on).
● No feedback data point available [FbAddr:] = empty
Based on the feedback time parameter [TiMonOn/TiMonOff], the output [FbVal]
is delayed by [PrVal]. The output [TraSta] signals transition state.
Alarm value monitoring
[AI, AO, AVAL, BI, BVAL, MI, MVAL]
Alarm monitoring is optional and can be enabled using [EnAlm]. Analog limit or
switching values can be monitored depending on the block type. The tolerance
time [TiMonDvn] to trigger a process alarm can be set. Deviations for switch on and
off procedures can be distinguished for switching blocks.
Alarm monitoring can be enabled based on the process or time. You can switch off
frost protection monitoring in summer, for example.
Reliability monitoring
[AI, AI_RED, AO, AO_RED, AVAL, BI, BI_RED, BO,BO_RED, BVAL, MI, MI_RED,
MO, MO_RED, MVAL]
The blocks monitor the reliability of input and output sources and configuration
errors. A system alarm is generated for example when a source no longer
communicates and the cause is displayed on output [Rlb]. The disturbance output
[Dstb] changes to yes. This output, for example, can return to the block for the local
disturbance to achieve a more secure position using a higher priority. Reliability
monitoring can be switched off using [OoServ], which may make sense for
defective or faulty hardware.
Reliability monitoring is always active for the RED blocks since no [OaServ] is
available. Superposed control does not distinguish this state and plant safety is
not provided under certain circumstances.
Minimum switching times
[BO, BVAL, MO, MVAL]
The minimum time on [TiOnMin] and the minimum time off [TiOffMin] may be
defined to reduce switching frequency. For a switch on or off command, is written
to [PrioArr] as priority 6 and maintained there during the defined switching period.
No lower priority can change the switching value during this time frame.
Switch-on and switch-off
delay
[BO, BVAL, MO, MVAL]
To delay switch on or off for elements [DlyOn/DlyOff]. For example to implement a
pump run-on to extract residual heat. For a switch on or off command, the
corresponding switching value is written to [PrioArr] as priority 6 and maintained
there during the defined switching period. No lower priority can change the
switching value during this time frame.
Ramp-up/down time
Runtimes for ramp-up and down
[BO, BVAL, MO, MVAL]
The runtime of a damper or the coasting time for a multi-speed motor can be
defined in table [TbTiDly] to display or evaluate a transient state [TraSta]. The time
parameter can also influence the switching response depending on the switch kind
[SwiKind] used.
Plant fault
The block independently recognizes faults and reports them to the defined alarm
class [AlmCl], which for its part is responsible for distributing the alarms to alarm
receivers. Depending on the alarm function [AlmFnct] set in the block, you may
have to acknowledge the alarm and reset it after eliminating the alarm.
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Local Control Design
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The faulted block on output [Dstb] is reset only after the user action is run. The
plant ramps up only after an alarm reset since both the local control, as a rule, with
this output is blocked for a fault and as superposed control triggered a plant fault.
The alarm reset can be triggered:
● By triggering a common reset in the common alarm block CMN_ALM
● Via an alarm client, for example, AlarmDisplay or PXM20
4.2 Local Control Design
Fault-related shutdown
The disturbance output [Dstb] for an I/O function block is activated when the block
recognizes a FAULT alarm (for example, broken wire) or an OFFNORMAL alarm
(for example, exceeding a limit value).
The following figure shows how a valve and a pump are forcibly shut down or
ramped up depending on the fault state.
Temp: AI
100 %
OR
TraSta
CritActv
P4 Crit
Dstb
FbVal
PrVal
P15 Pgm
TraSta
CritActv
P4 Crit
Dstb
FbVal
PrVal
P15 Pgm
Pu Cp: BO
Figure 36: Fault-related pump shutdown
Example forced set-up
A limit value [HiLm] is defined for the temperature in block AI Temp. As soon as
this threshold is reached, the output [Dstb] switches the valve via Enable [EnSfty]
for the analog output value to 100%. At the same time, the pump is switched to off
by Enable [EnSfty] for the Binary Output BO.
Example of fault-related
shutdown
The block BI ThOvrld monitors the state of the pump’s thermal switch. If the contact
is triggered, the function block is activated based on the parameterized reference
value [RefVal] for [Dstb] output. The pump is shutdown through Enable [EnSfty] of
the Binary Output BO. The Binary Output BO further monitors the contact’s
feedback. In the event of a fault, where the feedback is interrupted, for example,
the block reports the fault and shuts down itself via the back wired output [Dstb].
The pump can only be switched on again only after the fault is eliminated and the
alarm message is reset as required.
The following figure shows a local fault-related shutdown related to superposed
plant control. The compound mapped here as an example was reduced to make is
easier to recognize the structure of the local control.
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Dstb
PrVal
Off
Ort
Ax:OR
P4 Crit
CritActv
P15 Pgm
13. ValCrit
12. EnCrit
15: ValPgm
Local Control Design
14: EnPgm
4
CmdVal Cp:BVAL
Or2 Ax.OR
TCtr
PID_CTR
EnCrit
ValCrit
KickDmp
PrVal
TraSta
CritActv
Dstb
FbVal
P4 Crit
Off
Pu 1St: BO
R/sCtl
PrVal
P15 Pgm
On
Dstb
0%
Data Sink: Receives Data
The Information is written by a Client with a
certain priority or is read by the Function Unit.
Figure 37: A local fault-related shutdown
Local fault-related shutdown of the aggregate depicted here as an example is
triggered as follows:
1. A fault is displayed at output [Dstb] when a component valve [Vlv] or pump
[Pu1St] reports a fault (FAULT or OFFNORMAL). The signals revert to enable
safety priority [EnSfty] for block BVAL (1). Fault-related shutdown of all
components is triggered via the state output [SftyActv] (2).
2. You can also impact the safety shutdown of the components via the compound
interface [I1 EnSfty].
The superposed plant control (not displayed here) can access the object directly
via referencing since the block BVAL is mapped on BACnet and has a priority array
[PrioArr]. As a result, plant control can also trigger a shutdown of the components
by commanding the safety priority.
Interlocks
The following figure shows a solution where a fan is only enabled after the damper
is completely open.
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Val En
Val En
TraSta
SftyActv
CritActv
PfmActv
Dstb
Val En
E,H
Damper Cp:BO
Off
Val En
Val En
Val
E,H
TraSta
PfmActv
P4 Crit
Dstb
P15 Pgm
PrVal
Val
P4 Crit
SftyActv
En
Val En
OpMod
[On/Off]
Yes
PrVal
P15 Pgm
CritActv
En
4
OpMod
[On/Off]
Yes
Local Control Design
Fan Cp:BO
Figure 38: Local interlocks for damper/fan
Local interlocks
A command to ramp-up the plant [OpMod] =On, the damper output changes to
[TraSta] = Yes, indicating that a transient state is now active, in other words, the
damper is moving. This information is formed on the one hand from the
parameterized damper run time [TbTiDly] and, on the other hand, from the
feedback contact for the damper's mechanical stop.
The valve is blocked via input [EnSfty] as long as the damper is either blocked or
moving, in other words, an intervention via the operator unit PXM20 directly on the
fan is prevented. When the transient state ends and the damper is open, the
Enable [EnSfty] is cancelled and the fan switched on via the program value
[ValPgm]. Enable of the program value [EnPgm] is a constant in this example.
Interlock among
aggregates
The targeted interlocking is employed in a modified form from the superposed plant
control. To allow, for example, plant control to access the fan during smoke
extraction control, the interlock is not implemented by enabling the safety value
[EnSfty], but rather by enabling the critical value [EnCrit].
The fan is set to Off by the damper via Enable [EnCrit] until the damper is fully
open. The fan can only then start. The damper is held open via [EnCrit] as long as
the fan is running to prevent a mistaken operation that could destroy the plant.
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OpSta
EnCrit
Open
ValCrit
BACnet Reference
4
ValCrit
FanSu Ag: Fan1St
EnCrit
OpSta
DmpShofOa Ag: DmpShof
Figure 39: Cross-aggregate interlocking of damper/fan
The operating state [OpSta] for both aggregates are formed within the compounds
as illustrated in the previous example from the AND link for [PrVal] and [TraSta].
4.3 Superposed Plant Controls
Two blocks are available in Desigo for superposed plant control:
● CMD_CTL command control for sequence control
● PWR_CTL power control for stepped control
Both blocks are based on the standard BACnet Command Object. They have both
tables that define the operating modes and switching response of the underlying
aggregates. The commandable blocks in the aggregates must have a BACnet
[PrioArr] to use the following output and value blocks: AO, BO, MO, AVAL, BVAL
und MVAL.
PWR_CTL may only be communicated using the MVAL blocks based on the
specialized task – controlling steps.
Referencing
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Referencing is used exclusively for communications by the superposed control
blocks with the output and value blocks in the aggregates to be commanded. The
references are derived from the Technical Designation (TD) of the block. The
reference is defined relative to the control block to the command block. The
aggregate does not have to be in the same hierarchy; cross-plant communications
is possible.
Example for a reference: B = \...\...\PreHcl’CmdVal
Where CmdVal is the designation for a BVAL object in the PreHcl aggregate. More
than one block can be referenced for each aggregate.
As the project-specific root is not part of the address, the references do not need to
be modified if the root changes. This simplifies project-specific name changes and
the copying of library solutions into a project.
The references, that is, the technical designations with relative addresses are
resolved in the controller at runtime. Any addressing errors will therefore only be
apparent during runtime. The cause of the error can largely be eliminated, however,
when parameterizing the controls blocks with the help of the Plant Control Editors.
The figure shows that the [PrioArr] can communicate directly with the referenced
blocks. You can command switch and positioning values and enable them. A
commanded command remains valid until the priority entry is enabled again. The
control blocks automatically enables all commanded priorities, when the block
commands the aggregates to the new plant operating mode. The entries for the
[PrioArr] are deleted in the commanded blocks when restarting the PX controller,
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with the exception of local, manual interventions to priority 8, for example, via
PXM20.
Special Desigo S7
features
Interconnection in CFC and not referencing is used for superposed control blocks
to communicate with the commanding aggregates! The control concept is
otherwise the same as the one for Desigo PX.
Determining plant
operating mode
A superposed plant control generally has different sources such as plant switch,
scheduler program or important fault messages, from which the resulting plant
operating mode must be determined.
The ENSEL_MS (Enable Selector Multistate) and ENSEL_BO (Enable Selector
Boolean) blocks are available for evaluating the resulting plant operating mode in
the firmware library of Desigo. As a rule, the block is placed before plant control as
illustrated in the following figure. All potential influences are interconnected,
prioritized by importance on the block and the corresponding required plant
operating mode is determined.
Example:
● A fire detector as a high priority (P04) and requires the plant operating mode
EmergOff.
● The smoke extraction switch has the highest priority (P01) and demands plant
operating mode smoke extraction.
● The scheduler has a low priority (P11) and demands plant operating modes
Stage 1, Stage 2 and Off.
The output [Val] for ENSEL_MS now supplies the CMD_CTL the resulting plant
operating mode for additional processing. It is important that the multistate
enumerations for both blocks ENSEL_MS and CMD_CTL are the same. The
multistate values are not text, but rather numbers based.
Superposed command control CMD_CTL
The command control CMD_CTL block is used primarily for the sequence control in
the ventilation plants. The block makes it possible to sequentially switch on and off
the aggregates. As it is implemented in a very general and flexible way, other fields
of application are also conceivable, for example, for refrigeration plants.
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Ccl Ag: CclT
Superposed Plant Controls
PltCtl Cp: CMD_CTL
4
Tsu
DmpShofEh Ag:DmpShof
FanSu
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
On
On
En
En
DmpMx Ag: DmpMx
Sequence table
On
On
Frost
DefVal:Off
SttUpMod
Cp: V(A) StupPrg
En
En
En
O&M
En
En
On
TOa
E,H
OpMSwiCnv
Ax: DMUX8_BO
On
TSu
OpModMan
Cp:MVAL_OP
TOa
Sched
Cp:BSCHED
TSu
OpModSwi Cp:MI
En
EmgOff
On/P14
DmpShofOa Ag. DmpShof
ErcRo DmpShof
On/P14 Open/P14
EnCrit
OpSta
En
En
En
En
SmextEh
SmextSu
EmgOff
Frost
E,U
SmextEh Cp:BI
E,U
SmextSu Cp:BI
TSu
E,U
EnCrit
SmextPrg
CMD_CTL
EnCrit
FireDet Cp:BI
EnCrit
OpSta
FanEx
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
A-Transport
Figure 40: Structural overview: Sequence control for a ventilation plant
The block CMD_CTL controls and monitors output and value blocks mapped on
BACnet. Communications is based on BACnet referencing rather than
interconnections to optimize the costs of engineering. The following blocks can be
used with CMD_CTL: AO, BO, MO and AVAL, BVAL and MVAL.
The sequence is determined in the CMD_CTL in a table. The command for the
individual aggregates and the components can be determined based on the plant
operating mode.
The main functionality of the block CMD_CTL is the sequential control of
aggregates and components dependent on the preset plant operating mode
[ValPgm]. For this purpose the switch-on sequence is defined by the order in the
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function table [FnctTb]. The switch-off sequence is the reverse of the switch-on
sequence. Independent switch-on and switch-off sequences are not implemented
in this block.
Switched on block can be monitored for their states. There is no monitoring of the
OFF status.
Prior to switching on a block a test is made to see if the conditions for executing a
command are given. The switch-on process is not even available for active switch
on delay, minimum switch off times or a switch command with a higher command
(for example, a maintenance switch). This Look Ahead mechanism is described in
greater detail in this chapter.
This block does not contain interlocks of individual functional units within
aggregates. These are implemented locally via the data flow between the relevant
blocks.
Plant Control Editor
The block parameters are set in the Plant Control Editor.
Figure 41: Plant Control Editor
The upper part of the dialog box serves primarily to provide a quick online overview
of the present plant operating mode. You can also define exception value which
become active as a plant operating mode during a plant fault.
The upper part of the table configures the sequences. The switch-on sequence of
the objects, the monitoring mode and the switch on and off types for the sequence
controllers can be defined here.
The lower part of the table is used to define the plant operating modes. You can
define what command at what priority is command per plant operating mode for
each sequence element.
The following priorities for commanding are available:
● Priority 2: Life safety, automatic
● Priority 5: Plant safety, automatic
● Priority 14: Specific command object
● Priority 16: System control
You can enable a command priority with the value Not command for plant
operating modes where the local control is intended to assume control of the
aggregate.
[DefVal] applies when the [PrioArr] for the corresponding block is empty, that is, not
active recognition set, at that time.
Function workflows in
CMD_CTL
Siemens
A series of safety, monitoring and switch actions are conducted for each change to
the plant operating mode in block CMD_CTL. The following table includes an
overview of function workflows:
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Stage
Function
Action
1
Safety function
Check AllLifeSafety plant operating modes.
2
Preview
Checks if the aggregates in question can be switched.
3
Abort sequence
Incomplete sequences are interrupted.
4
Reset sequence
Switch off unneeded aggregates.
5
Step-up sequence
Switch on the newly needed aggregates.
6
Monitor switch-on states
Start monitoring of countdown of delay period.
Table 18: Function workflows
Step 1: Safety function
AllLifeSafety
If all switch commands for a given plant operating mode have the priority Life
safety, it is referred to as the AllLifeSafety plant operating mode.
A pending AllLifeSafety plant operating mode in the [ValPgm] is executed
immediately in all cases and maintained regardless of previously existing and
newly occurring faults in the plant – human life takes precedence over plant safety.
If the AllLifeSafety mode includes switch-on commands, then the preset delay
times (Delay and Timeout) will be observed. However, in the case of the Timeout
setting, the switching sequence will continue even in the absence of any feedback
signal. Interlocks cannot therefore be guaranteed, with the exception of local
interlocks implemented via Priority 1 (life safety, manual).
Priority 1 (life safety, manual) cannot be overwritten in the AllLifeSafety.
Step 2: Preview Look
Ahead
Before changing to a different plant operating mode, in which referenced blocks
are to be enabled, block CMD_CTL checks to ensure that all the aggregates can
actually be enabled. For this purpose, the entries in the priority array [PrioArr] for
the switching sequence blocks are checked in advance. If switch commands of a
higher priority are found to be active (for example, a minimum switch-off time or the
OFF-command of a repair switch), then CMD_CTL waits to implement the new
plant operating mode until the full switching sequence can be implemented. Only
referenced blocks, for which a switch-on command exists in the new plant
operating mode, are checked, and only if the operating-state monitoring feature
has been enabled.
The following priorities are checked:
● Priority 1 [EnSfty/ValSfty], life safety, manual.
● Priority 7 [EnSwi/ValSwi], manual operation, for example, manual switch.
● Priority 8 [EnOp/ValOp], manual operation, operating unit, for example, PXM20.
● Priority 6 [TiMinOff], minimum switch off time.
Priority 6 is checked only for a switch on command to determine whether the
aggregate is still within the minimum switch off time. In this case, it waits until the
switch off time expires and only then switches on.
There is no Look Ahead for Desigo 7.
Priority 4 (plant safety, manual [EnCrit/ValCrit]) is not considered during the check,
since local mutual locking via data flow interconnection, such as depicted in the
figure Cross-aggregate interlocking of damper/fan, would change this value during
the switch-on process.
The present operating mode remains until it is certain that all impacted aggregates
with active operating state supervision can be switched to the new set state. A
process alarm is triggered in CMD_CTL of a monitored block is not switched on.
The exception value [EcptVal] is active as the new plant operating mode in this
case. The online diagnostics for the Plant Control Editors determines which
element is the cause of the fault.
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Step 3: Abort sequence
On-going switch sequences are aborted when delay times are still active.
Exception: An alarm is generated when a fault occurs as part of internal monitoring
of the block. The demanded plant operating mode is determined in this cased by
the exception value [EcptVal]. If the switch sequence is active, but not completed, it
is NOT aborted, but rather is completed.
Step 4: Ramp-down
sequence
The ramp-down sequence is started first for the new plant operating mode. This
shuts down all aggregates that must be switched off per the new plant operating
mode. The shut down takes place in the table sequence from right to left, in other
words, the last aggregate in the switch sequence is the shut down first. The
parameterized times for the time off delay are active during ramp down to off. The
time off delay can be activated using a fixed delay time or a maximum timeout or
deactivated using the immediate option. The length of the delay for timeout
depends on the switch off state of the monitored sequence elements. Transition to
the next sequence occurs as soon as it reports switched off, that is, the process
value of the block [PrVal] = Off. It switches after the timeout time expires when the
shut-down message is not sent.
If a sequence element with a life-safety or plant-safety priority is switched off, the
preset delay times will be ignored.
Step 5: Step-up sequence
The step-up sequence is then started for the new plant operating mode. The
remaining aggregates are switched on per the data in the function table. The
switch on takes place in the table sequence from left to right, in other words, the
first aggregate in the switch sequence is the switched on first.
The parameterized times for the time on delay is active during step-up.
The step-up delay can be activated using a fixed delay time or a maximum timeout
or deactivated using the immediate option. The length of the delay for timeout
depends on the switch on state of the monitored sequence elements. Transition to
the next sequence occurs as soon as it reports switched on, that is, the process
value of the block [PrVal] <> Off. It switches after the timeout time expires when
the switch on message is not sent.
When a sequence element with a life-safety or plant-safety priority is switched on,
the preset delay times will take effect first.
Step 6: Monitoring switch
on state
A process alarm (off normal) is generated when the monitored aggregate is not
switched on after the sequence delay time expires.
The current switch sequence is immediately aborted when the current plant
operating mode is not AllLifeSafety and the exception value [EcptVal] is selected
as the operating mode.
If, however, the exception value [EcptVal] is already the plant operating mode, the
switch sequence is not aborted and the plant operating mode does not change.
Switch on aggregates
The following figure shows the switch response and monitoring mechanism for
block CMD_CTL.
The system initially checks if the new plant operating mode is an AllLifeSafety
mode. The Look Ahead check takes place in the second step, followed by the
check and abort of on-going sequences. The next step is to run the shut-down
series, where objects 8 and 4 are switched off to the extent they have not yet be
shut down. The sequences are then switched on one after the other in the followon switch on series.
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Sequence 1
1
Object nr.
Sequence 2
2
3
None
State monitoring
Sequence 3
4
5
None
None
6
7
8
None
Delayed
Switch-on mode
00:30
Switch-on delay
Switch-off mode
01:00
02:00
Delayed
Delayed
Delayed
02:00
01:00
00:30
Operating states
On
On
Spec. cmd
Priority
Switch-on 1
On
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Switch-on 2
Not cmd
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Sequence 1
Stage X
Switch-on 3
On
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Objects 1, 2 and 3 are switched on in parallel.
As soon as 1 and 3 transmit an On signal
or the 30 sec. timeout expires,
the transition to the next sequence starts.
Switch-on 6
4
5
Switch-on 7
8
Sequence 3
(Off)
Sequence 2
Timeout 0:30
Sequence 2 has no active switch-on command
in stage X, and is therefore skipped.
Objects 6 and 7 are switched on in parallel.
The state monitoring mechanism waits
max. 2 minutes for objects 6 and 7 to
transmit an On signal.
Object 8 is inactive in stage X.
Timeout 2:00
Figure 42: Switch on from Off to Stage X
The set time (delay or timeout) marks a switch on or off sequence that may consist
of one or more objects. The times apply for the entire sequence and take effect,
when a switch on or step up command or a switch off or ramp down command is
demanded.
Switch on occurs in parallel per sequence. A check of the switch on state occurs
only in the switch on type timeout. The next sequence is only started after either all
monitored objects report a switched on state or the timeout period expires.
Operating state monitoring of the objects for monitoring, as depicted in the
following figure, only become active after the step-up process for a sequence is
completed.
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Sequence 1
1
Object nr.
Sequence 2
2
3
None
State monitoring
4
5
None
6
7
8
None
Delayed
00:30
Switch-on delay
Switch-off mode
Sequence 3
None
Switch-on mode
4
01:00
02:00
Delayed
Delayed
Delayed
02:00
01:00
00:30
Operating states
Stage X
On
Priority
On
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
Not cmd
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
On
On
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Switch-on control of objects:
Check if switch-on time reached
Sequence 1
Switch-on procedure
completed:
Stae monitoring active
Object switch-on:
No check if switch-on
state reached
Sequence 2
Object switch-on:
Check if switch-on
state reached
Switch-on procedure completed:
State monitoring active
Sequence 3
Switch-on procedure completed: State monitoring active
Figure 43: Switch on of blocks and status monitoring
Operating status monitoring is optional and monitors only blocks in a Switched on
state. If a referenced block is found to be switched off during active operating state
monitoring, but that the block should have been in the state Switched on, a process
alarm is generated and the plant operating mode changes to exception value
[EcptVal].
The momentary alarm state is visible from the state flag [StaFlg].
Sequence 1
Object nr.
1
2
State monitoring
Sequence 2
3
None
4
5
None
None
6
7
8
None
Delayed
Switch-on mode
Switch-on delay
Switch-off mode
Sequence 3
00:30
01:00
02:00
Delayed
Delayed
Delayed
02:00
01:00
00:30
Operating states
Stage X
Priority
On
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
Not cmd
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
On
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Figure 44: Operating state monitoring
Monitoring is active from the point when the corresponding sequence successfully
completes the switch on process, that is, the process value for block [PrVal] is not
equal to Off and the transient state is completed [TraSta] = No.
The [PrVal] of the block will be monitored. Hence, only those events which affect
[PrVal] can be detected, that is:
● Local fault shut down using interconnection of fault [Dstb] to enable safety,
manual [EnSfty].
● Local shut down of the block in a higher priority application program.
● Switch-off by manual operation of the output module if the I/O module returns
the manual setting value.
● Block switched off via HMI operation or manual switch in control panel
Command control is only in a position to recognize fault-related deviations and act
accordingly when the interconnection of all relevant faults [Dstb] occur locally on a
monitored output of value block to [EnSfty]. Its default value [DefVal] becomes the
process value [PrVal], if a referenced output or value block is out of service
[OoServ]. The state monitoring of the plant cannot operate correctly, since [PrVal]
no longer reflects the actual state of the aggregate.
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To reduce the frequency with which aggregates are switched on and off, it is
possible to define a minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin] in the aggregates. The
look-ahead mechanism in the CMD_CTL block prevents the switching of the whole
sequence if the minimum off-time in one aggregate with active state-monitoring has
not yet expired. The output [TraSta] shows the transitional state and [PrVal]
remains unchanged, at the last value. The new plant operating mode will be
implemented only when all the aggregates to be enabled in the switching sequence
can actually be enabled.
A minimum off-time should always be set for aggregates incorporating a rotating
mass (for example, fans).
Operating mode
changeover
The following figure shows a changeover from operating mode Stage Y to Night
cooling.
All objects were switched on in Stage Y. During the changeover to Night Cooling,
the system initially checks whether the new plant operating mode is an
AllLifeSafety mode. The Look Ahead check takes place in the second step;
followed by the check and abort of on-going sequences.
In the next step, the switch off series is conducted where the sequence elements of
switch off sequence 1 are switched off in parallel. It transitions to the second
sequence after the delay time expires. Object 5 is commanded to Off with plant
safety, priority 5. For plant safety or life safety (priority 2), the delay times or
timeouts have no effect. The transition to switch-off sequence is immediately since
object 4 is already switched on.
Sequence 1
Object nr.
1
Sequence 2
2
3
None
State monitoring
Sequence 3
4
5
None
None
Switch-on mode
6
7
8
None
Delayed
00:30
Switch-off delay
Switch-off mode
01:00
02:00
Delayed
Delayed
Delayed
02:00
01:00
00:30
Operating states
On
On
Spec. cmd
Switch-off 8
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Switch-off 7
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Sequence 1
Priority
Switch-off 6
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Spec. cmd
Objects 8, 7 and 6 are switched off in parallel.
The transition to sequence 2 occurs as
soon as the 30 sec. delay has expired.
Switch-off 5
Sequence 2
Delayed 0:30
4
Object 4 remains on, object 5 is
switched off at priority level 5. The transition
to sequence 1 occurs immediately
without delay.
Switch-off 3
Switch-off 2
1
Sequence 3
Delayed 1:00
Objects 3 and 2 are switched off in parallel.
Object 1 remains on.
Delayed 2:00
Figure 45: Block switch-off
Objects 3 and 2 are switched at the same time as object 5. Object 1 remains
switched on.
Alarm management
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Block CMD_CTL is alarmable and differentiates process from system alarms.
A process alarm occurs, when:
● One of the monitored aggregates is not switched on.
● One of the referenced aggregates cannot be switched on.
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The exception value [EcptVal] becomes the present plant operating mode as a
reaction to a process alarm. In addition, an alarm is sent.
A system alarm occurs for the following configuration efforts:
● A referenced aggregate is not available.
● A referenced aggregate is not a commandable object.
● Impermissible priorities are used (priorities 2, 5, 14, 16 are allowed).
● [ValPgm] or [EcptVal] are outside the permissible range.
● The referenced aggregates have a different number of operating modes.
The command control attempts for a system alarm to enable all referenced blocks
for local control. The four commandable priorities are commanded – in other words
enabled to Not commanded: Life safety (2), plant safety (4), specific command
control (14) and system control (16).
The response of the block to an alarm can be defined. The following mechanisms
have been incorporated to prevent hunting in the plant.
● Basic and standard: When the block goes into alarm, the exception value
[EcptVal] is switched. When all the aggregates are ready for switching again,
CMD_CTL automatically tries to implement the present plant operating mode
[PrVal]. If all the aggregates are ready for direct switching immediately after
implementation of the exception value [EcptVal], hunting is likely to occur. In
this case, CMD_CTL prevents any further switch-on attempt, and the required
plant operating mode [PrVal] must be changed.
● Extended: When the block goes into alarm, the exception value [EcptVal] is
switched. The alarm has to be reset by the user, and there is therefore no risk
of hunting.
The block is not alarmable for Desigo 7.
Out of service
The block can be taken out of commissioning using [OoServ]. The following occurs
when switching [OoServ] to On:
● Immediately abort of switch on and off sequences and monitoring.
● All objects are commanded with a release of the priorities: Life safety (2), plant
safety (4), specific command control (14) and system control (16)
Superposed power control PWR_CTL
The power control function block PWR_CTL is used for control and monitoring of
the performance of a number of energy producers (multiple boiler systems,
refrigeration machines, etc.). As is the case for command control CMD_CTL, the
data is exchanged bilaterally between power control and the individual energy
producers (boiler, refrigeration aggregate, among others), via referencing. Since
the energy producers are generally implemented in the form of logical aggregates,
and contain local logic, the PWR_CTR block communicates only with MVAL blocks.
The control strategy is based on the use of tables and is designed for multi-stage
energy producers. Additional energy-producer stages are connected or
disconnected in accordance with the actual power demand. For modulating energy
producers, a stepped output is converted into a proportional output within the
aggregate. This makes it possible to handle the full power range (0…100%) in one
stage, or to divide the power range into several stages (for example, Stage 1:
0…20%; Stage 2: 20…40%; etc.).
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Figure 46: Overview of PWR_CTL for control and monitoring of energy producers
Plant Control Editor
The block parameters are set using the Plant Control Editor.
Figure 47: Plant Control Editor Aggregate tab
The upper part of the dialog box serves primarily to provide a quick online overview
of the block. The maximum power controlled by the block is set with the maximum
power parameter [MaxPwr]. The value must be greater than 0 kW in order for the
block to work. Any changes in this limit value have a direct effect in online mode. If
no limit value is required, the maximum power must be set at an appropriately high
value.
The Aggregates tab is used to set the control variables of the aggregates (boiler,
refrigeration machine).
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●
Enable: Activation/deactivation of an entry if they are not released, aggregates
in the Profile table will be ignored.
● Command object reference: Reference (relative addressing) to multistate value
blocks [MVAL] of the relevant energy producer. During the configuration
process, all MVAL blocks at the same and at lower hierarchical levels are
displayed.
● Aggregate description: The reference to the value object provides access to
(and hence, knowledge of) all information in a special dialog box via the
referenced object in the control command.
● Switch-on delay: Delay time when switching from OFF to Stage 1.
● Switch-off delay: Delay time when switching from Stage n to OFF.
● Step-up delay: Delay time when switching from Stage n up to Stage n+1.
● Step-down delay: Delay time when switching down from Stage n to Stage n–1.
● Switch-on stage power: Power in [kW] at the lowest (that is, first) stage.
● Next power stage: Additional power at the next stage(s) in [kW].
The control sequences for the aggregates (boiler, refrigeration machine) are
defined under the Aggregates tab. Each profile describes the order in which the
energy producers are to be switched and the maximum stage in each case. A total
of 8 profiles each with 15 sequence entries can be defined.
Figure 48: Plant Control Editor Profile tab
The active profile table is defined by entering the profile number [PrfNr] as an input
parameter, or by selecting it from the Profile dropdown list in the Plant Control
Editor. This input parameter can be interconnected, so that the profile can be
changed as a function of other events (faults, summer mode, boiler operating
hours, etc.). If the profile is changed during operation, the power output [PrPwr] is
switched in accordance with the power profile in the new profile table.
The profile definition determines the order in which individual aggregates are to be
switched on or off. The following information must be entered for every sequence
entry:
● Object: Selected from the previously referenced aggregates.
● Stage limitation: Limit up to which the aggregate may be enabled.
● Control type: Specifies whether the enabled stages are to be switched
permanently or released to the control system.
– Fixed: The total power provided by a given switch stage is switched on or
off permanently. This option can be used, for example, for a specific base
load which is required to be present at all times. The command is
implemented with Priority 14.
– Enable: The power actually required from the released switch stage is
determined by local control of the aggregates. The command is
implemented with Priority 16.
For each sequence step, the function block only ever releases the last aggregate
marked Release to the control system. It displays this released object [RlsObj], with
the released object stage [RlsObjSt], at the output. All other aggregates are fixed at
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the released stage value. If none of the aggregates is marked Release, the
aggregate of the current sequence step is released to the control system.
On/Off switching of
PWR_CTL
When PWR_CTL is switched on [ValPgm = On], the first step in the sequence of
the current profile is executed immediately. In this case, the switch-on delay is not
valid. If the trigger for default power is on [PwrTrg = On], the aggregate is switched
directly to the default power level [DefPwr].
A switch-off command [ValPgm = Off], disables all the energy producers defined in
the profile table with Priority 14.
Out of service
If the PWR_CTL function is taken out of service [OoServ = On], then all referenced
aggregates are switched OFF with Priority 14, without taking account of delay
times. The monitoring of the aggregates is disabled.
Demand signals
The current power demand is determined locally in the energy producers. In the
event of a power deficit or surplus, the aggregate will send the appropriate demand
signal to the PWR_CTL block. The demand signal from the aggregate can be
generated, for example, on the basis of the boiler setpoint deviation and the
primary flow. The demand signals of the separate aggregates are combined and
transmitted to the [StepUp] or [StepDn] input of the PWR_CTL block. After expiry of
the relevant delay times, the block executes the appropriate sequence step to
increase or reduce the power, as necessary.
When both [StepUp] and [StepDn] demand signals are present simultaneously,
[StepDn] takes priority.
Direct switching of a load
In cases where the power is to be increased or decreased without observing the
delay times, the default-power trigger input [PwrTrg] can be used to switch to a
defined default power level [DefPwr]. From the current profile, and taking account
of the current power output, the PWR_CTL block determines the sequence steps
required to cover the power demand and implements them directly.
Power display
The block has two outputs at which it displays the current total power of the energy
producers. This consists firstly of the controlled power output [CtldPwr]. This output
represents the total power switched by the PWR_CTL block.
The other output, the present power output [PrPwr], shows the additional power
output of energy producers that are not directly switched by PWR_CTL. To do this,
PWR_CTL evaluates the priority array [PrioArr] of the MVAL blocks. In this way it
can detect, for example, that an energy producer has been switched manually
[Prio8] to a given stage.
Configuration error
The entries in the two configuration tables are checked cyclically for validity.
● A fault alarm is generated under the following circumstances:
● Aggregates no longer accessible from PWR_CTL, owing, for example, to
retrospective modifications to the technical hierarchy, affecting the references
of the energy producers
● Retrospective changes to the stage-limit value in the aggregate, making the
value configured in the profile table too high
● No multistate value object
● Reference block no longer available: For example, deleted with delta download
● Several references to the same block
● Empty profile table
In the event of a fault alarm, all aggregates still accessible by PWR_CTL are
switched OFF permanently.
Alarm management
The PWR_CTL block in the system is an alarm-generating block with a
configurable alarm class [AlmCl] and alarm function [AlmFnct].
An Offnormal process alarm is generated:
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●
When the step-up demand signal [StepUp] persists for longer than the
monitoring time deviation [TiMonDev], and there are no further sequence steps
to increase the power.
● When the step-up demand signal [StepUp] persists for longer than the
monitoring time deviation [TiMonDev] plus the step-up delay time of the next
sequence step, AND a step-up would cause the maximum power limit [MaxPwr]
to be exceeded.
The process alarm is reset to normal:
● When a sequence step with an increase in power becomes possible again.
Another sequence step with an increase in power becomes possible when the
[MaxPwr] limit will no longer be exceeded, or when a further sequence step
with a power increase is present.
● When there is no further [StepUp] demand signal
The text of process alarms can be defined to suit customer requirements.
For Desigo S7 the PWR_CTL block is not alarmable.
Switching alternatives
Various switching alternatives can be defined by entries in the profile table. Note
that where one or more step-up sequence steps (intended to increase the power)
would, in practice, result in a drop in the power output, all steps in the step-up
sequence are enabled automatically until a sequence entry is reached, at which
the power output actually does increase as required. See also the following
example.
Figure 49: Example of aggregate table
The power data in the object table and the sequence entries in the profile table in
Figure Example of aggregate table together give the power profile illustrated in
Figure Example of profile entries with a drop in power (Profile 2) .
Profile 1
In the main application of the PWR_CTL function, a new energy producer is added
for each sequence entry in the profile table. For this purpose, an aggregate only
needs to be entered in the sequence table once.
In the event of a power demand, which the boiler transmits to the PWR_CTL
function in the form of the [StepUp] demand signal, a further boiler stage /
sequence step is enabled when the step-up delay has expired. When a boiler
reaches the stage limit, the function switches to the next boiler or boiler stage after
expiry of the switch-on delay. The last-enabled boiler stage is released to local
power control, while all other boilers are fixed at their current power output.
If the power needs to be reduced, this is transmitted to the PWR_CTL function via
the [StepDn] demand signal. The sequence steps are then executed in reverse
order, with the defined switch-off and step-down delay times.
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Figure 50: Example profile table using a normal power profile
Figure 51: Example profile table using a normal power profile
Profile 2
Profile 2 shows that the order in which boiler stages are to be enabled has been
changed, and that sequences which will cause a drop in the power output have
been defined in the power profile. In the example illustrated, Boiler 3, which is
currently delivering 200 kW, is switched OFF via sequence entry 2. Boiler 1, which
could achieve a power output of 150 kW with its enabled stages, is defined as the
next object in the sequence. This results in a drop in the power output, causing the
function block to enable all sequence steps automatically until an actual increase in
power is achieved.
In sequence entry 4, Boiler 2 is enabled up to stage 2, giving a further 150 kW
output. Boilers 1 and 2 are thus enabled simultaneously up to stage 2, to prevent a
drop in power. The effective delay time for the simultaneous switching process is
determined the maximum delay time of the boilers concerned. Since it is Boiler 1
which has the longest delay (15 minutes), the simultaneous switching operation will
be delayed for this period of time.
Sequence entry 5 would again result in a drop in performance, because stage 2 of
Boiler 2 is no longer enabled. The block therefore switches straight to sequence
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entry 6, enabling Boiler 3 to compensate for the power deficit. In this case the
effective switch-on time is based on the switch-on delay for Boiler 3 (10 minutes).
Figure 52: Example of profile entries with a drop in power
Figure 53: Example of profile entries with a drop in power
Online diagnostics
A diagnostics screen for the PWR_CTL block is available online in Xworks Plus
(XWP).
Figure 54: Plant Control Diagnose
The following states are displayed:
● Present value: Operating state at the block output pin [PrVal]
● Action: Transient state [TraSta] depending on actual switching conditions: Up,
down or hold
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●
●
●
●
Present power: Value at the block output pin [PrPwr]
Status flag: In accordance with the BACnet definition, the value of [StaFlg] is
always Overridden. Alarms may also be displayed here.
Released aggregate or stage: This shows the current sequence entry, the
released object [RlsObj] and the released object stage
Last alarm/event message: Value at the block output pin [LstMsg]
4.4 Closed-Loop Control Strategy
Controller types
For closed-loop control purposes, two controller blocks are provided in the Desigo
system, which cover the majority of requirements:
● [PID_CTR]
● [CAS_CTR]
PID_CTR stand-alone
controller – Sequence
controller
The PID_CTR block is used as:
● A universal stand-alone PID controller
● A universal PID controller with external tracking
● An individual sequence-controller element in a sequence controller or
sequence cascade controller
The PID_CTR block integrates the following functions:
● Can be programmed for P, PI, PID or PD control action
● Gain, integral action and derivative action can be programmed individually
● Proportional control output with minimum and maximum limit control
● Programmable gain factor
● Programmable neutral zone
● Programmable offset (for P and PD controllers)
● Programmable initial integrator value (for PI or PID controllers)
● Programmable runtime for control variable (0 – 100%, 100 – 0%) and
positioning speed
● Type of operation (direct acting or reverse acting) can be selected
A sequence controller can be implemented by interconnecting several PID_CTR
blocks. The sequence linker SEQLINK can also be used, where appropriate. The
only function of this block is to enable individual sequence elements to be deleted
without the need to create new connections.
CAS_CTR cascade
controller
The PID_CTR block is used:
● As the master controller in a sequence cascade control configuration (for
example, room/supply air cascade).
● In temperature and humidity control loops
The following functions are integrated in the CAS_CTR block:
● Can be programmed for P, PI, PID or PD control action
● Proportional controller output with minimum and maximum limit control
● Setpoints for heating and cooling sequences, and for energy recovery
● Setpoint depending on type of operation, for energy recovery
● Initialization of integrator (initial value)
Universal PID controller
The PID_CTL block can be used as a universal stand-alone controller in a plant for
the control of any control variables. For example:
● Temperature, temperature differential
● Pressure, pressure differential
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●
●
4
Velocity
Absolute humidity, relative humidity
Figure 55: PID_CTR block
Control action
The PID_CTR block can be configured as a P, PI or PID controller. The following
parameter settings are used to define the control action:
● Gain [Gain]
● Integral action time [Tn]
● Derivative action time [Tv]
As an option, the gain [Gain] can be influenced with the [GainFac] input. It can be
useful to correct the gain factor in this way when controlling outside air dampers,
for example, as the effect of the damper positions can depend on the outside air
temperature. The correction factor is defined with the gain scheduling block
ADAGAIN.
The actuator runtime can be set. Specifying the actual actuator run-times makes it
possible to tune the controller more accurately to the actuator concerned, so
improving the control quality of the control system.
Correcting range
The correcting range is limited by specifying the minimum and maximum output
variable. In this process, the minimum of the two values is always set as the
maximum value. In other words, the maximum value may be below the minimum
value; there is no need to update the minimum value.
Neutral zone [Nz]
[Nz] is a zone on either side of the setpoint, within which the controller does not
respond. As soon as the difference between the setpoint [Sp] and the measured
value [Xctl] is less than half of the [Nz], the output is driven for a further 7 cycles,
so that the measured value [Xctl] is as close as possible to the middle of the [Nz].
The output signal [Yctr] then remains constant. The output signal is only readjusted when the parameters move outside the [Nz] again.
Figure 56: Controller response in the neutral zone
P/PD controller
Siemens
If the PID_CTR block is configured as a P-controller or PD-controller, a calibration
point (Offset) [YctrOfs] can be specified. For example, the P-controller can be
calibrated so that the set point is maintained with a 50% load.
With a 0% or 100% load, the P-deviation is then half the amplitude of the
proportional range [Gain].
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Figure 57: Calibration point (Offset) for P and PD-controllers
Tracking [Track]
[Track] is used, for example, where the PI(D) controller, operates as a limit
controller, for example, acting on a valve or actuator via an intermediary minimum
or maximum selector block. The tracking input ensures the availability of the
controller during the period in which it is blocked by the minimum or maximum
selector block. During this time, its integrator (and, hence, its output) is maintained
at the value of the signal received, so that if the limit conditions are violated, it is
able to respond immediately. [Track] is also used in conjunction with special
actuators with positioning feedback.
Direct/reverse-acting
control action [Actg]
[Actg] is a characteristic parameter of the controller and indicates the relationship
between the setpoint deviation and the change in energy flow. A distinction is
made between direct action and indirect [Actg].
● Direct control [Actg]: As the controlled variable rises, the controller output
increases, and as the controlled variable falls, so the controller output
decreases.
Example: Cooling or dehumidification – as the measured value rises above the
setpoint, so the flow of energy is required to increase.
● Indirect control [Actg]: As the controlled variable decreases, the controller
output decreases.
Example: Heating or humidification – as the measured value falls below the
setpoint, so the flow of energy is required to increase.
Figure 58: Control action [Actg] with P controller
Inversion [Inv]
[Inv] of the output signal is required, for example, for air dampers. The outside air
and exhaust air damper must close in response to an increasing heating demand.
The inversion of the manipulated variable affects only the output signal [Yctr] and
not the action of the controller.
Sequence controller
Sequence controllers are used primarily in ventilation and air conditioning systems
to control the temperature and humidity. Other applications are also possible, for
example, in heating systems.
Each controlled aggregate functional unit incorporates a universal PID controller
function block, PID_CTR, as a sequence-controller element.
The statements made about the universal PID controller also apply to the use of
the PID_CTR function block as a sequence-controller element.
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The sequence-controller elements coordinate their own interaction independently.
Interaction is coordinated with coordination signals [FmHigher] and [ToLower],
which are mutually exchanged by adjacent sequence-controller elements. This is
the only link between the sequence-controller elements. This process allows the
setting of individual parameters for each individual controller or aggregate, and
hence effective optimization of the entire plant.
Figure 59: Example of a sequence control
Properties and design of sequences and sequence controllers:
● Each sequence may include any number of elements
● The setpoint for each element of a sequence can be defined separately, but set
points must not be allowed to decrease in the direction from the heating
sequence to the cooling sequence.
● The setpoint for energy recovery can be selected and is either at the midpoint
between the setpoint of the first heating element and that of the first cooling
element, or (depending on the method of energy recovery currently possible), it
may be equivalent to the setpoint of the first heating element (if the extract air
temperature is higher than the outside air temperature) or equivalent to the
setpoint of the first cooling element (if the extract air temperature is lower than
the outside air temperature).
● The gain of each sequence element can be influenced individually. In this way,
for example, the amplification factor (gain) of the energy-recovery element
varies as a function of the difference between the extract air temperature and
the outside air temperature, in order to achieve an almost constant loop gain.
● For each element, P, PI, PID, PD or on/off control can be selected. The control
parameters for each element (controller gain, integral action time and derivative
action time) can be adjusted individually.
● If all the sequence elements have the same parameter values, the sequence
responds in exactly the same way as a single PI(D) controller whose output
variable is distributed to individual aggregates within the plant.
● The controller output and the integrator of the sequence element is limited in
the range [YctrMin] to [YctrMax]. For this purpose, the high limit of the last
enabled sequence element of the heating and cooling sequence is limited with
an anti-windup strategy (limitation of I/portion on manipulated variable limits).
All other limit values are controlled by straightforward selection of the minimum
or maximum value.
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●
●
●
The rate of change of the output of each sequence element is limited to the
speed of the connected actuator. This helps improve control quality.
The type of operation of each element (heating/cooling or
humidification/dehumidification) can be selected individually for each element.
Only one element of the sequence can have a controlling function. When the
output of a controlling sequence element reaches [YctrMin] or [YctrMax],
control is transferred to the nearest adjacent active element ("ON").
Naming convention
The term higher is applied to sequence elements that correspond to higher set
points in the sequence diagram (normally cooling or dehumidification).
The term lower is applied to sequence elements that correspond to lower set points
in the sequence diagram (normally heating, energy recovery or humidification).
Configuration of a
sequence controller
Essentially, the sequence controller consists of individual PID_CTR blocks. with
each PID_CTR block acting as a sequence-controller element for an aggregate.
The PID_CTR blocks are connected (from "Low" to "High") in the same order as
the control sequences (1…n) of the sequence controller. Accordingly, the
connection of the PID_CTR blocks must take account of the intended operating
range (for example, for heating) and the order of switching.
Figure 60: Control action [Actg] of the sequence-controller elements
For example, aggregates:
1 = Re-heater, 2 = Pre-heater, 3 = Dampers, 4 = Cooling coil
Control series for heating: 3 ---> 2 ---> 1
Cooling control sequence: 4 ---> …
The lowest sequence-controller element (Low) corresponds to control sequence 1,
and the highest (High) to control sequence n.
The lowest sequence-controller element controls a reverse-acting aggregate (if
used).
The type of operation may also be reversed during normal operation, (for example,
for energy recovery) but the order of the sequences must not be affected.
In the sequence controller, the set points [Sp] of sequence-controller elements
(1…n) must increase incrementally:
[Sp]1 ≤ [Sp]2 ≤ [Sp]3 ≤ ... ≤ [Sp]n
In the transition from one control sequence to the next, continuous control is
maintained if all the control sequences with the same type of operation (direct or
reverse acting) also have the same setpoint.
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Figure 61: Setpoints of the control sequence elements
When the type of operation changes, the neutral zone is defined by the set points
(for example, heating setpoint / cooling setpoint).
Figure 62: Zero energy zone
Options for connecting
sequence controller
elements
The PID_CTR blocks can be connected to form a sequence controller via:
● Direct connection
● SEQLINK connection
Direct connection
The individual PID_CTR blocks are connected directly with each other. The
[ToLower] pins are connected to the [FmHigher] pins, and the [FmLower] pins are
connected to the [ToHigher] pins.
Figure 63: Direct connection of the PID_CTR block
SEQLINK connection
With this method, the individual PID_CTL blocks are connected via the SEQLINK
block. The sequence linker block SEQLINK is a wiring block with no function other
than that of connecting other blocks.
Figure 64: Connecting a sequence controller using [SEQLINK]
The connection is made between the pins of block PID_CTL and a location on the
SEQLINK block. The order in which the PID_CTR blocks are connected must be
the same as that of the sequence. The connections to the SEQLINK block need
not be continuous: connected pins and unused pins may be interspersed.
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For example, 1 = Re-heater, 2 = Pre-heater, 3 = Dampers, 6 = Cooling coil.
Figure 65: Connection details with interface names
This method of connection is used to interconnect PID_CTR blocks on different
charts, or in cases where individual project-specific sequence-controller elements
or aggregates are to be deleted from an off-the-shelf solution (CAS library).
Communication between one sequence controller element and another flows via
the pins [ToLower] → [FmHigher] and [ToHigher] → [FmLower].
The block recognizes configuration errors and shows these at the Token State
output [TknSta]. If, for example, the control action [Actg] of an individual sequencecontroller element is incorrectly set, the associated sequence controller element is
disabled and an error message is displayed.
Figure 66: Example: Output from elements 4 and 6 [TknSta] = HEL_CSEQ Output from elements 3 and
5 [TknSta] = CEL_HSEQ
Figure 67: Examples of automatically deactivated sequence elements
In all the examples illustrated, several aggregates are deactivated. This is a
precaution, as the sequence elements cannot determine which of the aggregates
has incorrectly set parameters. For this reason, the aggregates are disabled one
after the other until there is a clear transition to the next sequence.
Cascade control
The CAS_CTR block integrated into the Desigo system is a PI master controller for
room supply air cascade control. It delivers three supply air set points on the basis
of the difference between the measured room temperature and the room setpoint.
Figure 68: CAS_CTR block
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The following functions are integrated into the block:
● Facility to select P or PI control
● Gain and integral action time (can be configured)
● Low supply air setpoint for the reverse-acting part of the sequence
● High supply air setpoint for the direct-acting part of the sequence
● Supply air setpoint for energy recovery
● Min/Max setpoint limit control (supply air setpoint)
● Selection of type of operation for heat recovery
● Initial value for the integrator can be defined
Figure 69: Basic cascade control structure
Compared with control without a cascade, for example, cascade control improves
the dynamics of the control process.
If the temperature in a ventilated room is below the setpoint, for example, the
supply air temperature must be increased, at least for a brief period, in order to
raise the temperature to the room setpoint. This can be achieved by measuring
and controlling not only the room temperature, (that is, the value which actually
concerns the user), but also the supply air temperature, whose setpoint depends
on the difference between the room setpoint and the room temperature.
If the room temperature is lower than the room setpoint, the supply air setpoint is
adjusted in proportion to the room control differential, and the supply air
temperature is increased via the supply air control loop.
The master controller generates the setpoint for the auxiliary variable (for example,
the supply air temperature) on the basis of the difference between the primary
setpoint and the primary controlled variable (for example, the room setpoint and
the room temperature).
The master controller must include an integrator function (I component), because
even under static conditions (that is, when the measured value and the setpoint are
equal) there is generally a negligible control deviation, which means that the
controller output must be at a different operating point. For improved control
dynamics, a P-component should be connected in parallel with the integrator. This
is why the master controller in this case has a PI control structure.
Even when the primary controlled variable (room temperature) is identical to its
setpoint, the auxiliary controlled variable (supply air temperature) must generally
be at a value other than 0, (that is, setpoint ≠ 0). This is only possible if the output
of the master controller is not equal to 0, even if the P component = 0. In other
words, the master controller must have an I-component which remains constant
when the control differential = 0. This is why the master controller has a
proportional and an integral component. It is a numerical PI controller for use as a
master controller in a room/supply air cascade.
To save energy in the ventilation plant, various room set points are selected for
different types of air handling (heating/cooling and humidification/dehumidification).
The master controller in the cascade must therefore be able to generate different
supply air set points, depending on how the kind of air treatment (heating/cooling
or humidification/dehumidification).
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Figure 70: Supply air setpoints
The supply air controller must determine whether the heating or cooling sequence
is to be activated and the decision-making strategy does not affect the calculation
of the two supply air set points. Within the cascade control loop, the supply air set
points always move parallel to each other, and their offset is determined by the
integral component.
If the air handling plant includes an energy recovery aggregate, this aggregate may
be either reverse-acting (for example, heating) or direct-acting (for example,
cooling) depending on the relationship between the condition of the outside air and
the condition of the exhaust air.
To avoid external calculation of the energy recovery setpoint, this, too, is done by
the master cascade controller, and made available to the energy recovery
aggregate, if there is one, at a separate output pin:
Figure 71: Setpoint for energy recovery
In a humidity control system with various physical control variables, the initial value
of the integrator should be predefined.
Example:
If the humidity of the supply air is measured with an absolute humidity value [g/kg],
while the room air humidity is measured in terms of relative humidity [%Hu], an
initial value must be defined for the I-component, otherwise the mean value from
[SpLoR] and [SpHiR] will be used as the initial value. If the room set points are
expressed in terms of relative humidity, then the initial value for the integrator will
start at a numerically high value, and decrease as a function of the preset integral
action time [Tn]. The result of this can be that even if the room needs to be
dehumidified, the humidifier is enabled in the controller start-up phase until the
integrator reaches its correct value.
To prevent this, the current measured supply air humidity value is linked to the
initial value of the integrator, or a fixed parameter value is defined for the integrator.
If control accuracy is critical (for example, no deadband or zero-energy control
zone), then the current measured value is linked to the initial value of the integrator,
or a fixed parameter value is defined for the integrator.
4.5 Desigo Room Automation
Multiple mechanical and electrical installations (referred to as technical installations
in this chapter) come together in one room. These typically are HVAC, lighting, and
blinds. Each technical installation is automated and operated optimally from its
perspective. For Desigo Room Automation, coordination of the individual technical
installations must be optimized while considering that the same type of installation
may exist several times in one room.
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Room featuring:
1. HVAC zone (blue)
2. Lighting zones (yellow)
3. Shading/blinds zones (green)
3
3
2
1
2
Figure 72: Room application sample with different mechanical and electrical installations
HVAC zone
The room typically is considered 1 HVAC zone influenced via a common
automation and control strategy regardless of number and type of installed HVAC
plant components (for example, radiator, chilled ceiling, fan coil unit).
Lighting zone
All lamps operated/automated together are grouped into a lighting zone regardless
of number and type of the installed lamps. A room typically has one or several
lighting zones.
Shading zone
All shading products (blinds) operated/automated together are grouped into a
shading zone regardless of number and type of the installed shading products. A
room typically has one or several shading zones.
Desigo Room Automation and room coordination
Application function
structure
Specific functionality is set up for each zone of each technical installation: The
application functions. For Desigo Room Automation, this is supplemented by a
room-wide function coordination called room coordination.
Figure 73: Overview of Desigo Room Automation application functions
Room coordination basically has two application functions:
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●
●
Cross-technical installation coordination to ensure smooth functional interplay
of the various installations
Centralized, room-wide access point to operate and monitor a room
Cross-technical
installation coordination
The application functions of the individual technical installations contain
functionality required for technical installation-specific control. Additional
functionality assuming coordination with other technical installations is part of room
coordination. As a result, project-specific Desigo Room Automation requests and
changes can be carried out without changes to technical installation-specific
application functions.
Examples for coordination functions are coordination of HVAC and shading
functions and coordination of shading and lighting functions.
Centralized, room-wide
access point
Room coordination offers a centralized, room-wide access point to operate and
monitor a room. This allows users to enter common data for several technical
installations only once and retrieve them as a group.
Examples:
● Predefinition of the room operating mode (across all technical installations)
● Predefinition of a scene for the entire room
● Queries for general occupancy
● Common alarm for system alarms
The room coordination default solution influences the following functions:
Room operating mode
Various sources influence and determine the room operating mode:
● Centralized commands from scheduler programs or manual intervention
● Local commands from presence detectors or scheduler program override
Room coordination offers a centralized, room-wide access point to operate and
monitor a room operating mode. The individual technical installations separately
acquire all relevant information.
Scene
Scenes are defined to command several or all technical installations in a room via
one single command: For example, brightness of a lighting zone, or blinds
positions in each shading zone can be defined for each scene. Room coordination:
● Controls a scene as per the predefined values
● Changes the predefined values
Both are carried out by the room user.
Thermal room load
analysis
Room coordination supports room temperature control via blinds control. The
various HVAC data is analyzed to determine the thermal room load and the
associated signal definition for blinds control:
● Load if energy must be supplied to the room via the blinds position
● Unload if no additional energy must be supplied to the room via the blinds
position
Blinds control determines the optimal blinds position in dependence of room
occupancy and solar position (thermal radiation and glare).
Green Leaf
(RoomOptiControl)
Manual room user manipulations (for example, manual lighting and shading
commands, or manual changes to the room temperature setpoint) can result in
inefficient energy operation. Each zone and each technical installation is checked
for inefficient definitions to be pointed out to the room user. Room coordination
then summarizes the results and visualizes them on the room operator unit. The
room user can then reset all manual entries (which lead to inefficient plant
operation) by one single pressure of a button.
Room common alarm
One common alarm is set up for each room to keep down the number of set up
system alarms. To this end, room coordination acquires status information
(normal/alarm) for each zone and each technical installation, and determines the
room-wide alarm state as a common alarm.
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HVAC room control
HVAC plants and their HVAC devices in the room influence the climate in closed
rooms.
HVAC plants in rooms are used to:
● Maintain a temperature range suitable for building occupancy
● Control other control variables such as humidity and air quality
● Efficiently operate HVAC plants in the room
HVAC plants in the room are grouped into plant families differentiated by
mechanical design and functioning:
Figure 74: Examples for HVAC plant families in a room: radiators (right), Fan coil units (center), VAV
(left)
The members of the related HVAC family differ only marginally:
Figure 75: Examples for members of the fan coil family
HVAC supply chain
requirements
Siemens
HVAC plants in a room consume energy. The supply chains outside the room
supply air, water, or electricity to the room. Linked existing energy sources and
consumers are called supply chain. An air supply chain or a water supply chain
thus is an HVAC system with a supply/consumer relationship to the HVAC plant in
the room.
The supply equipment typically supplies more than one room, and the HVAC plant
in the room often is a consumer of multiple supply chains.
HVAC control basically has the same objectives as the entire HVAC plant:
● Maintain the room temperature in the selected comfort range
● Adapt the room temperature range to room user needs
● Supply, extract, and recirculated air to satisfy air quality and comfort needs
● Adapt the air flows to room user needs
Energy saving requirements:
● Devices for sequential control of a heating and cooling sequence and thus:
– Preventing sequence overlap (simultaneous heating and cooling)
– Using the most efficient energy source
● Reducing the temperature as soon as comfort mode no longer is needed
● Reducing ventilation as soon as it is no longer needed
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Coordination of the HVAC supply chain:
● Operation of supply chain equipment as per user demand
● Optimization of operating levels (temperature, pressure) of the supply plant
● Prevention of damages to HVAC equipment
An HVAC control application in the room is connected to the following:
● HVAC plant in the room via sensors and actuators
● Room coordination application
● Centralized coordination application for HVAC supply chain(s)
● Building operator via BAC workstations
● Building automation and control functions for scheduling
● Room user
Supply Chain
Functions
HVAC control structure
Room Coordination
User Request
HVAC Plant Control
T
WndCont
PscDet
Figure 76: HVAC control structure
The HVAC control application in the room consists of two parts:
● Application function for user requirements
● Application function for HVAC plant control
The HVAC plant control contains a control module (CFC) that implements the
control functions associated with the HVAC device.
Control concepts
The physical room conditions are controlled by a combination of control methods
(setpoints by operating mode).
Sequence control
Algorithms for room temperature sequence control operate the heating and cooling
equipment within applicable limits. The algorithm for one single heating element is
as follows (for example, radiator):
Figure 77: Control algorithm for heating element
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Below is an illustration of the temperature control sequence for a more complex
HVAC plant in the room. The charts show the segregation of heating and cooling
control sequences and associated setpoints and sequencing of heat convection by
fan air flow or associated switching stages.
Heating
nor
Cooling
100%
0%
TREff
Speed 3
Speed 2
Speed 1
FanSpdMin=Off
TREff
SpH
SpC
Figure 78: Temperature control sequence for complex HVAC plant
Individual temperature sequence controllers are assigned to each heating and
cooling element. They intercommunicate to achieve required sequencing.
Open-loop control
Siemens
Additional interactions between HVAC devices implemented via open-loop control
functions are required in an HVAC plant in the room. The open-loop control
functions feature two basic interactions:
● Support: Heating coil and cooling coil require the fan to run on the stage/speed
required for their operation.
● Lock: The electric heating coil is locked to ensure that it cannot be operated
without air flow.
Open-loop control and sequence controller are used together to implement the
above, typical control sequence.
The following display shows the connection between controller and actuating
devices (this does not correspond to the actual program structure).
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FanDevMod=Mod
HclDevMod=Mod
CclDevMod=Mod
AND
FanSpdMaxH
H2
FanSpdMinH
AND
H1
C1
FanSpdMaxC
C2
FanSpdMinC
Room temperature
control
AirFlReqHeat
AirFlReqCool
FanSpdMin
Max
FanSpd
HclVlvPos
CclVlvPos
Figure 79: Open-loop control and sequence controller
Operating modes
The HVAC plants in the room adapt to the room's comfort requirements. For
example, ventilation is:
Active while the room is occupied
Off, as soon as the room no longer is occupied
The following illustrations show sequence control for an HVAC plant in the room for
operating modes Comfort and Economy. Sequence control acts on heating and
cooling equipment and a multi-speed fan.
Plant operating mode Comfort
HCSta
Heating
Heat 2
Neither
Cooling
Heat 1
Cool 1
Cool 2
100%
VlvPos
VlvPos
0%
HclHw01
TREff
AirFlReqHeat
CclChw01
AirFlReqCool
Speed 3
FanSpd
FanMultiSpd01
Speed 2
Speed 1
FanSpdMin=Off
TREff
SpH
SpC
Figure 80: Control sequences in the Comfort operating mode
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Plant operating mode Economy
HCSta
Heating
Heat 2
Neither
Cooling
Heat 1
Cool 1
Cool 2
100%
VlvPos
VlvPos
0%
HclHw01
CclChw01
AirFlReqHeat
AirFlReqCool
Speed 3
FanSpd
FanMultiSpd01
Speed 2
Speed 1
FanSpdMin=Off
TREff
SpH
SpC
Figure 81: Control sequences in the Economy operating mode
The available operating modes determine both operation and basic control strategy
in the automation and control system at three different levels:
● The room operating modes determine the operation of HVAC equipment in a
room in terms of current use by the user. The room operating modes defined
for the room are available in all HVAC control applications in the room.
● The HVAC plant operating modes determine the operation the HVAC plant in
the room with regard to existing, physical plant processes. The HVAC plant
operating modes are defined specifically for 1 HVAC plant in the room.
● The device operating modes determine the operation of the HVAC devices in a
room by predefining their tasks and implementation method. The device
operating modes are defined specifically for each individual HVAC device.
The following table shows the plant and device operating modes of a plant with
heating coil, cooling coil, and fan. Project-specific adaptations of both plant and
device operating modes can be implemented by adapting the operating mode table.
Plant operating mode
Fan operating mode
Heating coil operating mode
Cooling coil operating mode
Off
Off
Off
Off
Comfort
Modulating
Modulating
Modulating
PreComfort
Modulating
Modulating
Modulating
Economy
Modulating
Two-position
Two-position
Protection
Modulating
Two-position
Off
Heat up
Modulating
Two-position
Off
Cool down
Modulating
Off
Two-position
Table 19: Plant and device operating modes
In addition, setpoints and setpoint limits define room and device operating modes.
They can vary depending on the selected HVAC plant operating mode. Four
different setpoints are provided for heating and cooling in the room.
SpC
SpH
RClmOpMod
t
Eco
00:00
06:00
Figure 82: Setpoints for room heating and cooling
Siemens
Cmf
Eco
18: 00
24:00
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The HVAC control applications in the room dynamically enable and disable the
setpoints to achieve the desired combination of energy-saving Economy and
demand-based Comfort operating mode.
Command priorities
An HVAC control application simultaneously achieves several goals. Functions
with different objects may conflict when they are implemented. In this case, the
command priority determines which command value has priority in the priority array
of the BACnet objects.
HVAC control applications in a room are programmed to accept commands at
many different levels, including operating mode variable level. As a result, HVAC
control applications control the controlled output objects at a priority commensurate
with the active priority of the operating mode variable. The following figure shows
how commands and priorities are passed in the application.
Fire Detector
16 15 14 13 ... 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
RClmOpMod
Man / Auto
Eco,Cmf
Fcu01
FcuPltMod01
Off
C ... 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
16 15 14 13
Man / Auto
Prot
PltOpMod
Emg
FcuDevMod01
Off
Eco
Cmf
16 15 14 13 ... 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Man / Auto
Prot
Close
Mod
Mod
Close
2Pos
Mod
Close
2Pos
Mod
FanDevMod
HclDevMod
CclDevMod
FanMultiSpd01
HclHw01
CclChw01
FanSpd:MO
HclVlvPos:AO
CclVlvPos:AO
TXM1.6R
TXM1.8U
TXM1.8U
Emg
16 15 14 13 ... 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Figure 83: Application commands and priorities
The BACnet objects in the system support 16 priority levels. The HVAC control
applications apply these levels as follows:
Priority
Purpose assigned to the level
Use in HVAC library
Emergency mode 1
Manual commands related personal safety
None
Emergency mode 2
Automatic commands related to personal safety
Propagated response to Emergency
mode commands
Emergency mode 3
Unassigned - additional level for commands related to
personal safety
None
Protection mode 4
Manual commands to avoid damage to equipment
None
Protection mode 5
Automatic commands to avoid damage to equipment
Programmed response to equipment
safety conditions
Minimum On/Off 6
Commands to avoid damage by short cycling equipment
None
Manual operating 7
Manual commands through switches on equipment
None
Manual operating 8
Manual commands through BAS workstation
None
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Priority
Purpose assigned to the level
Use in HVAC library
Automatic control 9
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Automatic control 10
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Automatic control 11
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Automatic control 12
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Manual operating 13
Manual commands through room unit
Programmed response to inputs from
occupants
Automatic control 14
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Automatic control 15
Typical automatic commands for comfort and energy
conservation
Typical automatic commands
Automatic control 16
Unassigned - commands for comfort and energy conservation
None
Table 20: Priority levels
Adaptation to another
HVAC plant
An HVAC control application comprises several different members of an HVAC
room family. It contains application-specific components (CFC) matching existing
HVAC devices in the room. Components no longer matching existing HVAC
devices in the room are either added, removed, or replaced to control a slightly
different HVAC plant with different HVAC devices.
Room HVAC Plant
Room
TEx
TR
TSu
FanMulti01
HclHw01
CclChw01
Fan1Spd01
HclHw02
CclChw02
FanVarSpd01
HclEl01
TOa
DmpOa01
Figure 84: Adaptation of an HVAC plant
Often, more must be done than merely adding or removing components (CFCs). If,
an HVAC device, for example, is to be added, the following must be added or
removed:
● Information in the operating mode table
● Corresponding BACnet objects to operate the new device
Shading control
Products and
requirements
Siemens
Suitable façade products and intelligent control allow for optimum satisfaction of
various requirements for shading.
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Façade products and their control required to protect against environmental
influences or to make use of the same are the primary issue:
● Shading to protect against glare
● Using daylight
● Using solar energy for heating
● Shading to protect against overheating
● Protection against rain
Other requirements may be:
● Intrusion protection
● Protection of privacy
Façade product control in addition must protect persons and equipment against the
façade products themselves. Examples:
● Drive up blinds in case of fire to open an escape route
● Protect against collision (for example, in the event of outward-opening doors)
Façade control protects the façade products and their functionality against
environmental damages caused, for example, by rain, wind, or frost.
The market knows many different façade products such as roller shutters, blinds,
awnings, etc. to satisfy the various requirements. The different properties of the
products are included in the respective control functions. The following figure
shows a few typical façade products (from left to right):
● Horizontal blinds
● Roller shutter
● Vertical blinds
● Drop-arm awning
● Vertical awning
● Sliding-arm awning
Figure 85: Typical facade products
Influences on blinds
control
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Blinds control requires much information on environmental influences and user
interactions to be able to best satisfy requirements.
The blinds control can be influenced by, for example:
● Smoke, fire alarm
● Maintenance switch
● Wind, rain, humidity, temperature
● Intrusion alarm
● Date/Time
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● Solar radiation
● Geographical position
● Horizon limitation
● Presence detector
● Local operator
● Saving and retrieving scenes
● Central operation (operation, scenes, override)
● Management station
● Commissioning/Test
Blinds position on a building, room purpose, and allocation of rooms to an
organizational unit determine the type of information acting on blinds control.
Example:
● Wind speed monitoring acts on all blinds of a building or building wing
● Automatic shading acts on all blinds of façade or part of a facade
● A scheduler program acts on all rooms of a renter
● Local manual operation acts on all blinds of a room, or on a single blind
Figure 86: Grouping of blinds
Color key:
● Gray: Complete building
● Blue: Façade or part of a facade
● Green: Rooms of a renter, for example, one floor
● Orange, red: Local, manual operation
The functions are grouped into local and central functions depending on whether
the function acts on one or multiple blinds in a room, or on an entire group of blinds,
for example, on all blinds of a facade. The following table shows the grouping by
local and central functions for the examples from the figure above.
Central function
Local function
Local manual operation
Automatic shading
Wind speed monitoring
Scheduler program
n/a
Determination of optimal
shading position in
dependence of sun
position
Measuring of wind speed
Commanding of a position
in dependence of daytime
Decision on which position
is commanded
automatically
Positioning of blinds
Commanding of manual
position
Positioning of blinds
Monitoring of wind speed
Commanding of wind
protection position
Positioning of blinds
Positioning of blinds
Table 21: Grouping into local and central functions
Control concept
Siemens
The control concept is based on the following:
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●
●
●
Grouping into autonomous functions determining a set position for the blinds
Priority assignment to individual functions
Evaluation of all functions and decision in favor of specific blinds position based
on priorities
The following table provides an overview of autonomous functions to control blinds.
Priorities depend on plant requirements. The table shows the typical priorities in
ascending format.
Function
Description
Automatic shading
Automatic determination of optimum blinds position based on current room use, solar
radiation, outdoor brightness, solar position, and HVAC status. In simple terms, this
function prevents glare in occupied rooms and uses solar energy for heating in
unoccupied rooms, or protects the building against undesired heat-up.
Manual operation (room, central)
Manual operation allows users to themselves determine the blinds position via buttons. If
manual operation overrides a lower-priority function, a scheduler program or local
presence information will reactivate the function.
Presence-based influence
Locking of automatic operation upon entering a room, and activation of automatic
operation upon leaving a room. The presence-based function generally acts on the same
priority as manual operation.
(room)
Scheduler program
A scheduler program opens, closes blinds at specific times, or commands them to a
specific shading position. Furthermore, automatic operation can be activated or
deactivated via scheduler program. Another priority may need to be commanded
depending on purpose. If, for example, automatic operation should be activated at noon,
manual operation must be overridden by allowing the scheduler program to act on the
priority for manual operation. If the blinds are to be closed at night without allowing for
manual operation, a higher priority must be commanded.
Automatic shading at high priority
For example, to prevent overheating it may be necessary to use automatic shading at
higher priority, which limits or prevents manual operation in certain situations.
Manual operation at high priority
Manual operation at high priority allows for positioning blinds and overriding low-priority
functions. For example, local operation can be overridden during, for example, a
presentation. Or it can be ensured that neither automatic shading nor a scheduler will
drive the blinds up or down at an undesired time.
(room, central)
Product protection, local
Risks impacting a blind only, for example, protection against collision with a service door
opening outward, are included in local product protection.
Product protection, central
Environmental influences impacting a group of blinds are included in the central functions
for product protection. A common function in this category is protection of blinds against
damage from strong winds.
Maintenance position, central
For maintenance or cleaning, blinds are commanded or blocked to a specific position at
high priority enabling staff to carry out all required work without risking injury due to
moving blinds.
Protection, central
Blinds can be moved/driven up to provide escape or access routes for emergency
personnel in the event of a fire.
Table 22: Autonomous functions
A very simple control contains just one or two functions; a complex plant may use
many or all available functions. In addition, the response of individual functions
may require parameterization depending on the requirements. The following figure
shows an example of a plant including all functions.
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Central function
4
Local function
Central safety (fire alarm)
Maintenance position
(blinds maintenance, window cleaning)
Product protection local (avoiding
collisions)
Product protection central
(wind, rain, frost)
Manual operation at high priority
(button)
Manual operation at high priority (btton,
management station)
Selection of right automatic
position for high priority
Selection of priority
Scheduler program, high priority
Execute
resulting drive
command
Scheduler program
Manual operation
(button, management station)
Manual operation (button)
Presence-induced activation/
deactivation of automatic mode
Determining shading position by solar
position
Selection of right automatic
position
Figure 87: Control concept shading
Lighting control
Products and
requirements
Siemens
Suitable lighting products and intelligent control allow for optimum satisfaction of
various requirements.
Lighting products and their control are the primary means to create optimum
lighting conditions for building users:
● Optimum workspace conditions (bright or darkened rooms)
● Optimum lecturing/teaching conditions (presentation)
● Comfort in living spaces
● Mood lighting in entertainment spaces (restaurants, bars, etc.)
Other requirements may be:
● Energy savings
● Lighting of objects, products
● Façade lighting
● Intrusion protection
Lighting products control in addition must ensure the safety of persons. Examples:
● Switching on lights in case of fire
● Escape route lighting
A multitude of different lamps exists to satisfy the various needs, such as:
● Incandescent light bulbs
● Halogen lamps
● Fluorescent tube lamps
● Compact fluorescent tube lamps
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● Metal halide lamps
● LEDs
For comprehensive information on lighting products and their application, see the
e-learning module Lighting basics (B_B01RA).
Influences on lighting
control
Blinds control requires much information on external influences and user
interactions to be able to best satisfy requirements. The following figure shows an
overview of the influences that may be considered as part of lighting control.
Figure 88: Lighting control influences
Lighting product positioning in a building, room purpose, and allocation of rooms to
an organizational unit determine the type of information acting on lamp control.
Example:
● A fire alarm acts on the entire building
● A scheduler program acts on all rooms of a renter
● Local manual operation acts on all lighting of a room, or on individual lamps
Gray: Complete building
Green/yellow: Rooms of a renter, for example, one floor
Orange: Local, manual operation
Figure 89: Lighting groups
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The functions are grouped into local and central functions depending on whether
the function acts on one or multiple lamps in a room, or on an entire group of lamps,
for example, on all lamps of a renter. The following table shows grouping by local
and central functions for the examples from the figure above.
Central function
Local function
Local manual operation
Fir alarm
Scheduler program
n/a
Fire alarm reception
Commanding of On-command
Commanding of On/Off command in
dependence of time
Switching on lighting
Switch on/off lighting
Commanding of manual brightness
Adapting lighting
Table 23: Local and central functions
Control concept
The control concept is based on the following:
● Grouping into autonomous functions determining a command for lighting
● Priority assignment to individual functions
● Evaluation of all functions and decision on the state of lighting based on
priorities
The following table shows autonomous functions to control lighting. Priorities
depend on plant requirements. The table shows the typical priorities in ascending
format.
Function
Description
Automatic control
Automatic switch-on/switch-off based on brightness, constant lighting control.
In simply terms, this function achieves optimum lighting conditions automatically in
occupied rooms, and switches off lighting when rooms are unoccupied.
Manual operation (room, central)
Manual operation allows users to themselves determine brightness via buttons. If manual
operation overrides a lower-priority function, a scheduler program or local presence
information will reactivate the function.
Presence-based influence (room)
Automatic switch-on when dark upon entering a room, and automatic switch-off when
leaving a room. The presence-based function generally acts on the same priority as
manual operation.
Scheduler program
Lighting can be switched on/off at specific times using a scheduler program. Furthermore,
automatic control can be activated or deactivated via scheduler program. Another priority
may need to be commanded depending on purpose. If, for example, automatic control
should be activated at noon, manual operation must be overridden by allowing the
scheduler program to act on the priority for manual operation. If lighting is to be switched
off at night without allowing for manual operation, a higher priority must be commanded.
Manual operation at high priority (room,
central)
Manual operation at high priority allows for influencing lighting blinds and overriding lowpriority functions. For example, this function allows for ensuring that neither motion
detectors nor scheduler programs can switch on/off lighting at the wrong time during a
lecture/presentation.
Maintenance, central
For maintenance or cleaning, lighting is switched on/off at high priority enabling staff to
carry out all required work without risk of injury or being interrupted.
Protection, central
Lighting can be switched on in the event of a fire alarm to light escape routes or support
emergency crew access.
Table 24: Autonomous functions
A very simple control contains just one or two functions, A complex plant may use
many or all available functions. In addition, the response of individual functions
may require parameterization depending on the requirements. The following figure
shows an example of a plant including all functions.
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Control Concept
Desigo Room Automation
Central function
Local function
Central safety (fire alarm)
Maintenance
Manual operation at high priority
(button)
Manual operation at high priority (button,
management station)
Selection of priority
Scheduler program at high priority
Execution of
resulting lighting
command
Scheduler program
Manual operation
(button, management station)
Manual operation (button)
Presence-induced influence
Automatic control
Figure 90: Control concept lighting
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Technical View
Standard Plant Structures
5
5 Technical View
The technical view illustrates the technical building services equipment, such as
HVAC systems and associated elements, in the building automation and control
system.
Area Gubelstrasse
Heat
generation
Heat distribution
Group N
Group S
Air handling, 3rd floor
Burner
Sensor
KNG:ABdb6'AHU3Fl'FanSu
Figure 91: HVAC plants and their associated elements
The technical view helps organize measured and controlled physical variables from
specific, technical installations in a building. The technical view is modeled with
structure objects. The structure of the technical view represents the hierarchy of
the technical installations. Objects representing variables, such as setpoints or
operating modes supplement the view.
Plant types
The technical view contains all the conceptual objects in the system. The following
plant types have been defined for descriptions and categories:
● Primary plant: All physical plants that are directly controlled from the
automation level, for example, heating systems, ventilation systems, etc.
● Room automation: Individual room controls.
● Global objects: Data objects which exist simultaneously in several automation
stations at the automation level, for example, an exception calendar for the
time schedules of all plants. These objects are combined as a virtual plant in a
global area and can be invoked as such (global data).
The technical view can be used for other disciplines integrated via PX Open. The
technical view and the associated technical designations can be set up in the
compounds library.
5.1 Standard Plant Structures
To display different plants in a uniform manner, a standard hierarchical plant
structure has been created for each plant type.
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Technical View
Standard Plant Structures
Primary plants with Desigo PX
Structure
Site
Plant
Partial plant,
Aggregate,
Component
Total max. 6
recursions (max. 7
levels)
Figure 92: Structure for primary plants
Elements
Site: A site is a self-contained area in terms of location, function and organization,
usually a building or a group of buildings (facility). A site can comprise several
plants. Example: Building 6
Plant: A plant consists of partial plants, aggregates and components. A plant can
comprise several partial plants. Aggregates and components can be directly
subordinate to a plant. Example: Ventilation system, heating system
Partial plant: A partial plant can comprise various aggregates. Components can be
directly subordinate to a partial plant. Example: Central supply air treatment, air
distribution, hot water supply (one or more boilers)
Aggregate: An aggregate can comprise various components. Example: Exhaust air
fan
Component: A component can comprise several components, which can comprise
several components themselves. Example: Pumps (motors), dampers, valves,
sensors, detectors, limit switches, contactors, selector switches, remote/local
switches
Engineering model
BACnet/System model
Site
Site
1
Element type:
auxil. element
plant (primary)
area
subarea
section
n
n
Hierarchy element
Element type
CFC Editor: Compound
Element type
1
Total max. 6
recursions
(nesting)
n
Element type:
plant
area
subarea
section
Structured view object
1
Assignable to PX
Element type:
auxil. element
partial plant
aggregate
component
room
Hierarchy object
Element type
n
Function element
CFC Editor: Compound
Function block
Function
Element type
1
Block object
Element type
Element type:
partial plant
aggregate
component
room
Standard BACnet object
Element type
Element type: auxiliary element, plant, partial plant, aggregate, component, area, subarea, section, room
Figure 93: Primary plant with Desigo PX
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Technical View
Standard Plant Structures
Example: Ventilation VB
Zug
5
Site: Site [Site]
Area: A [Ventilation system]
Plant: Ahu03 [Ventilation VB Zug]
Aggregate: FanEh [Exhaust air fan]
Component: DPMon [Differential pressure]
Figure 94: Technical view of the Ventilation plant VB Zug
Global objects
Structure
Site
Global area
Component
Figure 95: Structure for global objects
Elements
Siemens
Site: A site is a self-contained area in terms of location, function and organization,
usually a building or a group of buildings (facility). Example: Building 6
Global area: The global area contains all the global components of the site. There
is one global area per site.
Global objects are data objects which exist simultaneously in several automation
stations at the automation level, for example, an exception calendar for the time
schedules of all plants. These objects are combined as a virtual system in a global
area and can be invoked as such.
Component: A global area may contain several components, such as 3 calendars,
18 notification classes for alarm distribution. Each component is present on all
automation stations of the site. For operation, however, each component is visible
only once.
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Technical View
Standard Plant Structures
Room automation with Desigo RX
Structure
Site
Area, Subarea,
Section
Room
Figure 96: Structure for room automation with Desigo RX
Elements
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Site: A site is a self-contained area in terms of location, function and organization,
usually a building or a group of buildings (facility). A site can comprise several
plants. Example: Building 6
Area: An area is typically a building, and can comprise subareas, sections,
components and subcomponents. Example: Building
Subarea: A subarea is typically the wing of a building and can comprise several
sections. Rooms can be directly subordinate to a subarea. Example: Building wing,
staircase
Section: A section is typically a floor in a building and can contain various rooms.
Example: Floor
Software objects, which need to be displayed and operated even though they do
not exist as physical elements in a real building, are also treated both as sections
(for example, via grouping criteria, such as east facade or emergency group 12)
and as components (for example, group object for distribution of centrally
determined control variables to several rooms).
Room: A room is a section of a building that is delimited by walls, ceilings, floors,
windows and doors. Example: Individual room, hall
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Technical View
Standard Plant Structures
5
Room automation with Desigo Room Automation
Structure
Building
Floor
Room
Room segment
Functional unit
Component
Figure 97: Structure for room automation with Desigo Room Automation
Elements
Building: A building is a locally, functionally and organizationally defined area.
Example: Building 6
Floor: A floor in a building can contain various rooms. Example: Floor
Room: A room is a section of a building that is delimited by walls, ceilings, floors,
windows and doors. Example: Individual room, hall
Room segment: A room segment is a subdivision of a room. A room can contain
several room segments.
Functional unit: A functional unit is a logical component representing an
encapsulated application unit which may be independently deployed to an arbitrary
automation device. Example: Fan coil
Component: A functional unit can contain several components. Example: Awning
Example: Technical view
of the Shd01 component
Building: BU33 [Building 33]
Floor: Fl3 [Floor 3]
Room: R01Segm01 [Room]
Components: Shd01 [Shading 01, venetian blinds or awnings]
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Technical View
Technical Text Labels
Figure 98: Technical view of the Shd01 component
5.2 Technical Text Labels
The Technical Designation (TD) is a technical identifier that is used to identify the
plant and associated elements.
The structure of the TD is based on the hierarchical structure of the plant and its
associated elements, z.B.:
● For primary plants with Desigo PX:
Site / Plant / Partial plant / Aggregate / Component / Pin
● For room automation plants with Desigo RX:
Site / Area / Subarea / Section / Room
● For room automation plants with Desigo Room Automation:
Building / Floor / Room / Room Segment / Functional Unit / Component / Pin
The text is based on designations in abbreviated form that are customary within the
industry, for example:
GUB:AGeb6‘Ahu3St‘FanSu = Gubelstreet facility / ventilation plans building 6 / Air
handling third floor / supply air fan
Technical designations are linguistically neutral (mnemonic). They are based on
mnemonic texts set up in the library, with additional project-specific details.
The TD is defined by Siemens. The User Designation (UD) can be defined by the
customer.
Name&Description_Pair
Each element of the TD is called ShortName. A ShortName is a designation for an
individual plant element within the automation station. A ShortName is always
linked to a description. This pair is called the Name&Description_Pair.
TD rules
The following table shows the rules for the TD:
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Technical Text Labels
Item
Rule
Address structure
Comprises at least one hierarchical object and one function object
5
Has a variable length (site + 1..8 hierarchy and function objects + pin name)
Is independent of the automation station, that is, does not contain a designation for an
automation station
Must be unique for each site
Mnemonic
Based on the English terms
Must not be translated
Plant elements on the same hierarchy level are distinguished through different part
names, for example, HG01/HG02.
Syntax
Site designation
Consists of upper and lower case letters, and numbers (must start with a letter): [a..z,
A..Z, 0..9].
Is case insensitive, for example, Imax and IMAx are treated the same.
Other partial designations
Consist of upper and lower case letters ([A..Z] and [a..z]) and/or numbers 0 to 9.
Is case insensitive, for example, Imax and IMAx are treated the same.
Max. number of characters
Site: 10
Object: 9
Pin: 8
TD: 80
Separators
Colon (:) after site name
Apostrophes (‘) for all other separations
Period (.) in front of pin name
Table 25: TD rules
Function blocks and pins
A function block, that is, an object with pins, can represent an area, a partial plant,
a sub-area, an aggregate, a section, or a component. Function blocks have
attributes and function block pins have attributes.
The following figure shows a function block and its pins as they appear in the
program view:
Figure 99: Function block in the program view
Function block attributes
Siemens
The main attributes of the function block are:
● Name: Name of the function block based on the key of the TD. Example:
ThOvrld
● Description: Additional description. For generic operation it is shown as text in
an operator unit. Example: Thermoelectrical ovrld
● Element type: Block in plant-engineering terms. Example: Component
● Main value: Main value of the function block. It is set during engineering.
Example: PrVal
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Technical View
Technical Text Labels
Figure 100: Attributes of the function block Thermoelectrical ovrld
Function block pin
attributes
The main attributes of the pins are:
● Name: Pin name, based on the key of the TD. Example: PrVal
● Description: Description of the pin name. Example: Present value
● Value: Current value of PrVal. Example: Normal
● Parameter Kind: Application pin type. Example: Process input
● Data Type: Data type of the pin. Example: Multistate
For a complete list of attributes, see CFC Online Help.
Figure 101: Pins of the function block ThOvrld
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Global Objects and Functions
Ensuring Data Consistency
6
6 Global Objects and Functions
Every automation station contains all the data necessary for stand-alone operation,
including, for example, date and time, calendar function blocks and Notification
Class function blocks. The system functions of individual automation stations do
not depend on a central server.
The System View and the Program View are based on the automation station, that
is, each object (block, BACnet data object) belongs to a specific automation station.
These objects are called local objects. This form of representation is adequate for
most elements of a physical plant, for example, for the supply air temperature or
the set point of a ventilation system.
However, certain data objects need to be visible in identical form in some or all the
automation stations of a site. These objects are called global objects. Global
objects let you centrally change parameters, which are then distributed to all
automation stations.
Local objects
Local objects are individual and unique objects which exist only once on a
particular automation station in the system. Most application-related objects are
local objects. When local objects are required, such as the outside temperature in
several automation stations, access to this data must be configured or
programmed explicitly with function blocks (such as analog, binary and multistate
inputs, or grouping in the room management system) and referencing.
Global objects
Global objects are data objects which exist simultaneously on each automation
station at the automation level. Global objects are always global within a given site.
Global objects are engineered in Xworks Plus (XWP).
Global objects are compiled in a global chart. There is exactly one global chart per
site. You can modify global charts, save them in the tool's library folder, and copy
them to other projects.
Global objects and functions are not supported in Desigo S7.
6.1 Ensuring Data Consistency
Primary copy
The primary copy procedure ensures that the global objects are consistent at all
times. This means that all copies of a particular global object contain the same
value and any modification of a value is transmitted to all copies.
Primary and backup
server
Only one automation station per site acts as the primary server for all global
objects of this site. All other automation stations of this site are backup servers. A
client (PXM20 or management station) may only modify the values of the global
objects on the primary server. The primary server then updates the copies of the
modified global objects on all backup servers. A backup server accepts the
modifications to global objects only from its primary server but not from a client.
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Global Objects and Functions
Roles in the System
Figure 102: Primary copy procedure
Xworks Plus (XWP) and all BACnet clients can only modify the data of global
objects in the primary server.
6.2 Roles in the System
Server/Function
Function and description
Primary server (Desigo PX)
One automation station of a site acts as the primary server. Make sure that only one primary server
exists at any one time on a site.
Life check
The primary server monitors the backup servers and the third-party BACnet devices of a site.
The primary server can monitor the TRA server.
Time synchronization
The primary server synchronizes the time of the backup servers and the third-party BACnet devices of
the site.
The primary server can synchronize the TRA server time.
Start-up
No coordinated start-up.
Replication
The primary server replicates the global objects and properties (device object) to the backup servers
of a site. A backup server accepts changes of global objects only from the primary server.
Table 26: The role of the primary server
Server/Function
Function and description
Backup server (Desigo PX)
The other automation stations of a site must be backup servers.
Life check
The backup servers monitor the primary server of the site.
Backup servers can monitor TRA servers.
Time synchronization
The backup server can synchronize the time of the TRA server and of the third-party BACnet devices.
Start-up
No coordinated start-up.
Table 27: The role of the backup server
Server/Function
Function and description
TRA server / Third-party BACnet
device
The TRA server acts like a standard BACnet device.
Life check
The TRA server / third-party BACnet device is monitored by the primary server or the backup server.
Start-up
No coordinated start-up.
Replication
No global objects to be replicated.
Table 28: The role of the TRA server and third-party BACnet device
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Global Objects and Functions
Life Check
Server/Function
Function and description
Clients (management station, PX
Web, PXM20)
A client can read global objects from the primary server or any backup server. A client may only
modify a global object (for example, with WriteProperty) on the primary server. Each client must
therefore recognize the primary server of a site. A client can query the identification of the primary
server of a site.
6
Replicated objects from backup servers which are not online or which are connected to the BACnet
network at a later stage, are updated by the primary server as soon as the primary server becomes
aware of them. This occurs after a restart of the automation station, after connecting it to the network
or on expiry of the synchronization request period [SynReqp].
Table 29: The role of the clients
Server/Function
Function and description
Alternative primary server
If the primary server fails, no global objects can be modified. You can configure any backup server of
the site to act as the primary server using a client or Xworks Plus (XWP).
Table 30: The role of the alternative primary server
6.3 Life Check
The life check checks if all devices of the site (primary server, backup server, TRA
server or third-party BACnet device) work correctly, that is, if they are operating
and if they are running their application.
● The primary server monitors if the backup servers / TRA servers are active.
● The backup servers monitor if the primary server is active.
● The primary server checks that only one primary server exists at any one time
on a given site.
Figure 103: Life check
Add and delete devices
For life check and replication the primary server has a list [BckUpSrv] of all known
devices of a site. The primary server automatically adds newly commissioned
devices on the site to this list. Devices which are removed from the site must be
deleted manually in Xworks Plus (XWP) from the list in the primary server.
The primary server performs a life check at regular intervals, to check that all
devices of its site are online. The interval between life checks is defined by the
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Global Objects and Functions
Time Synchronization
Check if all devices are
online
synchronization request period [SynReqp]. During this period, the backup servers
are checked one after the other in a cyclical process. The interval between two life
checks can be calculated as follows: t ≈ SynReqp / Number of backup servers .
A short synchronization request period and a large number of backup servers may
involve a substantial communications load. Take this into account when setting the
synchronization request period in Xworks Plus (XWP).
If one or more devices are not online, the primary server generates an alarm signal.
The alarm is reset as soon as all devices are online again and have been detected
by the primary server. This ensures that problems, such as the failure of a device,
the termination of the HVAC-application processing of a device, or faulty
configuration (for example, two primary servers in one site) are detected.
Monitor if the life check
checks the backup server
Each backup server monitors its own periodic life check by the primary server. If a
life check fails, or if no primary server has ever carried out any life checks on this
backup server, the backup server generates an alarm. The backup server resets
the alarm as soon as the primary server carries out a life check.
6.4 Time Synchronization
Each automation station is assigned to a site.
The primary server is the time master. It represents the system time within a given
site. The primary server synchronizes the time in the other automation stations at
regular intervals.
If the primary server receives a time synchronization request which triggers a time
change, the primary server synchronizes the time in the other automation stations.
The primary server transmits the time in UTC format (Coordinated Universal Time)
to the other automation stations (backup servers) and in UTC format or local time
format to the third-party BACnet devices.
The backup server then triggers time synchronization of its recipients configured in
Xworks Plus (TRA server, third-party server, third-party BACnet devices). This can
be in either UTC or local time format.
Periodic synchronization
The time synchronization interval is defined in the property
TimeSynchronizationInterval [TiSynIvl] (default value: 150 minutes). The property
can be configured in Xworks Plus (XWP) and adapted to the specific situation via a
switchable [AlgnIvl] offset [IvlOfs]. How these three properties function is defined in
the BACnet standard and implemented accordingly.
Add and delete devices
For time synchronization, the primary server has a list [TiSynRcp] containing the
recipients configured in Xworks Plus (XWP) and all known backup servers of its
site.
The primary server automatically adds newly commissioned backup servers on the
site to the list [TiSynRcp].
Backup servers which are removed from the site must be removed manually from
the primary server list in Xworks Plus (XWP).
Link the system time of a
site with operator units
The network-capable operator units (management station, PX Web, PXM20) do
not belong to a site. The primary server does not update the time in the operator
units. The client can read and update the time, if required.
Daylight saving time
changeover
The daylight saving time changeover does NOT take place in the primary server.
Each automation station makes this switch independently.
The date of the daylight saving changeover is set as a parameter in the primary
server. The primary server replicates the date on the backup server. The official
(Central European) changeover date is set as default.
The local time in an automation station is a calculated variable. The calculation is
based on the internal time in UTC format, the property UTC offset [UtcOfs] and the
date of the summer and winter time changeover.
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Global Objects and Functions
Examples of Global Objects
6
See Desigo Insight, Management station operation (CM110588) and Desigo CC
User Guide (A6V10415471).
6.5 Examples of Global Objects
BACnet device object
Certain properties of the BACnet device object are defined as global, because from
the perspective of the system, they are required to have the same value throughout
the site. These properties are set in Xworks Plus (XWP). Examples:
Global properties
●
●
●
●
●
Local properties
Date and time for the summer and winter time changeover.
Daylight savings time start date [DsavSdt] (Default: last Sunday in March)
Daylight savings time start time [DsavSti] (Default: 02:00AM)
Daylight savings time end date DsavEdt] (Default: Last Sunday in October)
Daylight savings time end time [DsavEti] (Default: 03:00AM)
UTC_Offset [UtcOfs]
Difference between UTC and local Winter time in minutes. Default value: – 60
mins (Central Europe). In Summer, the effective difference [UtcOfs] is –60 mins
(Central Europe: –120min).
Synch.Request Period [SynReqp]
Period between life checks by primary server The load on the communications
system generated by the life check can be controlled with this parameter by
adapting it to the site size. Default value: 1800 s.
Name resolution interval [NamRI]
Periodic repetition for the resolution of references across devices. Default value:
900 s.
COV resubscription interval [CovRI]
Time within which the automation station resubscribes to a subscribed value.
Default value: 1800 s.
Local properties which refer to the functionality of the life check / replication:
● Server type [SvrTyp]
Defines if the device acts as a primary server or a backup server. Default:
backup.
● Primary device [PrimDev]
Device object ID of the primary server of the site or an invalid value if the
primary server is not known (read-only, set automatically by the primary server).
● Last engineering time, global object [GOEngTi]
Time stamp of the last structure modification of the global objects by Xworks
Plus (XWP).
● Last online modification of global objects [GOChgTi]
Time stamp of the last online modification of a global object in Xworks Plus
(XWP) (modified by the primary server, read-only).
Notification class object
The Notification Class object is a standard BACnet object and defines the system
response of alarms and system events.
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Global Objects and Functions
Examples of Global Objects
Figure 104: Distribution of alarms and events
There are local and global Notification Class Objects.
Global Notification Class Object: A logical object at site level that exists in identical
form (as a replicated object) in every automation station on a site.
Local Notification Class Object: Individual object (unique object) that exists only on
a particular automation station.
Reading of objects by a client: A client may read the global notification class
objects from any automation station.
Reasons for replication: Keeping the setting parameters consistent for all
automation stations of a site when modifications occur (adding or deleting
configured recipients from recipient list, changing priorities).
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Examples of Global Objects
6
Figure 105: Global and local Notification Class Objects
The number of global Notification Class objects is limited to 18 (six alarm classes
each with three possible alarm functions).
Calendar object
There are global and local calendar objects.
Figure 106: Global and local calendar objects
Global calendar object: A logical object at site level. It exists in identical form (as a
replicated object) on each automation station of a site.
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Global Objects and Functions
Examples of Global Objects
Local calendar object: Individual (unique) object that exists only on a particular
automation station.
Local processing: Schedule objects in an automation station may reference the
replicated calendar objects in the device. A client may read the global calendar
objects from any automation station.
Reasons for replication: Global exceptions (bank holidays, general holidays, etc.)
can be modified centrally in one location for the entire site. Ensures continuity of
operation if the master fails.
User profile object
Global user profile object: A logical object at the site level. It exists in identical form
(as a replicated object) on each automation station of a site. There must be at least
one user profile object.
There are no local user profile objects.
Local processing: Access control is based on the replicated user profile objects in
the automation stations (BACnet devices): No dependency on a server.
Reading of objects by a client: A client may read the global user profile objects
from any automation station.
Reasons for replication: Replication is designed to maintain consistency of the
access rights throughout the site, and to ensure continuity of operation in the event
of the failure of the master.
Figure 107: User profile objects
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Events and COV Reporting
Sources and Causes of System Events
7
7 Events and COV Reporting
Events
System events are messages which inform a client (for example, Desigo CC) of
specific events in an automation station, such as:
● Change in operating state of the automation station (STOP, RUN)
● Overflow of the operating hours counter built into certain I/O objects
Conceptually, system events are similar to alarms, however, they differ from alarms
in some ways:
● System events have no memory, that is, they do not have a finite state
machine.
● System events do not affect the status of a plant, that is, they can occur in any
alarm state without influencing it.
● System events are displayed, but do not need to be acknowledged or reset.
System events are forwarded to clients using the same mechanism as alarms.
COV reporting
If a value of a specific process variable changes, the change is transmitted to other
system components by means of Change Of Value (COV) reporting. Polling is
used only in exceptional cases. COV reporting can be used to transfer value
changes to several automation stations. A COV notification is issued only when the
value of the process variable changes in comparison with the preset or default
incremental value. There is no need to poll the process variables at regular
intervals.
There are two roles:
● COV-Server: The automation station which reads the process variable and
whose change of value is to be reported.
● COV-Client: The recipient of the COV notifications. This may be another
automation station or a BACnet client (for example, PXM10/20/40/50, PX Web,
Desigo Insight, Desigo CC).
7.1 Sources and Causes of System Events
The source of a system event is a function block (as with alarms). System events
can originate from the same block types as alarms:
● Analog Input/Output/Value
● Binary Input/Output/Value
● Multistate Input/Output/Value
● BACnet Device Info Object (or Multistate Input Object for Desigo S7)
Every block type capable of generating a system event has a clearly defined set of
system event triggers.
Event-generating block types
Description
Operating hours counter
The input, output and value objects of the Binary and Multistate types have an inbuilt operating hours
counter. A system event is generated when the operating hours limit is exceeded or when the
maintenance interval has expired.
BACnet Device Info Object
The BACnet Device Info Object detects the causes of system events which apply to the automation
station as a whole. The following causes are detected:
- Change of operating state (start and stop the program)
- Restart after a power-up
- Primary server has found a new backup server on the network
- Backup server has found the primary server
Table 31: Event-generating block types
Siemens
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Events and COV Reporting
Routing System Events
7.2 Routing System Events
System events are forwarded to clients using the same mechanism as alarms.
They are forwarded to all temporary and configured alarm recipients in accordance
with the settings in the associated Notification Class objects.
Comparison with the
alarm strategy
System events cannot be acknowledged or reset. A Confirmed Event Notification
message is sent to all alarm recipients. The Notify_Type data field in the message
defines that the event is a system event and not an alarm. Each alarm recipient
that receives the Confirmed Event Notification is required to respond with a
SimpleAck. If the SimpleAck is not received, the same mechanism comes into
operation as for alarms.
SimpleAck
SimpleAck
t
t
t
Figure 108: System event forwarding procedure
Event texts
Each system event has a message text assigned to it. For the system events
related to the operating hours counter, a user-specific text can be set up in Xworks
Plus (XWP). Predefined system texts are available for the other system events.
7.3 Sources and Causes of COVs
Process variables which can be mapped to standard BACnet objects are COVcapable.
I/O function block
Function blocks for Analog, Binary and Multistate Inputs, Outputs and Values are
mapped directly to the associated BACnet object types. They are COV-capable
and can establish COV connections with all COV clients.
Interface variables
Interface variables of compounds and function blocks whose data type is Analog,
Binary, Multistate, Integer, Duration and DateTime are COV-capable and can be
mapped to simplified BACnet value objects for operation and monitoring.
A COV is initiated when the value of the process variable [PrVal] of the BACnet
object which represents it changes. A COV is also initiated when a status flag
[StaFlg] (InAlarm, Fault, Overridden or Out of service) changes, for example, when
a sensor open circuit (fault) occurs or when an I/O value is overwritten manually.
COV increment
For analog objects, a COV is not initiated for every minor change of [PrVal], but
only when the value changes by an amount greater than a predefined increment.
This increment is saved in the COV increment [COV] of the analog object, and can
be defined in Xworks Plus (XWP) during engineering.
7.4 COV Reporting
Subscription
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Siemens
Each COV client must subscribe to every process variable from which it requires
COV notifications. Each COV-capable object transmits COV notifications only to
those COV clients which have subscribed to COV notifications. The subscription
process is carried out using the BACnet service SubscribeCOV, transmitted by the
COV client to the COV server. This message contains all the information that the
COV server needs to send the COV notifications to the correct destination. It also
includes a time period which determines the validity period of the subscription. The
time period may be infinite.
For system limits, see chapter System Configuration.
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7
COV notifications
The COV server reports every COV individually to each COV client which has
subscribed to it. The BACnet service ConfirmedCOVNotification is used for this
purpose. It contains the values of [PrVal] and [StaFlg]. The service is a Confirmed
Service, which means that the COV client must acknowledge the notification
(SimpleAck). This ensures that when a COV client ceases to be available, this will
be recognized by the COV server. If no SimpleAck message is received, the
transmitting device tries to send the information again (three times).
For system limits, see chapter System Configuration.
Connection terminated
If a COV client cannot be contacted, the COV server ceases to send COV
notifications to that client. The transmission of COV notifications to a COV client is
resumed when the COV client re-subscribes.
Checking the connection
To ensure that the COV service is maintained over a long period, a maximum time
period without COV reporting can be set in the BACnet Device Info Object via the
BACnet property COV Resubscription Interval [CovRI]. The client must subscribe
with SubscribeCOV again before [CovRI] expires.
COV clients and COV
servers
Figure 109: COV clients and COV servers
The local PXM10 operator unit is not a BACnet client and cannot, therefore, be
used as a COV client.
See PXM10 operator unit: User's guide (CM110397).
COV reporting between COV client and COV server
COV mechanism
Siemens
BACnet clients use the COV mechanism for continuous monitoring of process
variables without putting an excessive load on the bus through continuous polling.
They subscribe to the objects that they are monitoring. These COV connections
must be maintained as long as the object is being monitored.
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COV Reporting
SimpleAck
ation
COVNotific
nf
Co irmed
SimpleAck
cation
COVNotifi
Confirmed
SimpleAck
t
t
Figure 110: COV reporting between COV client and COV server
The BACnet client subscribes to the COV server as a COV client using the BACnet
service SubscribeCOV. The server sends a SimpleAck acknowledgement.
Immediately after the acknowledgement, the COV server transmits an initial
ConfirmedCOVNotification. The COV client acknowledges receipt of the value with
a SimpleAck acknowledgement. The COV connection between the COV server
and COV client is now established, and ConfirmedCOVNotifications are sent
whenever a trigger for the subscribed COV occurs.
The BACnet service SubscribeCOV includes a time limit for the COV connection.
However, the COV client re-registers with the COV server before this limit expires,
thus ensuring that the connection is maintained. A COV connection ends when the
subscription period expires and is not renewed, or when the COV client can no
longer be contacted, causing the COV server to stop sending notifications.
In addition to the SubscribeCOV service, a SubscribeCOV Property service is
implemented, for example, for the operation of plant graphics in the management
station. This enables the system to respond with appropriate speed to changes in
the high or low limit.
COV reporting between automation stations
COV connections between automation stations are used to implement preengineered references, that is, for the exchange of process values between
individual plant parts on different automation stations. In this case the receiver is
an input function block of the relevant data type (Analog, Binary, Multistate). The
input function block contains the technical designation of the required COV source
in its input/output address parameter [IOAddr]. These COV connections must be
permanently live. The COV mechanism enables a dropped COV connection to be
re-established.
Co
SimpleAck
n
Notificatio
nfirmed COV
SimpleAck
ation
COVNotific
Confirmed
SimpleAck
t
t
Figure 111: COV reporting between automation stations
When an automation station connects, the BACnet service WhoHas searches the
entire network for the object referred to in the COV client. The automation station
concerned responds to the COV client with the BACnet service IHave. If the COV
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7
client cannot find the COV server, it repeats the WhoHas request after the time
period defined in the BACnet Device Info Object Property Name resolution interval
[NamRI] until the COV server is found.
The COV client registers for a limited period as a COV client with the COV server
using the BACnet service SubscribeCOV. The server sends a SimpleAck
acknowledgement. The value is then sent to the COV client for the first time by the
COV server, using the BACnet service ConfirmedCOVNotification. The COV client
acknowledges receipt of the value with a SimpleAck acknowledgement. The COV
connection between the COV server and the COV client is established from this
point on. According to the global property COV renewal interval CovRI of the
BACnet Device Info Object, the COVsubscription is renewed. The lifetime used for
SubcribeCOV is twice the COV renewal interval CovRI. The COV connection ends
when the subscription period expires and is not renewed, or when the COV client
can no longer be contacted, causing the COV server to stop sending notifications.
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Alarm Management
Alarm Sources
8 Alarm Management
Alarms indicate faults in the HVAC plant and building automation and control
system, and let you initiate corrective action, where appropriate. The management
of alarms (generation, signaling, acknowledgement) is in compliance with the
BACnet standard.
There are two alarm types:
● OFFNORMAL
● FAULT
OFFNORMAL
OFFNORMAL alarms (process alarms) occur when a process variable assumes an
inadmissible value. What is inadmissible is determined during engineering. The
relevant parameters are stored in all alarm-generating objects. An OFFNORMAL
alarm always indicates a fault in a plant, while the automation system itself works
properly.
Examples of OFFNORMAL alarms:
● Temperature in HTHW circuit is too high or too low
● Alarm generated by fire detection system
● A damper-motor feedback signal has not been received
● A time schedule cannot execute a command
FAULT
FAULT alarms are faults in the automation system itself (internal alarms). You
cannot define the cause of a FAULT alarm during engineering. Nor is it possible for
the user to suppress or otherwise influence the monitoring of FAULT alarms.
FAULT alarms are intrinsically linked to the system. A FAULT alarm always takes
precedence over an OFFNORMAL alarm from the same alarm source, because in
the case of a FAULT alarm, there is some uncertainty about the reliability of the
alarm source.
Examples of FAULT alarms:
● Faulty sensor (open circuit, short circuit, etc.)
● Buffer for storage of non-volatile data full
● Access to an I/O module failed
● Bus open circuit (RX integration)
Alarm detection procedure
Every alarm (OFFNORMAL or FAULT) can be uniquely allocated to a source. The
alarm monitoring system is based on the principle of Intrinsic Reporting or
Algorithmic Reporting as defined in the BACnet standard.
Intrinsic reporting
Intrinsic reporting means that alarm monitoring (target-actual comparison) takes
place within the alarm-generating object itself (the alarm source). For this purpose,
the function block contains the entire alarm state machine. Alarm detection does
not require any function blocks with external functions. The alarm behavior of the
object is defined by setting variables in the alarm-generating object (function block).
Algorithmic reporting
Algorithmic Reporting means that alarm suppression (target-actual comparison)
occurs outside the alarm source. The alarm state machine is not located in the
function block of the alarm source. For alarm detection, function blocks with
external functions are required. The object's alarm response is not parameterized
using variables of the monitored object (function block).
8.1 Alarm Sources
The following function blocks can be alarm sources:
● Analog Input / Analog Output / Analog Value
● Binary Input / Binary Output / Binary Value / Pulse Converter
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●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Multistate Input / Multistate Output / Multistate Value
Event Enrollment
Command Control object2
Power Control object2
Schedulers (Analog / Binary / Multistate Scheduler object) 2
AlarmCollection object
Discipline I/O1, 2
Trend Log / Trend Log Multiple
Group1, 2
Device Info object, which models the properties of an automation station as a
complete entity
● Loop object
1 Discipline I/Os, Groups, Time Scheduler and Trend Log Multiple support only
system alarms, that is, only alarms of the FAULT type. Both function blocks can
transmit more than one system alarm. The parameters [Rlb] and [MsgTxt] provide
detailed information about the cause of the most recent alarm message. The
messages are transmitted in the order in which they occur, irrespective of the
importance of the alarm.
2 These function blocks are not alarm sources in Desigo S7.
Only these alarm sources incorporate Intrinsic Reporting, and can thus generate
their own alarms. If any other value of a function block needs to be monitored for
an alarm (for example, the control signal for a controller block), an Event
Enrollment object must be added.
Alarm-generating function blocks include a range of interface variables which can
be set as parameters to determine the alarm response (Input Property) or to supply
the relevant alarm state information (Output Property). These interface variables
are described further below. Some of the interface variables are common to all
alarm-generating block types, while others are specific to certain types of alarmgenerating blocks.
Alarm state machine in an alarm-generating function block
Alarm state machine
The response in the event of an alarm is modeled by an alarm state machine. Each
alarm-generating block incorporates an alarm state machine of this type. The
alarm-related interface variables can therefore be used to define the response of
this state machine, to simulate state transitions, or to represent the current status
of the state machine itself.
Figure 112: Alarm response with an analog function block
Alarm state event states
Siemens
The alarm state machine can assume one of three basic states (event states
[EvtSta]):
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Alarm Example
● NORMAL: There is no alarm condition present
● OFFNORMAL: Alarm caused by an OFFNORMAL condition
● FAULT: Alarm caused by a FAULT condition
With analog blocks, the OFFNORMAL state is explicitly subdivided into the substates HIGH LIMIT and LOW LIMIT, which are described in detail further below.
The current state of the alarm state machine in an alarm-generating block is
displayed externally in the form of the output variable [EvtSta] (event state) of the
block concerned.
State transitions
The following table shows the state transitions between the alarm states:
Transition
Trigger
Action / Event state
TO_OFFNORMAL
A new OFFNORMAL alarm condition has been detected.
OFFNORMAL
TO_NORMAL1
The current OFFNORMAL alarm condition has disappeared, and there is
no other alarm condition present.
NORMAL
TO_FAULT
A new FAULT alarm condition has been detected.
FAULT
TO_NORMAL2
The current FAULT alarm condition has disappeared, and there is
currently no other alarm condition.
NORMAL
Table 32: Transitions between the alarm states
System events may also occur within each alarm state. These message functions
do not affect the alarm state.
Because FAULT alarms take priority over OFFNORMAL alarms, the state transition
from FAULT to OFFNORMAL only occurs under very special circumstances.
If, while in the OFFNORMAL state, a FAULT alarm condition occurs, there is then a
state transition TO_FAULT (because as stated above, FAULT takes priority over
OFFNORMAL).
8.2 Alarm Example
What happens in the
Desigo system when the
V-belt of an extractor fan
breaks?
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Siemens
The following figure shows the main information exchanged by the elements
concerned, namely:
● Operator
● Ventilation system sensor/actuator (differential pressure monitor, maintenance
switch and single-speed extract air fan)
● PXC program
● Desigo Insight plant graphic
● PXM20 operator unit
● PXM10 operator unit
See PXM20 / PXM20-E operator unit User’s Guide (CM110754), PXM10 operator
unit (CM110397), and Web operation PX Web (CM110757).
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Alarm Example
PXC Program
Ventilator
1
State machine
D?
3
3
RefVal
4
Belt
disturbed
PrVal
2
PrVal
7
disturbance
6
OR
Exhaust Air FAN 1 St.
BL
MntnSwi
PrVal
Cmd_CNTL
ON
OFF
Auto
Popup
Notification Class ( =23)
1
5
.. ..... High Pro Alarm
........ Extended Alarm
........ Receiver = DI Name
Insight
Txt:........................
3
ACK
5
RESET
Auto
ON
OFF
Popup
Txt:........................
9
ACK
RESET
Figure 113: Information flow
Key:
Siemens
A
State machine
B
CFC program
C
DI plant graphic page
D
DI popup
E
PXM… Values (in a PXM10 alarm handling is only possible for connected PXCs or PXRs)
F
PXM… Popup (in a PXM10 alarm handling is only possible for connected PXCs or PXRs)
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Alarm Example
Figure 114: Time sequence in the example
1. Ventilation system on (for example, in automatic mode, Cmd.ValPgm = 1),
single-speed extract air fan running, fan blades rotating
2. The V-belt breaks, the pressure drops, the differential pressure monitor
responds (delta p < X) and DPMon.PrVal goes to zero. This activates the alarm
monitoring function in the DP monitoring block, and the [TiMonDvn] timer starts
counting down.
3. After expiry of the time [TiMonDvn], the DPMon block (BI) establishes that
DPMon.PrVal (0) is still equal to DPMon.RefVal (0). This is equivalent to the
OFFNORMAL state. DPMon.Dstb then goes to 1, and a TO_OFFNORMAL
event is transmitted.
An alarm pop-up window is then displayed, in which the alarm message reads
Alarm, Unacked (Desigo Insight or PXM…, see figure below).
4. The motor of the single-speed extract air fan is disabled (that is, Cmd.PrVal → 0)
because [EnSfty → 1 and Cmd.ValSfty=0, Prio1 Cmd Input]. As a result,
DPMon.RefVal goes to 1, thereby activating the alarm monitoring function.
After expiry of the time [TiMonDvn], the alarm monitoring function determines
that [DPMon.PrVal (0) <> DPMon.RefVal (0)]. The state therefore changes to
NORMAL and a TO_NORMAL event is transmitted.
The alarm display now changes to Alarm = Normal, UnAcked.
5. The operator now acknowledges the alarm with Ack in the alarm pop-up dialog
box. The alarm display now changes to Alarm = Normal, Acked. The operator
sets the maintenance switch [MntnSwi] to Maintenance ON, replaces the fan
belt, returns the maintenance switch to Maintenance OFF and resets the alarm
with Reset.
The alarm in the display changes to Alarm = Normal, Unlocked and
DPMon.Dstb → 0.
6. The fault has been cleared. When DPMon.Dstb = 0, then Cmd.EnSfty → 0 and
hence Cmd.PrVal → Cmd.ValPgm=1, that is, the fan motor is enabled. Then,
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with Cmd.TraSta = 1 (transient state), the fan ramp-up time is allowed to expire,
that is, DPMon.RefVal is held at 1 during the transient state. Only after expiry
of the ramp up time does DPMon.RefVal revert to 0.
7. The ventilation system is already running (from step 6 on), that is, the fan
blades start rotating, the pressure builds up and the differential pressure
monitor detects delta p = X again, that is, DPMon.PrVal → 1. The alarm
monitoring function is active again. After expiry of the time [TiMonDvn], this
determines that there is no alarm condition present, because [DPMon.PrVal(0)
<> DPMon.RefVal (1)]. The system then operates 100% correctly as described
under step 1 above.
Figure 115: Plant graphics for the ventilation system in Desigo Insight
Figure 116: CFC chart for single speed fan Fan1St
To simplify the time chart shown above, the connection to DPMon.EnAlm has not
been included.
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Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response
Figure 117: State machine
Figure 118: Object Viewer with ventilation system pane
8.3 Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response
The following table shows which BACnet properties are present in which function
blocks.
I = Input
O = Output
V = Value
SBT designations
BACnet property
Long name
Ref.
Description
Alarm enable
EnAlm
Alarm enable
Event enable
EnEvt
Event enable
Function blocks (BACnet objects)
Other
Binary
Analog
Multistate
Alarm_Enable
Pulse Converter
Event Enrollment
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
Event_Enable
Pulse Converter
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Trend Logs
Event Enrollment
Loop
Event detection
enable
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EnEvtDet
Enable event
detection
Event_Detection_ Event Enrollment
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Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response
SBT designations
BACnet property
Long name
Ref.
Description
Event state
EvtSta
Event state
Event_State
8
Function blocks (BACnet objects)
Other
Binary
Analog
Multistate
Discipline I/O1
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
O
O
O
Group1
Pulse Converter
Trend Logs
Device-Info1
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
Feedback value
FbVal
Feedback value
Feedback_Value
Upper limit
HiLm
Hi Limit
High_Limit
Limit enable
EnLm
Enable limit
Limit_Enable
Lower limit
LoLm
Low limits
Low_Limit
Message text
MsgTxt/EvtMsg Message text
Message_Text
Pulse Converter
I/O/V
Pulse Converter
I/O/V
Discipline
I/O1
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
Group1
Pulse Converter
Command Control1
Power Control1
Loop
Event Enrollment
TiMonDvn
Deviation
monitoring period
Time_Delay
Deviation
monitoring period
Pulse Converter
Power Control1
Loop
Switch-off
monitoring time
TiMonOff
Switch-off
monitoring time
Time_Delay2
I/O/V
Switch-on
monitoring time
TiMonOn
Switch-on
monitoring time
Time_Delay1
I/O/V
Dead band or
dead zone
Nz
Neutral zone
Deadband
Pulse Converter
Out of service
OoServ
Out of order
Out_of_Service
Device-Info1
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
Discipline I/O1
Group1
Pulse Converter
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
Present value
PrVal
Present value
Present_Value
Pulse Converter
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Loop
Reference value
RefVal
Reference values RefVals
Siemens
Reference value
Alarm_Value
Reference values Alarm_Values
I/V
I/V
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Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response
SBT designations
BACnet property
Long name
Ref.
Description
Reliability
Rlb
Reliability
Reliability
Function blocks (BACnet objects)
Other
Binary
Analog
Multistate
Device-Info
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
I/O/V
Discipline I/O1
Group1
Pulse Converter
Trend Logs
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
State flag
StaFlg
State flag
Status_Flags
Device-Info
Pulse Converter
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
Suppress event
algorithm
SupEvtDet
Event time stamp TiStmEvt
Event algorithm
inhibit
Event_Algorithm_ Event Enrollment
Inhibit
Event time stamp Event_Time_Sta
mps
Device-Info1
Discipline I/O1
Group1
Pulse Converter
Trend Logs
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
Notification
function selector
NotifSel
Notification
function selector
[NotifSel]
Notification_Func Device-Info1
tion_Selector
Discipline I/O1
Group1
Pulse Converter
Trend Logs
Command Control1
Power Control1
AlarmCollection
Event Enrollment
Loop
Table 33: BACnet properties
1 Not
in Desigo S7
Alarm enable [EnAlm]
[EnAlm] (Boolean type) is used to enable and disable the monitoring of
OFFNORMAL alarms. OFFNORMAL alarms will only be detected if [EnAlm] is
TRUE. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Alarm_Enable.
FAULT alarms are monitored independently of the value of the alarm enable
property [EnAlm]. Monitoring is continuous and cannot be disabled.
If [EnAlm] is changed from TRUE to FALSE during operation, the timer for all
deviation monitoring periods [TiMonDvn] will be reset to zero. As soon as the value
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Effects of BACnet Properties on Alarm Response
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of [EnAlm] reverts to TRUE, the associated [TiMonDvn] timer starts counting to its
preset value again from zero.
The value of [EnAlm] can be modified via BACnet clients or using the CFC editor
online. During operation, if [EnAlm] is changed from TRUE to FALSE while an
OFFNORMAL alarm is still active, this will result in an immediate state transition to
TO_NORMAL1. In other words, the existing OFFNORMAL alarm condition is seen
as having cleared, and the alarm state of the alarm source is updated accordingly.
Enable event [EnEvt]
[EnEvt] (Boolean type) is used to enable and disable the transfer of OFFNORMAL
and FAULT alarms. OFFNORMAL and FAULT alarms are only transferred if [EnEvt]
is TRUE. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Event_Enable.
Enable event detection [EnEvtDet]
[EnEvtDet] (Boolean type) lets you turn the intrinsic/algorithmic reporting on/off.
OFFNORMAL and FAULT alarms are only forwarded when [EnEvtDet] = TRUE.
This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Event_Detection_Enable.
Event state [EvtSta]
This variable denotes the current alarm state of the object. It can accept three
values: NORMAL, OFFNORMAL (in the case of analog HIGH_LIMIT and
LOW_LIMIT values) and FAULT. The value of the variables is updated immediately
after the associated alarm state transition. This is equivalent to the standard
BACnet property Event_State.
Feedback value [FbVal]
[FbVal] is a feedback signal input, configured at a physical input via a separate
hardware address. This use of a physical input can also be the source of reliability
errors. [FbVal] can be neither overridden nor commanded. If [FbVal] is not
configured at a physical input, then, by definition, it will be equal in value to Present
Value, in which case no OFFNORMAL alarms can be issued via the output object.
This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Feedback_Value.
Unlike the binary output and multistate output blocks, the analog output function
block does not use [FbVal] as a criterion for OFFNORMAL alarm conditions. If
[FbVal] is used, it can be a source of reliability errors and can result in FAULT
alarms.
Hi limit [HiLm]
This parameter (data type Real) determines the high alarm limit. If [PrVal] exceeds
the high limit value [HiLm] for longer than the period defined under [TiMonDvn], an
OFFNORMAL alarm condition prevails, namely: HIGH_LIMIT.
Enable limit [EnLm]
This variable only exists in the BACnet view of analog blocks (for reasons of
compatibility with the BACnet standard). It has exactly the same meaning as the
alarm enable variable [EnAlm] and its current value is derived from the value of
[EnAlm] (that is, [EnLm = EnAlm], Limit enable = Enable alarm). This variable is
equivalent to the standard BACnet property Limit_Enable.
Low limit [LoLm]
This parameter (data type Real) defines the low alarm limit. If [PrVal] exceeds the
high limit value [LoLm] for longer than the period defined under [TiMonDvn], an
OFFNORMAL alarm condition prevails, namely: LOW_LIMIT. This is equivalent to
the standard BACnet property Low_Limit.
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Message text [MsgTxt]
For Desigo PX, the variable [MsgTxt] contains the message text of the last event
notification associated with TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_FAULT and TO_NORMAL
alarms.
As of Desigo V6.0 the [EvtMsg] variable provides the same function.
Deviation monitoring period [TiMonDvn]
This refers to a delay before generating the alarm if an alarm condition is detected
without a prior change in switch command (that is, without a set point change).
[TiMonDvn] is not an integrating function, that is, the condition causing a change in
the alarm state must persist without interruption for a period of time at least
equivalent to the duration of [TiMonDvn], before it has any effect. The BACnet
standard only supports a [TiMonDvn] for a monitoring period and the associated
alarm delay. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Time_Delay.
In certain applications, different end-switch monitoring periods are required for
Open and Close commands and for the Idle state.
For this reason, the additional properties [TiMonOff] und [TiMonOn] have been
introduced for the binary input, binary output, binary value and multistate output
objects.
Switch off- [TiMonOff] and switch on monitoring period [TiMonOn]
[TiMonOff]
Delay time before an alarm is generated when there is a preceding set point
enable command. This is equivalent to proprietary BACnet properties Time_Delay1
and Time_Delay2.
[TiMonOn]
Delay time before an alarm is generated in the event of a set point switch-off
command.
Application: Control of fire protection dampers (see further below).
Figure 119: Monitoring period
The definitions of the set point and the measured value depend on the object type:
Object type
Set point
Measured value
Binary Input
invers [RefVal]
[PrVal]
Binary Output
[PrVal]
[FbVal]
Binary Value
invers [RefVal]
[PrVal]
Table 34: The set point and the measured value depend on the object type
Examples
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The following example shows the use of the three time periods [TiMonDvn],
[TiMonOn], [TiMonOff]. For another example, see Alarm Example.
It is assumed that a fire damper has two separate feedback mechanisms (end
switches). This means that the damper is commanded via the commands Open
and Close. The first end switch, the Open switch delivers the signals Fully open or
Not fully open. The second end switch, the Closed switch delivers the signals Fully
closed or Not fully closed. The following is an example of how to connect the BO
(binary output for commanding and integrating the Open switch) and BI (the binary
output for the closed switch):
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Figure 120: Fire protection damper with two end switches
Given the feedback signal [FbVal] Fully open, the Open and Close commands
follow the time sequence shown below, making use of all three deviation
monitoring times [TiMonDvn].
Figure 121: Time sequence
Since the BO block can handle the feedback of two different addresses, the fireprotection damper solution can be further simplified by direct connection of the
Closed switch (Addr. 1) and Open switch (Addr. 2). In cases where both end
switches are simultaneously On or simultaneously Off, the BO block treats the
[FbVal] as invalid. Throughout this period, therefore, the alarm monitoring function
will return the value Alarm = OFFNORMAL. The circuit and time sequence for
normal and error conditions are as follows:
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Figure 122: Circuit and time sequence for normal and error conditions
Figure 123: Fire protection damper timing with BO and two feedback addresses
Figure 124: Fire protection damper timing with BO and two feedback addresses
Error condition: The damper does not close quickly enough.
Neutral zone [Nz]
[Nz] (data type Real) can be used to define a switching hysteresis for the state
transition TO_NORMAL1. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property
Deadband.
Out of service [OoServ]
The following applies to alarm response:
[PrVal] can also change for [OoServ=TRUE].
[PrVal] is monitored for alarms irrespective of the source of any change in [PrVal].
In other words, the value of [OoServ] does not affect the monitoring of
OFFNORMAL alarms. If [OoServ = TRUE], the [Rlb] property can be overwritten
via BACnet. However, the alarm monitoring system responds to changes in
Reliability in the same way as if [OoServ=FALSE]. This makes it possible to
simulate FAULT alarms.
In the BACnet Device Info object, this Boolean variable is FALSE at the very time
when the operating state is RUN, that is, when the D-MAP program is being run on
the automation station. All the alarm-generating blocks (including the BACnet
Device Info Object) are only monitored in the operational status RUN. Corresponds
to the standard BACnet Property Out_of_Service.
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Present value [PrVal]
OFFNORMAL alarms are monitored exclusively on the basis of the current value of
[PrVal] the present value variable. The source of this present value (whether a
process value, operator value, replacement value or commanded value) is
irrelevant. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Present_Value.
Reliability [Rlb]
The value under [PrVal] is only plausible if [Rlb] = NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
When [Rlb] <> NO_FAULT_DETECTED, this is precisely the condition for a FAULT
alarm.
The BACnet Device Info Object is an exception. The value of [Rlb] for the BACnet
device object is NO_FAULT_DETECTED, except in the case of the fault
FLASH_FULL (FAULT condition). This is equivalent to the standard BACnet
property Reliability.
Reference value [RefVal]
[RefVal] is a set point, used to set the value which [PrVal] (the measured value)
must assume in order to initiate an alarm after the time defined by [TiMonDvn] has
expired. [RefVal] is equivalent to the standard BACnet property Alarm_Value.
Reference values [RefVals]
The variable [RefVals] comprises a list of multistate elements. The value range
(number of states) of the items in the list is the same as for [PrVal]. All states to be
treated as OFFNORMAL are entered under [RefVals]. [RefVals] is equivalent to the
standard BACnet property Alarm_Values.
Example of [RefVals] : STEP 1, STEP 2, STEP 4
Name
Value
State 1
STEP 1
State 2
STEP 2
State 3
STEP 4
Table 35: Reference values
In this example, an incoming OFFNORMAL alarm will be detected if [PrVal] =
STEP 1, STEP 2 or STEP 4 after expiry of the period defined by [TiMonDvn].
State flag [StaFlg]
The variable [StaFlg] includes the two bits 'In_Alarm' and 'Fault'.
By definition, In_Alarm is TRUE whenever [EvtSta] is not equal to NORMAL.
By definition, FAULT is TRUE whenever [EvtSta = FAULT].
The value of these two [StaFlg] variables is thus derived from another variable.
For each change of the variable [StaFlg] a Change of Value (COV) notification is
sent to all COV subscribers of the alarm-generating object. In this way, the COV
subscribers can be kept informed of an alarm state in their COV server. This is
equivalent to the standard BACnet property Status_Flags.
Suppress event detection [SupEvtDet]
[SupEvtDet] (Boolean type) lets you turn the OFFNORMAL and FAULT alarm
detection on/off. OFFNORMAL and FAULT alarms are only detected when
[SupEvtDet] = FALSE. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet property
Event_Algorithm_Inhibit.
Event time stamp [TiStmEvt]
This variable (ARRAY [3], type TimeStamp), contains time stamps for the last
changes of state of the alarm-generating object TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_FAULT
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and TO_NORMAL. The value of the variables is updated immediately after the
associated alarm state transition. This is equivalent to the standard BACnet
property Event_Time_Stamps.
Notification function selector [NotifSel]
This variable specifies if the alarm function is executed as per default pattern
(Simple-/Basic-/Extended alarm) or as per a customized alarm function.
8.4 Alarm Response of the Function Blocks
Alarm Collection
The default value of [EnEvt] for the Alarm Collection object is FALSE, that is,
[EvtSta] transitions are not notified.
An OFFNORMAL alarm is generated when:
● The following applies to one or more alarm collection members:
[EvtSta] <> NORMAL and applies simultaneously for all these members:
[StaFlg].Fault = false.
A FAULT alarm is generated when:
● The following applies to one or more alarm collection members:
[StaFlg].Fault = true and therefore is set [Rlb] = UNRELIABLE_MEMBERS.
Analog Input, Analog Value, Analog Output
The Analog Input, Analog Value and Analog Output function blocks all have an
identical alarm handling procedure.
The analog output function block also has a feedback value [FbVal]; however, this
is not used for alarm monitoring. High and low alarm limits (variables [HiLm] and
[LoLm]) are set for the OFFNORMAL alarms of analog objects. An OFFNORMAL
alarm occurs either when the high alarm limit is exceeded, or when the current
value falls below the low alarm limit. OFFNORMAL alarms are thus subdivided into
two subcategories: HIGH_LIMIT and LOW_LIMIT. In addition, the variable [Nz] can
be used to define a switching hysteresis for [HiLm] and [LoLm] to prevent overfrequent switching of alarms around the alarm limit.
Alarm response
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An OFFNORMAL alarm is generated:
● [PrVal] has either remained above the high alarm limit specified by the [HiLm]
variable for a period of time longer than the period specified in [TiMonDvn]
● or [PrVal] has remained below the low alarm limit specified by the [LoLm] for a
period of time longer than the period specified in [TiMonDvn]
An existing OFFNORMAL (HIGH_LIMIT) alarm will disappear when [PrVal] has
remained below the value ([HiLm] + [Nz]) for longer than the time specified in the
variable [TiMonDvn].
An existing OFFNORMAL (LOW_LIMIT) alarm will disappear when [PrVal] has
remained below the value ([HiLm] + [Nz]) for longer than the time specified in the
variable [TiMonDvn].
● A FAULT alarm is generated as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
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Figure 125: Alarm response
In Desigo S7 the monitoring described are not reported from the device object, but
rather from an MV object.
BACnet Device Info Object
OFFNORMAL alarms
All the alarm-generating objects described so far model specific types of individual
data points (physical or virtual). The BACnet device object by contrast, models the
properties of an automation station as a complete entity. Alarm-relevant faults
which cannot be allocated to a data point can be generated in an automation
station (see the examples further below). This is why the BACnet device object
includes an alarm mechanism. The alarm state machine and the alarm-related
variables are essentially the same as for all the other alarm-generating block types.
The difference lies in the possible causes of the alarm:
The alarm conditions described below cause the generation of an OFFNORMAL
alarm in the BACnet Device Object:
Battery low
The battery in an automation station is checked periodically. An alarm is generated
if the battery voltage is too low, or if the battery itself is missing. When the required
voltage level is reached again, the alarm is reset with BATTERY_NOT_LOW.
RAM Pattern failed
This indicates that a memory-check error was found when the automation station
was switched on. If no memory-check error is detected when the automation
station is next switched on, the alarm will be reset.
Recipient not receivable
A recipient name (for example, the configured recipient of an alarm) could not be
resolved, because, for example, the network connection to the recipient was
interrupted. This causes an alarm to be generated. The alarm is cleared as soon
as the subsequent name resolution process succeeds.
Notif. Class ref. missing
Each alarm-generating block includes a reference to a Notification Class block. If
the referenced Notification Class block does not exist, the BACnet Device Object
generates an alarm.
Life check error
While the life check is in progress, the primary server finds that it is unable to
communicate with one or more of its backup servers (for example, owing to a
network failure). This causes an alarm to be generated. The alarm is cleared when,
during a subsequent life check, all the backup servers are found again.
Primary server not found
This bit is set when the backup server detects that the primary server is no longer
connected to the network. At the same time a notification (data-type STRING) is
sent, defining the source, target and reason. The bit is reset as soon as the backup
server detects the primary server on the network again.
FAULT alarms
The condition described below causes a FAULT alarm to be generated in the
BACnet Device Object:
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Flash is full
The automation station checks periodically whether there is at least one free page
(64 kB) in the flash memory. This bit is set if the flash memory falls below this value.
The bit is reset when the flash memory contains at least one free page again.
Alarm response of the BACnet Device Object is also parameterized or depicted by
the number of variables, but the display differs: The BACnet Device Object is not
displayed by a D-MAP function block, but rather only visible via BACnet. The
variables described are therefore only accessible as properties of the BACnet
Device Object.
Binary Input and Binary Value
The alarm handling process is identical for the function blocks Binary Input and
Binary Value.
● An OFFNORMAL alarm occurs when [PrVal] assumes the value specified by
the variable [RefVal] for a time period at least equivalent to the delay time
specified in the variable [TiMonDvn], [TiMonOff] or [TiMonOn].
● An existing OFFNORMAL alarm condition will disappear (a) when [PrVal]
assumes the value complementary to [RefVal] for a period at least equivalent
to the period specified in [TiMonDvn], [TiMonOff] or [TiMonOn] or (b) when
[EnAlm] is changed from TRUE to FALSE (see further below).
● A FAULT alarm is generated when the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Figure 126: Binary Input and Binary Value
Binary Output
The alarm handling process in the binary output function block is essentially
different from that of the binary input and binary value blocks.
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●
●
●
●
8
An OFFNORMAL alarm occurs when the current values of the variables [PrVal]
and [FbVal] differ from each other for a time period at least equivalent to the
delay time specified in [TiMonDvn], [TiMonOff] or [TiMonOn].
An existing OFFNORMAL alarm will disappear when the current [PrVal] und
[FbVal] are again identical and remain so for a period at least equivalent to the
time specified in the variable [TiMonDvn].
A FAULT alarm is generated when the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when the [Rlb] property changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
In the case of the binary output, [Rlb] errors may originate both from the [PrVal]
(or associated physical output) and from the [FbVal] (or associated physical
input).
A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the variable [Rlb] changes from a
value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the value
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Figure 127: Binary Output
Command Control
An OFFNORMAL alarm is generated:
● A monitored, referenced object is not enabled
● A referenced object cannot be enabled
A FAULT alarm is generated when:
● A referenced object is not found
● A referenced object is not a commandable object (output object or value object)
● Invalid priorities are used for the referenced object (valid priorities are Priority 2,
5, 14 and 16)
● ProgramValue or ExceptionValue are outside the permissible range
● The referenced objects have a different number of operating modes
● The function table is empty
Discipline I/Os and Group
Alarm response
Siemens
Alarm handling is identical for Discipline I/O and Group blocks. These function
blocks only support FAULT alarms.
● A FAULT alarm is generated as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
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NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
The following conditions cause a FAULT alarm to be initiated:
● Address conflict:
The subsystem fails to recognize the device defined in the [IOAddress]
parameter. This alarm is issued by the associated function block.
● Communications error:
The subsystem indicates a communications failure. This can be due to a bus
open circuit or a faulty device, or, very rarely, to a communications overload on
the bus. These alarms are indicated by the shared function block.
The subsystem indicates an inadmissible response from a device for example
in the case of faulty QAX… room unit. These alarms are indicated by the
shared function block.
Multistate Input and Multistate Value
The alarm handling process is identical for the function blocks Multistate Input and
Multistate Value.
● An OFFNORMAL alarm occurs when [PrVal] assumes one of the values
specified under [RefVals] (list of multistate values) and remains at this value for
a period at least equivalent to the time specified by the variable [TiMonDvn]. In
particular, this applies when [PrVal] changes from one value in [RefVals] to
another value in [RefVals].
● An existing OFFNORMAL alarm condition will disappear either if [PrVal] reverts
to a value not contained in the [RefVals] list, and retains this value for a period
at least equivalent to the period specified in [TiMonDvn], or if [EnAlm] is
changed from TRUE to FALSE (see further below).
● A FAULT alarm is generated when the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Figure 128: Multistate Input and Multistate Value
Multistate output
The alarm handling procedure for the Multistate Output function block is different
from the alarm handling procedure for the Multistate Input and Multistate Value
function blocks, but follows the same principles as for the Binary Output block:
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●
●
●
●
8
An OFFNORMAL alarm occurs when the current values of the variables
[RwVal] and [FbVal] differ from each other for a time period at least equivalent
to the delay time specified in [TiMonDvn].
An existing OFFNORMAL alarm will disappear when the current [PrVal] und
[FbVal] are again identical and remain so for a period at least equivalent to the
time specified in the variable [TiMonDvn].
A FAULT alarm is generated when the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when the [Rlb] property changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In the case of the multistate output block, [Rlb] errors
may originate both from the [PrVal] (or associated physical output) and from
[FbVal] (or associated physical input).
A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as [Rlb] changes from a value not equal
to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Figure 129: Multistate Output
Power Control
An OFFNORMAL alarm is generated:
● The UP command is issued but the maximum stage has already been reached
● The UP command causes MaxPower to be exceeded
● Table_No is set outside the admissible range
A FAULT alarm is generated when:
● A referenced object is not found
● A referenced object is not a multistate value object
● Object_No. is outside the admissible range
● StepLimit is outside the range of the referenced object
● The function table is empty
Pulse Converter
Alarm response
Siemens
An OFFNORMAL alarm is generated, when [PrVal]:
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●
[PrVal] has remained above the high alarm limit specified by the [HiLm]
variable for a period of time longer than the period specified in [TiMonDvn]
(HIGH_LIMIT)
● or [PrVal] has remained below the low alarm limit specified by the [LoLm]
variable for a period of time longer than the period specified in [TiMonDvn]
(LOW_LIMIT)
An existing OFFNORMAL (HIGH_LIMIT) alarm will disappear when [PrVal] has
remained below the value ([HiLm] + [Nz]) for longer than the time specified in the
variable [TiMonDvn]
An existing OFFNORMAL (LOW_LIMIT) alarm will disappear when [PrVal] has
remained below the value ([HiLm] + [Nz]) for longer than the time specified in the
variable [TiMonDvn]
● A FAULT alarm is generated as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Figure 130: Pulse Converter
Trend Log
Alarm response
The Trend Log function has an Intrinsic Reporting mechanism, but does not issue
OFFNORMAL alarms.
● A FAULT alarm is generated as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function block
assumes any value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. In particular, this is
the case when [Rlb] changes from a value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another value not equal to
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm will disappear as soon as the [Rlb] property of the function
block changes from a value not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED back to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
Event message
An event is generated when:
● The record count exceeds the record count value [RecCnt] set via the
notification threshold [NotifThd], that is, the local non-volatile trend memory is
overflowing.
Event Enrollment
The Event Enrollment object monitors referenced BACnet properties in other
objects. The referenced property can be located in the local device or in another
device.
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Event algorithms
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Monitoring details for a property value are defined by means of event algorithms.
An event algorithm has a specific parameter. Event algorithms are the same as for
Intrinsic Reporting. Intrinsic Reporting uses a subset of the possible event
algorithms of Event Enrollment.
Event_Type
Event_State
Event_Parameters
Data Type
CHANGE_OF_BITSTRING
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
OFFNORMAL
Bitmask
BIT STRING
List_Of_Bitstring_Values
list of BIT STRING
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
OFFNORMAL
List_Of_Values
list of BACnetPropertyStates
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
Bitmask
BIT STRING
Referenced_Property_Increment
choice {BIT STRING, REAL}
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
OFFNORMAL
Feedback_Property_Reference
BACnetDeviceObjectPropertyRef
erence
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
HIGH_LIMIT
Setpoint_Reference
BACnetDeviceObjectPropertyRef
erence
Low_Diff_Limit
REAL
High_Diff_Limit
REAL
Deadband
REAL
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
HIGH_LIMIT
Low_Limit
REAL
LOW_LIMIT
High_Limit
REAL
Deadband
REAL
Notification_Threshold
Unsigned
Previous_Notification_Count
Unsigned
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
OFFNORMAL
List_Of_Alarm_Values
list of BACnetLifeSafetyState
LIFE_SAFETY_ALARM
List_Of_Life_Safety_Alarm_Values list of BACnetLifeSafetyState
CHANGE_OF_STATE
CHANGE_OF_VALUE
COMMAND_FAILURE
FLOATING_LIMIT
LOW_LIMIT
OUT_OF_RANGE
BUFFER_READY
CHANGE_OF_LIFE_SAFETY
EXTENDED
UNSIGNED_RANGE
NORMAL
Mode_Property_Reference
BACnetDeviceObjectPropertyRef
erence
Vendor_Id
Unsigned
Extended_Event_Type
Unsigned
Parameters
Extended_Event_Type
NORMAL
Time_Delay
Unsigned
HIGH_LIMIT
Low_Limit
Unsigned
LOW_LIMIT
High_Limit
Unsigned
Any BACnetEventState
Table 36: Event types and states and their parameters and data types
Event notification
An Event Enrollment object also monitors the status flag property of an object with
referenced property. If the FAULT flag of the referenced object is set, the Event
Enrollment object generates a Fault alarm.
Loop object
Alarm response
Siemens
The Loop object contains intrinsic reporting.
An OFFNORMAL alarm occurs when:
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●
[XCtr] exceeds the limit (SetPoint + ErrorLimit) longer than the specified time
(HIGH_LIMIT) defined in variable [TiMonDvn]
● [XCtr] drops below the limit (SetPoint – ErrorLimit) longer than the specified
time (LOW_LIMIT) defined in variable [TiMonDvn]
An existing OFFNORMAL alarm (HIGH_LIMIT) disappears again when [XCtr]
drops below the value (SetPoint + ErrorLimit – Deadband) longer than the specified
time defined in variable [TiMonDvn].
An existing OFFNORMAL alarm (LOW_LIMIT) disappears again when [XCtr]
exceeds the value (SetPoint – ErrorLimit + Deadband) longer than the specified
time defined in variable [TiMonDvn].
FAULT alarm:
● A FAULT alarm occurs immediately as soon as [Rlb] of the function block has a
value other than NO_FAULT_DETECTED. This is true in particular when [Rlb]
changes from a value that is not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED to another
value that is not equal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● A FAULT alarm disappears immediately as soon as [Rlb] of the function block
changes again from a value that is unequal to NO_FAULT_DETECTED to the
value NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
8.5 Alarm Functions
Depending on the type and degree of urgency of the alarm, the system user may
be required to acknowledge a change in the alarm state with an explicit operator
action.
Acknowledgement
There are two types of acknowledgement:
● Acknowledgement: Confirmation of an incoming alarm
● Reset: Confirmation that an alarm is no longer present
This type of interaction can be carried out locally or with clients, via the network.
Standard pattern
There are three standard categories of alarm, or alarm functions, reflecting the type
of acknowledgement required:
● Simple alarm
● Basic alarm
● Extended alarm
Each alarm source is assigned (via a Notification Class, see further below) to one
alarm function only. No further distinction is made at this stage between
OFFNORMAL and FAULT alarms.
Simple alarm
Neither incoming alarms (disturbance appears) nor disappearing alarms
(disturbance disappears) require acknowledgement.
Figure 131: Simple alarm
Basic alarm
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Acknowledgment is required for incoming alarms only, but not for alarms that have
been cleared (that is, acknowledgement required but not reset).
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Figure 132: Basic alarm
Extended alarm
Locking alarm with acknowledgement of incoming alarms (disturbance appears)
and cleared alarms (disturbance disappears). Alarms in this category require both
acknowledgement and reset.
While testing the system, it may not be possible to reset an alarm. The reason is
that an Extended Alarm is not reset until it has been acknowledged, and the time
delay has expired.
Figure 133: Extended alarm
Key:
The alarm remains locked until the fault has disappeared and has been
acknowledged and a reset has been carried out. For example:
The burner system is restarted when the service engineer has acknowledged the
alarm, cleared the fault and reset the alarm. The alarm state of every alarmgenerating object is managed within the object itself. The state machines above
illustrate this for each of the alarm functions.
Simple message
The alarm function simple message is the same function as the simple alarm. State
transitions, however, are not indicated as events, but alarms.
Figure 134: Alarm source with Simple message alarm function
For HVAC applications and response in the system, the functionality is identical to
simple alarm: Simple alarm without acknowledgement of incoming and outgoing
faults. The only difference is EventNotification as alarm or event.
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Customized alarm
Any alarm function under BACnet can be used. The following behavior can be
defined for customized alarms:
● EventNotification can occur as either event or alarm
● Acknowledgement: For each change of state (TO-OFFNORMAL, TO-NORMAL,
and TO-FAULT) can be defined whether or not an acknowledgement is
required.
[AckTra] Acknowledged
transitions
This feature is used to represent the acknowledgement status, or to handle
information about which state transitions currently still require acknowledgement.
The value of [AckTra] is based on the alarm function, the current [EvtSta] and the
monitoring of acknowledgements already received.
[AckTra] consists of three flags, one each for TO-OFFNORMAL, TO-NORMAL and
TO-FAULT. The flags have the following meanings:
● The flag is always FALSE when there has been a relevant state transition and
an acknowledgement is required, because this is a requirement of the alarm
function and no acknowledgement has yet taken place.
● The flag is TRUE when no acknowledgement of the state transition is required.
This may be the case because the alarm function does not require
acknowledgement, or because no state transition has occurred, or because a
state transition that has occurred has already been acknowledged.
[TiAck] Time of
acknowledgement
Time of the last acknowledgement (time stamp).
8.6 Alarm Management by Notification Class
Intrinsic reporting
With intrinsic reporting, the alarmable object itself assumes alarm identification and
state machine for alarm handling. However, the subsequent distribution of alarm
messages to alarm clients (for example, the PXM20 operator unit) and the alarm
management is no longer the responsibility of the alarm source itself, but of a
Notification Class object assigned to the alarm source. The Notification Class
object is both a D-MAP function block and a standard BACnet object, which
contains all the information required for the distribution of alarms and system
events within the system.
Algorithmic reporting
With algorithmic reporting, alarm detection and the state machine for alarm
handling normally are taken over by the Event Enrollment object. In this case,
alarm management also is set up in an alarm source via assigned Notification
Class object.
Notification Class
Figure 135: Alarm management by notification class
Each alarm-generating object is assigned one notification class [NotifCl] only, but
one notification class can be used by more than one alarm-generating object. This
makes it possible to create a Notification Class object for each group of alarms (for
example, HVAC alarms, fire alarms etc.). Each alarm source in a given alarm
group is assigned to the [NotifCl] for that group.
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There are global and local notification class objects:
● Global notification class: One set of max. 18 global notification class objects
per site. Global notification classes are replicated and thus exist on all Desigo
PX of a site in identical form.
● Local notification class: On Desigo PX, local notification classes can be
engineered, but are NOT replicated.
● Desigo Room Automation supports exclusively local notification classes.
Interface definition
The notification class function block [NotifCl] is the means by which functionality is
transferred from the BACnet standard into the CFC environment.
Figure 136: Function block
This function block contains the instance number of the Notification Class (an
integer). which must be identical to the value entered in the subordinate alarm
sources. This makes it possible to create a unique reference.
The number must not be modified online.
In Desigo S7 all Notification Classes are compiled in a function block.
Notification class number
There are 18 predefined global notification classes. The notification class is
identified with the two independent variables AlarmFunction and AlarmClass, and
referenced in the alarm source:
● AlarmFunction [Simple(1), Basic(2), Extended Alarm(3)]
● AlarmClass [UrgentAlarm (1), HighPrioAlarm (2), NormalAlarm (3),
LowPrioAlarm (4), UserDefinedAlarm (5) and OffLineTrend (6)]
Formula
The notification class number is calculated as follows:
NotificationClass# := 10 * AlarmClass + AlarmFunction
This gives the following notification classes:
AlarmClass
AlarmFunction
Priority
(default values)
To-Offnormal
To-Fault
To-Normal
Uses
NotificationClass#
(derived)
Highly critical alarms, system
messages, device info object
UrgentAlarm
Simple
1, 1, 5
11
UrgentAlarm
Basic
1, 1, 5
12
UrgentAlarm
Extended
1, 1, 5
13
Critical alarms
HighPrioAlarm
Simple
2, 2, 6
21
HighPrioAlarm
Basic
2, 2, 6
22
HighPrioAlarm
Extended
2, 2, 6
23
Normal alarms
NormalAlarm
Simple
3, 3, 7
31
NormalAlarm
Basic
3, 3, 7
32
NormalAlarm
Extended
3, 3, 7
33
Non-critical alarms
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AlarmClass
AlarmFunction
Priority
(default values)
To-Offnormal
To-Fault
To-Normal
Uses
NotificationClass#
(derived)
LowPrioAlarm
Simple
4, 4, 8
41
LowPrioAlarm
Basic
4, 4, 8
42
LowPrioAlarm
Extended
4, 4, 8
43
As project-specific alarms for
special applications
UserDefinedAlarm
Simple
5, 5, 9
51
UserDefinedAlarm
Basic
5, 5, 9
52
UserDefinedAlarm
Extended
5, 5, 9
53
Offline trends
The To-Normal priority must
be such that it is less than or
equal to the Alarm Priority
Limit of the device object (for
Remote Mgmt)
OffLineTrend
Simple
2, 2, 2
61
OffLineTrend
Basic
2, 2, 2
62
OffLineTrend
Extended
2, 2, 2
63
Table 37: Notification classes
Project-specific notification classes can be defined in addition to predefined ones.
Alarm classes 7...16 are intended for this purpose. The associated calculation of a
notification class number is identical to calculation of predefined notification class
numbers.
Customized alarms can be engineered in Desigo PX. In this case, the value for a
notification class number can be defined without restrictions.
Priority [Prio]
This defines the alarm priority on the basis of which alarm and system events are
to be transmitted to the receivers. Every transition can be described individually
with this BACnet property, data type ARRAY of INTEGERS [TO_OFFNORMAL;
TO_FAULT; TO_NORMAL]. Priority levels can range in value from 0 to 255. The
lower the value, the higher the priority. In Desigo only priorities 1 to 9 are used.
Alarmfunction [AlmFnct]
Alarm function types: Simple, Basic or Extended. [AlmFnct] is only supported by
Desigo PX.
Destination list [RecpList]
The configured (permanent) alarm recipients, the week days, and the time window
in which the alarm recipient is operated, are entered here. [RecpList] is equivalent
to the standard BACnet property Recipient_List.
Destination list [DestLi]
This is where the configured (permanent) alarm receivers are entered, together
with the days of the week and the time-window in which the alarm receiver is
operated. [DestLi] is only supported by Desigo PX.
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Remote Area_Site "Luzern"
Device Name "Insight 01"
Remote Area_Site "Bern"
Device Name "Insight 02"
8
Device Name "Insight 03"
Site "Muri"
BACnet PTP
BACnet PTP
Device Name "Insight 04"
Router
Site
"Suhr"
Site
"Emmen"
Site
"Sempach"
Figure 137: Allocation of operator units to a remote area site
Operator units:
● Permanently connected operator units (and hence, alarm receivers) are
addressed by their Device Name.
● Operator units (and hence alarm receivers) with a point-to-point connection
(PTP connection) are addressed with a Remote Area Site identifier and their
Device Name. For example:
B=fff for permanent connection
B=kkk:aa for point-to-point connection (PTP connection)
● Adjustments are required during the addressing process so that there is no
conflict between the names of operator units and the plant or room
management designations.
Permanent and point-to-point connections:
● For alarm receivers, the address syntax (see further below) indicates the type
of connection: permanent or PTP connections.
● Desigo PX automation stations with half-routers must know the Remote Area
Site designators of their remote alarm receivers to enable an PX automation
station to resolve the remote alarm receiver designator.
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B=
DeviceIdentifier
Permanently
connected
alarm receiver
DeviceIdentifier
Alarm receiver with
PTP connection
and Desigo PX
half router
DeviceIdentifier
Alarm receiver with
PTP connection
and third-party
half router
RemoteAreaSite
Not case-sensitive
A..Z
a..z
0..9
Figure 138: Alarm receiver syntax
Element
Description
DeviceName
Device name. In plain text so that the user can understand it.
Example: Insight1
DeviceIdentifier
Device Identifier. Alternative syntax for the alarm receiver of a thirdparty manufacturer. If the alarm receiver has a special address range
or if DeviceName does not work.
Example: [13456]
RemoteAreaSiteName
Remote area site name. In plain text so that the user can understand it.
Example: Chur
NetworkNumber
Network number. Required with a third-party half router.
Example: [3]
Table 38: Alarm receiver syntax
8.7 Alarm Routing over the Network
Alarm server and alarm clients
Alarm servers are entities capable of producing an alarm. Alarm clients are entities
capable of receiving an alarm.
There are two types of alarm client: temporary alarm receivers and pre-configured
alarm receivers. The following concept for temporary alarm recipients is only valid
for Desigo PX.
Temporary alarm
receivers
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Temporary alarm receivers are not defined at the engineering stage. They can be
connected to or removed from the network at any time during operation. If a
temporary alarm receiver is connected to the network, it will perform the following
activities for every alarm server:
● The alarm recipient enters its address in the BACnet property recipient list
[RecpList] of the BACnet device object of the automation station, using the
BACnet service AddListElement.
● Read information about all currently existing alarms, and all currently
outstanding acknowledgements, from the automation station (BACnet service
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GetEventInformation). This ensures that the alarm receiver – irrespective of
when it was connected – displays the current alarm status of the system.
After making these entries, the temporary alarm receiver, while connected, will
receive all alarm messages from the automation station in accordance with the
routing mechanisms described below.
If an automation station cannot transfer an alarm message to a temporary alarm
receiver (for example, because it is no longer connected to the network), the
address of the receiver concerned will be removed from the [RecpList]. All alarm
messages destined for that receiver will then be deleted.
Preconfigured alarm
receivers
The preconfigured alarm receivers are entered in the notification class object:
● In the [DestList] for Desigo PX
● In the [RecpList] for Desigo Room Automation
Time response in the network
The routing of all alarm and acknowledgement ,messages between the alarm
server and the alarm clients takes place over the BACnet network using special
BACnet services. These are:
● Confirmed Event Notification for all changes in the alarm state of an alarmgenerating object (TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_NORMAL, TO_FAULT), and for
messages via local acknowledgements. Direction: Direction: From alarm server
to alarm client.
● AcknowledgeAlarm for the routing of acknowledgements (including reset)
performed by the user on an alarm client. Direction: From alarm client to alarm
server.
The two services are referred to as Confirmed Services, that is, the receiving
device always confirms the receipt of a service by immediately returning a
SimpleAck message. This tells the transmitting device that its message has been
received by the receiving device. If no SimpleAck message is received, the
transmitting devices tries to send the message again (up to three times).
An alarm is always issued by one (and only one) alarm server. Generally, however,
there will be several alarm clients on the network. To maintain consistency, all
alarm clients must always display the same alarm state. For this reason, all alarmrelated functions must always be routed to all the alarm clients. The procedure is
the same for both temporary and pre-configured alarm receivers.
The following time-diagrams describe the communications via the network for the
various alarm-related events.
Change of alarm state
SimpleAck
SimpleAck
t
t
t
Figure 139: Change of alarm state
This procedure is carried out for every change in alarm state on an alarm server:
TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_FAULT und TO_NORMAL. The data record Confirmed
Event Notification contains the following information:
● BACnet address of the alarm server
● Object ID of the alarm-generating object
● Time stamp
● Alarm priority
● Initial and final state of the transmitted state transition (this is used to determine
whether the state transition is TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_FAULT or TO_NORMAL)
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●
Acknowledgement required [AckReq]: Does the notified state transition require
acknowledgement or not?
● Alarm text
● Other technical details
Based on this information, the alarm client can present the alarm in a
comprehensible way; it may also read additional information automatically from the
alarm server, and if required, return any acknowledgement to the correct address.
If a temporary alarm receiver does not confirm receipt with a SimpleAck message
(via the Confirmed Event Notification input), the alarm server will try three times
more to transmit the alarm to the relevant alarm receiver. The message for this
alarm client will then be lost and its reference will be deleted from the [RecpList] of
the BACnet device object.
Alarm acknowledgement
over the network
This process is performed for all acknowledgements made on an alarm client.
SimpleAck
SimpleAck
t
t
t
Figure 140: Alarm acknowledgement over the network
Acknowledge and reset
The alarm can be acknowledged by any alarm client. The AcknowledgeAlarm data
record contains information as to which alarm is being acknowledged and other
details related to this alarm and the acknowledging alarm client. The alarm
acknowledgement is confirmed with a SimpleAck message by the alarm server
which generated the alarm. All other alarm clients in the network will be sent a
Confirmed Event Notification to notify them of the alarm acknowledgement. They,
in turn, will send a SimpleAck message to acknowledge the receipt of this
notification, the objective being to ensure that all clients have up-to-date and
consistent information.
Local alarm
acknowledgement
Alarms can also be acknowledged and reset locally on the alarm server. The alarm
is acknowledged internally in the alarm server that generated the alarm. Confirmed
Event Notifications are now transmitted to all alarm clients, to notify them that the
alarm has been acknowledged. The alarm clients, in turn, send a SimpleAck
message to acknowledge their receipt of the Confirmed Event Notification.
SimpleAck
SimpleAck
t
t
t
Figure 141: Local alarm acknowledgement
Disabling the routing of
alarms
Each alarm-generating object has an [EnEvt] parameter (data type: Boolean).
Alarm messages (and system events) are only transmitted over the network if
[EnEvt=TRUE]. This does not affect the alarm monitoring of the object, that is, the
alarm state machine is always kept up to date.
8.8 Alarm Queuing
Until they have been forwarded to all the pre-configured alarm recipients, all alarm
messages are normally stored in the automation station.
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Each automation station has its own alarm queue for this purpose. Each incoming
alarm and each system event is entered in the queue. An entry remains in the
queue until the alarm or system event has been sent with a confirmed event
notification to all recipients listed in the notification class object, and until the
relevant acknowledgements have been received.
If the queue is full to overflowing, the oldest entries are deleted automatically, and
a system event message is generated. Entries are deleted irrespective of alarm
priority.
Alarm queuing has no effect on the alarm state of the alarm source.
Alarms destined for a temporary alarm recipient are not saved in the automation
station. If a temporary alarm recipient can no longer be reached, the address of the
recipient concerned is removed from the [RecpList] of the device object.
BACnet device object
properties
The queuing of alarms is controlled by the following BACnet properties in the
device object of the Desigo PX automation stations. These properties are not
mapped to a function block, and can therefore only be viewed and modified online.
Buffer size [BufSize]
This BACnet property defines the maximum number of entries which can be saved
in the queue.
A new value will only be accepted if it is greater than the record count [RecCnt].
Buffer size [BufSize] of the alarm queue.
● Default = 100 (PXC) or 150 (PXR)
● Range = 10…500 depending on the available memory space
Record count [RecCnt]
This BACnet property represents the number of entries currently stored in the
queue.
The alarm queue can be deleted by writing the value 0 to this property. A write of a
value not equal to 0 results in an error message.
If the queue is deleted, this information is entered as a system event in the queue
and transmitted to the receivers. This causes the value to change to 1 as soon as
[RecCnt] is set to zero.
Notification threshold
[NotifThd]
This BACnet property defines the dial-out threshold, and the number of alarms to
be deleted in the event of a queue overflow.
If [RecCnt] is greater than or equal to [NotifThd], a connection is established with
any alarm recipients connected by cable (modem) which are destined to receive
alarms and events from the queue. The connection is established provided that the
remote alarm recipient concerned is listed in the notification class object.
The message threshold also defines how many alarms are to be deleted in the
event of a queue overflow. As many alarm entries are deleted as necessary until
[RecCnt] is equal to [NotifThd]. This function does not distinguish between local
and remote alarm recipients in the notification class object.
To avoid deleting too many alarms, it is recommended that [NotifThd] be set to
approximately 80% of the [BufSize].
Alarm queue message threshold [NotifThd]:
● Default = 80 (PXC) or 130 (PXR)
● Range = 5…495
Alarm priority limit
[PrlmAlm]
This BACnet property defines another independent threshold for dial-out.
An alarm priority which is less than or equal to [PrlmAlm] results in a connection
with any alarm recipients connected by cable (modem) which are destined to
receive alarms and events from the queue. The connection is established provided
that the remote alarm recipient concerned is entered in the list of Notification Class
objects.
Alarm priority limit [PrlmAlm]:
● Default = 2 (HighPrioAlarm or UrgentAlarm)
● Range 0…255
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If the notification class object contains only local alarm recipients, then the
optimum results are achieved by use of the default values for control of alarm
queuing. The default values should therefore not be changed.
If the notification class object contains remote alarm recipients, then it may be
appropriate to modify the default values for control of alarm queuing.
The values for [NotifThd] and [PrlmAlm] determine when a remote cable
connection (modem) is to be established, in order to inform the user of the
occurrence of alarms.
If low-priority alarms are to be forwarded immediately, the [PrlmAlm] value must be
increased (the higher the number, the lower the alarm priority). The value for
[NotifThd] must not be modified.
The value for [NotifThd] can be reduced, however, in cases where a connection is
to be established when there is a smaller number of alarms in the alarm queue. It
is important to ensure, however, that the difference between [BufSize] and
[NotifThd] does not become too great, as this is the value that controls the deletion
of alarms in the event of a queue overflow.
Note that modifying these values also affects connection costs.
It takes time to establish a connection by cable (modem). If it is likely that further
alarms will occur during this time, thereby causing the queue to overflow, the
difference between [BufSize] and [NotifThd] should be increased.
The following settings are recommended:
● Buffer size [BufSize] = 120
● Notification threshold [NotifThd] = 80
In cases of doubt, the default values should be left unchanged.
The parameters are hardcoded in Desigo S7 and not mapped in BACnet. A
project-specific modification is not required since only Ethernet-IP networks are
supported.
8.9 Common Alarms
The BACnet object alarm states InAlarm, Unacked and Unreset are grouped in the
following blocks:
● The CommonAlarm block for Desigo PX
● The CommonEvent block for Desigo Room Automation
The difference between CommonAlarm and CommonEvent is, that the
CommonAlarm block supports Intrinsic Reporting. The alarm detection and
notification of the CommonEvent block is handled by a special Event Enrollment
object called CommonEventEnrollment. The CommonEventEnrollment block also
handles the common alarm reset / ack and common manual intervention functions.
All alarms generated by alarm-generating BACnet objects on the same chart level
or subordinate charts are automatically grouped into a common alarm. There is
therefore no need for the user to create a common alarm by establishing links or
interconnections. The engineering process simply involves placing the block at the
required chart level. No other configuration steps are necessary.
Common alarm reset / ack
Similarly, all the alarms covered by this block can be the subject of a common
alarm reset and acknowledge.
Acknowledging the common alarm object is equivalent to acknowledging all objects
on the same and lower levels in the hierarchy.
Resetting the common alarm object is the equivalent to resetting all objects on the
same and lower levels in the hierarchy.
Common manual
intervention
The same common alarm object also uses the status flag Overridden to indicate
the manual operation of one or more of the BACnet objects (with [StatFlag]
override facilities) on the same or a lower chart level. Manual intervention are
determined on the properties: Out of service [OoServ], overridden, commanding to
Prio 7 (manual switch) and Prio 8 (operator).
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This diagram shows the practical application of the common alarm object within the
technical hierarchy. The common alarm object in the partial-plant compound
encompasses all the alarms of this partial plant. The higher-level common alarm
encompasses the alarms of both partial plants.
Figure 142: Common alarm object
In Desigo S7 the Common Alarm block in the CFC is nested with the block
generating the alarm.
8.10 Alarm Suppression
Alarm suppression refers to suppression of alarm and event notifications in the
Desigo system. Thus, sending BACnet event notifications is suppressed. Alarm
suppression does NOT prevent detection of alarm states.
Alarm suppression types
The following types of alarm suppression exist in Desigo:
● Alarm suppression by automation station using function block AS_STA allows
for implementing alarm suppression at the automation station level.
● Hierarchical alarm suppression is made possible via the common alarm object
based on the structure of the technical view.
● Specific alarm suppression: All alarmable objects offer alarm suppression by
object.
● Exceptions for alarm suppression: Each alarmable object has a pin SupEcpt.
This pin allows for defining exceptions to hierarchical alarm suppression.
Validity for alarm suppression
All types of alarm suppression apply to Desigo PX. Desigo Room Automation
devices can generate and suppress alarms. Alarming for Desigo Room Automation
devices without their own alarming is ensured in Desigo PX via Event Enrollment
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objects. General types of alarm suppression of Desigo PX apply to the Event
Enrollment objects.
Alarm suppression by automation station
AS_STA (Device Access) is a Desigo PX function block that allows to suppress all
alarms of an automation station. The function block allows for suppressing BACnet
event notifications by means of an application. Thus, sending of alarms and events
during, for example, maintenance, can be suppressed, for example, via a key
switch.
Alarm suppression is controlled via pin SupEvt. The following values are defined
for SupEvt:
● true: The automation station sends NO BACnet event notifications.
● false: The automation station sends BACnet event notifications.
For more information on function block AS_STA, see Desigo Firmware blocks,
automation level, Overview (CM110749) and Desigo Vxx Firmware blocks
(CM110729).
Desigo Room Automation supports the suppression of all alarms of an automation
station. To do this, it uses the device infrastructure objects CommonEvent and
CommonEventEnrollment.
Hierarchical alarm suppression
Hierarchical alarm suppression allows for suppressing alarms of a plant, partial
plant, aggregate, component, or subcomponent. Hierarchical suppression is based
on suppressing alarms of any part of a partial tree in the technical structure.
For Desigo PX hierarchical alarm suppression is carried out via the Alarm
Collection (CMN_ALM) object. CMN_ALM comprises all alarmable BACnet objects
as a group on the same or lower hierarchies in the technical view. Thus,
CMN_ALM allows for controlling alarm suppression for all alarmable BACnet
objects of a group.
Alarm suppression is controlled via pin SupEvt. The following values are defined
for SupEvt:
● true: Alarmable BACnet objects of a group do NOT send BACnet event
notifications.
● false: Alarmable BACnet objects of a group send BACnet event notifications.
Desigo Room Automation supports the hierarchical suppression of alarms. It uses
the CommonEvent and CommonEventEnrollment objects.
The CommonEvent object aggregates the alarm state of all BACnet objects on the
same or the lower hierarchy levels of the technical view.
The CommonEventEnrollment object monitors the CommonEvent object. The
hierarchical alarm suppression can be turned on or off in the
CommonEventEnrollment object.
Specific alarm suppression
All alarmable BACnet objects allow for specific suppression. Each alarmable
BACnet objects offers pin EnEvt for this type of alarm suppression.
The following values make sense for EnEvt:
● (False, False, False): The object sends NO BACnet event notification.
● (True, True, True): The object sends BACnet event notification.
Value combinations with True and False for EnEvt should be avoided.
Alarm suppression exceptions
A possible application is to activate alarm suppression during plant maintenance.
Vital alarms must be excepted from alarm suppression.
For Desigo PX exceptions can be defined for hierarchical alarm suppression with
CMN_ALM.
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Function block CMN_ALM has pin EnSupEcp. This exception specifies if
exceptions are possible within the alarmable BACnet objects of the group. The
following values are defined for EnSupEcp:
● true: Exceptions for alarm suppression within the group of alarmable BACnet
objects are considered.
● false: Exceptions for alarm suppression within the group of alarmable BACnet
objects are NOT considered.
Each alarmable BACnet object can be exempted from hierarchical alarm
suppression with CMN_ALM. To do this, each alarmable BACnet object has pin
SupEcpt. The following values are defined for SupEcpt:
● true: The object is considered as an exception for alarm suppression.
● false: The object is NOT considered as an exception for alarm suppression.
Combination of multiple alarm suppressions
The above options to suppress alarms can overlap. For an object impacted already
by multiple types of suppression, the following rule applies: One type of alarm
suppression cannot be overridden by another type of alarm suppression.
The following table shows combinations of different alarm suppression types:
AS_STA.
SupEvt
CMN_ALM.
SupEvt
CMN_ALM.
EnSupEcp
FB.SupEcpt
FB.EnEvt
Resulting alarm suppression
for function block
True
•
•
•
•
suppressed
•
•
•
•
(F, F, F)
suppressed
False
False
•
•
(T,T,T)
not suppressed
False
True
False
•
(T,T,T)
suppressed
False
True
True
True
(T,T,T)
not suppressed
False
True
True
False
(T,T,T)
suppressed
Table 39: Alarm suppression
8.11 Alarm Message Texts
Desigo contains all the alarm texts necessary to help the user maintain an
overview and an understanding of the alarms. These alarm texts can be freely
defined in the engineering tool for each alarm source individually. If this is not done,
text will be generated automatically on the basis of the Technical Designation of
the individual function blocks. In a third category are the predefined alarm texts
used in conjunction with device faults.
Configured alarm
message texts
Siemens
The Desigo system supports alarm message texts.
For Desigo PX the message texts for TO_OFFNORMAL, TO_FAULT and
TO_NORMAL alarms are entered as an Array [3] in the BACnet property
[Message_Text]. For Desigo Room Automation the BACnet Property
Event_Message_Texts_Config is used.
For Desigo PX if no alarm message text has been entered for an alarm source, or
if the alarm message text for a given state (for example, TO_FAULT) has been left
blank, an alarm message text will be generated from the existing descriptions.
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Alarm Message Texts
Standard
Description
Project-spec.
Description
8
Figure 143: Alarm message texts
Longer messages are divided into segments with forward slashes // so that the
client can display the message over several lines. Each segment may contain a
maximum of 70 characters, with a maximum of three segments separated by // for
any one message.
Non-configured message
texts
System alarms and events of the BACnet Device Info Object use text messages
which cannot be configured, for example, Battery low.
Predefined, languagedependent text
System alarms and events of the BACnet Device Info Object use non-configured
text messages whose contents are language-dependent. These languagedependent texts are organized into text groups with a predefined server system
text scope, and can be translated. The translated text groups are loaded into the
automation station via BACnet description information. The BACnet generator has
to insert the text group into the BACnet description information.
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9
9 Calendars and Schedulers
Standard BACnet objects
The standard BACnet objects Schedule and Calendar are used for time scheduling
functions in the Desigo system. These objects can be used to configure and
operate time scheduling functions at different operating levels within the system
(Desigo Insight, Desigo CC, PX Web, PXM20/40/50) and via BACnet-compatible
operator units from other manufacturers.
The local PXM10 operator unit can also be used to operate the standard BACnet
objects for the connected automation stations and PXC.
Function blocks
The time scheduling functions are implemented as function blocks in CFC charts of
PX automation stations. Each automation station and each switching operation
requires one schedule block. The pins of the function blocks are mapped to
standard BACnet properties.
There are four versions of the schedule block, with an analog, binary or multistate
output or with a variable data type (Boolean, Unsigned, Real or Enumerated). A
schedule block can only contain schedule values of the same data type.
[WeekSchd] [EcptSchd]
The scheduler program consists of a weekly schedule [WeekSchd] and an
exception schedule [EcptSchd]. The weekly schedule contains a 24-hour profile for
each day. The exception schedule contains up to 20 profiles, which can be
activated for a date or date range. The date or date range can be defined both in
the schedule itself and in the calendar object.
[Prio]
A priority must be assigned to each of the profiles in the schedule. Based on the
priority level assigned, the scheduler program determines from the priority [Prio]
which profile is to be processed. The weekly schedule has the lowest priority.
[EfPrd]
The effective period [EfPrd] property defines the time period for which the schedule
is active.
[PrVal] [NxVal] [NxTi]
The present value [PrVal], next value [NxVal] and next time [NxTi] are available at
the output of the time schedule. [NxVal] and [NxTi] are used for optimization
purposes.
Commanded objects
The time schedule also incorporates a list of references to BACnet objects and
(optionally) a property which is to be controlled by the scheduler program via
BACnet.
[DefVal]
The BACnet property Relinquish_Default is the default value [DefVal] for the
present value output [PrVal].
Figure 144: Scheduler with referenced calendar
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Schedule
9.1 Schedule
Weekly schedule [WeekSchd]
The weekly schedule [WeekSchd] consists of seven 24-hour profiles, one for each
day of the week. By default, the priority level assigned to the weekly schedule is 16
(the lowest priority). The weekly schedule is active unless there is an exception
schedule.
For system limits, see chapter System Configuration.
24-hour profiles
A 24-hour profile is a list of time-and-value pairs. The present value remains at the
[PrVal] output until the processing of the next time-and-value pair causes a new
value to be written to the output.
If there is no schedule entry with a switch time of 00:00 in the daily profile, the
default value determines the resulting Present_Value (=Rule schedule default
value).
If the daily profile encompasses an empty list of schedule entries, the default value
[DefVal] determines the resulting Present_Value (=Rule schedule default value).
Figure 145: Evaluate exception day program, weekly program and Schedule_Default
The evaluation of the exception schedule, weekly schedule, and [DefVal] is as
follows:
Start of the day:
● Exception schedule with switch value at 00:00:
The exception schedule determines the resulting Present_Value if an active
switch value exists at 00:00. The day begins with this exception value (=Rule
switch value exception schedule).
● Empty daily profile:
If the daily profile encompasses an empty list, the default value [DefVal]
determines the resulting Present_Value (=Rule schedule default value).
● Daily profile with switch value at 0:00.
If a schedule entry with switch time 00:00 and active switch value is available in
the daily profile, the switch value determines the resulting Present_Value. The
day begins with the daily profile value (=Rule Switch value daily profile).
Course of the day:
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●
●
●
9
Switch value exception schedule:
If an active switch value exists for a specific time, the exception schedule
determines the resulting Present_Value.
Daily profile switch value:
If an active switch value from a daily profile exists for a specific time, the daily
profile determines the resulting Present_Value.
Default value switch value:
If no active switch value from the exception schedule and the daily profile exists
at a specific time of day, the default value determines the resulting
Present_Value.
Exception schedule [EcptSchd]
Exception profiles
The exception schedule [EcptSchd] overwrites some or all of the daily switching
operations in a weekly schedule [WeekSchd]. It consists of one or more profiles
(max. 20).
Each profile has a:
● Date
● Specified time
● Priority
● Value for the output signal
The exception schedule may be a time range, including multiple days.
Activating exception
profiles
Depending on the customer's requirement, the date on which an exception profile
is to be activated can be defined either in the time schedule itself, or in the
standard BACnet object Calendar. In the latter case, the calendar object is linked
to the time schedule via BACnet references.
An exception begins with the first time entry and ends with the last. Each profile
may contain up to 20 switch times.
Setting priorities
The switch value of all current profiles is continuously monitored for present
priorities. The priorities determine which switch value is transferred to the [PrVal]
output. The system evaluates every minute if a day or an exception profile should
be active. Each profile of the exception schedule is assigned a priority level from 1
(highest) to 16 (lowest). If several exceptions are valid at the same time, the profile
with the highest priority is processed.
If multiple switch values from different exceptions with the same priority exist at a
specific time, the active switch value of the exception with the lowest array index
(from the exception schedule) determines the exception switch value. The
procedure is the same as the procedure for various priorities. The array index is
used as a sub-priority. Exceptions with different priority levels however, are
independent of each other. That's why it is preferable to assign different priorities to
exceptions defined in the schedule.
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Schedule
Figure 146: Exception schedule
Key:
1
An exception profile applies to more than one day. On the second day, the exception profile is
inactive, because another profile with a higher priority is active for the whole day.
2
An exception program without the entry NULL. This exception profile is active for the whole day
and ends automatically in the automation station at 24:00 hours by the NULL entry.
3
Several exceptions with the same priority on the same day, but without overlapping times. The
exception profiles do not interfere with each other as an exception begins with the first time entry
and ends with NULL.
4
Several exception profiles with the same priority on the same day with overlapping times. These
exception profiles affect each other, as several exceptions with the same priority level are active
simultaneously. In such cases, the rule is that if the switch commands are the same, the first
time-entry applies (in this example 13:00 to NULL). With non-identical switch commands, the
latest time-entry applies.
5
Operation in accordance with the weekly schedule.
Output signals
[PrVal] [NxVal] [NxTi]
The scheduler sends the following output signals:
● [PrVal]
● [NxVal]
● [NxTi]
The [NxVal] und [NxTi] output signals support the optimum start/stop control of the
plant. When determining [NxVal] and [NxTi] in the time schedule, the current day
and the next two days are taken into account. This results in a time window of 48 to
72 hours, depending on the current time and the next switch entry. If there is no
change in [PrVal] within the time window, then [NxVal] is the same as [PrVal] and
[NxTi] is equivalent to the current date plus 3 days (00:00h).
[DefVal]
This default value [DefVal] appears at the [PrVal] output when there is no active
entry in the time schedule, or when the entries are all NIL, or when the time period
is outside the active period.
[EnDef]
The [EnDef] variable enables or disables the [DefVal] variable.
The function block variables [DefVal] and [EnDef] are mapped to the
Schedule_Default property. The property Schedule_Default can have the value
[DefVal] or NIL.
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Schedule
Variable DefVal
Variable EnDef
Property Schedule_Default
Value
True
Value
Don't care
False
NIL (= Release)
9
Table 40: DefVal and EnDef function block variables
The NIL value in the Schedule_Default property is the release value for the active
priority of the object controlled by the scheduler. Do not confuse it with the NIL
value in the exception schedule used to prioritize the time entries.
Function blocks for various data types
There are four versions of the schedule block, with an analog, binary or multistate
output or with a variable data type (boolean, unsigned, real or enumerated).
Function block
Output
Example
BSchd
Binary
True/False
ASchd
Analog
20°C
MSchd
Multistate
Off, Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3
Schd
Boolean / Unsigned / Real /
Enumerated
Table 41: Function blocks for data types
The switching value is output to [PrVal] and to the objects to be switched
(commanded objects list). A schedule block can only contain switching values of
the same data type (binary or analog or multistate or boolean or unsigned or real or
enumerated). It is therefore not possible to switch two different data types in
sequence.
Figure 147: Schedule function blocks for analog, binary, and multistate
The CAL (calender) and SCHED (schedule) function blocks can be created online.
The ASCHED, BSCHED and MSCHED function blocks cannot be created online.
Commanded objects
The schedule can influence other commandable objects, irrespective of whether or
not they are in the same automation station.
The schedule is thus a grouping object and contains a list of group members, in the
form of a list of name references [NamrList]. These group members are the
commanded objects, that is, the objects to be switched. The list can contain up to
five entries.
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Schedule
Referencing
The referencing of group members is based on the technical designation (TD) and
is resolved at runtime.
Information flow
The grouping and the information flow only go in one direction (forward
referencing).
The information flows inside one automation station or across several automation
stations. The scheduler object recognizes the flow of information and knows where
to send information and what data type is required by the group members. The
information transmitted covers only the present value [PrVal] or the values for the
Optimum Start/Stop functions [PrVal], [NxVal] and [NxTi].
Heartbeat [Hrtbt]
The function block variable Heartbeat [Hrtbt] determines the period measured in
seconds at which the current value (Present_Value) is written.
Enable_Repeat_
Command [EnRptCmd]
The function block variable Enable_Repeat_Command [EnRptCmd] defines if the
switching action is executed if the Present_Value does not change:
● EnRptCmd = TRUE: Switching action is executed if Present_Value does not
change.
● EnRptCmd = FALSE: Switching action is NOT executed if Present_Value does
not change.
Figure 148: Commanded objects
In Desigo S7 commandable objects are not supported. Control of the objects to be
switched occurs via interconnecting the output signals in the CFC.
Effective period [EfPrd]
You can define the period for which the schedule is to be active, for example, you
can configure separate schedules for summer and winter operation. If the current
day is outside the active period, the [PrVal] output is equal to the default value
[DefVal].
Time resolution
The smallest unit in the scheduler program is one minute and in the calendar one
day. The schedule may be dependent on the calendar. In the PX automation
stations, the calendar function block is automatically processed before the
scheduler function block. The superposed cycle for processing the calendar and
scheduler begins at the start of the new minute of the system time.
A PX automation station incorporates an automatic load shedding mechanism. The
result is that a switch command at time x is executed within a time-period defined
by time x + 1 minute.
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Calendar
9
System time
Schedules and calendars are based on the same global time. This ensures that all
automation stations on a site have the same time base.
For a description of the functions associated with the global time, such as the time
synchronization between the automation stations, UTC (Universal Time
Coordinated), local time and the daylight saving time-change, see Desigo Insight
Engineering of user functions (CM110592).
Interdependency and order of processing
Interdependency of
function blocks
The calendar and schedule function blocks are standalone objects which are
processed individually. The Schedule function blocks depend on the Calendar
function blocks. The objects to be switched (commanded objects or data flow
output) depend on the Schedule function blocks.
Processing order
At start-up, when delta loading and when adjusting the date and time, the order of
processing is a key factor in ensuring that from the first processing cycle on, the
correct output values of a schedule function block are determined and transmitted
to the output. The temporary transmission of incorrect switch values can be
avoided in this way. The order of processing of the individual function blocks is
determined in the CFC Editor (manual/automatic).
The order of processing is:
1. Calendar function blocks
2. Schedule function blocks
3. Any other function blocks, which could be switched by a schedule function
block
Figure 149: Order of processing and interdependency of function blocks
9.2 Calendar
Function block Calendar
The calendar object is a function block from the firmware library. It contains a list of
dates [DateList] with, for example, a date or a date range.
The date list [DateList] uses Boolean logic to control the calendar outputs. [PrVal]
activates an exception profile if the calendar object is referenced by a schedule
object. The outputs tomorrow [Tmw] and day after tomorrow [DayAfTmw] support
the optimum start/stop control of the plant.
Standard BACnet object
Calendar
The SCHED (schedule) and CAL (calender) function blocks in the firmware library
correspond to the SCHED and CAL standard BACnet objects. Standard BACnet
object can be operated via the BACnet clients.
The calendar and schedule can be linked at the BACnet level by references. There
is no data flow link between the calendar and schedule function blocks in the CFC
chart.
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Wildcards
9.3 Wildcards
A wildcard character (*) generates a repetition and is an abbreviated way of listing
individual entries. For example, writing 3.* is a short way of representing 3.1., 3.2.,
3.3., 3.4., 3.5., etc.
All data structures of the scheduler or calendar objects support dates with
wildcards. Date ranges and time specifications do not support wildcards. Invalid
weekdays are ignored.
Date entries with
wildcards
The following table shows examples of date entries containing wildcards:
Date
Meaning
23.April.2001 /Monday
23.April.2001, Monday
23.April.2001 /Tuesday
Never, since 23.April 2001 is a Monday
23.April.2001 /*
23.April.2001
23.April.* /Monday
Each April 23rd, each year if the weekday is a Monday
*.April.2001 /*
Every day in April 2001
*.April.* /Tuesday
Each day in April of each year if the weekday is a Tuesday
31.*.* /*
Each January 31, March 31, May 31, … of each year
or each February 28/ 29, April 30,... of each year
Table 42: Date with wildcards
If a date contains a wildcard in the month or year, the last day of the month is used
for the day, if the value of the day is greater than the maximum number of days in
the month.
Week and day with
wildcards
The following table shows an example of entering a week and day (WeekNDay)
using wildcards. During the evaluation, a wildcard is replaced by the corresponding
value of the current date. If the WeekNDay generated in this way is equivalent to
the current date, this is an exception day.
Day of the week
Meaning
January/2/Monday
Monday in the second week of January
*/1/Tuesday
Every first Tuesday of a month
February/*/Wednesday
Every Wednesday in February
Table 43: Week and day with wildcards
9.4 Alarm Messages
The scheduler object cannot directly generate alarms when, for example, a
commanded object cannot be found.
The alarm function (extended, basic or simple) which defines the alarm behavior of
the object in the system, and the alarm class do not exist because of standard
compliance.
The fault alarming of the schedule object must therefore be implemented as an
additional binary value function block. That's why the function block is linked with
the Dstb (Disturbed) pin of the scheduler and parameterized accordingly. The
additional binary value function block is optional and only required, when a fault
alarming of the scheduler is wanted, for example, for scheduling external objects.
The scheduler object in Desigo S7 is not alarm capable.
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Trending
Trend Functions
10
10 Trending
Trend data provide important information about the processes in a building
automation and control system. For example:
● Monitoring of the control system for optimization purposes
● Logging the room temperature in association with the set temperature
● Logging of temperature and humidity trends for the pharmaceutical industry
Offline/Online trend
There are two types of trend data:
● Offline trend:
The recorded trend data are saved in the automation station and uploaded to
the management station periodically or as needed. The data can be analyzed
in the management station.
A connection is needed only during the data upload. Trend objects are needed
in the automation station.
Offline trend is mostly used for long term data logging.
● Online trend:
Arbitrary data points that are, for example, visible in the Desigo Insight Plant
Viewer or Object Viewer, can be saved as online trends.
A permanent connection is needed. No trend objects are needed in the
automation station.
Online trend is mostly used for temporary data logging.
Trend Log Objects
The trend data is saved in the buffer of the Trend Log and Trend Log Multiple
objects in the automation station.
The Trend Log object can only record one value of a data point. The Trend Log
Multiple object can record up to six different values of a data point.
The Trend Log object cannot be set up online, but must be set up in advance,
offline in the application. A Technical Designation (TD) determines (BACnet
reference) which object is to be logged. This presupposes that the referenced
object is visible via BACnet (not No Element). The reference and the parameters
can be defined and modified online or offline.
When the number of trend log entries reaches a definable threshold (Notification
Threshold [NotifThd]), the Trend Log object generates an event. The Trend Log
object sends out an alarm which is defined in a notification class specified for
Trend Log.
The trend log data acquired can only be read, and if necessary, archived, with a
BACnet Client configured for this purpose (for example, the management station).
The status of a Trend Log object is not affected by reading out trend log data. It is
not possible to reload sampled data into Xworks Plus (XWP).
A BACnet client cannot reserve a Trend Log object. Every BACnet client can
access the Trend Log object. In the case of access or modifications undertaken by
several clients, the rule is that the most recent one always takes priority.
PX Web
In PX Web you can view trends graphically and in list form. You can export the
trend data in a CSV file.
See Web operation PX Web User's Guide (CM110757).
PXM20
In the PXM20 operator unit you can view trends graphically and in list form. You
cannot export the trend data.
See Operator Unit PXM20 / PXM20-E (CM110754).
10.1 Trend Functions
The trend log object supports the following functions.
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Trend Functions
Continuous Run
The trend data is saved continuously (ring buffer). When the available memory
area is full, the oldest data is overwritten by new data. You can define the
Continuous Run function with the parameter Stop when full.
Figure 150: Continuous run
Single Run
The trend data is saved until the available memory area is full. You can define the
buffer size [BufSize] within the range 2 to 5,000 entries. You can define the Single
Run function with the parameter Stop when full.
Figure 151: Single run
Logging Type
The parameter Logging Type [LogTyp] defines the logging type. The values are:
● POLLED: Periodic Sampling
● COV: COV Sampling
● TRIGGERED: Triggered Sampling
By setting the parameters accordingly, you can define combinations of Continuous
Run / Single Run and Periodic Sampling / COV Sampling / Triggered Sampling.
Periodic Sampling
In Periodic Sampling data is acquired by sampling and storing values in a regular
cycle. Periodic Sampling is supported by the trend log object and the trend log
multiple object.
Figure 152: Periodic sampling
COV Sampling
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In COV Sampling data is stored based on a change of value (COV) of the
referenced parameter. A COV subscription can be applied to all supported data
types (analog, Boolean and multistate). The amount of change required to initiate a
COV is set as a parameter in the object to be referenced. COV Sampling is
supported only by the Trendlog object.
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Editing Parameters
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Figure 153: COV sampling
Triggered Sampling
In Triggered Sampling an application (for example, via data flow interconnection)
determines when values are acquired/logged and saved. Triggered Sampling is
supported by the Trendlog object and the Trendlog Multiple object.
Figure 154: Triggered sampling
10.2 Editing Parameters
Many of the parameters in the trend log object are definable only if:
● Enable for logging (Enable logging) [EnLog] is inactive
● The log buffer is empty (Record count = 1)
In this state, the following variables can be modified:
– Start time [TiStt] and stop time [TiStp]
– Interval [Ivl]
– Buffer size [BufSize]
– Record count [RecCnt] (can only be overwritten with 0: delete log buffer)
– Notification threshold [NotifThd]
– Input/Output address [IOAddr] (if an unavailable BACnet address is entered,
an alarm is initiated)
● [EnLog] is inactive or active
● The log buffer is not empty (log count > 1)
In this state, only the following parameters can be configured:
– Start time [TiStt] and stop time [TiStp]
– Record count [RecCnt] (can only be overwritten with 0: delete log buffer)
– Notification threshold [NotifThd]
The record count [RecCnt] can only be overwritten with 0. This deletes all the log
data. After a write operation of 0, there is one entry showing the log status (record
count = 1).
It is not possible to reload sampled data into the CFC Editor.
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Processing Trend Data in the Management Station
With a full loading procedure, any previously sampled data will be lost. With
differential or delta loading the data will not be lost.
The PXM20 stores modified parameters in its internal memory cache. To display
the data actually written, you must exit from the trend log object and re-select it.
10.3 Processing Trend Data in the Management Station
Trend data in Desigo CC
The Trends application in Desigo CC lets you create and display online trends and
offline trends. You can save, query, delete, edit and save trend data in Trend
Views.
You can display the trend data in the Trend Viewer any time, even if the
management station is not connected to the site (no real-time data is available).
For more information, see Desigo CC User Guide (A6V10415471).
Trend data in Desigo Insight
After the trend data has been stored in the Desigo Insight trend database, you can
use the data to display curves in the Trend Viewer. These curves are used, for
example, to monitor a plant's behavior.
The trend database continuously receives data until a specific limit is reached. You
can define the limit in the System Configurator. You can then archive or delete the
data.
For more information, see Desigo Insight Operating the Management Station
(CM110588).
Complex analyses
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In addition to the life cycle of trend data in Desigo Insight, you can also archive
trend data over a longer period and conduct additional, more complex analyses, for
example, for energy management purposes. To do this the data must be
transferred to Advanced Data Processing (ADP) or Consumption Control (CC). The
ADP/CC program then runs together with the PDM database on the same or on a
different Desigo Insight management station in the same network.
In mid to large-sized projects, we recommend that you separate Desigo Insight
from ADP/CC and PDM to ensure performance and stability. In such projects
Desigo Insight and ADP/CC are usually operated by different people anyway.
In critical environments such as the pharma industry, InfoCenter is the preferred
and supported solution for long-term data archiving.
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Reports
Desigo Insight Report Viewer
11
11 Reports
You can create reports for information and analysis.
11.1 Desigo Insight Report Viewer
The Desigo Insight Report Viewer lets you query defined samples and displays
them as reports. The reports are used for analysis of plant data and behavior, and
for evaluation and documentation purposes.
Desigo Insight Report Viewer functions:
● Alarm reports (query from alarm database)
● Log reports (query from log database)
● Audit trail reports (query from audit trail database)
● Data point reports (query from automation station and system database)
● Emergency lighting reports (query from automation station and system
database)
● TRA group reports (query from system database)
● System reports (query from system database)
● Archive reports (query from log and audit trail database)
● Manual or automatic reporting
● Operation/Report display for desktop and web users
You can select existing report definitions to manually start sample logging of data.
A report is then created containing the values of the plant data defined in the report
definition at the time of the data logging (snapshot function).
Together with the Desigo Insight event program (reaction processor resp. global
schedule with calendar), you can automatically run preselected reports at a
predefined time.
You can save reports in PDF format for printing or CSV format for analysis in MS
Excel or MS Access.
Figure 155: Report function
Standard report definitions
Siemens
The following standard report definitions are provided with Desigo Insight:
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Desigo CC Reports
●
●
●
Reports to show alarm and fault states (active, unacknowledged,
acknowledged, etc.)
Reports to show logbook entries (alarm, system and user events)
Reports to show plant states (manual interventions, maintenance request,
room measured value, actual values, set point settings, etc.)
Customized report
definitions
With the Report Builder tool you can create customized report definitions based on
your individual needs. The basic Desigo Insight license includes the report function
using standard report definitions. The Report Builder is subject to a separate
licensing agreement.
Filters
To display only specific data in the reports, you can define filter criteria in the
search queries (for example, address mask wildcards, plant, data point type, time,
date, etc.). You can save the search queries.
Report-based batch
processes
The dialog box for the data point report allows for adapting individual values or
groups of values and write back the data as part of one single batch process to the
automation stations.
Query reports via the web
When using a Desigo Web Client PC with the appropriate access rights, you may
select report definitions in Desigo Insight using the Web Report Viewer function
and start sampling. The report is then displayed in Desigo Web and can be
downloaded in PDF format from the web server to the client computer.
ADP/CC
Advanced Data Processing and Consumption Control (ADP/CC) lets you create
expanded and enhanced reports through the use of archived data, long-term
operational data evaluation, energy management, consumptions checks, etc.
11.2 Desigo CC Reports
The Reports application in Desigo CC lets you create reports about the functioning
of the building automation and control system.
You can configure:
● The elements in the report (such as tables, plots, logos, form controls, text and
so on), and their layout.
● Filters (such as name, condition, time, and/or row) to populate the elements of
the report with information. For example, if you want a report on a room's
activity data over the past month, you could define a name filter and a time filter
in an activities table.
● The formatting of the report elements and the page layout.
● The output type (PDF or XLS) and the output destination (file, email, or printer).
You can save your report definition for later use, run it, or schedule the report to be
run at a specified time.
You can use reports as a reference or as a troubleshooting mechanism. Reports
are helpful during system operation.
For example, you can:
● View a mixed report containing:
– A table displaying details of all active events for a floor of a building
– A table displaying a history report of events
– A trends plot displaying the temperature variations gathered from
temperature sensors
● Export trend data for statistical analysis to:
– An XLS file
– A CSV file (according to the EMC requirement)
● Schedule production of a report using macros and reactions
● Send a report by email, print it or save it as a PDF
You can export and import report definitions and logos.
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Desigo CC Reports
11
You can also create and configure reports for operating procedures. These reports
are used during assisted treatment to enter information about how the alarm or
event is being handled.
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Data Storage
Data Categories
12 Data Storage
Large volumes of data are created in the Desigo system during engineering,
commissioning and plant operation. The data is processed, saved, and archived as
needed in accordance with type, generation, and meaning in the various system
components.
12.1 Data Categories
The application logic (control functions) and the required setting and configuration
data are processed during engineering and loaded in the corresponding system
products, such as the management station or automation station during
commissioning.
This data is arranged according to two criteria:
● Data category
● Data ownership
Data categories
The following table shows a common method of classifying data in building
automation and control systems.
Data category
Description
Related terms
Program elements
Software components which perform a predefined task
and have a known interface.
Function blocks, functions, program
blocks, compounds, solutions
Setting parameters
Values that affect the program elements.
Setpoints, default values, limit values,
address settings
Configuration parameters
Data in the form of defined constants, or data that
influences the appearance or operability of the plant.
Description data, templates, profile,
metadata
Process data
Physical process variables of the plant during operation.
History or saved process data are plant data.
Measured values, state variables,
calculated values
Table 44: Data categories
Data ownership
Data ownership is based on the practical allocation of data to its owner. The owner,
usually an organizational entity, a person, or a group of people, checks the data
and is responsible for its scope and content. Data ownership shows in which
Desigo system product the data is located and which tools are available for its
management. Data ownership is divided in four groups.
The following table shows the four data ownership groups.
Data ownership
Description
Owner
User
Program data
Software of a Desigo system product with
basic data blocks.
Research & Development
(R&D) (HQ)
Project/Library engineer
Libraries
Collection of predefined, specific, and tested Library manager (HQ/RC)
program elements.
Libraries can be copied and customized.
Project/Library engineer
Project data
All data for the customer project or customer Contractor
plant.
Project engineer
Plant operator
Plant data
Data from the customer plant saved
permanently following commissioning.
Plant operator
Customer
Table 45: Data ownership
12.2 Program Data
The executable software of a Desigo component is composed of programs. There
are system and product components.
System components
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System components are:
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Libraries
●
●
12
System blocks for controlling the plant
System interfaces which are implemented in every component and which
control the data traffic between the components
Product components
Product components are the local subroutines responsible for the internal
consistency of setup, startup, shutdown, navigation and display, etc. among the
individual components.
Parameterization
There are two parameter types:
● Setting parameters: System and product components have predefined default
settings. These values are application-independent, but always lie within the
system limits.
● Configuration parameters: The system and product components have a basic
configuration. The basic configuration of certain blocks is not complete and
must be supplemented during engineering with, for example, addresses of the
I/O blocks.
The library or project engineers can adapt the setting and configuration parameters
to the plant or project conditions.
12.3 Libraries
Libraries are needed during engineering. You can create loadable applications
using libraries. Library elements are compiled from system basic components. For
example, the graphic library of the management station contains default graphics
for visualizing plants during engineering.
You can copy and customize or extend libraries. Every engineering level has a
library. Libraries can cover many combinations.
DXR2 automation stations are delivered with preloaded applications and only need
to be configured.
There are three library types:
● HQ libraries are tested, well documented and delivered with the system version.
Every new Desigo version contains new libraries.
● RC libraries are tested, well documented and contain country-specific
characteristics. They are optional, independent or an addendum to the HQ
library. Not all RCs offer comprehensive libraries.
● Project-specific libraries are not tested and documented.
Application libraries
Application libraries contain plant-specific functions (heating, cooling, control of
electrical equipment, etc.) or templates for subsystem bindings. You can set up
and manage libraries with the Xworks Plus (XWP) and Automation Building Tool
(ABT) engineering tools.
PX libraries
The functional units of the PX application libraries are defined by compounds. You
can copy, change and extend the compounds of the PX library.
Application libraries for PX and Desigo S7 are designed using the same application
principles and are provided via Xworks Plus during project engineering.
PXC3/DXR2 libraries
The functional units of the PXC3/DXR2 application libraries are defined by
application functions. You can copy, change and extend the application functions
of the PXC3/DXR2 library.
Parameterization
The library elements have plant-specific or function-specific setting and
configuration parameters:
● Setting parameters: The default values are defined by the application and
usually do not require adjustment.
● Configuration parameters: The default values can be adapted as needed.
Graphics libraries contain graphics that represent the operating elements of the
firmware and application libraries. The graphics are used in the management
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Data Storage
Project Data
station to visualize and operate plants. The elements of the graphics libraries
depend on the elements of the application libraries. Any changes to the application
libraries must therefore also be made to the graphics libraries.
The graphics libraries for Desigo PX, PXC3/DXR2, and Desigo S7 are identical.
Desigo Insight and Desigo CC have one library each.
Graphics libraries
12.4 Project Data
There are three types of project data:
● Project data that is saved locally and then loaded into the system.
● Data on the Branch Office Server (BOS).
● Data that is loaded into the system with ABT Site and is not saved locally.
Project data is created during project engineering, when you create a project
program using library components. Project programs define the sequence in which
function blocks (programming elements) are processed, and what interconnections
are used between blocks.
The library components are selected:
● In Xworks Plus (XWP) in the Solution Generator (recommended workflow for
Desigo PX)
● In the CFC Editor from the compound and firmware libraries for Desigo PX and
Desigo S7
● In Xworks Plus and Automation Building Tool (ABT) from the Desigo Room
Automation automation stations
Desigo Room Automation
room applications
Desigo Room Automation room applications are configured in ABT by selecting the
required functions or model rooms.
RXC/RXB room
applications
RXC/RXB room applications are configured in XWP by selecting the required
functions or sample rooms. Data import in XWP to address the room devices is
carried out in different tools, depending on the RX device.
For device...
From tool...
RXC
RXT10
RXB, RXL and KNX/EIB third-party devices
PX KNX tool
RXB and KNX/EIB third-party devices
ETS
LonWorks third-party devices
Standard LON tools
Table 46: Tools and devices for importing data
PXC3 room applications
PXC3 room applications are programmed and configured in XWP/ABT by selecting
and configuring the applications required for the rooms and room segments
(application functions).
TX-I/O modules
The configuration of TX-I/O modules depends on the PX automation station:
● PX automation station with island bus connection: The XWP/ABT tools transfer
the configuration data (IOC) to the target automation station PX/PXC3.
● PX automation station with P-bus connection: The configuration data (IOMD)
from XWP is loaded into the I/O modules via the TX-I/O tool.
The IOC/IOMD configuration data is saved as project data.
Back up and restore
Project data is stored offline in XWP/ABT and Desigo S7 engineering tools. The
backup and restore function creates a backup of the data and, in case of data loss,
restores the data to the PX automation station.
Back up your data regularly to protect yourself against data loss.
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The backup copy contains all necessary data of a PX automation station to ensure
the automation station is fully functional after data restoration. You can back up
and restore data on third-party automation stations. You can save engineering data
on PX compact automation stations.
Backup
Data from the PX automation stations are saved as a backup copy on Desigo
Insight. The data is exported and saved as BACnet data.
To back up the data:
● The PX automation station must be connected and available (online).
● The PX automation station must support backup and restore.
● The building automation and control system must work smoothly.
Restore
You can restore data backed up on Desigo Insight to the corresponding PX
automation stations. The restored PX automation station automatically restarts
after data restoration.
12.5 Plant Data
Plant data is process data from the operation of a customer plant, that is
permanently saved from the time of commissioning. Process data represents
process variables in a building. The data is continuously changed by the
environment, automation station and, in the event of physical outputs, the operator.
Most process data is volatile. Few process data, such as adaptive control
parameters and runtime totalization counts, remains available following a restart or
power failure of the automation station. Process data can be archived as plant data.
12.6 Data Transfer Processes
Project data is transferred from the tools to the devices or other consumers online
and offline via the system interface. PX automation stations are configured offline
and then the data is downloaded onto the automation station. Desigo Room
Automation automation stations (PXC3 and DXR2) can be engineered. DXR2
automation stations also have preloaded applications and only need to be
configured.
Transfer operations
There are four transfer operations for data synchronization:
● Offline generation
● Online loading
● Online readback
● Offline import
Data transfer to PX
automation stations
You can load a new program on a PX automation station while the old program is
still running. The operation of the automation station is not interrupted. Process
values remain intact. If you load a firmware on the automation station, you must
restart the automation station.
Data transfer to Desigo
Room Automation
automation stations
If you load a new program on a Desigo Room Automation automation station, you
must restart the automation station. The operation of the automation station is
interrupted. Process values do not remain intact. If you load a firmware on the
automation station, you must restart the automation station.
There are four loading units for Desigo Room Automation automation stations:
● Load program
● Load parameters (full download for DXR automation stations)
● Load configuration (settings on the automation station)
● Load firmware (programs, parameters and configuration are not lost)
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Data Transfer Processes
Offline generation
Full code generation
Full code generation:
● Checks the overall application consistency (limits, identifiers)
● Converts the application into loadable units
● Generates the appropriate description data for configuration
You must compile the code to get the required performance. You cannot engineer
a compiled program.
Delta generation
Delta generation (converts only the modifications):
● Improves performance
● Is faster than full code generation
Online loading
Full download
The full download transfers all loadable units into the automation station.
Delta download
The delta download:
● Copies additional blocks into the automation station
● Deletes blocks which are no longer valid
● Updates parameter settings
The delta download is faster than a full download. You do not need to interrupt the
operation of the automation station.
The delta download helps prevent unintentional parameter changes. Online
changed process data and settings parameters are protected against unintentional
overwriting, provided the process data was not changed in the tool.
Download options
You can define what happens in the automation station before and after the
download. You can define if:
● Parameters are read back before the download
● The program starts and/or the I/O bus is turned on after the download
Online readback
During readback of non-volatile process values and parameter settings the data in
the automation station is aligned with the project data in the tool.
Readback comprises two steps:
1. Current parameter settings and non-volatile process values in the PX/PXC3
automation station are read from the automation station and copied to the data
storage.
2. The values are updated in the CFC data storage or PXC3 program and
configuration data storage.
The following data can be read back from PX/PXC3 to the project data storage in
the XWP/ABT tools:
● Setting parameters changed in the PX/PXC3 automation station
● Changed, non-volatile process values or configuration data
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Reading back data has the following advantages:
● Outdated data in XWP/ABT is overwritten by current data and thus is available
again for reloading programs in the PX/PXC3 automation station.
● During online changes of background variables (for example, calendar), data
between CFC and XWP/ABT and the automation station is retained.
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Texts
12
●
Current setting parameters and non-volatile process values (for example,
operating hours) are saved.
● The newest configuration is saved offline and can be used for, for example,
reports.
Runtime data cannot be read back. Only offline data can be read back. Only
objects (not individual properties) can be read back. If a property is changed, the
entire object (for example, data point), that is, the last change on the object is read
back. The last change per object is always valid.
Workflows for changes
There are two workflows for changes:
Workflow 1 (ideal workflow):
1. Perform readback before the changes
2. Perform changes offline
3. Download
Workflow 2:
1. Perform changes offline
2. Perform readback
3. Compile
4. Download
Offline import
You can import configuration and description data for the plant into the
management station. This is the same as the data downloaded to the automation
station.
12.7 Texts
If you work with HQ or RC libraries, the texts are from a text database. These texts
can be automatically translated, because they have a unique ID. Project-specific
texts that are not from the text database cannot be automatically translated.
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Network Architecture
BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)
13 Network Architecture
The Desigo system is divided into three network levels:
● Management Level Network (MLN)
● Automation Level Network (ALN)
● Field Level Network (FLN)
BACnet Internetwork
BACnet Network #100
RemoteArea: Zürich
Management Level
Network
Management station 1
Management station 2
IP segment 2
IP segment 1
BACnet Network #1
IP segment 3
BACnet Network #2
BACnet Network #3
PXG3.W100
IP segment 6
IP segment 5
PXC #1
PXG3.M/L
PXC #2
IP S egment 8
PXC00-U
BACnet Network #4
Management
station 3
Field Level
Network
PXC3/DXR2 #1
PXC #1
PXC3/DXR2 #2
PXC3/DXR2 #3, 4, 5, 6, 7, ...
IP segment 7
PXC #1
LONWORKS segment
PXC #2
PXC #1
BBMD
PXC #2
IP segment 9
Automation Level
Network
IP segment 4
PXC3/DXR2 #1, 2, 3, ...
KNX segment (FLN)
RXB #1 RXB #2
RXL #1
Figure 156: Desigo architecture
This classification is based on the functions performed at a given level, rather than
on the communications protocol or medium. The MLN and ALN use the BACnet
protocol. The transport protocol (Data Link Layer) is LonTalk or IP. The FLN uses
LonWorks, KNX and MS/TP technology.
13.1 BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)
Structuring
BACnet defines the following structuring of the network topology:
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Figure 157: BACnet internetwork
Key:
Internetwork
B
Bridge, for example, IP router, LonWorks router
R
Repeater, for example, LonWorks physical repeater
RT
Router, for example, PXG3
½RT
Half router, for example, PX..-T
In BACnet, the BACnet internetwork is defined as the largest BACnet unit. It
consists of one or more BACnet networks. Only one active connection can exist
between any two BACnet devices in a BACnet internetwork.
A BACnet internetwork is a closed address range. Only BACnet devices within
the same internetwork can communicate with each other.
All bus subscribers from the ALN and MLN, including BACnet third-party devices,
are part of the BACnet internetwork. The devices in the FLN are part of the Desigo
system but not part of the BACnet internetwork, because they do not communicate
via BACnet.
Network
Siemens
Desigo devices use LonTalk (BACnet/LonTalk), IP (BACnet/IP) or MS/TP (BACnet
MS/TP) as their transport protocol. If different transport protocols are used,
different physical networks are created, which must be connected to the PXG3
router. BACnet routers connect networks on the BACnet network layer and
transmit messages via the network number.
If the transport protocol changes, the BACnet network also changes. For example,
BACnet devices that use LonTalk as their transport protocol are always located in
a different network than devices that use IP as their transport protocol. This also
applies to PTP connections.
Desigo devices use LonTalk (BACnet/LonTalk) or IP (BACnet/IP) as their transport
protocol and MS/TP (BACnet MS/TP) to integrate third-party devices. If different
transport protocols are used, different BACnet networks are automatically created,
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BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)
which must be connected to the PXG3 BACnet router. Multiple BACnet
internetworks can be created on an IP segment by using different UDP port
numbers.
Desigo establishes PTP connections only between operator units (Desigo Insight,
XWP/ABT) and a network. Operator units duplicate a virtual network since PTP
connections demand a network at both ends.
Desigo CC does not use PTP.
Segment
Large networks are structured, that is, divided into several (logical) network
segments for reasons of security, performance, size and (limited) address range of
network devices. The segments must then be connected to routers of the
corresponding transport protocol (for example, LonWorks router, IP router).
In most cases it is not necessary to divide a BACnet/LonTalk network into several
LonWorks segments (ALN). However, if it does prove necessary, it is not possible
to use a LonWorks router, because this limits the length of the data packets. An Lswitch (Loytec) can be used as a router on the ALN.
BACnet MS/TP networks cannot be segmented, because there are no associated
routers.
With BACnet/IP some IP segments may be connected by IP routers. Since the IP
router prevents broadcasting, the connection must be activated with the BACnet
Broadcast Management Device (BBMD).
Physical segment
Physically, (cable) networks cannot be expanded as desired. Depending on
electrical transmission properties and the data link layer based on it, repeaters
must be added at specific cable lengths to amplify the signal. This divides the
network into multiple, physical segments. A repeater does not impact the
transmission protocol; it merely electrically connects two physical networks.
Dividing up the network into several physical segments may be necessary in
LonWorks technology.
See RXC Installation Guide (CA110334).
The physical segments are connected with physical or logical repeaters. Due to the
limited buffer size of logical repeaters, only physical repeaters may be used on the
ALN. Only one physical repeater may be located between any two nodes.
MS/TP is transmitted on a two-wire cable as per EIA-485/RS-485*. The length of
the physical segment can be max. 1,200 m and can be extended with EIA-485
repeaters.
*TIA standard (Telecommunications Industry Association): TIA-485-A Electrical
Characteristics of Generators and Receivers for Use in Balanced Digital Multipoint
Systems (ANSI/TIA/EIA-485-A-98) (R2003)
Desigo site
A site is an independent and self-contained logical entity within the building
automation and control system. This type of structuring is not defined by BACnet,
and is therefore largely independent of the BACnet network topology. The BACnet
devices bound to a site can therefore be placed anywhere within a BACnet
internetwork. A site cannot extend across a PTP connection. Communication
occurs only within the site, but data can be exchanged with any device on the
BACnet internetwork.
Only automation stations (PXC/PXC3) and LonWorks system controllers
(PXC...D+PXX-L11/12)) are assigned to the sites, by special structuring of the
Device ID and Device Name. SX Open and Desigo S7 cannot be assigned to a site.
These products are considered third-party devices for the purposes of a site.
Protocol layer model
Desigo supports:
● BACnet/IP
● BACnet/LonTalk (LonWorks technology)
● BACnet/PTP
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●
●
13
BACnet MS/TP
BACnet/IPv6 (only via PXG3 BACnet router)
ISO/OSI Layers
BACnet Layers
Application Layer
Application Layer
Network Layer
Network Layer
VMAC
BVLL
Data Link Layer
BZLL
BVLLv6
UDP/IP
ISO8802-2 Type 1
(IEEE802.2)
UDP/IPv6
PTP
LonTalk
(EIA 709.1)
EIA-485
EIA-232
TP/FT 10
(EIA-709.1)
ZigBee
ISO8802-2 Type 1
(IEEE802.2)
Ethernet
ISO8802-3
(IEEE802.3)
Physical Layer
MS/TP
Ethernet
ISO8802-3
(IEEE802.3)
ARCNET
IEEE
802.15.4
Supported in Desigo
Only via PXG3 router
Figure 158: BACnet protocol layer model
BACnet directly over ethernet, ZigBee or ARCnet is not supported.
Application layer
The BACnet application layer defines services, objects and their characteristics.
From the network viewpoint, the Device object is important. The object ID and the
object name must be unique within the BACnet internetwork.
Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 159: Application layer
Device ID
Category
The Device ID is the object ID of the BACnet device object.
The device ID is divided into the following categories:
Device ID
Object type
Description
Object instance
2 bit
10 bit
10 bit
Unconfigured
DEVICE
00
0000000000 0000000000
All unconfigured devices
Class A
DEVICE
00
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx (1...1048576)
Third-party devices
Class B1
DEVICE
01
Device number
0000000000
Class B2
DEVICE
01
Device number
0000000001
Class B3
DEVICE
01
xxxxxxxxxx (1...999)
Device number
0000000010
Siemens
xxxxxxxxxx (1...999)
xxxxxxxxxx (1...999)
Stationary operator units
(Desigo Insight, Desigo CC)
Mobile operator units / tools
(PXM20, PX Web)
System devices (BACnet
router)
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BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)
Category
Device ID
Class C
DEVICE
Class D
Description
01
DEVICE
11
Site number
Device number
Automation stations (PXC…)
xxxxxxxxxx (1...999)
xxxxxxxxxx (1...999)
System controllers (PXC…)
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx (1...1048576)
Reserved
Table 47: Desigo definitions
Device name
The device name is the object name of the BACnet device object.
Guidelines
Different rules for object names apply for configuring TD (Technical Designation),
UD (User Designation), or FD (Free Designation):
● The TD is generated from predefined partial names, separated by an
apostrophe ('), that show the technical hierarchy with plant, partial plant, and
component. The TD is supplemented by site name and pin name.
● The names may consist of upper- and lowercase letters and numbers 0 to 9.
The site name is separated by a colon (:) and the pin name by a period (.). The
maximum total length is 30 characters.
● The UD is formed similar to the TD based on partial names. However, users
determine the partial names, structure, and separators. The names consist of
upper- and lowercase letters, numbers 0 to 9, and separators, such as _-;=’,
etc. The maximum total length (including site name and pin name) is 80
characters.
● The FD is a freely assigned name consisting of letters, numbers and a few
special characters, limited within the system only by uniqueness and length.
The maximum total length is 80 characters, ten of which, plus one separator,
are reserved for the site name.
Category
Device name
Description
Unconfigured
““
Empty string for unconfigured devices
Class A
No rules
Class B1
Meaningful text for the user (this text is used as a reference
for the alarm recipient)
Class B2
Model name + device ID
Model name + “ “ + 8 character device ID (hexadecimal). The
device name for temporary devices is generated
automatically.
Class B3
Max. 25 characters
Class C
Site name + automation station name
Site name + “:“ + automation station name
Table 48: Desigo definitions
Category
Site number
Device number
Device ID
Site name
Device name
Device name
A
–
1
0x02000001
–
Third-party 1
Third-party 1
B1
–
1
0x02100001
–
Management
station 1
Management station 1
B2
–
15
0x02100401
–
–
PXM20TMP0210040f
C
1
1
0x02200401
Cham
PXC #1
Cham:PXC #1
C
1
2
0x02200402
Cham
PXC #2
Cham:PXC #2
C
1
3
0x02200403
Cham
PXC... #1
Cham:PXC... #1
C
2
1
0x02200801
Zug
PXC #1
Zug:PXC #1
C
2
2
0x02200802
Zug
PXC... #1
Zug:PXC... #1
C
3
1
0x02200C02
Baar
PXC #1
Baar:PXC #1
Table 49: Examples from the topology at the beginning of the chapter
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BACnet Architecture (MLN & ALN)
BACnet device
parameters
13
The BACnet device parameters are written to the devices during commissioning.
These parameters include the following values:
Designation
Description
Max APDU Length Accepted
Maximum length of application message (Application Protocol Data Unit) supported for this
device. The length depends on the transport medium used, and the capacity of the device
buffer. The length of the APDU must always be less than the length of the smallest NPDU
(Network Protocol Data Unit) between the different bus subscribers.
Beispiel
There are two IP networks linked by a PTP connection. The two IP bus subscribers could have
a maximum APDU length of 1476 octets. However, since the maximum NPDU length of the
PTP connection is 500 octets, the maximum APDU length of both devices must be set to 480
octets.
Values for LonTalk
Range:
50/128/206 Octets
Default value:
206 Octets
Range:
50/128/206/480 Octets
Default value:
480 Octets
Range:
50/128/206/480/1024/1476 Octets
Default value:
1476 Octets
Values for MS/TP
Values for IP (equal for IPv6)
APDU Segment Timeout
APDU Timeout
Number of APDU Retries
Timeout of an APDU segment (= part of an APDU). This value must be identical throughout the
internetwork.
Range:
1000...5000 ms
Default value:
2000 ms
Timeout for an acknowledged message. This value must be identical throughout the
internetwork.
Range:
1000...5000 ms
Default value:
3000 ms
Number of retries in the event of an APDU or APDU segment timeout. This value must be
identical throughout the internetwork.
Range:
1...5
Default value:
3
Table 50: Desigo definitions
Window size
To transfer large data packs, BACnet uses the windowing algorithm. Windowing
means that instead of acknowledging individual segments separately, the
acknowledgement applies to a specific number of segments, referred to as a
window.
Definitions for Desigo
The window size is permanently set to four for all Desigo devices, so that for
segmented messages, only every fourth segment is acknowledged.
Network layer
The most important information in the network layer is the network number of the
BACnet network.
Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 160: Network layer
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Network number
The network number is the unique identification of the BACnet network. There are
stationary and temporary networks:
● Stationary networks are defined during commissioning and then remain
unchanged.
● Temporary networks are created when a tool (for example, XWP/ABT) dials
into a network via PTP.
Range/Value
Description
0
Reserved for applications with only one BACnet network in a BACnet internetwork, that is, where there are
no BACnet routers.
1...65280
Network number for stationary BACnet networks. You can select any network number in this range.
We recommend that you form categories, for example:
65281...65534
BACnet/LonTalk networks via (half)router:
1...99
BACnet/IP network (common network):
100
Management station or XWP/ABT connected via BACnet/PTP :
1000...1099
Reserved for temporary BACnet networks. Not yet used in Desigo.
Table 51: Desigo definitions
Router parameters
The router parameters are written to the BACnet router during commissioning. The
following information is required for each port (logical connection to network):
Designation
Description
Network Number
Network number of the directly connected network.
Max NPDU Length
Max. message length supported in this network. This value depends on the transport medium
used.
Values for LonTalk:
Range:
50/228
Default:
228
Range:
50/228/501
Default:
501
Range:
50/228/501/1497
Default:
1497
Range:
50/228/501
Default:
228 for LonTalk
/ 501 for Ethernet/IP
Values for MS/TP:
Value for IP (equal for IPv6):
Values for PTP:
Table 52: Desigo definitions
Hop counter
Every BACnet that is routed to another BACnet network has a hop counter. The
counter reading is reduced by one with each pass of the BACnet router. When the
counter reads 0, the message will not be routed further. This prevents continuously
circulating messages.
Definitions for Desigo
For Desigo the hop counter is initialized with a fixed value of 5. This means that a
message can pass through a maximum of four BACnet routers.
LonTalk data link layer
The LonTalk data link layer is supported by the PX automation station and by the
operator units and tools.
LonTalk ist he communications protocol for LonWorks technology.
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Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 161: LonTalk data link layer
Addressing under
LonWorks technology
Physical address, neuron ID: The Neuron ID is the physical address for a
LonWorks device. It is a unique 48-bit (6 byte) identifier which is assigned to each
neuron chip during manufacturing.
Logical address: The logical LonTalk address is written to the LonWorks node
during commissioning on the network side.
Figure 162: Logical address structure
Domain ID: The domain ID is the highest unit in the LonWorks addressing system.
Data can only be exchanged within a domain. A gateway is required for interdomain communication. The domain ID can be 0, 1, 3 or 6 octets in length. A
domain can consist of up to 255 subnets.
Subnet ID: The subnet is a logical collection of up to 127 nodes within a domain.
The bus traffic within a subnet can be kept local by using BACnet routers. Subnets
must never be defined across a router.
Node ID: Unique identifier within the subnet. Each node can be addressed uniquely
within a domain by the subnet ID and the node ID.
Group ID: The group address is a type of addressing. The group address is not
used in BACnet.
On the ALN, the following rules apply to Desigo:
Designation
Values/Range
Description
Domain ID
0x49h (73)
The default length of the domain ID is one octet and the default value is
0x49h (73).
Subnet ID
1…255
The subnet ID is a consecutive number that starts with one. The subnet ID
is incremented by one when a subnet is full (no free node IDs).
Node ID
1…100
This range is for automation stations (PXC), system controllers (PXC...)
and system devices (BACnet routers).
101…120
Operator units and management stations are assigned to this range.
121…127
Temporary operator units (PXM20) and tools (XWP/ABT) look for a free
node ID in this range.
Table 53: Desigo definitions
IP data link layer
An additional layer, the BACnet Virtual Link Layer (BVLL), is used for BACnet over
IP. This layer transmits broadcast messages across IP routers.
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Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 163: IP data link layer
Below the BVLL, BACnet relies on UDP (User Datagram Protocol). Unlike TCP
(Transmission Control Protocol), UDP supports broadcast messages. The
connection monitoring (carried out by TCP) is resolved in the Application Layer.
All media, such as ethernet, are available if supported by IP as physical layers.
For detailed information on the IPv6 data link layer, see Ethernet, TCP/IP, MS/TP
and BACnet basics (CM110666).
IP addresses
The IP address of stationary and temporary operator units can be set automatically
via DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) provided that there is a DHCP
server in the network. The use of DHCP is not recommended with automation
stations and BACnet routers. DHCPv6 is currently not supported for IPv6.
DHCP is not allowed for devices using integrated BBMD functionality.
The IP addresses must be agreed upon with the IT department.
RFC1918 defines three specific address areas for private networks. IP addresses
within these ranges are not routed:
10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 Subnet mask: 255.0.0.0
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 Subnet mask: 255.240.0.0
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 Subnet mask: 255.255.0.0
For IPv6, IP addresses and private address ranges are defined differently. See
Ethernet, TCP/IP, MS/TP and BACnet basics (CM110666).
IP address: Host address of the network subscriber.
Subnet mask: Subnet mask of the IP segment in which the device is located. This
value must be aligned with the other IP devices.
The subnet mask is required for the identification of broadcast messages and for
communication across IP segments. The subnet mask and target IP address
enable the transmitting IP device to decide whether the data packet can be
delivered directly to the target device or if it must be forwarded via the default
gateway.
For IPv6, the subnet mask corresponds to the network prefix. See Ethernet,
TCP/IP, MS/TP and BACnet basics (CM110666).
Default gateway: IP address of the IP router. This value is relevant for
communication across IP segments.
UDP port number
For BACnet/IP to use UDP, a UDP port number must be defined. Only devices with
the same UDP port number can communicate with each other.
Port numbers are divided into the following classes by the IANA (Internet Assigned
Numbers Authority):
● Well Known Port Numbers: Fixed port numbers assigned by IANA (0… 1023)
● Registered Port Numbers: Numbers registered with IANA (1024…48151)
● Dynamic and/or Private Ports Dynamically assigned or privately used port
numbers (49152…65535)
For BACnet, port number 47808 (0xBAC0) is registered with IANA.
If there are several BACnet internetworks on an IP network, they can be separated
by different port numbers. Using several internetworks can be helpful in very large
projects, for migration, and to encapsulate sections of a plant with different
reliability criteria. Since the management station communicates simultaneously
with multiple internetworks, the operation is not restricted.
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However, only one port number is registered for BACnet with the IANA. If
additional UDP port numbers are required, we recommend the use of port numbers
47809 to 47823 (0xBAC1...0xBACF). This does not comply with IANA regulations.
This range is reserved for future applications and should not be used. There is only
a very small chance that these ports might be used elsewhere. To avoid clashes,
do not use any port numbers from the range of dynamic or private ports. See
www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers.
BACnet Broadcast
Management Device
(BBMD)
The BBMD is required as soon as IP routers are used in a BACnet network. IP
routers limit broadcast messages to the local IP segment, that is, they do not allow
any broadcast messages to pass through. In order to distribute BACnet broadcast
messages across IP segments irrespective of this limitation, a BBMD is required in
the relevant IP segments. If a BBMD receives a broadcast message, for example,
within the local IP segment, it transmits this as a unicast message to all other
BBMDs. The BBMDs then transmit the received message to their own local IP
segments. BACnet refers to this as two-hop distribution:
1. Hop: BBMD sends a unicast message to all other BBMDs.
2. Hop: They then distribute the message to all BACnet devices in the local IP
segment.
One-hop distribution can be implemented with Direct Broadcasts. In this case the
BBMD sends a direct broadcast to all remote IP segments. This broadcast is
received by all IP bus subscribers in the relevant segment. Not all IP routers
support Direct Broadcasts.
IPv6 (BVLLv6) only supports two-hop BBMD. Broadcasts are implemented via IPv6
mutlicasts. See Ethernet, TCP/IP, MS/TP and BACnet basics (CM110666).
BBMDs ensure that broadcast messages are distributed in a BACnet network.
They are grouped by BACnet network. A maximum of one BBMD is allowed in any
one IP segment.
BACnet network #100 is separated by IP routers. The Internet also contains IP
routers. This is why different segments are shown before and after the Internet
cloud. BBMDs are required so that BACnet broadcast messages are available in all
IP segments.
BBMD parameters
The BBMD parameters are written to the BBMD or (for Desigo) to the BACnet
router during commissioning. The following information is required for each BBMD
in the BACnet network:
Designation
Description
IP address
IP address of the BBMD.
UDP port
UDP port number of the BBMD.
Broadcast mask
If the BBMD is to be addressed via direct broadcast (one-hop distribution) the subnet mask of the
BBMD must be specified. Since not all IP routers support this mechanism, direct broadcasts are
not supported by default. Two-hop-distribution is always possible. The broadcast mask is then
255.255.255.255.
Not required for IPv6.
Table 54: Structure
Foreign device
Siemens
A foreign device is a (remote) BACnet device in a remote IP segment. It registers
with a BBMD in order to send or receive broadcast messages. Registration with a
BBMD involves making an entry in its Foreign Device Table (FDT). The registration
must be renewed at regular intervals.
The foreign device does not send broadcast messages, but passes them as
unicast messages to the BBMD for distribution. The BBMD in turn passes incoming
broadcast messages as unicast messages to the foreign devices in its FDT.
In the Desigo system, the management station, XWP/ABT, PX Web and PXM20-E
can be operated as foreign devices. IPv6 does not support foreign devices
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Examples from the Desigo
topology
●
●
●
●
Foreign device
parameters
IP Segment 1: Management station 1 does not have to be configured as a
foreign device, because this IP segment contains a BBMD.
IP Segment 2: PXM20-E does not have to be configured as a foreign device,
because this IP segment contains a BBMD.
IP Segment 2: Management station 3 does not have to be configured as
foreign device, because this IP segment contains a BBMD.
IP Segment 3: This segment only contains Management station 2. To enable
Management station 2 to receive and send broadcast messages, it must
register with a BBMD as a foreign device. It does not matter with which BBMD
it registers.
If a BACnet device operates as a foreign device, the IP address and UDP port
number of the BBMD must be specified.
Designation
Description
IP Address of BBMD
IP address of the BBMD with which the foreign device registers.
UDP Port of BBMD
UDP port number of the BBMD with which the foreign device is registered. The default is 0xBAC0.
Table 55: Structure
The recording interval (Time-To-Live) for Desigo products is set at 300 seconds (=
5 minutes).
PTP data link layer
The PTP Data Link Layer is used for remote management over the telephone line.
Unlike LonTalk and IP, PTP does not allow the creation of a network. The PTP
connection is always between two half routers, and between two different BACnet
networks. Several BACnet networks may be located at each end of the PTP
connection. Only one active communication line can exist between any two
BACnet networks or between any BACnet devices.
The half-router function is implemented in the management station, XWP/ABT and
PX.
Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 164: PTP data link layer
PTP connections are only possible between the management station, XWP/ABT
und PX. PTP connections between PXs are not permitted.
PX devices which can be reached via PTP always belong to a separate site. With
reference to the topology at the beginning of the chapter, the site named Baar must
not be combined with the sites named Zug or Cham. Several PXs per site can be
used as half routers. When establishing a communication, the best-performing
connection is always selected. Redundancy is not allowed, that is, several
simultaneously active connections in a given BACnet network are not allowed.
With the management station, a separate, independent, internal BACnet
internetwork is created for each Data Link Layer type. Routing between LonTalk, IP
or PTP is therefore not possible.
The following parameters are required for each half router:
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Designation
Description
Local network number
The BACnet network number to which the half router belongs.
13
With PX, the local network number is the same as the device's own network number.
The management station supports all three different Data Link Layers (IP, LonTalk and PTP).
They are handled internally as independent BACnet internetworks. This means that routing
between the different Data Link Layers is not possible. Therefore, the local network number can
be allocated to IP and/or LonTalk independently of the networks. However the local network
number must be unique among all networks which could possibly be reached from the
management station via a PTP connection.
Recommendation:
If the management station has an additional Data Link Layer (IP and/or LonTalk), the local network
number of this network should be used (example in the beginning of the chapter: For management
station 2, the local network number of BACnet network #4 should be adopted).
In a management station system with only one PTP connection, the local network number must be
in the range 1000 to 1099. (Example: Management station 3 -> #1000).
COM parameter
For the PX half router, the COM port to which a modem or null modem is connected must be
specified.
Modem parameters
The modem parameters contain individual settings for the relevant modem types. Predefined
parameter sets are available for the PX half router.
Table 56: Parameters for half routers
The following parameters are required for each PTP connection starting from a PX
half router:
Designation
Description
Remote network number
This network number determines the BACnet network in which the remote partner device is
located. In the Desigo system this is the local network number of the management station.
Remote area name
The remote area name stands for a peer-to-peer remote network number of the network
containing the management station.
During configuration, the remote area number lets you assign a clear name to the (remote) alarm
recipient rather than a network number.
Telephone number
The telephone number for access to the remote device.
Performance index
The performance index refers to the quality of the router data connection. If multiple PX halfrouters are available in a PX site, and if a connection to a remote network is to be established, the
router with the best performance index is selected. If no connection is established, the router with
the next best performance index automatically tries to connect.
Range: 0...255
(0= best / 255 = worst connection)
Table 57: Parameters for PTP connections
For each PTP connection in the management station, only the telephone number
needs to be defined.
Data link layer MS/TP
Data Link Layer Master/Slave Token Passing MS/TP is another protocol variant for
BACnet. Desigo supports this variant via a specific router that connects BACnet
MS/TP to BACnet/IP.
MS/TP is based on the physical layer EIA-485/RS-485 and supports baud rates up
to 76.8 kbps. Up to 256 devices can be connected to one MS/TP segment (in
theory, dependent on their unit load).
Application Layer
Network Layer
LonTalk
IP
PTP
MSTP
Figure 165: Data link layer MS/TP
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Addressing MS/TP
devices
Each device has its own unique MAC address. The MAC address is one octet long
and defined as follows:
● 0-127 reserved for master devices
● 0-254 reserved for slave devices
● 255 reserved for broadcasts
The MAC address can be set via DIP switch (hardware) or related configuration
tools (software) for each device.
Structuring
MS/TP is transmitted via two-core cables as per EIA-485/RS-485. The maximum
length of a segment is 1200 meters. The specification allows for up to 32 full unit
load devices on the segment (unit load is the assumed load derived from electrical
resistance of the transceiver block in the device). Modern devices only need load
units of 1/2, 1/4 or even 1/8. This allows for up to 256 devices per segment.
Different segments can be interconnected via repeaters to form a larger EIA-485network. The specific electrical properties, such as polarity, common signal ground,
terminating resistances, etc. must be taken into account. The actual, possible
network size and maximum transmission rate primarily depend on the network
structure. Establishing a network in daisy chain form is best.
BACnet/IP
10664Z42_06
MS/TP
...
Router
PXG3
DXR2
DXR2
DXR2
DXR2
Figure 166: MS/TP nodes in a line architecture
Due to relatively difficult, electrical conditions imposed by EIA-485 wiring and
limited data transmission capacity, we recommend using BACnet MS/TP only for
devices with low data volumes that are geographically far apart.
For devices with larger data volumes and shorter distances to the Desigo
automation station, integration in Desigo primarily should be carried out via TX
Open or PX Open.
System devices
PXG3 is a BACnet router that routes BACnet telegrams between BACnet networks
and different data link layers. It is available in two versions:
● PXG3.L: (triangle router) Simultaneous routing between Ethernet/IP, LonTalk,
and MS/TP
● PXG3.M: Routing between Ethernet/IP and MS/TP
See BACnet router for BACnet/Ethernet/IP, BACnet/LonTalk, BACnet MS/TP
PXG3.L, PXG3.M (CM1N9270).
An individual BACnet IPv6 data link can be used as an option for the router. As a
result, the PXG3.M is turned into a triangle router and the PXG3.L to a square
router. The router can be configured either via XWP or the integrated web server.
BACnet address
Every BACnet device in the BACnet internetwork can be accessed via its BACnet
address.
The BACnet address is defined by the BACnet standard and comprises the
following elements:
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Designation
Description
Network number
Network number of the BACnet network in which the device is located. The network number is
only parameterized on devices with BACnet router functionality (including half router) and is
implicitly valid for all BACnet devices in the BACnet network.
BACnet MAC address
Address specific to the transport protocol. This address is written to the device in the
commissioning phase.
BACnet MAC address for:
LonTalk:
2 octets, subnet ID und node ID
IP:
6 octets, IP address and UDP port
IPv6:
3 octets as virtual MAC address (VMAC)
MS/TP:
1 octet, MAC address (master 0-127, slave 0254, broadcast 255)
Table 58: Structure
BACnet device address
Each BACnet device has a device address. This address is written to the device
during the network commissioning process. The BACnet device address is unique
within the BACnet internetwork. The term BACnet device address is an in-house
term rather than an official BACnet term.
Designation
Description
Device ID
Object identifier of the BACnet device object. The device ID is unique within the BACnet
internetwork.
Device name
The object name of the BACnet device object. The device name is unique within the BACnet
internetwork.
Table 59: Structure
13.2 LonWorks Architecture (ALN)
With the LonWorks-based communication protocol complete networks made up of
interoperable products can be created. The protocol conforms to ISO/IEC 14908
(worldwide), EN 14908 (Europe), ANSI/CEA-709/852 (U.S.) and is also
standardized in China. See www.lonmark.org.
LonWorks is suited for use with different types of transmission media, such as
twisted pair cables, power line, RF, fiber optics or IP (TCP/IP and UDP/IP) It
supports straightforward installation with different cabling topologies (for example,
star or line). The connection of objects via bindings (for example, standard network
variables (SNVTs), standard configuration properties (SCPTs)) can be defined at
the project engineering stage or can be adapted in the field.
Structure
The following figure shows the structure of a Lon network in the FLN
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Figure 167: LonWorks network
Key:
R
Repeater, for example, LonWorks physical repeater
B
Bridge, for example, L-Switch (Loytec)
RT
Router, for example, LonWoks router
GW
Gateway, for example, PXC..., RXZ03.1
See LonWorks networks Checklist (CA110335).
Trunk
A trunk holds all devices that can communicate with each other directly or via
repeater, bridge or router. The term trunk is specific to the Desigo system. One
trunk corresponds to one LonWorks or Desigo RXC project. Trunks can be
connected via gateways.
Segment
A trunk can be divided into segments. The segments are connected by a router. If
there are no routers, the trunk comprises only one segment.
Physical segment
The physical segment is the communication medium. LonWorks devices are
connected to the physical segment. One segment can be divided by bridges or
repeaters into several segments. The number of devices per physical segment is
limited. See RXC Installation Guide (CA110334).
System devices
Gateway
The gateway links trunks. It operates on the application layer of the ISO/OSI layer
model. The following LonWorks gateways are available:
The RXZ03.1 point coupler provides a fixed number and type of LonTalk network
variables (NV). Each side of the point coupler belongs to a trunk or LonWorks
project. The point coupler can be used to implement time-critical connections
between two trunks. The point coupler integrates third-party devices that have
been engineered with a different tool.
Loytec L-Proxy and Sysmic XFM-LL are freely programmable point couplers. The
XFM-LL device may be used, when depicted like a standard third-party device
(configuration via its own tool).
The PXX-L.. extension modules let you connect LonWorks devices to the PXC..D
modular series. This adds the grouping, schedule, trend, and alarm management
functions to the RXC room automation and allows the mapping of data points to
BACnet/IP or BACnet/LonTalk.
The LonWorks router operates on the network layer of the LonWorks protocol. It
filters data packets based on their subnet ID or group ID. Subnets or groups must
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13
Router
never be defined across a router, that is, the subnet IDs and group IDs at each end
of the router must never be the same. Routers are used where there is heavy local
network traffic. They allow the unloading of unaffected devices from the network
traffic. In Desigo there are no large LonWorks networks, as the FLN is divided into
trunks. Routers are only required in exception cases.
L-Switch (Loytec)
The L-Switch filters the package on the basis of the subnet/node ID or group ID. It
automatically learns the topology and forwards the data packets accordingly. The
L-switch does not have to be configured. Unlike the router, there is no need to take
account of any addressing limits (allocation of Subnet ID or Group ID).
Physical repeater
LonWorks has physical and logical repeaters. The physical LonWorks repeater
does not filter the data packets. It regenerates the electrical signal. One physical
LonWorks repeater can be used in the path between any two devices within a
segment.
In logical repeaters, the data packet is processed by the neuron chip. This enables
several logical repeaters to be connected in series. The disadvantage is that the
logical repeater must be configured, and that owing to the limited size of the buffer,
it cannot be used for large data packets, that is, for BACnet/LonTalk.
13.3 KNX Architecture (ALN)
KNX is an open standard that conforms to EN 50090 and ISO/IEC 14543. See
www.knx.org. KNX corresponds to the former European Installation Bus (EIB) and
is backward-compatible.
With KNX technology, advanced multiple disciplines and simple solutions can be
implemented to satisfy individual requirements in room and building automation in
a flexible way. The ETS, a vendor-independent tool is available for commissioning.
KNX can use twisted pair cables, radio frequency (RF) or data transmission
networks in connection with the Internet Protocol for communication between the
devices. KNX has links and interfaces for connection to Ethernet/IP, RF, lighting
control with DALI and building automation and control systems.
Structure
The following figure shows the structure of the KNX network:
● KNX: KNX devices, for example, third-party KNX
● PX KNX: Automation station PXC001.D or PXC001-E.D and PX KNX firmware
Backbone line
Backbone
coupler
(1.0.0)
Backbone
coupler
(2.0.0)
PX KNX
(0.0.y)
Backbone
coupler
(3.0.0)
Area 1
Area 3
PX KNX
(3.0.y)
Line
coupler
(3.1.0)
PX KNX
(3.1.y)
Line 1
Line
coupler
(3.2.0)
EIB
EIB
EIB
EIB
EIB
EIB
Line 2
Figure 168: KNX network topology
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Line
A KNX network consists of lines. Up to 64 devices can be connected to each line.
Area
Up to 15 lines can be connected to a main line via line couplers (LC). This is called
an area.
Backbone line
The topology can be expanded by means of a backbone line. Up to 15 areas can
be connected to the backbone line via backbone couplers (BC). Technically, these
are the same devices as line couplers.
Line/Backbone couplers
Couplers separate the areas and lines. Couplers keep the bus traffic within bounds.
Datagrams that are only needed on one line should not create a load on the entire
network and hence have to be confined to that line. Respective filter tables are
created (ETS) when setting up the project/network.
Engineering Tool Software The KNX Engineering Tool Software (ETS) is used to create KNX projects. A bus
(ETS)
interface is required to commission the devices with ETS.
For a detailed description of the KNX topology, see
http://www.knx.org/fileadmin/template/documents/downloads_support_menu/KNX_t
utor_seminar_page/basic_documentation/Topology_E1212c.pdf.
System Devices
PX KNX
The PX KNX system controller maps KNX devices to BACnet objects. PX KNX also
supports different system functions, such as grouping, scheduling, alarming,
trending, etc.
The system controller must be positioned correctly in relation to the topology and
the load on the bus caused by the devices and connections (group addresses).
Bus power supply
Each line and each area must include a bus power supply.
13.4 KNX PL-Link Architecture (FLN)
KNX PL-Link (PeripheraL-Link) connects communicating room and field devices
(room devices, sensors, actors) with the PXC3 room automation station and the
DXR2 compact room automation station. KNX PL-Link fully complies with the KNX
standard.
Siemens field devices can be connected to the KNX PL-Link using the KNX PLLink plug & play capability. KNX PL-Link devices are configured using the Desigo
tools. The KNX commissioning software (ETS) is not needed.
One or more KNX PL-Link devices are connected to the trunk of the corresponding
room automation station in a line topology.
A comprehensive library with preconfigured devices supports simple engineering.
The PXC3 room automation station allows for simultaneous integration of devices
with KNX PL-Link and KNX S-Mode on a single bus line. Devices with KNX SMode are additionally commissioned using ETS.
Structure
The following figure shows an example of a logical network topology with KNX PLLink devices, a room automation station and several rooms.
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Network Architecture
DALI Architecture (FLN)
13
BAC network
Automation
station
KNX PL-Link network
Room
Room
Room
Figure 169: KNX PL-Link logical network topology
Power supply concept
The PXC3 and DXR2 room automation stations have an integrated KNX power
supply to supply their trunks with the corresponding KNX PL-Link devices. This
allows simple installations, for example, an automation station with one or a few
room units, without an extra device for power supply to the KNX PL-Link network. If
many KNX PL-Link devices are connected, the power supply at the room
automation stations is shut off and an external KNX power supply must be used.
The following figure shows the concept of a built-in power supply unit (PSU):
Automation station
PSU
KNX PL-Link network
Figure 170: Built-In KNX PL-Link power supply unit
System devices
Third-party KNX devices can be integrated in KNX PL-Link networks via KNX Smode. The KNX Engineering Tool Software (ETS) is necessary to engineer and
commission these devices.
DXR2.M.. automation stations cannot integrate KNX S-Mode devices.
13.5 DALI Architecture (FLN)
DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) is a dedicated protocol for lighting
control. See www.dali-ag.org.
DALI is tailor made for modern lighting solutions. A DALI system can be as small
as a single luminaire, or can encompass multiple systems across one or more
buildings. DALI systems can be connected using lighting hubs/routers.
DALI features:
● Max. 64 devices per subnet (hub/routers)
● Max. 300m cabling
● Max. 250mA device consumption
● Standard two-core cable (1,5mm²)
● Polarity free & free wiring topology
● DALI power and data on the same pair of wires
● Bidirectional communication with feedback of operating state (dim level, lamp
failure, etc.)
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Network Architecture
DALI Architecture (FLN)
Structure
A DALI system can be made up of control gear, control devices and bus power
supplies.
Control gear
Control gear usually contains the power control circuit to drive lamps, or some
other type of output, such as on/off switching or 1 to 10 V analog signals.
Control devices
Control devices can provide information to other control devices, such as light
intensity information, and can send commands to control gear. Input devices are a
type or a part of a control device that provides some information to the system,
such as a button press or movement detection. DALI application controllers are
also control devices, for example, they can send commands to control gear to
modify the lighting.
Bus power supplies
At least one bus power supply must be present in a DALI system. This is
necessary to allow both communications on the bus, and to power any buspowered devices. The bus power supply does not need to be a separate unit – it
could be part of another device such as a LED driver or a sensor.
Bus wires
A DALI system also includes the bus wires that are used to connect the DALI
terminals of the various devices in the system.
Addressing
DALI allows the flexible addressing of devices.
At the simplest level, all devices are addressed simultaneously by broadcast
commands. This allows the control of lighting in a similar manner to 1 to 10 V
analog control, without requiring any configuration of the individual devices. If a
level (Direct Arc Power Command) is broadcast, then all control gear will act upon
that command, changing their output to the same new level.
With simple configuration, DALI devices can be given one of 64 short-addresses.
This allows individual control, configuration and querying of any single device in the
system.
DALI devices can also be group addressed. For example, a DALI LED driver could
be programmed to be in any combination of the 16 available groups. When a
command is sent to a group, only devices that are in that group are addressed.
System devices
PXC3...A
The PXC3…A automation stations have a DALI bus for connecting up to 64 DALI
ballasts/drivers.
PXC3.E16A
The PXC3.E16A room automation station is optimized for lighting applications. It
has an onboard DALI interface for connecting up to 64 electronic ballasts or LED
drivers
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Remote Access
Remote Access Methods
14
14 Remote Access
The remote access is an access to resources via the internet or a point-to-point
connection.
The remote access is used to:
● Connect a remote location to a management station, for example, for on-call
service, managing different locations or support by a specialist
● Remotely access a management station
● Make a change, create an extension or search for errors using an engineering
tool
● Forward alarms as text messages or emails from PX Web, TP Web or a
management station
14.1 Remote Access Methods
There are two remote access methods:
● Methods that establish a direct point-to-point connection
● Methods that use public networks (for example, telephone networks for
accessing the internet) as a transport medium
Management station
Metro ethernet
Modem
TV cable
GPRS/UMTS/LTE modem
Touch Panel
Radio
BACnet/IP
10664Z45en_01
Web interface
Automation stations
Figure 171: Remote access methods
The following access networks can be used for the remote access:
● Telephone network
● TV cable network
● Other cable-based networks, such as metro ethernet
● Mobile networks
● Other RF-based access networks
Telephone network-based technologies
DSL variants
Siemens
Characteristics of DSL variants:
● There are different ADSL and VDSL variants. The DSL variants are countryspecific.
● The uplink (that is, the data flows from your private home or project to the
internet) and downlink (that is, the opposite direction) bandwidth are different.
Take this into account when you select a suitable internet access.
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Remote Access
Choosing a suitable Access Technology
●
●
The DSL line in parallel can be used for telephone calls.
If you want to use telephony on the same line, you need a splitter in addition to
the DSL modem.
TV cable-based access
●
This access is similar to DSL. You can access the system remotely via a cable
modem provided by the cable network operator.
Other cable-based networks, such as metro ethernet
Characteristics of other cable-based networks, such as metro ethernet:
● Connections with very high bandwidth are available.
● A metro ethernet connection is usually not implemented as part of a BACS
project.
Use of mobile telephone networks
The available bandwidth is shared by an unknown number of users with an
unknown usage profile. The maximum data transfer rates that are advertised by
the mobile network operators deviate substantially from the actual data transfer
rates.
The access via a mobile network is less stable than via a cable-based network in
terms of availability and data throughput.
If you have to establish a remote access in a remote area, check the service
availability and stability. You can use the distance from the base station of the
network operator as a criterion. You can also check if there are any large obstacles
(mountains, etc.) between the base station and the building.
LTE & UMTS
Characteristics of LTE & UMTS:
● Can be fast
GPRS
Characteristics of GPRS:
● The speed suffices merely for tasks requiring a low bandwidth, for example, for
the system to send an email with a small attachment.
Other RF-based access networks
Characteristics of such RF-based technologies:
● Suited for remote locations, when no DSL is available.
● There are various technologies used by the different providers. Find out what is
available at your location.
● Depending on the used frequency, transmission problems can occur during
rain or snowfall, even over short distances.
14.2 Choosing a suitable Access Technology
The technology depends on your intended use and the required bandwidth.
For details about the required bandwidth of the management stations, see chapter
System Configuration.
I want to use the remote access for...
Remote access to the management station
Remote access to another BACnet client
Connecting a Desigo system to a management
station
Alarm forwarding
DSL
LTE &
UMTS
GPRS
TV cable
Metro
ethernet
RF-based
o/+
o/+
-
+
+
o/+
+
o
o/-
+
+
+
o/+
-/o
-
+
+
o/+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Table 60: Which remote access technology is suitable for which task?
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Remote Access
Technical Details
14
Key:
+
Good
o
Slow but still possible
-
Not possible or too slow
The different access technologies are available with different bandwidth, for
example, DSL (o/+) can be fast or relatively slow.
Costs
The costs are divided into monthly basic costs and usage costs. To optimize costs,
analyze your usage profile, that is, how many times per month do you use it and
how much data do you exchange per use.
A data flat rate ensures that the costs are capped. Choosing an inappropriate rate
plan for a mobile subscription could result in high costs.
Availability
RF-based links and all mobile network-based transmission standards can suffer
from transmission problems due to bad weather especially at the cell border. The
bandwidth that can effectively be used in the project can vary over the day,
because the bandwidth is shared by all users. The bandwidth variations for cablebased technologies are lower.
Recommendations
To ensure a reliable remote access, use cable-based technologies even if the cost
is slightly higher. Use mobile networks or RF-based systems only if no alternative
is available. If you require a high availability remote access, you can additionally
establish a mobile network-based link as a fallback solution. To do this, use a
router that offers both a DSL and a GPRS/UMTS/LTE modem.
Every remote access can be attacked. Note the safety measures in the document
IT Security in Desigo Installations (CM110663).
Access to the PXC..D/-U automation stations via Desigo Insight remote
management or Xworks Plus (XWP) can be protected with a password (password
property for remote access [RemAcpwd]). You can enter the password in the
Device Property dialog in XWP.
If the automation station establishes the connection, the connection is not
protected by a password.
Migrating from an analog
modem-based method
Analog modems should not be used in new installations and are not future-proof
due to the migration of the networks to Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).
ISDN also is not a future-proof technology and should therefore not be used.
If DSL is available, use DSL. Otherwise, use other cable-based internet access
networks. If you cannot use such a network, use a mobile network or an RF-based
access.
If a project is based on LON, use the PXG3.L router, to connect the remote access
on the IP side of the router.
14.3 Technical Details
DSL
The DSL modem must match the used xDSL technology and should be purchased
in the country of use. DSL connections can use different coding methods, which
differ from country to country.
A modem either has one RJ45 connector for connecting the router or has a built-in
router. The router must be configured. The modem needs an access code from the
Internet Service Provider (ISP).
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Technical Details
If the telephone line is to be used for DSL and telephony, a DSL splitter that splits
the phone and data signals is necessary.
TV cable-based method
The operator provides the modem. Sometimes, you have to configure the modem.
Usually, the cable operator provides a preconfigured modem or the modem
configures itself automatically when you connect it for the first time. The modem
has an RJ45 connector to connect it to the IP network (the router) or a built-in
router. The router must be configured. Sometimes you need to enter an access
code received from the operator.
A separate DSL splitter for splitting TV and data signals is not necessary.
Metro Ethernet
Metro ethernet is usually not implemented in a BACS project and is therefore not
described in this document.
Use of mobile telephone networks (GPRS/UMTS/LTE)
Several suppliers offer GPRS/UMTS/LTE modems, for example, modems for
private use and modems for industrial applications (also top-hat rail).
Because of the attenuation of the walls and ceilings, the signal inside a building
can be weak, that is, an antenna must be placed on the exterior of the building,
preferably on the roof.
You can get the best signal strength when the nearest base station of the mobile
network you want to use is not too far away and there are no large obstacles
between the base station and the modem's antenna (line of sight). Directional
antennas improve the transmission quality, but must be optimally directed towards
the base station.
The antenna cable between the modem and the antenna must be short, otherwise
the signal is too weak. Observe the manufacturer's information on the cable type
and maximum length. Antenna cables may not be bent or pinched too severely.
The mobile modem must be placed near the optimum antenna location. The length
of the cable to the IP network is not that critical.
The mobile network operator provides the SIM card. SIM cards come in various
sizes, depending on the modem. Choose the correct SIM card.
The modem is connected to the IP network. The safety measures depend on the
modem.
GPRS modems with an RS-232 connection can be connected to some PX
controllers using a USB-RS-232 converter.
RF-based access networks
Since there are different technologies, an RF-based access is only implemented in
tight cooperation with the network operator. We recommend that you strictly follow
his guidelines.
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Management Stations
Technical Details
15
15 Management Stations
A building automation and control system encompasses all control functions of one
or more buildings.
In addition to typical HVAC systems, there is a need to integrate other areas of the
building, such as lighting and blind control systems, fire alarm systems and access
systems.
At completion the system comprises one or more superordinate management
stations that let you centrally operate and monitor the individual plants, while each
plant's technical building equipment still continues to work autonomously.
Figure 172: The management station lets you operate and monitor the plants
Functions
The management level has the following functions:
● Central operation of HVAC processes and related areas of a building
● Visualization, storing and interpretation of data from underlying levels
● Control of superordinate functions (time catalogs, external process reactions)
● Interface for external communication (alarm messages, etc.)
● Data exchange between DDC controllers (automation level)
Requirements
Modern building automation and control systems need to fulfill the following
requirements:
● User friendliness
● Integration capability
● Expandability
● Remote operability
● Cost effectiveness
Advantages
Under the brand name Desigo™, Siemens offers a system family of
complementary automation modules and management stations for buildings and
infrastructures of all types and sizes.
The Desigo management stations have the following advantages:
● A uniform interface for all connected areas from heating, ventilation and airconditioning through fire alarm systems, video solutions and intrusion alarms to
access control systems.
● Cost-effective solutions in every expansion phase through the broad scalability
of the number of data points, functions, and broad integration of subsystems.
● A state-of-the-art graphical user interface.
● PC- or server-based management station based on the current Microsoft
operating system.
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Management Stations
Desigo Insight
15.1 Desigo Insight
Client-server architecture
Desigo Insight is based on a client-server architecture, which improves system
performance and reduces the costs of a large installation with multiple user
stations. Desigo Insight can be installed as a desktop, server or web application.
Desktop application
The desktop application is suitable for small plants and does not have web and
remote desktop access.
Server application
The client-server application with centralized data handling and enhanced access
through web or remote desktop is suitable for larger or more complex installations.
Web application
The web application is suitable for operation as a service. The Desigo Insight
server process can thus run continuously, like the web server (MS IIS), without a
Windows user being logged in or without the need to start a desktop application.
This lets you access the plants via the web at any time.
The Desigo web application provides the most important Desigo Insight user
functions. It does not provide engineering and configuration tasks.
Terminal server
application
Via the terminal server function, a remote desktop client has full access to all
Desigo Insight functions, including engineering and configuration (remote service
and engineering). To use the remote desktop and terminal server functionality,
Desigo Insight must be installed for operation as a service.
15.1.1
Desigo Insight shell
User Functions
The Desigo Insight shell is a taskbar that shows the connected sites, time and date,
pending alarms and events, and the logged in user.
The taskbar lets you do the following:
● Log in and log out
● Launch Desigo Insight user functions
● Connect and disconnect the site
● Start configured third-party applications
● Open the online help
● Close Desigo Insight or third-party applications
Plant Viewer
Figure 173: Plant Viewer
The Plant Viewer graphically displays the areas of a building and the associated
plants. You can monitor and control data points in the building, change values and
acknowledge alarms. You can view several windows at the same time (overlapping
or tiled). You can even view large graphics, such as floor plans by freely adjusting
their size.
Measured values, setpoints, operating states and alarms are continuously updated
and displayed in real-time. You can define the way they are displayed during
engineering, for example, status changes are indicated by the object symbol, such
as animation, change in shape and color.
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Time Scheduler
Figure 174: Time Scheduler
The Time Scheduler lets you centrally program all time-controlled functions in the
building automation and control system, including the individual room control
system. With the graphics-based operation of weekly schedules and exception
programs, you can easily modify and optimize scheduler programs at any time.
Alarm Viewer
Figure 175: Alarm Viewer
The Alarm Viewer displays alarms by type, and helps you choose the appropriate
action required by the system. Its extensive filter and search functions, help you
quickly find the necessary information.
In larger systems with more than one management station, all management
stations access the same alarm database. An alarm for any given management
station is entered in this database and automatically displayed on all management
stations.
Alarm Router
Figure 176: Alarm Router
The Alarm Router transfers messages or events in the building automation and
control system to specific receivers without the need for user action at the
management station. The Alarm Router launches when Desigo Insight is started,
and runs in the background whether or not a user or site is connected.
Alarms and important system events can be transferred via the following media:
● Printers
● Faxes
● Pagers
● Mobile phones
● E-mail systems
Trend Viewer
Figure 177: Trend Viewer
The Trend Viewer displays current process data in real time (online) and past
process data (offline) in a historical view over a time period in an easy-to-use
graphical or textual form. The Trend Viewer is used to optimize plant operation and
reduce costs.
Trend data can be displayed in the following modes:
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Online trend logging displays real-time process data that are updated
whenever a change of value (COV) occurs, or as the result of a time-based
scan.
● Offline trend logging displays past process data that was recorded by an
automation station and uploaded to a database at the management level.
● Archive data displays older data that was moved from the trend database into
archive files.
The trend views can be saved. Online trend data can be continuously logged and
stored in the trend database.
●
Eco Viewer
Figure 178: Eco Viewer
The Desigo System Eco Monitoring function offers decision-making basics on
economic operation of primary plants. The Eco Viewer uses reference data (quality
status indicators) to illustrate the efficiency of primary plants in real time (baseline
comparison). If limit values are violated, the Green Leaf display in the Eco Viewer
and Plant Viewer changes its color from green to red. To evaluate data, the
calculated value for the associated time period is logged via Trendlog object.
Object Viewer
Figure 179: Object Viewer
The Object Viewer helps you navigate through the entire structure. You can select,
view and change the hierarchically organized data objects.
The Object Viewer supports four hierarchical views:
● Technical View is the plant-based standard view associated with the technical
designation (TD).
● User View is based on customer-specific user designations (UD) (user
addresses). The address structure and contents are defined during the
engineering process.
● System View is the standard hierarchical view that represents the topology of
the BACnet network. A site contains devices and each device contains objects.
● Online View reads all BACnet objects on a network. Data can be imported to
the database using the device wizard.
See Import BACnet project data (CM110591).
Log Viewer
Figure 180: Log Viewer
The Log Viewer shows all tracked events that have occurred in the system. Events
and user activities are archived in chronological order in the log database and can
be viewed at any time.
The Log Viewer runs in the background (Event Handler) as a service and
continuously logs the following events:
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Alarm events from the process level, for example, plant alarms and high priority
warnings. The alarm is logged when it occurs, upon acknowledgment, reset
and return to normal.
● System events from Desigo Insight management stations and automation
stations, for example, communication failures, selection procedures, start-up,
shutdown, hard-disk monitoring, battery checks, etc.
● User events for reporting user activities on the management station, for
example, authorized and unauthorized user login procedures and the
modification of values, parameters and setpoints, etc.
● Status events from the process level, for example, plant ON/OFF, etc.
The logged data are stored on a Microsoft SQL server or in an MSDE database,
and are protected by password.
●
Archiving log and trend
data
The archiving function (proprietary or in XML format) removes data from the
runtime databases to create space for new data if storage capacity is limited, and
to store the data in a suitable form for retrieval at a later date. Data are archived
either manually by the user or automatically on the basis of time or data quantity.
Report Viewer
Figure 181: Report Viewer
See chapter Reports.
Reaction Processor
Figure 182: Reaction Processor
The Reaction Processor monitors plants and processes system-wide for the
occurrence of specific criteria (events). If one (or a combination) of these monitored
criteria is met, the Reaction Process triggers preconfigured (re)actions. The
Reaction Processor is a server function that operates continuously.
Reactions are actions that – based on certain conditions – are automatically
executed, either at the automation or at the management level. Process-critical
reactions, such as reactions with high requirements regarding real-time response
and reliability must operate on the automation level and must therefore be set up
accordingly during the engineering phase.
Reactions can be configured by an operator online during the normal operating
phase (not during the engineering phase). Reactions on the management level
replace repetitive manual tasks by the user, that is, tasks that an operator runs per
clearly defined circumstances (for example, on Monday morning print high-priority
alarms that occurred over the weekend).
The Reaction Processor lets you automate repetitive operator actions that are
usually run manually by the operator, for example:
● Automated control and switching of plants based on events that occur and are
monitored during operation
● Automated start up and routing of reports
The Reaction Processor includes a global scheduler / calendar program at the
management level for plants integrated at the automation level without a time
switch.
User-oriented reactions should not represent an integral part of standard process
programming, as the latter should operate autonomously and decentralized and be
protected against unauthorized access.
Desigo Insight has a global time scheduler with calendar functions on the system
management level to execute reactions at predefined times of the day (time
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Global time scheduler with
calendar function
15.1.2
schedule) or on specific days (calendar/date). Plants and devices can be controlled
on the automation level accordingly without time and calendar functions.
Main Components
Generic configuration
tools
The generic configuration tools are offline tools that let you configure the
organization and behavior of the management station. The tools only use the data
at the management station and do not communicate with the automation systems.
The tools are generic, as they are not specific to any particular automation system.
Generic editors
The generic editors let you operate the building. You can change or override
parameters and edit management objects (for example, time schedules, trend log
objects and destination lists).
Generic DB Import tool
The generic DB Import tool imports, updates or deletes the engineering data of the
automation stations from the engineering tool into the Desigo management station
database.
Change of State (COS)
PDX and SDX
PDX (Process device Data eXchange) is an interface for reading data from and
writing data to devices in the subsystem. PDX allows the integration of automation
systems (Desigo PX, Unigyr, Visonik and Integral automation systems and BACnet
third-party devices), which depend on connection-based or connection-free
communication protocols.
See BACnet Third Party Integration (CM110795).
SDX (Storage Directory eXchange) provides two major services for the Desigo
Insight applications:
● A directory service that enables an application to browse through the
engineering data in the automation systems. This service supports different
views (System View, Technical View and User View).
● A naming conversion utility for conversion between the various address formats.
License server
The license server provides services to client applications that are used to
determine the exact range of functions and sizes for which the user has a valid
license. The server also includes functions for sharing dongles over a LAN.
Database server
The database server relies on the Microsoft SQL Server and manages the
databases for alarming, logging, trending and the system database. The server
handles the manipulation of the database and is responsible for transactions,
rollbacks and the locking mechanism. It also provides a uniform data management
architecture that is reliable and open to a wide range of applications and data
sources.
Alarm server
The alarm server handles alarms from various automation systems and adds
information, such as alarm status, to the alarms. The server has an interface to the
alarm database for permanent storage and provides clients with an interface for
reading and manipulating alarms.
Protocol drivers
Protocol drivers, such as the BACnet driver, act as an interface between the
automation system and Desigo Insight. The protocol drivers are used for the
automation system-specific mapping of information and services to the standard
PDX interface.
Trend server
The trend server stores offline trend data uploaded from the automation systems
and online trend data from the Trend Viewer in the trend database. It also provides
an open interface (API) for access to the data in the trend database.
The archiving component handles the periodical archiving of historical data from
the trend database.
Event server
The event server provides all Desigo management station applications with a
service for writing events to the log database. It adds missing information to the
received log events if necessary.
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Access to the log database is provided exclusively via the event server, that is, this
server provides a service which enables all clients to read the log database. The
provided data is filtered in accordance with the read access level of the user
logged in the client PC.
The services for writing to the log database (for example, for engineering tools) and
retrieving log data (for example, export for ADP) are available even when Desigo
Insight is not running.
System monitoring
The System Supervisor is accessible from the taskbar and shows the free system
resources and the system resources that are used by Desigo Insight.
Desigo Insight is a BACnet operator station. It is delivered with its own PICS
(BACnet Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement).
See BACnet Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement (PICS) (CM110665).
ADP/CC
ADP (Advanced Data Processing) is a data analysis and reporting program for
offline trend data.
CC (Consumption Control) manages and monitors energy costs in buildings.
PDM
PDM (Process Data Manager) is a server application that manages the common
MS SQL database for the ADP/CC clients.
The Trend and Trend Archive databases, are linked to the PDM database for
transferring data.
InfoCenter
InfoCenter analyzes and logs trend and system activity data. It is mainly used in
critical environments, such as the pharmaceutical industry, for archiving,
administering and logging critical data for compliance reporting.
In order for InfoCenter to collect data from Desigo Insight, Desigo Insight must be
installed as a service and the Desigo Interface function must be enabled.
ADP, CC, PDM and InfoCenter are not part of Desigo Insight and must be
purchased and installed separately.
15.1.3
Access and Security
User environment
The management station has a flexible mechanism for defining each user’s
environment. You can define which users have access to which sites, which
buildings and which Desigo management station applications they may operate.
Users in a building can be grouped logically according to their responsibilities (for
example, caretaker, building supervisor, maintenance engineer), with each user
group having its own set of privileges. Default user groups and copy functions are
provided to speed up engineering and setup.
Access levels
There are eight access levels. Each level includes the access rights of all levels
below it.
Scope
Scope is the general term for specific object access in the management station. A
scope segments and implements certain rules for the user role in the project. A
user only sees the area of the building assigned to him, for example, pumps,
receives only alarms from this area in the event of an emergency and can only
acknowledge those alarms. If an emergency occurs in an area that is not in the
scope of this user, for example, ventilators, the user does not receive an alarm
about this event.
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Alarm messages to printers, mail, pagers or in files are forwarded by definition in
the Alarm Router and are not influenced by scopes.
Figure 183: Scopes
User groups
Desigo Insight has six predefined user groups. The Administrators and Expanded
Server groups are for managing and handling the system. The remaining four
groups are reserved for end customers. Each of these user groups has a different
access level.
The other four groups are:
● Basic operation: For the building operator and for security personnel who may
operate and monitor the plant from time to time. This group may operate the
Alarm Viewer, Time Scheduler, Object Viewer and Plant Viewer.
● Standard operation: For plant operators and trained personnel, who are familiar
with the plant and all the associated inputs and outputs, are able to carry out
minor repairs and servicing work (sensors, pumps, spare parts replacement),
and can optimize the plant by fine-tuning its control action. In addition to basic
applications, this group has access to the Alarm Router, Trend Viewer and Log
Viewer.
● Expert operation: For service technicians and personnel responsible for the
plants. The service technicians must operate and monitor all control functions.
In addition to standard applications, this group has the right to run DB Import.
● Service operation: For Siemens service personnel and qualified plant
technicians.
Engineering and runtime
management
In the System Configurator you can engineer access rights, that is, configure user
groups with users and associated access rights.
The access and security policy is defined in System Configurator for the individual
user groups. Read and write levels for each object are stored in the system
database and certain information may be hidden or write-protected, depending on
the rights of the logged-in user.
Predefined user groups and a copy function help keep engineering work to a
minimum.
15.1.4
Alarms
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Alarm Management
An alarm is a notification that alerts the system user that an event has occurred or
that a condition exists which is outside the defined limits. The Desigo Insight alarm
management system alerts building operators to abnormal conditions and assists
them in taking appropriate actions.
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Alarm management
Alarm management in the building automation and control system comprises the
following:
● Alarm generation and alarm message customization on the automation level in
Desigo PX, on Desigo Room Automation or other subsystems
● Alarm notification and alarm handling in the operator units, that is, Desigo
PXM20, the PX Web and all subsystems on the Desigo Insight management
station
● Alarm routing
Alarm management in the Desigo Insight management station involves several
modules:
● Alarm Viewer is the main alarm handling application.
● Alarm Handler (background process) displays and sends alarms to the user
applications.
● Alarm Server (background process) serves tasks initiated by a user application.
● Popup Viewer directly alerts the user to a critical alarm.
● Event Handler logs all alarms in the log database, and the Log Viewer displays
the event history.
● Shell shows a summary of the active alarms in order of priority and allows
context-specific navigation to the Alarm Viewer.
● Alarm Router (Router Server) sends the alarm messages to the receivers.
Alarm handling is usually management station-specific. The automation system is
responsible for routing alarms from devices to operator terminals, such as the
Desigo Insight management station.
The Alarm Handler, Alarm Server, Event Handler and Router Server are
components of the Insight Server.
Shared alarm database
All management stations connected to one Desigo Insight server share the same
alarm database. An alarm is forwarded to a given management station, registered
in the shared database and displayed automatically on all other management
stations. Despite this, the alarms are processed on a management station-specific
basis.
Only the management station defined as a destination for the alarm can forward an
event and display an alarm pop-up window. Pop-up windows are configured
specifically in the Alarm Router of each management station. To enable it to
acknowledge or reset an alarm, a management station must be connected to the
site to which the alarm object belongs.
Alarm strategy
The Alarm Viewer displays a detailed overview of pending alarms from all the sites
and buildings in the system. When an alarm event occurs, this list is updated
automatically, so that it always contains the current alarm state of the system.
Each time a new physical connection to a site is established, the alarms in all the
automation systems are updated (alarm refresh). This means that the alarm server
reports all pending alarms to the management station level. The alarm server can
also update alarms periodically.
Different alarm types are displayed according to the severity configured in the
automation system:
● Simple alarms appear and disappear without user intervention.
● Basic alarms must be acknowledged.
● Extended alarms lock the plant and must be acknowledged and reset.
Engineering
You can configure basic alarm routing to the management station and its response
and display in the Desigo PX or Desigo Room Automation automation station or in
other subsystems.
In the system database, you can attach an alarm help text, which may contain
extensive customer-specific information, such as operator instructions or hyperlinks
to other documents, to an alarm-generating object on the management station.
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Alarm notifications cannot be sent from one management station to another. If
several management stations need to receive an alarm event (for example, to
display an alarm pop-up window), you must configure it at the automation station
level.
Alarm routing strategy
15.1.5
Alarm routing determines what alarm type is shown when, where and how.
You can define what alarm type (for example, priority) is shown when (for example,
day, night, weekday, weekend, holiday), where (for example, tech-operator’s office
or doorman’s desk) and how (for example, which printer, e-mail, SMS).
This ensures - if properly configured - that an alarm will always be received by
someone. Alarms cannot be routed to a remote desktop nor a web client.
These principles apply to all event types: alarms, system, user and status events.
Although the routing of alarms is configured for a specific management station, it
can be modified by any other management station in the same project. This
requires a higher user access level.
The alarm receiver is independent of the alarm state display. All Desigo Insight
management stations in your system display alarm states in the Alarm Viewer,
irrespective of where the alarm messages are routed to.
Installation, Setup and Engineering
The Desigo Insight management station can be set up and engineered in the
following steps:
Figure 184: Installation, setup and configuration process
To keep the set up as simple as possible, comprehensive default settings are
available.
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DB import
Importing Desigo PX and Desigo Room Automation engineering data usually
requires two steps:
1. Import metadata:
Metadata describe the standard BACnet objects used in the Desigo PX
automation system. For each object, the BACnet type and the associated
properties are described. The metadata also comprise default values for the
properties (for example, access levels) and the global texts.
2. Import project data:
After the Desigo PX automation stations have been engineered, the project
data is available in Xworks Plus (in ABT for Desigo Room Automation). The DB
Import then transmits this data to the system database. When a project is
modified, you only need to import the modified automation stations.
The project data contains:
– A description of the objects defined in every Desigo PX automation station
– The System, Technical and User View of these objects (Object Viewer)
– Site-specific, device-specific and project-specific text
Import BACnet third-party
devices and Desigo S7
The DB Import tool accepts input files in predefined formats. The Desigo Excel
Project Tool (DIEPT) is an Excel-based software tool available from HQ, which
reads all data in any format that can be read by Excel and creates a file that DB
Import can use.
See Excel Project Tool DIEPT (CM110634).
As for the Desigo PX data points, the third-party BACnet devices must be imported
in two steps: first for the metadata and then for the project data.
Figure 185: Importing third party BACnet devices
Expanded metadata, which almost covers the functional scope of Desigo PX, are
available for Desigo S7.
Project engineers can use DIEPT to define the Technical and User Designations
for BACnet objects.
BACnet 3rd
party objects
DIEPT
BACnet 3rd
party objects
description
DB Import
System DB
Figure 186: Importing via DIEPT
As an alternative, BACnet third-part devices can also be identified and imported via
the online view of the Object Viewer.
15.1.6
Graphics Library
The Desigo Insight delivery contains libraries with standard graphic elements for
PX/ PXC00(-E).D/PXX-L11/12//PX KNX. Genies and other standard graphic
elements match the PX / Desigo Room Automation application compounds
supplied, and allow easy plant graphics engineering with the Desigo Insight
Graphic Generator.
Genies
Siemens
Genies are highly functional graphical display objects in the Plant Viewer, which
receive values from the automation station and display them. The genies can also
receive commands (for example, clicking a button or changing a value) and send
them to the automation station.
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Nested genies are genies that are used in other genies, for example, the alarm
genie is used in all genies, which are in an alarm state. This reuse of genies
ensures that graphic elements, such as alarms, have a uniform look and feel
throughout the system.
● Generic genies adapt to the specific properties of a data point on the basis of
its technical designation. During the compile process, additional information
about the data point is retrieved from the system database, and the genie
automatically alters its response. For example, one fan genie is available for all
fan types. When the fan genie is used for a particular fan data point, it searches
the system database for extra information and finds two fan speeds and a
maintenance switch. When it is activated, the genie display automatically
shows two speed levels and the maintenance switch.
The library is suitable for Desigo PX and Desigo Room Automation objects.
●
Access and security
15.1.7
In the System Configurator you can define the access and security policy for user
groups. Read and write access levels for each object are stored in the system
database. Depending on the rights of the logged in user, information can be hidden
(not visible) or write-protected.
Graphic Generator
The Desigo Insight Graphic Generator is optimized for the use of Xworks Plus
(XWP) and Automation Building Tool (ABT) with tested solutions from the Solution
Browser. The Graphic Generator automatically creates and configures Desigo
Insight pages based on the imported project data. This improves the efficiency of
the project engineering for the entire Desigo system.
See Graphic Generator (CM110587).
Plant structure
Desigo Insight templates
and genies
CFC charts
Plant unit
Plant unit
Preheater
Aggregates
Pump
Components
Key:
15.1.8
Block/Compound
Proxy (Blank compound)
High Availability Solution
Desigo Insight can be operated as a redundant system.
See High availability solution (CM1N9160).
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Figure 187: High availability solution
HA solution complexity
Depending on customer needs, the complexity of the solution may vary:
● If a geographic separation of the productive and backup systems is not
required, the high availability solution already offers a storage system (Network
Attached Storage, NAS) that provides significant security against a failure of
the Desigo Insight management station.
● If a redundant design of the productive and backup system is required, a two
NAS solution with data replication must be used.
HA solution functions
The high availability solution has the following functions:
● Uninterruptible monitoring of all physical servers in a resource pool and restart
of virtual systems impacted by a service failure.
● Monitoring of the operating system for failure and automated restart of the
impacted virtual systems.
● Periodic monitoring of Desigo Insight applications and automated restart of the
system for failures.
● Recognition of server failures using the server heartbeat.
● Nearly immediate restart without human intervention of the virtual systems on
an available server within the same resource pool.
● Report to operator for failover.
● VMware Infrastructure Manager (VIM) for server administration.
Figure 188: High availability solution with Desigo Insight and other applications
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By using Desigo Insight and other applications (for example, InfoCenter) with the
high availability solution the impact of hardware and software faults on linked
server databases can be minimized.
See High availability solution HA-300/HA-500 (CMI110797).
15.1.9
Desigo Room Automation Integration
Desigo Room Automation communicates directly with the management level. The
PXC00-E.D. system controller can be used only for the Scheduler and Calendar.
Operation
Generic and engineered operation is available on the management station.
Generic operation
No additional engineering is required on Desigo Insight for operation in the Object
Viewer. The Object Viewer allows the operation of standard BACnet objects.
Operation can take place both via central functions or rooms and directly at the
Desigo Room Automation application level.
Engineered operation in
the Plant Viewer
Typically, room integration requires a graphical display of the building along with
the various floors and rooms. Desigo Insight efficiently supports generating
graphical images and integrating Desigo Room Automation. The Desigo Insight
graphics library contains predefined supergenies for key data points for each
Desigo Room Automation application.
Figure 189: A possible Desigo Room Automation visualization on the management level
15.2 Desigo CC
Architecture
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The Desigo CC management platform presents a single point of entry for users to
operate, monitor and optimize building automation, fire safety and security systems
or a combination thereof.
Desigo CC is a flexible, full client-server architecture allowing scalability from small
and medium to large and complex systems. The platform provides customizable
and market-specific distributions.
Desigo CC can be installed on one single computer, with full server and client
functionality. Furthermore, Installed, Web, and Windows App Clients can also be
added on separate hardware. Additional system connections can be made through
systems installed with Desigo CC Front End Processors (FEP) configurations. Web
interfaces provide the customer an increased flexibility for operation and future
extensions, e.g. mobile applications for tablets and smart phones.
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Figure 190: Desigo architecture
Main server
The main server contains the project database and the software that monitors and
commands the system network. Clients connect to this server to monitor and
control the facility. If the same computer runs Microsoft IIS, the installation provides
web clients with access to the facility. The Desigo CC server installation always
includes an installed client with a user interface for monitoring and controlling the
facility. The main server has interface connections to the field (either directly or
using FEP) and provides a centralized database and other services to the
connected clients. The main server can support a number of clients that are
connected using a network (LAN) or Intranet (WAN).
Installed client
The Installed Client is typically used for operators who are focused entirely on
monitoring and managing building systems. In this configuration, software
components used for event management are locked in place and cannot be moved
or covered by other applications. This ensures that critical events are never missed
or hidden. Installed Clients can optionally be configured to run in a closed mode
where only Desigo CC and other specifically identified applications are allowed to
run. In closed mode, the workstation is dedicated to running Desigo CC, with
access to the Start menu or other operating system and customer applications
available only to administrative users.
Web client (browser client) The web client is deployed on the intranet with full trust and allows access to local
resources. The system runs in the Internet Explorer browser (using HTTP or
HTTPS as communication protocol) and is downloaded on demand each time the
user launches the system as web application. When working in a browser, you can
have the same capabilities as those working on an Installed Client, or can be
restricted to have different access when connected remotely.
As web clients require low latency and high network bandwidth, they are
appropriate for intranet use. We do not recommend it for internet use.
See Desigo CC Installing the Web Client Application Certificate (A6V10415479).
Windows app client
(ClickOnce)
The Desigo CC Windows App Client looks like the standard system software, but is
a light application that can be downloaded from the Desigo CC server when
connecting through a browser. When the Windows App Client is downloaded, it
runs like any other Windows application on the desktop. It can be launched from
the Start menu, desktop icon, quick-launch toolbar, and so on. This deployment
does not require administrative privileges. The Windows App Client runs in its own
pane, without the overhead of the internet browser application and menus.
Web server
To use the Desigo CC Web and Windows App Clients, you must install the web
server. To install the web server, you must first install Microsoft IIS on the web
server computer. Usually the web server is on the Desigo CC server. It might be
located on a separate computer, if the customer's IT department requires the web
server to be installed in a separate controlled environment, or if it is preferred not to
use the resources of the system server for the Microsoft IIS tasks.
The web server lets you to access the system using the intranet and a web
browser. You can add only one web server. It lets you download all files required
for the Web Client and Windows App Client environments. It provides a system
web page to access the Web Client, the Windows App Client, and the system
documentation in the Internet Explorer browser. It also represents the endpoint of
the communication with the system server.
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Front End Processor
15.2.1
A Front End Processor (FEP) is a computer that provides additional connections
between building level devices (such as field panels) and Desigo CC. By providing
additional connections to the building level network, an FEP enables load
balancing for the network-based processing for a Desigo CC system.
User Functions
Graphics
The Graphics application allows you to view the configured graphics representing
your facility or equipment. You can change the current state of an object's
properties from a graphic, filter your view of a graphic by discipline and section and
you can zoom in and out for greater detail or for a birds-eye overview.
Trends
All available process data of a system can be recorded and applied to operational
optimization. This lets you record information on plant states, temperature curves,
switching states, and counter values in a form that is suitable for your purposes.
The measured value data can be displayed and evaluated graphically.
Online trend records real-time values from your plant and displays them graphically
in a Trend View. If a value changes, the data values are sent to the trend
application. Offline trend data is used for the longer-term storage and retrieval of
historical data for the analysis of entire plants or single processes. With offline
trend, data is recorded directly in the automation station.
Trend and system activity data is stored in a Microsoft SQL Server database.
Microsoft SQL Server Express is included with the Desigo CC software, and can be
upgraded as required. The Trend Comparison View lets you time-shift the trend
view to compare data at different times for quick analysis of changing conditions.
Figure 191: Trends
Scheduling
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The Scheduler allows you to schedule events for management stations and field
panels at your facility. You can create daily or weekly schedules for management
stations and BACnet devices. You can fully configure and monitor standard
BACnet schedules, calendars, command objects, and workstation-based
schedules that can be used to support systems without built-in scheduling
capabilities. Schedules are automatically associated with systems they control, so
you can quickly navigate to the schedules of any selected object. A Timeline
Viewer lets you view the details of multiple management station and field panel
schedules simultaneously, spanning a range of time.
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Figure 192: Scheduler
Reports
The Desigo CC reporting tool includes standard reporting templates and lets you
create fully configurable reports with custom logos, headers, footers, and layouts
that include tabular and graphical system information. You can schedule reports
and save them in CSV or PDF formats.
Figure 193: Reports
Event management
Event management allows you to manage events throughout the system. You can
monitor and manage the progress of each event from initiation through resolution.
The full history of each event issue is recorded, and you can generate eventrelated reports that you can view, save, and print.
Log Viewer
The Log Viewer application provides an historic log of all user and system events
and activities that have occurred. You can retrieve these historic events and
activities for further analysis and investigation using sorting and filtering. Log views
can be saved and exported if required.
Detailed log
The detailed log allows users to view the most recent records for any selected
object. The same content filtering and sorting functionality available in the Log
Viewer is possible in the detailed log.
Remote notification
You can configure Desigo CC to automatically or manually send email or SMS
messages to specific recipients.
You can specify:
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●
●
●
●
What events the recipients should be notified for and when
How notifications are escalated from one recipient to another until a notification
message is responded to
If a message is periodically sent to the operators stating that the system is
running normally
Which devices are used for the notification
Macros
Macros are predefined lists of commands that enable a user to send out a group of
commands to specified devices with a single action. Some macros can be started
manually while others may be part of schedules defined for time-based functions or
automatic reactions. Macros are also used by the system to perform multiple
command actions. These predefined system macros are applied to specific control
actions, such as block commands to fire control panels and system backup
functions.
Reaction Processor
Reactions are automations programmed in the system, so that when a specific
situation occurs on site, a command or a series of commands is automatically
executed.
You can define actions to be executed automatically when specific conditions are
verified. Conditions can be based on time, on events, on a change of values, or on
a combination of some or all. When conditions are met, the Reaction Processor
executes a pre-configured list of commands.
Document management
Desigo CC can handle the different types of document templates used in the
project. You can configure document templates in PDF, RTF, TXT, XLS, and HTML
format.
15.2.2
System Manager
Main Components
The System Manager lets you navigate the system, view and override current
conditions, analyze historical operations, and configure the system. The System
Manager contains the System Browser, Primary, Operation and Related Items
panes that interact via built-in workflows. Multiple system management session can
be concurrently used.
Figure 194: System Manager
System Browser
The System Browser displays objects in the building control system through
various views. You can search and filter objects, display object names and
descriptions, and drag objects into Trends, Schedules, and Reports.
Historical data is stored in an access-controlled MS SQL Server database. The
System Management Console lets you create a project History Database (HDB)
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History Database (HDB)
and link it to the active Desigo CC project on the main server. The history database
is used to log a wide range of user and system activities, such as:
● User and system activities
● Alarms and their treatment
● Faults that have occurred and are handled as batch messaging
● Values that are logged as trends
Project database
The runtime data (process image) and the engineering data are stored in a filebased database in a subdirectory of the project directory. The data is unencrypted
and database access can only be prevented by restricting access to the database
files. The project directory needs to get shared when deploying installed clients. It
is therefore important to restrict access on the db folder in the project directory to
the Windows account running the Desigo CC main server.
Microsoft SQL Server
Desigo CC uses the Microsoft SQL database software. Microsoft SQL Express is
included on the product installation DVD (Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Service
Pack 2, Express Edition, version 10.50.4000.0). Alternately, you can use an
existing Microsoft SQL Server installation (same version 10.50.4000.0). In this
case, the Desigo CC Installer will skip the Microsoft SQL Server installation. In both
cases, Microsoft SQL must first be installed and running on the computer where
the Desigo CC main server will be installed.
Microsoft IIS server
A Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) server for Web Clients and Windows
App Clients can be installed on the Desigo CC server or on a separate installation
(web server).
License Manager
Licensing ensures the operation of the system within the agreed system limits.
Only the system is allowed to change license data.
If a license becomes temporarily unavailable (for example, due to network
connection issues) the system continues to run fully operational for a grace period.
The system continues to check for the license and shuts down at the end of the
grace period, if none of the license checks succeed.
Exceeding the limits of the license (for example, by integrating more field system
data points than stated in the license) puts the system into courtesy mode. Phases
of courtesy mode accumulate until a total duration of 30 days is exceeded, then the
server shuts down. Unless new licenses are made available, after a manual restart
the system again goes into courtesy-mode exceeding and shut down.
Any unauthorized attempt to modify system license data directly in the database
(for example, changing the remaining time of a specific license mode) shuts down
the system.
15.2.3
Access and Security
User management
User privileges can be assigned to users and to workstations, allowing users to be
granted the same access from everywhere or different access depending where
they're logged on. The user interface displays only elements, such as menus,
buttons, list items, tree nodes, where the user has at least read access.
Access privileges can be assigned to resources/groups, such as workstations,
features, applications, system objects, system object properties and logical groups
of these resources.
User authorization
User access rights in Desigo CC are determined by four main factors:
● The system must know the user (authentication).
● The user must be assigned to a user group.
● The user must have the appropriate application rights.
● The user must have the appropriate scope rights.
If all of these conditions are met, the user can log on to Desigo CC, and read/write
objects and execute tasks, depending on the assigned rights.
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See Desigo CC Engineering Manual (A6V10415473).
Scopes
Scope is the general term for specific object access in the management station. A
scope segments and implements certain rules for the user role in the project. A
user only sees the area of the building assigned to him, for example, pumps,
receives only alarms from this area in the event of an emergency and can only
acknowledge those alarms. If an emergency occurs in an area that is not in the
scope of this user, for example, ventilators, the user does not receive an alarm
about this event.
Communication security
In general, communication channels are non-encrypted due to performance
reasons. Exceptions are communication channels for file transfer using web and
video transfer. Sensitive data (passwords during authentication or user
management configuration) is transferred as encrypted message content.
Wireless input devices (especially keyboards) use radio transmission that is often
not or inadequately cryptographically protected. Even from greater distances, it is
possible to listen in or even plant external data in the system.
We recommend that you do not use wireless input devices. If you must use
wireless input devices, use only devices with proven encryption.
Communication ports and
protocols
15.2.4
Which ports are used depends on the actual deployment and subsystem
integration of the whole system.
See Desigo CC System Description (A6V10415500).
Event Management
Desigo CC lets you quickly, easily, and accurately respond to any event.
Summary Bar
The Summary Bar contains a summary of the events occurring in the system and
lets you quickly access functions, such as the Event List. It also displays
information, such as the system status, the logged in user, etc. Depending on the
client profile in use, the Summary Bar can be docked on the desktop or freely
opened and closed as needed.
Event List
The Event List provides a complete and easily filtered list of events under control of
the management station. When the Event List is expanded, it clearly shows each
event source, severity, current status, custom messages and suggested action
steps through the use of text, color, and icon representations. You can
acknowledge, silence, and reset alarms from the Event List.
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Figure 195: Event List
Event Bar
When using profiles for critical event management, you can collapse the Event List
into a condensed list of event buttons in an area called the Event Bar, that remains
docked on the desktop for easy access. This lets you keep an eye on the current
situation at all times.
Client profiles
To ensure the correct level of event management support for users in any situation,
a workstation and/or users can be easily assigned predefined profiles supporting
casual, intermediate, or dedicated event notification and management.
Fast treatment
From the Event List or Event Bar, you can quickly select an event and perform all
the commands (for example, Acknowledge, Reset, Close or Suspend) from the
Event Detail Bar and Event List, without looking at treatment steps, viewing live
video or a map of the alarmed area, etc. The event descriptor (visible when the
Event List is expanded) contains a short description of the next action (which
command to select).
When event treatment is in progress, you can send the available commands to the
source object causing the event or suspend treatment.
Investigative treatment
From the Event List or Event Bar, operators can quickly open the System Manager
with focus on the source of the event, and all information (live video, recent history,
schedules, etc.) related to the event source.
Operating procedures
Operating procedures consist of a sequence of steps or actions, which the operator
must, or is suggested to perform with the assisted treatment. For each step of a
procedure, the system provides instructions and operating tools. With appropriate
permissions, you can create, view, edit, or delete operating procedures.
Assisted treatment
From the Event List or Event Bar, operators can quickly open the assisted
treatment to guide the operator through pre-configured operating procedures. Each
operating procedure is composed of steps - some of which may be mandatory - for
the user to complete (for example, to see the graphic of the object in alarm, fill-in a
treatment form, or automatically print the information of the event).
15.2.5
Installation, Setup and Engineering
The installation program installs the Siemens License Management Utility (LMU)
on every management station in a Desigo CC network. The LMU enables and
manages licenses and holds the installed licenses for Desigo CC. The operating
state of Desigo CC, the number of seats, the point count, and all functions are
controlled through the LMU. Each Desigo CC management station must be
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License Management
Utility (LMU)
licensed locally. Licenses can be activated, repaired, returned and renewed
through the LMU.
After you install the LMU, you must activate the Desigo CC licenses using the
following licensing methods:
● Online: Licensing carried out via the internet or intranet on the back office
license server.
● Certificate/Dongle (including remote dongle engineering): Licensing carried out
via certificate files representing the license.
– For Dongle-bound licenses, dongles and licenses can be obtained
individually and subsequently tied to each other and loaded onto the PC.
– Engineering licenses are always dongle-bound. Where a physical
connection of the dongle to the PC is not possible, for example, during a
remote support session, the engineering license can still be used for a
limited time.
● Manual: Manually returning a license based on XML request/response files.
See Desigo CC Installation Manual (A6V10376166).
System Management
Console (SMC)
The Desigo CC server hosts the System Management Console (SMC), a standalone tool which is installed on the main server only, and can only be launched
locally. Once Desigo CC is installed successfully, the field engineers must first
perform the typical system administration operations, such as configuring system
users, projects, and history database in the SMC, before being able to launch a
Desigo CC client.
Profiles, schemas and
templates
Client profiles define the appearance and behavior of the system functions involved
in event management, such as Summary Bar, Event List, Event Detail Bar, event
filters, and event treatment. Every project template has a matching client profile,
and every client profile has a matching event schema. To a ensure a consistent
configuration, the project template, the client profile and the event schema must
match.
Subsystem integration
Representative data points in Desigo CC can be created manually, imported
through data exchange files, or uploaded through a selective auto-discovery
mechanism depending on the type of system being connected. A unique,
extensible object modeling approach allows Desigo CC to normalize information
brought in through any interface, and to provide the same look, feel, and operation
through a common set of applications, without concern for the source of the data.
Desigo CC lets you configure connected subsystems directly and perform typical
automation station functions, such as scheduling and event generation, at the
management station for connected systems that do not support those functions
directly.
Desigo CC supports the following subsystems:
● Desigo Building Automation system (Desigo PX V5.1 SP; V6)
● Desigo Room Automation system (TRA V1.16; V1.2)
● Simatic S7 (S7-300; S7-400)
● Siclimat-X V4.1
● Sinteso Fire Safety System (FS20 EN MP5.2; FS20 DE MP5.2)
● Sinteso Fire Safety System (STT20 Centralisateur de Mise en Sécurité
Incendie)
● Intrunet Intrusion System (SPC MP3.4, connections using TCP-IP or UDP-IP
supported)
● Video through Milestone Video Management System
● Mass Notification System (Version 2.0) For a list of compatible Mass
Notification devices, please refer to the MNS documentation
● Third-party Building Automation and Fire Safety systems based on BACnet/IP
● Third-party subsystems through OPC (OPC DA V2.05/V3.00 standard)
● Third-party subsystems through Modbus/IP
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●
●
●
●
15
Integration through SNMP
APOGEE Building Automation system (Apogee BACnet V3.1.2; V3.2.4; V3.3;
V3.4)
XNET FireFinder XLS and MXL fire safety systems (FireFinder XLS V8 and
newer)
Desigo Fire Safety FS20 UL systems (FS20 UL MP1.x, MP2.0)
Auto discovery
Auto discovery lets you discover and import devices, which are already on the
network, into Desigo CC. You can set filters and detect your devices on the
network, which then display in the System Browser. You would typically use this
method for existing jobs, where field panels are already installed and online.
OPC server
OLE for Process Control (OPC) is a widely accepted industrial communication
standard that enables the exchange of data between multi-vendor devices and
control applications without any proprietary restrictions. OPC is a client-server
technology and Desigo CC can acts as the server providing data to third party
clients.
Web services
Using RESTful technology, Desigo CC provides alarm, object and time series data
via web based services to supervision management stations or other third-party
external applications.
Language packs
The Desigo CC software is delivered in English and can be extended with
additional languages. The following software language packs are supported:
● Arabic
● Chinese (simplified)
● Chinese (traditional)
● Czech
● Danisch
● Dutch
● English (default)
● Finnish
● French
● German
● Italian
● Korean
● Norwegian
● Polish
● Portugese
● Russian
● Spanish
● Swedish
● Turkish
You can install 3 languages simultaneously. Every user can define his user
interface language.
Project and HDB backup
Backing up Desigo CC requires saving independent parts on different servers or
PCs. We recommend that you save the backups of your project data to a different
machine from where they originally reside.
Two parts must be backed up:
● The entire customer project data, including all libraries, configurations, object
data (project backup).
● The historic data collected in the history databases (HDB backup).
Backups can be done either manually or by applying a macro in combination with a
management station scheduler.
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See Desigo CC System Management Console (A6V10415497).
15.2.6
Graphics Libraries
Desigo CC contains libraries with symbols and graphic templates for easy plant
graphics engineering. The Graphic Library Browser shows all the available
symbols and graphic template objects in your project libraries.
Symbols
A graphics symbol is a reusable graphic image that represents a piece of
equipment, floor, or any component or entity. Symbols are stored in a library and
are used to display system object values. Symbols can be associated with one or
more object types in the Models & Functions application and bound to object type
properties to create substitutions in your graphics that provide a dynamic, visual
representation of changing values from Desigo CC.
In its simplest form, a symbol is a graphic made up of drawing elements on the
graphic canvas in the Graphics Editor. Each drawing element has a series of
associated properties. These properties can be used to create substitutions.
Symbols can be associated with an object type
An object type is associated with a symbol in the Models & Functions application.
When you drag-and-drop the symbol onto a graphic, the symbol displays the
system object values in runtime mode and in the Graphics Viewer. Animation is
supported through a series of graphics. Pre-defined symbols are stored in library
folders. These symbols are visible and editable from the Graphics Library Browser.
Advanced users can create their own symbols.
Generic symbols
A generic symbol is a concept that allows you to create one type of symbol that
can support an object that has one or several properties with changing values.
Depending on the object, the symbol will not display the elements of the graphic
that do not have a data point associated them.
Graphic templates
Desigo CC provides standard BACnet TEC graphics for various applications. You
can also create template graphics for TEC applications.
Figure 196: Graphic templates
See Desigo CC Getting Started (A6V10415475) and Desigo CC User Guide
(A6V10415471).
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15.2.7
15
Graphics Engineering
Desigo CC graphics are built using smart objects that know how they are used and
how to represent themselves graphically. Smart objects let you create graphics by
dragging objects onto a page, without manually binding an object to graphical
symbols.
The Graphics application allows you to create, view, store, and command large
graphics representing equipment, floors, buildings, facilities, and entire campuses.
These graphical representations can contain dynamic elements to represent
devices or values you want to monitor or control. The Graphics application consists
of:
● Graphics Viewer
● Graphics Editor
● Graphics Library Browser
Graphics Viewer
The Graphics Viewer lets you view the graphics representing your facility or
equipment. You can change the current state of an object’s properties from a
graphic. You can filter your view of a graphic by discipline, section, or you can
zoom in and out for greater detail or for a birds-eye overview.
Graphics Editor
The Graphics Editor lets you create dynamic graphical representations of your
plants, buildings or equipment. You can test and simulate your dynamic graphics
before going online with them.
See Desigo CC Graphics Editor (A6V10415487).
Figure 197: Graphics Editor
Graphics Library Browser
The Graphics Library Browser lets you toggle between a view that displays all the
available symbols and graphic template objects in your project libraries.
AutoCAD import
You can import AutoCAD drawings and select and manipulate the layers of the
AutoCAD drawings during and after the import process.
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Figure 198: An imported AutoCAD drawing
15.2.8
Virtual Environment
Desigo CC is compatible with following Virtualization software packages:
● VMware®:
– Virtualization platform: VSphere 6.0
– Fault-tolerant software: ESXi 6.0b (build 2809209) managed by VCenter
Server Appliance v6.0.0 (build 2793784)
● Stratus®:
– Virtualization platform: KVM for Linux CentOS v7.0
– Fault-tolerant software: everRun Enterprise 7.2
– Virtualization platform: Citrix XenServer 6.0.2
– Fault-tolerant software: everRun MX 6.2 HotFix4 (build 6.2.9125.825HF:EA)
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16
16 Automation Stations
The Desigo PX range is based on freely programmable automation stations. They
provide the infrastructure to accommodate and process system-specific and
application-specific functions. The PX range of automation stations comprises the
compact and modular series.
See Desigo PX - Automation system for HVAC and building services - System
overview (CM110756), Automation stations modular series PXC..D, PXC..-E.D,
PXA40-.. (CM1N9222) and Automation stations compact model PXC..D
(CM1N9215).
Control Functions
The D-MAP programming language lets you program and parameterize plants,
using function blocks and compounds. The graphics-based data-flow programming
in Xworks Plus (XWP) lets you implement all the necessary control strategies for
optimum operation.
System Functions
The distributed functions, which ensure the overall functioning and inter-operation
of all plants, are described in the following chapters and documents:
● For alarm strategy, see chapter Alarm Management.
● For time scheduling, see chapter Calendars and Schedulers.
● For access rights and user designations, see IT Security in Desigo Installations
(CM110663).
● For emergency operation and forced control, see chapter Control Concept.
● For wiring tests with Desigo Point Test Tool, see chapter Desigo Workflow,
Tools and Programming.
Cyclical Processing
One PX automation station contains one downloaded D-MAP program. A D-MAP
program cannot run on two automation stations, that is, there are no overlapping
programs across automation stations. A downloaded D-MAP program does not run
automatically. It must be started explicitly and is executed in accordance with the
cyclical processing principle, that is, all D-MAP blocks in an automation station are
processed in a repeating cycle.
Cycle time
A minimum and maximum cycle time is defined for each automation station. If the
processing of all blocks is:
● Shorter than the minimum cycle time, the next processing cycle is delayed until
the minimum cycle time has elapsed.
● Longer than the maximum cycle time, the next processing cycle starts as soon
as possible.
The processing order of the individual blocks:
● Does not depend on their arrangement on the plan (D-MAP program)
● Can be set explicitly when creating the D-MAP program
Process image
The values at the physical inputs and outputs are displayed in the automation
station via the process image. There are two instances of the process image:
● The frozen process image does not change during a processing cycle. D MAP
programs only read from or write to this instance of the process image.
● The active process image is continuously connected to the real plant.
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Automation Stations
Device Object
AI
AO
Read
Write
Frozen values
Process image
buffer
Current values
I/O scan
Figure 199: Process image
Values read in cycle 1 are processed in cycle 2. Output values calculated in cycle 1
are transferred to the peripherals in cycle 2.
16.1 Device Object
Each automation station contains a device object. The device object:
● Contains the device and system information for the automation station
● Is based on the standard BACnet object as defined in the BACnet standard,
and contains additional proprietary properties
● Is always present and is set up in the automation station with initial values
● Is not programmed in the CFC Editor as a function block and is not loaded with
the program
You can monitor property values through a BACnet client (management station,
XWP, PXM20). You can change default values. You cannot read changed values
back into Xworks Plus (XWP). When an automation station is replaced, you must
reenter any changes made to property values.
Figure 200: Common tab
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Device Info Object
16
The serial number in the row Serial number SN=150120C61487 consists of:
● 15 = Year
● 01 = Month
● 20 = Day
● C = Hardware version
● 61487 = Consecutive number
Division into groups
The properties of the device object can be divided into groups based on category,
for example:
● BACnet communication and BACnet interoperability
● Global properties and system functions
● Local functions and settings
● Statistics and diagnostics
Properties for BACnet
communication and
interoperability
These properties ensure communication and interoperability between BACnet
devices, and are specified in the BACnet standard, for example, Protocol version
[ProtVn] and Vendor name [VndrNam]. Individual properties such as Object
identifier [ObjId] are set up by XWP during the commissioning process on the
network side.
Global properties
Individual properties of the device object are defined as global properties, because,
from the system perspective, all automation stations on one site must have the
same value. Global properties are only adjustable on the primary server.
Local properties
The device object contains local properties, which are necessary for the
parameterizing and functional scope of global objects and for functions, such as life
check, time synchronization and the replication of global objects. Local properties
also include properties for the system status of the automation station, the time
stamp for the generation of the program and the setting of the buffer size of the
alarm queue.
These properties can be reviewed in the Online Properties window in the Network
Configurator or CFC Editor in XWP.
Properties for statistics
and diagnostics
These properties contain statistical and diagnostic information and can be
reviewed in the Online Properties window in the Network Configurator or CFC
Editor in XWP.
16.2 Device Info Object
The Device Info Object is a proprietary BACnet object and contains the alarming
function for the automation station.
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Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
Figure 201: Alarming tab
Properties for system
alarms and system events
The device object has an alarm mechanism, because system alarms and system
events, which cannot be assigned to a data point, may occur in an automation
station. The alarm state machine and alarm-relevant connections are mapped to
the BACnet properties of the device object.
16.3 Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
There are various error sources, for example:
Error
Effect
Memory error, for example, faulty flash memory
Desigo PX stops working.
Battery failure
Desigo PX continues working.
Failure of backup server recognized by primary server
Desigo PX recognizes the fault and transmits the relevant alarm.
Table 61: Errors and effects
Non-critical errors /
configuration errors
Non-critical hardware and software errors are identified by Desigo PX and
registered as a device object alarm.
Critical errors
When a critical hardware or software error occurs, the automation station tries to
restart. If the same error is detected three times within 15 minutes, the automation
station switches to the COMA operating state. If the Fault LED is lit, the automation
station is in the COMA operating state.
Online properties for
diagnostics
The values in the Online Properties window in Xworks Plus (XWP) give clues about
the operation of the automation station.
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Operating States
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Figure 202: Diagnostics tab
16.4 Operating States
A PX automation station has the following operating states:
● STOP: The D-MAP program is stopped.
● RUN: The D-MAP program runs.
● KOMA: The automation station is in a prolonged sleep mode.
The following figure shows the operating states and the associated transitions:
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Operating States
1: Power failure
1: Power failure
Mains OFF
2: Power restored COMA
2: Power restored RUN
1: Power failure
2: Power restored STOP
STOP
RUN
BACnet: Download
required
14: Load
BACnet: Operational
12: Reanimation
COMA
13: Master reset
4: RUN Cmd
15: Delta loading
BACnet: Operational
5: STOP Cmd
16: Delta loading
10: Fatal Error
11: Fatal Error
7: Restart
9: Reset
7: Restart
9: Reset
Figure 203: Operating states and transitions
Operating states
Mains off
●
No power supply
STOP
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
RUN
●
●
●
●
●
●
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I/O scan active
Ready for wiring test (only possible without D-MAP program loaded) (PXM20,
for PTM modules only)
D-MAP program processing stopped
Communication with XWP: Master reset, complete loading and delta loading
allowed
BACnet communication with management station & PXM20 (clients):
ReadProperty, WriteProperty, Who-Has, COVs, EventNotification,
AcknowledgeAlarm GetEventInformation
COVs: For values changed by the operator, values cannot be changed by the
program
Alarming: Alarm monitoring inactive, no new alarms or events are generated
(the device info object can still generate alarms and system events).
Notification of saved alarms and events is possible if recipient lists are set up.
GetEventInformation and AcknowledgeAlarm possible.
Primary server in the STOP state: Primary server is not active, that is, no life
check, no time synchronization and no replication of global objects
Backup server in the STOP state: The backup server is not active, that is, no
time synchronization and no replication of global objects by primary server. The
backup server will not accept changes to global objects by a client.
I/O scan active
Wiring test not allowed
D-MAP program processing active
Communication with XWP: Master reset and complete loading not allowed,
delta loading allowed
BACnet communication with Desigo Insight & PXM20: ReadProperty,
WriteProperty, Who-Has, COVs, EventNotification, AcknowledgeAlarm
GetEventInformation.
COVs: For values changed by the program and operator
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●
●
COMA
●
●
●
●
●
16
Alarming: Alarm monitoring active, notification of alarms and events,
GetEventInformation and AcknowledgeAlarm
Primary server in the RUN state: Primary server is active, that is, life check,
time synchronization and replication of global objects
Backup server in RUN state: The backup server is active, that is, time
synchronization and replication of global objects by primary server. The backup
server does not accept changes of global objects by a client.
I/O scan not active
Communication with XWP not active
BACnet communication not active
Wiring test not possible
D-MAP program processing stopped
Transitions
1 Power failure
Power failure
2 Power restoration STOP
Power restoration. Operating state before power failure was STOP.
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold-start variable function blocks: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value.
The STOP state is reached when the I/O scan is finished.
3 Power restoration RUN
Power restoration. Operational status before power failure was RUN.
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold-start variable function blocks: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value.
● System event: Power restoration.
D-MAP processing starts when the first I/O scan is finished.
4 RUN Cmd
Explicit command via dialog in XWP or BACnet (DeviceObject, Out of service
property [OoServ])
Actions (warm start action):
● Implicit warm start I/O scan: I/O scan continues to run
● Implicit warm-start variables function blocks: All variables retain their last value
● System event: Change to operating state
D-MAP processing starts.
5 STOP Cmd
Explicit command via dialog in XWP or BACnet (DeviceObject, Out of service
property [OoServ])
Actions:
● System Event: Change to operating state
● Stop D-MAP processing at the end of current cycle
I/O scan continues.
6 Restart
Restart of the automation station due to software error.
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold start function block variables: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value.
The STOP state is reached when the I/O scan is finished.
7 Restart
Restart of the automation station due to software error.
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Operating States
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold start function block variables: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value.
● System event: Restart
D-MAP processing starts when the first I/O scan is finished.
8 Reset
Explicit reset of automation station via hardware push button.
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold start function block variables: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value.
The STOP state is reached when the I/O scan is finished.
9 Reset
Explicit reset of automation station via hardware switch.
Actions (cold start response):
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
● Cold start function block variables: Volatile variables are initialized with initial
value. Non-volatile variables retain their last value
● System event: Reset
D-MAP processing starts when the first I/O scan is finished.
10, 11 Fatal Error
Restart due to fatal error in the software or in the D-MAP program. Criterion: Same
error occurs three times within 15 minutes.
Actions (cold start response):
● Stop I/O scan If possible: Loss of hardware output values for compact and
modular automation stations
● Stop BACnet communication
● Stop XWP communication
D-MAP processing is stopped.
12 Reanimation
Only possible by deleting the D-MAP program (press ForceFWDownload pin and
reset the automation station).
Actions (cold start response):
● Change of required operating state to STOP
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
The STOP state is reached when the I/O scan is finished.
13 Master reset
Deletion of D-MAP program on automation station with XWP.
● Cold start I/O scan: Default values for output modules
D-MAP program data including system and event queue is deleted.
14 Load
Complete loading of a new D-MAP program.
● Before downloading, a master reset must be carried out.
Function block variables are loaded with initialized values.
15 Delta download
D-MAP program changes are loaded.
16 Power restoration COMA
Power restored. Operating state before power failure was COMA.
Actions (cold start response):
● Stop I/O scan
● Stop BACnet communication
● Stop XWP communication
D-MAP processing is stopped.
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Summary
Every time the automation station restarts (Powerfail, Reset) a cold start is carried
out.
The operating state is stored as a non-volatile variable.
The operating state is mapped as follows to the system status [SysSta] property of
the device object:
Operating mode
System status property [SysSta]
STOP (no D-MAP program loaded)
DOWNLOAD_REQUIRED
STOP (D-MAP program loaded)
NON_OPERATIONAL
RUN (D-MAP program loaded)
OPERATIONAL
Table 62: Operating modes and system status property [SysSta]
16.5 Data Storage
The following memory types are used in the automation station:
● RAM: The content is lost during a cold start. Read and write access is possible
any time without any special action.
● Battery supported RAM: Operating hours and trend data are preserved during
a cold start if the battery is loaded.
● Flash memory: The content is retained during a cold start. Read access is
possible at any time. Write access is only possible via a special driver and with
restrictions (access time, sequential only).
The data and code of a D-MAP program are saved in the flash memory during the
download process. A copy of the data is always stored in the RAM so that the DMAP program can access data efficiently for processing purposes. This means,
that all changes to the program data must be updated both in the RAM and in the
flash memory.
The following figure shows the various sequences:
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Data Storage
PXM20
XWP
D-MAP
Application
Communication
Flash
RAM
Figure 204: Data storage process
Downloading the D-MAP
program
1. The D-MAP program (code and data blocks) is copied to the flash memory (1a).
A copy of the data blocks is created in the RAM (1b) for later modification by the D
MAP program.
Read/Write via
communication system
2. When writing data, the data is written to the RAM (2a) and the flash memory (2b).
Read access to the data is via the RAM (2c).
Processing the D-MAP
program
3. The D-MAP program code is read from the flash memory (3a). The program data
is modified in the RAM (3b). Non-volatile process variables (for example, adaptive
control parameters, hours run, etc.) are written by the function blocks into the flash
memory (3c) at regular intervals (once per day) or saved in the battery supported
RAM.
Starting the automation
station
4. At each restart of the automation station, a copy of the data (data blocks) is
created in the RAM (4) from the flash memory (including all communication and DMAP changes).
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Data Storage
17
17 Logical I/O Blocks
I/O blocks are used to register and transmit raw data to and from the plant, and to
convert, process and integrate it into the program.
The following options are supported:
● Raw data from or to the input or output modules.
● Raw data from or to the PPS2 interface (room units) (not for Desigo S7 and the
modular series PXC…D)
● Data referenced via the Technical Designation (TD) and accessed either in the
same automation station (without a connection), or peer-to-peer via BACnet
services.
● Data made available via a Discipline I/O of a room automation station or thirdparty device (not for Desigo S7).
The term I/O blocks refers collectively to the individual input blocks and output
blocks.
● Input blocks are used to enable an input signal (for example, a measured value)
in the program to be handled as a process value.
● Output blocks are used to enable a process value to be transmitted as an
output signal (for example, a positioning command).
Value blocks act as a link between program pins, and are used to temporarily store
a process value, and if necessary, to display it on a client operator station. A
special version of the value block, the Value block for operation provides a
simplified means of operation from an operator client (without the facility to override
values manually).
Counter Input blocks (CI blocks) are used to enable a counter value (for example,
from a gas or electricity meter) to be processed in the application as a real-number
process value. In this process, the counter value (pulse) is converted in the block
into the associated physical variable.
Integration I/Os (Discipline I/O blocks) are used, for example, to integrate room
automation or third-party devices
Input blocks
Output blocks
Value blocks
Value blocks for operation
Analog Input (AI, AI RED)
Analog Output (AO, AO RED)
Analog Input (AVAL)
Analog Input (AVAL_OP)
Binary Input (BI, BI RED)
Binary Output (BO, BO RED)
Binary (BVAL)
Binary (BVAL_OP)
Multistate Input (MI, MI RED)
Multistate Output (MO, MO RED)
Multistate (MVAL)
Multistate (MVAL_OP)
Counter Input (CI)
Accumulator (CI ACC)
Discipline I/O
Table 63: I/O blocks
Program view and system
view
I/O blocks are displayed in two different views:
● The program view shows an I/O block with the pins and attributes required for
configuration purposes and to create the program. This is the display format
used in Xworks Plus (XWP).
● The system view shows the I/O blocks as standard BACnet objects. These
BACnet objects and the associated properties are then available to clients from
where they can be operated and monitored.
Desigo S7
In Desigo S7 the Step 7 Manager is used with CFC instead of XWP. PXM20
cannot be used. Use the management station as a client.
All the blocks listed above are implemented in accordance with the BACnet
standard. Therefore additional functions are available, such as alarm management.
These blocks incorporate a mechanism which acts as an alarm source for blocks
available as standard BACnet objects in the BACnet network. By use of various
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BACnet services, a given event is displayed as an alarm event on the relevant
clients (for example, PXM20) from where the alarm can be processed, that is,
viewed, acknowledged and/or reset.
In XWP these functions can be tracked via the relevant values at the block pins in
online test mode.
BACnet functions
17.1 General Functions
Blocks: AO, BO, MO,
AVAL, BVAL, MVAL
This section describes the general functional scope shared by many of the I/O
blocks. Each subsection includes a list of the blocks to which that subsection
applies. Any block-specific details which are not shared by other blocks are
described together with the block concerned.
Priority mechanism
Basic function
In order to evaluate the various defined setpoints received from the BACnet
command system and via the data flow connections, the AO, BO, MO, AVAL,
BVAL and MVAL blocks each incorporate a priority array [PrioArr].
All external sources write their defined setpoint and information bit (enable signal)
into this [PrioArr]. The block then evaluates these entries continuously, in order to
determine the valid present value [PrVal].
The [PrioArr] holds up to 16 different entries, each consisting of a setpoint
definition and the associated information bit (enable signal). The input number also
indicates the priority of the entry, where 1 is the highest and 16 the lowest priority.
Each priority level has a predefined meaning.
Figure 205: Priority arrayx
Determining [PrVal]
The block continuously evaluates the valid present value at the output [PrVal]. It
selects the value that has the highest priority of those whose information bit
(enable signal) is also set. If none of the information bits is set, the default value
[DefVal] is processed.
Structure of the Priority
Array [PrioArr]
Each priority level has a predefined meaning.
In the [PrioArr], two adjacent priority levels each are reserved for life safety,
manual operation and plant operation.
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●
The higher priority (lower number) of each pair is reserved for local control and
monitoring, close to the plant (priority 1, 4, 7 and 15).
● The lower priority (higher number) of each pair is reserved for higher level
control and monitoring (priority 2, 5, 8 and 16).
● Priority level 6 is specifically designed for switch-on and switch-off delays and
to maintain minimum ON and OFF times.
This ensures that, for example, an on-site EMERGENCY OFF command, initiated
at the plant level, takes priority over a safety function from a higher-level
subsystem.
Priorities 1, 4, 7, 15
Priority 6
Priorities 2, 5, 8, 14, 16
Local control
Control within block
Higher control
via data flow interconnection
via BACnet command
AO
BO
MVAL
CMD_CTL
e.g. emergency stop
1
PWR_CTL
Life safety
2
3
e.g. anti-icing
ValCrit / EnCrit
protection
Critical value
5
6
e.g. local manual
switch
Monitoring hours
M. station
7
Manual operation
ValOp / EnOp 8
9
13
Local control
Program control
14
15 ValPgm / EnPgm
General BACnet command
16
PrVal
Figure 206: Structure of the Priority Array [PrioArr]
Priority 6
Siemens
Priority entry 6 is used to forward the switch commands resulting from [PrioArr] to
the [PrVal] output after a delay. This enables you to implement both switch-on and
switch-off delays and minimum ON and OFF times.
For this purpose, the internal block logic imports the Present value [PrVal] into the
priority 6 entry. While the delay times referred to above are running, priority 6 is set
to active and so takes priority over priority levels 7…16. Outside these delay times,
priority 6 is always inactive.
Locating this function in the [PrioArr] between priorities 1…5 and 7…16 has the
following consequences:
● Commands with a priority level of 1…5 are always executed immediately,
irrespective of any currently active delay times.
● Commands with a priority level of 7…16 are always overridden by any currently
active delay times.
Unlike all the other entries in [PrioArr], the commands and information bit for
priority 6 are generated exclusively by the BO, MO, BVAL and MVAL blocks. A
priority 6 entry cannot be written from an external source.
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General Functions
The switch-on and switchoff delay
As soon as one of the commands with a priority of 7…16 determines the [PrVal]
which will therefore cause the present state of [PrVal] to change, the entry for
priority 6 is set up as follows:
If the switch-on delay [DlyOn] or switch-off delay [DlyOff] is greater than 0:
1. Priority 6 adopts the still unchanged present value [PrVal].
2. Priority 6 is set to active.
3. The switch-on or switch-off delay timer starts.
4. After expiry of [TiOnMin] or [TiOffMin], priority 6 is set to inactive.
If the delay times [DlyOn] or [DlyOff] are equal to 0, no action is taken.
If the new value which determines [PrVal] is the same as the current [PrVal], then,
here too, no action is taken.
The minimum on/off time
For each change at the output [PrVal] from OFF to Stage n or from Stage n to OFF,
the entry for priority 6 is set up as follows:
If the minimum ON-time [TiOnMin] or OFF-time [TiOffMin] is greater than 0:
1. Priority 6 adopts the new present value [PrVal].
2. Priority 6 is set to active.
3. The timer for the minimum on-time or off-time is started.
4. After expiry of [TiOnMin] or [TiOffMin], priority 6 is set to inactive.
If the minimum switch-times [TiOnMin] / [TiOffMin] are set to 0, no action is taken.
Constraints
●
●
●
Application
●
●
Information bit
The functions described above are supported only by the BO, MO, BVAL and
MVAL blocks.
With multistage switch commands, the monitoring periods are enabled only
when switching from OFF to Stage n or from Stage n to OFF. When switching
from one stage to another (for example, Stage 1 to Stage 2), the timer times
are not enabled.
However, any timer times already running will continue to run.
Unnecessary on/off switching operations can be prevented by activating
minimum switch-on or switch-off times.
Activating switch-on or switch-off delays ensures that run-on time delays are
maintained.
In order for a given value to be included in the evaluation of [PrioArr], its
information bit must be set.
The following applies to priority 1,4,7 and 15 (data flow connection): The relevant
information bit is set via pins [EnSfty], [EnCrit], [EnSwi] and [EnPgm].
The following applies to priority 2, 5, 8, 14 and 16 (BACnet command system):
When a given value is commanded via BACnet, the value concerned is entered in
the [PrioArr] and the associated information bit is set automatically.
The following applies to priority level 6: Both the value and the information bit are
handled by the block concerned.
Prio
Meaning
Use
Access via
1
Safety value (life safety)
Local safety function, for example:
Reserved for the initiation of safety
functions (1 = highest priority).
- Fire
Data flow interconnection via pins:
[ValSfty] and [EnSfty].
If priority 1 or 2 becomes the determining
value for [PrVal], then the value
concerned is transmitted immediately to
the [PrVal] output. It is not subject to the
delay times defined for priority 6.
- Service switch
2
3
- EMERGENCY OFF
Normally, [ValSfty] is a constant and
[EnSfty] can be enabled/disabled.
- Gas alarm
- Thermal package
Higher-level safety function, for example:
BACnet command system.
- Smoke extraction
Access via the CMD_CTL block.
Not used in Desigo.
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Prio
Meaning
Use
4
Critical value (plant protection)
Local monitoring of critical plant states, for Data flow interconnection via pins:
example:
[ValCrit] und [EnCrit].
Reserved for monitoring critical plant
states.
5
If priority 4 or 5 becomes the determining
value for [PrVal], then the value
concerned is transmitted immediately to
the [PrVal] output. It is not subject to the
delay times defined for priority 6.
- Frost protection (protection from excess
cooling)
Normally, [ValCrit] is a constant and
[EnCrit] is enabled/disabled.
- Icing protection
Higher-level monitoring of critical plant
states:
BACnet command system.
Access via the CMD_CTL block.
Minimum switch-on/off time
No access!
Prevent unnecessary switching operations.
Commands are only generated internally
in the block.
Switch-on/off delay
7
Access via
- Interlock of aggregates
- Frost in ventilation system (close
dampers, stop fans, switch pump on and
open valve)
6
17
Can be used to ensure that run-on delay times are implemented.
The timer periods [TiOnMin], [TiOffMin],
[DlyOn] and [DlyOff] can be configured in
blocks BO, MO, BVAL and MVAL.
Operating value
Local manual operation, for example:
Reserved for manual operation.
- Manual switch
Data flow interconnection via pins:
[ValSwi] und [EnSwi].
- Mode selector switch
8
Higher-level manual operation, for
example:
BACnet command system. Access via:
- Management station
- Management station
- PXM20
- Web client
9...13
Not used in Desigo.
14
Program value
Reserved for normal plant operation with
monitoring and control.
Superposed control and monitoring of the
plant.
- PXM20
- Web client
BACnet command system. Access is via
blocks:
- CMD_CTL
- PWR_CTL (if control enable signal =
Fixed)
15
Local control of plant.
Data flow interconnection via pins:
[ValPgm] and [EnPgm].
If the program value is a controller
variable, then [EnPgm] = True and
[ValPgm] = controller variable.
If the program value is not a controller
variable, then [EnPgm] = False.
16
Program value
BACnet command system. Access via
blocks:
Reserved for general cross-PX
commands via BACnet references.
CMD_CTL
PWR_CTL (if control enable signal is =
Released)
Cross-PX via various blocks, for example,
ASCHED, BSCHED, MSCHED (name
reference list).
17
Default value [DefVal]
If none of priorities 1…16 is active, then
the default value [DefVal] is processed
instead.
The influence of [DefVal] depends on the
state of the block concerned:
BACnet command system. Access via:
Out-of-service [OoServ=False]:
- PXM20
[DefVal], like the values of priorities
7…16, is subject to the delay times of
priority 6.
- CFC
- Web client
[OoServ=True]:
[DefVal] is transmitted immediately to the
[PrVal] output.
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Table 64: Priorities
Example: Effect of
priorities 7...16 on [PrVal]
Figure 207: Effect of priorities 7...16 on [PrVal]
Prio
Use
1
Prio 7…16
Assumption: The effective switch command from priority (7…16) is Off and is set to active.
Prio 6
Assumption: Priority 6 is not active.
[PrVal]
Assumption: The [PrVal] output is set to Off.
Prio 7…16
The effective switch command from priority (7…16) switches from Off to Stage 2.
Prio 6
Priority 6 adopts the (still unchanged) present value [PrVal=Off] and is set to active.
2
At the same time, the switch-on delay [DlyOn] starts. Throughout the delay time, priority 6 remains active –
the associated value remains Off.
3
[PrVal]
Since priority 6 overrides the effective switch command from priority (7…16), the [PrVal] output remains
Off.
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
1. After expiry of the switch-on delay [DlyOn], priority 6 is released.
2. The effective switch command Stage 2 from priority (7…16) is transmitted to the [PrVal] output.
3. Priority 6 adopts the new value of [PrVal] and is set to active again. At the same time, the minimum
switch-on time [TiOnMin] is started. Priority 6 remains active throughout this monitoring time.
4
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[PrVal]
The [PrVal] output changes from Off to Stage 2.
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] has expired. Priority 6 is released.
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Prio
17
Use
[PrVal]
When priority 6 ceases to take effect, the [PrVal] output is once again determined by the effective switch
command from priority (7…16).
[PrVal] remains at Stage 2.
5
Prio 7…16
None of the information bits for priorities (7…16) is active.
The resulting switch command is therefore determined by the default value [DefVal].
Prio 6
The block starts the switch-off delay [DlyOff].
Throughout this monitoring time, priority 6 is set to active – the associated value remains at Stage 2.
6
[PrVal]
Since priority 6 overrides the effective switch command [DefVal], the [PrVal] output remains at Stage 2.
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
1. After expiry of the switch-off delay [DlyOff], priority 6 is released.
2. The effective switch command Off from [DefVal] is transmitted to [PrVal].
3. Priority 6 adopts the new value of [PrVal] and is set to active again. At the same time, the minimum
switch-off time [TiOffMin] is started. Priority 6 remains active throughout this monitoring time.
7
[PrVal]
The [PrVal] output changes from Stage 2 to Off.
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
The minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin] has expired. Priority 6 is released.
[PrVal]
Since neither priority 6 nor any of the information bits for priority entries (7…16) is active, the effective
switch command is determined by [DefVal].
The output value [PrVal] remains at Off.
8
Prio 7…16
At least one of the information bits for priorities (7…16) is active again.
The effective switch command from priority (7…16) is Stage 1.
9
Prio 6
Priority 6 adopts the (still unchanged) present value [PrVal=Off] and is set to active.
At the same time, the switch-on delay [DlyOn] starts. Throughout the delay time, priority 6 remains active –
the associated value remains Off.
[PrVal]
Since priority 6 overrides the effective switch command from priority (7…16), the [PrVal] output remains
Off.
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
1. After expiry of the switch-on delay [DlyOn], priority 6 is released.
2. The effective switch command Stage 1 from priority (7…16) is transmitted to the [PrVal] output.
3. Priority 6 adopts the new value of [PrVal] and is set to active again. At the same time, the minimum
switch-on time [TiOnMin] is started. Priority 6 remains active throughout this monitoring time.
10
[PrVal]
The [PrVal] output changes from Off to Stage 1.
Prio 7…16
The effective switch command from priority (7…16) switches from Stage 1 to Stage 2.
Prio 6
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] is still active.
Changeover from Stage m to Stage n.
With multistage switch commands, the monitoring periods are enabled only when switching from OFF to
Stage n or from Stage n to OFF. When switching from one stage to another (for example, Stage 1 to
Stage 2), the monitoring periods are not enabled. However, monitoring periods which have already started
remain active – priority 6 adopts the new target value.
[PrVal]
A change from Stage 1 to Stage 2 would not activate priority 6.
However, since the minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] is still active, priority 6 still overrides the effective
switch command from priority (7…16).
The [PrVal] output changes from Stage 1 to Stage 2.
11
Prio 7…16
n/a
Prio 6
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] has expired. Priority 6 is released.
[PrVal]
When priority 6 ceases to take effect, the [PrVal] output is once again determined by the effective switch
command from priority (7…16).
The [PrVal] output remains at Stage 2.
Table 65: Effect of priorities 7...16 on [PrVal]
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Example: Effect of
priorities 1...5 on [PrVal]
Figure 208: Effect of priorities 1...5 on [PrVal]
Prio
Use
1
Prio 1…5
Assumption: All information bits for priorities 1…5 are inactive.
Prio 6
Assumption: Priority 6 is not active.
[PrVal]
Assumption: The [PrVal] output is set to Off.
Prio 1…5
At least one of the information bits for priorities (1…5) is active again. The effective switch command from
priority (1…5) is Off.
Prio 6
Since the effective switch command for priority (1...5) does not cause a change in the [PrVal] output,
priority 6 remains inactive.
[PrVal]
The output value [PrVal] remains at Off.
Prio 1…5
The effective switch command from priority (1…5) switches from Off to Stage 1.
Prio 6
Priority 6 adopts the new present value [PrVal=Stage 1] and is set to active. At the same time, the
minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] starts without waiting for the delay time [DlyOn].
2
3
Note: Entries for priorities (1…5) initialize only the minimum switch-on or switch-off times [TiOnMin] and
[TiOffMin] respectively, but not the switch-on and switch-off delays.
[TiOnMin] and [TiOffMin] times for which the timer has already started only take effect when all priorities
(1…5) are inactive, that is, when the [PrVal] will be determined by one of priorities (7…16).
[PrVal]
Priorities 1…5 are reserved to implement safety functions, and are executed immediately, irrespective of
any priority 6 monitoring periods which may already be running.
The [PrVal] output is switched immediately from Off to Stage 1.
4
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Prio 1…5
None of the information bits for priority entries (1…5) is active.
Prio 6
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] is still active. Priority 6 adopts the new target value from priority
(7…16).
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Prio
17
Use
[PrVal]
The effective switch command is determined from priority 6.
The [PrVal] output changes from Stage 1 to Stage 2.
5
Prio 1…5
n/a
Prio 6
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] has expired. Priority 6 is released.
[PrVal]
Since neither priority 6 nor any entries for priorities (1…5) are active, the output [PrVal] is now again
determined by the effective switch command from priorities (7…16).
The [PrVal] output remains at Stage 2.
Note: Switching from Stage 1 to Stage 2 does not re-start the minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin].
6
7
8
Prio 1…5
Assumption: All information bits for priorities 1…5 are inactive.
Prio 6
Assumption: Priority 6 is not active.
[PrVal]
Assumption: The [PrVal] output is set to Off.
Prio 1…5
At least one of the information bits for priorities (1…5) is active again. The effective switch command from
priority (1…5) is Off.
Prio 6
Since the effective switch command for priority (1...5) does not cause a change in the [PrVal] output,
priority 6 remains inactive.
[PrVal]
The output value [PrVal] remains at Off.
Prio 1…5
The effective switch command from priority (1…5) switches from Off to Stage 2.
Prio 6
Priority 6 adopts the new present value, [PrVal=Stage 2] and is set to active. At the same time, the
minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] starts without waiting for the delay time [DlyOn].
Note: Entries for priorities (1…5) initialize only the minimum switch-on or switch-off times [TiOnMin] and
[TiOffMin] respectively, but not the switch-on and switch-off delays.
[TiOnMin] and [TiOffMin] times for which the timer is already running only take effect when all priorities
(1…5) are inactive, that is, when the [PrVal] will be determined by one of priorities (7…16).
[PrVal]
Priorities 1…5 are reserved to implement safety functions, and are executed immediately, irrespective of
the switch state and of any priority 6 monitoring periods which may already be running.
The [PrVal] output is switched immediately from Off to Stage 2.
9
Prio 1…5
The effective switch command from priority (1…5) switches from Stage 2 to Off.
Prio 6
Priority 6 adopts the new present value [PrVal=Off].
The still-running minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] is cancelled.
The block re-starts the minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin].
[PrVal]
Priorities 1…5 are reserved to implement safety functions, and are executed immediately, irrespective of
the switch state and of any priority 6 monitoring periods which may already be running.
The [PrVal] output is switched immediately from Stage 2 to Off.
10
Prio 1…5
All information bits for priorities 1…5 are inactive.
Prio 6
The minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin] is still active.
[PrVal]
The effective switch command is determined from priority 6.
The output value [PrVal] remains at Off.
11
Prio 1…5
n/a
Prio 6
The minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin] has expired. Priority 6 is released.
[PrVal]
Since neither priority 6 nor any entries for priorities (1…5) are active, the output [PrVal] is now again
determined by the effective switch command from priorities (7…16).
The output value [PrVal] remains at Off.
Table 66: Effect of priorities 1...5 on [PrVal]
Switch types [SwiKind]
Blocks: BO, MO, BVAL, MVAL
All switching I/O blocks have a configurable switching response. The switching
response determines the functioning of the block. The switching functions are
subject to the priority mechanism in the [PrioArr] and the switch command delay.
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●
●
●
●
●
●
Normal: Direct switching in stages taking into account runtimes (for example,
motors, burners, dampers, etc.).
Motor: Switching in stages for rotating aggregates taking into account ramp-up
and ramp-down times (fan-belt protection).
Trigger: Event-driven switching, last command takes precedence; integration of
a data point (EIB, LONMARK)
Switch: Generation of an ON/OFF pulse of a defined duration.
Push button with delay: Generation of an ON/OFF pulse of a defined duration.
The pulse can be extended whenever required.
Release (Release Command): Issuance of a subsystem-specific release value
instead of Present_Value (=Relinquish_Default), if no priority is active in the
output object.
[SwiKind]
Normal
BO
MO
BVal
MVal
•
•
•
•
•
Motor
Trigger
•
Switch
•
•
Pushbutton with delay
•
•
Release
•
•
Table 67: I/O block switch types
Normal
Normal handling of the process values in the [PrioArr]. The configured runtimes are
active. The outputs can be switched directly or in stages.
Figure 209: Control of a multistage aggregate without configured runtimes
Motor
The Motor setting is used when there is a need to allow for ramp-up and rampdown times due to a rotating centrifugal mass. The programmed times in this
setting can be used, for example, to avoid overloading the fan belt when starting a
fan motor.
When the motor is switched down, the system checks on the basis of the ramp-up
time whether or not the current motor speed has been reached. The switch-down
command is not executed until the motor speed is stable. During the ramp-down
period, the effective command to the hardware is Off. When the ramp-down time
has elapsed, the new command is transmitted to the hardware.
Figure 210: Control of a multi-speed motor with configured runtimes
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Trigger
In the Trigger setting, the source of the last command takes precedence. The valid
value is written from the [PrioArr] to the [DefVal] and transmitted to the output. The
priority is then released again.
In this setting, Priorities 7…16 are treated equally; Priorities 1…5 have a blocking
effect.
The trigger function is used, for example, for the integration of LON data points.
Owing to the event mechanism, this function is not used for P-bus objects.
Switch
The Switch setting is used to generate an ON or OFF pulse of a predefined
duration. A command via BACnet, or the activation of an Enable signal in one of
Priorities 7…16 via the data flow connection initiates an associated pulse (event).
The minimum switch-on time [TiOnMin] and/or minimum switch-off time [TiOffMin]
must be set. Setting both times can prevent fast switching operations. Priorities
1…5 have a blocking effect.
Pushbutton with delay
(time extension)
The Pushbutton with delay function is like the Switch function, except an active
pulse can be extended by another pulse at any time.
Runtimes and monitoring periods
The I/O function blocks are designed for the runtimes and monitoring periods
required in HVAC engineering, and can therefore be used directly as components
(motors, dampers, fans, etc.).
Different runtimes and monitoring periods can be set, depending on the function
concerned.
Runtimes:
● Switch-on/off delay
● Minimum switch-on/off time
● Ramp-up/-down time
Monitoring periods:
● Feedback time with switch-on/off
● Feedback signal deviation during operation
Runtimes
Switch-on/off delay
Blocks: BO, MO, BVAL, MVAL
The switch-on/off delay when applied to the switching I/O blocks causes a delayed
output if the switch command was written via Priority 7…16. The delay time affects
Priority 6 as described. Switch commands via Priorities 1…5 are executed without
a delay.
Minimum switch-on/off
time
When applied to the switching I/O blocks, the minimum switch-on/switch-off time
causes the output to be blocked for a period of time if the switch command was
written via Priority 7…16. The minimum switch-on/off time affects Priority 6 as
already described in Section 24.2.1.3. However, switch commands via Priorities
1…5 are executed immediately irrespective of the minimum switch-on/off time.
Ramp-up/down time
The ramp-up/down times (run-up/-down times) can be defined in a table for each
stage. These times apply to the two switch types [SwiKind] Normal and Motor.
The ramp-up time is the time taken by a motor when changing from a lower speed
to the next higher speed, to reach the new speed. This limits the current
consumption of the motor.
The ramp-down time is the time taken by the motor when switching down from a
higher speed, to reach the lower speed. This prevents feedback to the mains
supply network and protects the fan belt and the motor.
As a rule, the ramp-up and ramp-down times depend on the centrifugal mass
involved, and must be determined separately for each project.
Especially with single-speed motors, the times can be used as Open/Close
runtimes (for example, damper actuator from 0…100%). A moving damper can
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thus be mapped in the system and the transition signal can, if required, be used for
control purposes.
Monitoring periods
Feedback monitoring /
process value monitoring
Blocks: BI, MI, BO, MO, BVAL, MVAL
The I/O objects have a monitoring function. The output objects monitor the
feedback signal from the plant. For this purpose, an address string must be
entered for the [FbAddr] feedback parameter [FbAddr] and the alarm function must
be enabled.
The input and value objects can monitor reference values. For this purpose, the
relevant reference values must be configured and the alarm function must be
enabled.
Deviation monitoring
If the feedback value deviates from the output value [PrVal], a deviation alarm is
generated after a configurable time period, and the block status changes to In
Alarm. When the two values match again, and the configured time period has
expired, the alarm and status are reset. There is otherwise no automatic block
reaction, that is, if a switch response in the plant is required as a reaction to this
alarm, this response must be programmed in CFC via the Disturbance output
[Dstb].
Switch-on/off feedback
monitoring
It is also possible to configure the time period during which the maximum deviation
of the feedback signal may occur after a switch-on/off operation. If the deviation
persists after the monitoring time has expired, an alarm is generated and the status
of the block changes to In alarm. When the two values match again, and the
configured time period has expired, the alarm and status are reset. There is
otherwise no automatic block reaction, that is, if a switch response in the plant is
required as a reaction to this alarm, this response must be programmed in CFC via
the Disturbance output [Dstb].
No feedback monitoring
If no feedback monitoring is required, and the address string is left blank, the
monitoring periods are used by the block for the internal generation of the transient
state [TraSta]. This means that the transient state signal for the switch-on/off
operation is set for the preset period of time. This is how a moving actuator, for
example, a damper, is displayed in the system.
Figure 211: No feedback monitoring
Limit monitoring
Blocks: AI, AO, AVAL
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General Functions
In the case of the analog I/O blocks, the present value [PrVal] can be monitored for
a high/low limit. If the alarm monitoring feature is enabled, a deviation alarm is
generated after a configurable time period, and the block status changes to In
Alarm. When the present value is within the limits again and the configured time
period has expired, the alarm and status are reset. There is otherwise no automatic
block reaction, that is, if a switch response in the plant is required as a reaction to
this alarm, this response must be programmed in Xworks Plus (XWP) via the
disturbance output [Dstb].
Override via client
The input, output and value blocks can be overridden via BACnet clients (for
example, the PXM20 operator unit) or in XWP (CFC) in online test mode.
User override of an input
value
Desigo
Management station
PXM20
Web client
PXM40/50
BACnet clients
Forced
value
Forced
value
Forced
value
Forced
value
Desigo PX
BACnet service, e.g.
WriteProperty (Present value)
Input block
alue
F orced v
Online test mode
in PX Design
Out of Service
Present value
Default value
State flag
Reliability
10523Z15en
Figure 212: Override of input blocks
There are two options:
1. Override via a BACnet client:
A BACnet client is overridden with a BACnet service.
Input objects are overridden by setting the out-of-service parameter [OoServ] and
writing the desired present value [PrVal]. The default value [DefVal] is
automatically set to the same value as [PrVal]. (You can also overwrite [DefVal], in
which case [PrVal] is automatically used instead).
There is no need to follow these rules when using the PXM20 to override a value,
as the operator unit observes them automatically.
Overridden input objects are not reset automatically. To do this, reset [OoServ] first.
[DefVal] remains at the last overridden value and [PrVal] is again derived from the
physical input.
2. Override via online test mode in CFC:
Overrides with CFC are carried out via a proprietary service.
Outputs of a block cannot be overwritten.
To overwrite [PrVal] the out of service state in [OoServ] must be set to TRUE, after
which the default value [DefVal] can be modified. This value is then adopted (or
applied) as the present value and is made available under [PrVal].
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General Functions
User override of an output
value
Desigo
Management station
PXM20
Web client
PXM40/50
BACnet clients
Override
Override
Override
Override
BACnet Service:
WriteProperty [PrVal], Value, [Prio]
WriteProperty [PrVal], NULL, [Prio]
ReadProperty [PrioArr]
Desigo PX
Output or Value block
[PrioArr]
Override
Online test mode
in PX Design
[OoServ]
[DefVal]
[EnOp]
[ValOp]
[EnPgm]
[ValPgm]
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
[PRVal]
[StaFlg]
[Rlb]
ValueEnable
10523Z14en
Figure 213: Override of output blocks
There are two options:
1. Override via a BACnet client:
The override of an output or value object is based on the priority array [PrioArr] in
the object. Priority 8 is reserved for the operator, that is, an override from the
PXM20 and PX Web is written to the Priority 8 entry. Other BACnet clients can
write to other priority entries.
The value (Value or Null) is stored in the [PrioArr]. After processing in the object,
the value, other than NULL, with the highest priority is transmitted to [PrVal]. If
there is no active priority, the [DefVal] is transmitted.
2. Override via the online test mode in Xworks Plus (XWP):
[PrVal] is an output and can therefore not be modified. In this case the value under
[EnOp] must first be set, after which the modifiable value under [ValOp] is written to
Priority 8 in [PrioArr]. After processing in the object, the value, other than NULL,
with the highest priority is then transmitted to [PrVal]. If there is no active priority,
the [DefVal] is transmitted.
Runtime totals
Runtime totalization can be implemented in the binary input, binary output and
multistate input and output blocks (BI, BO, MI and MO). Part of the overall range of
functions is defined by the BACnet standard. In order to provide the complete
range of runtime totalizing functions required in the field of building automation and
control, certain proprietary enhancements have been added here.
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Figure 214: Runtime totals
Function
With a binary input object, the operating hours are determined on the basis of the
ON state of [PrVal] (that is, by measuring the time for which this value is active).
For multistate blocks, you can configure how many states are to be totalized.
These are combined and added in a totalizer (the various states cannot be
evaluated individually). In contrast to the input object, the output objects of the ON
state for [FbVal] is logged (not [PrVal]) to operating hours message of the output
objects.
There are two separate totalizers for runtime totalization:
● Runtime totalizer
● Overall runtime totalizer
Release
Runtime totalization can be enabled via the [EnOph] pin (Enable operating hours
count). This is a binary value for binary objects, for multistate objects a list of
values released for counting.
Runtime totalizer
Maintenance messages (events) are generated via the runtime totalizers. These
are typically reset when the maintenance has been carried out. The present
operating hours [PrOph] output can be used to connect the runtime totalization
feature for further use in the program (for example, for changeover of pumps or
boilers based on operating hours).
Resetting the runtime total
The operating hours [Oph] input is used to reset the current runtime total. In online
test mode in Xworks Plus (XWP) via a BACnet client such as the PXM20, the
present value can be reset by overwriting it with a new value (usually 0). This reset
does not affect the total operating hours count (pins [OphTot] and [PrOphTot], total
operating hours and present total operating hours respectively).
Overall runtime totalizer
The total operating hours count records the total hours run by an aggregate. It is
only reset when the aggregate is replaced. The [PrOphTot] output is available for
further interconnection in the program.
Resetting the operating
hours total
The [OphTot] input is used to reset the total operating hours. In online test mode in
Xworks Plus (XWP) or via a BACnet client such as the PXM20, the present value
can be reset by overwriting it with a new value (usually 0). This reset procedure
simultaneously sets the runtime totalizer (pins [Oph] and [PrOph]) to the same
value.
This is necessary, for example, for an aggregate which is installed as a
replacement item, but which has previously been in operation elsewhere for some
time.
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Maintenance message
A maintenance message (event) can be generated either after a specified period of
operation or on a specified date. The operating hours limit value and the
maintenance date [OphLm]/[MntnDate] can be configured for this purpose. An
event message is generated when the limit value is exceeded or at 13:00 hours on
the preset date. At the same time, the binary output [MntnInd] (maintenance
indication) is set to active for further use in the program. After the operating hours
reset, this output reverts to inactive. At the same time, the time stamp of the last
reset is stored in the time stamp operating hours reset pin [TiStmOph].
Feedback value
The following applies to output blocks: When a feedback is configured, operating
hours count is done based on the feedback value and not based on present value.
The maintenance interval can be further connected via the output present total
operating hours limit [PrOphLm].
Value range for run time
totalizing
The hours run are registered in 32-bit format, giving a maximum value of
4,294,967,296. With a resolution in seconds, this gives a value range of over
49,000 days (more than 136 years).
Out of Service [OoServ]
The physical input/output is disconnected from the I/O block via the out-of-service
pin [OoServ]. This out of service function is normally used in cases where a
hardware module is faulty or temporarily not required, for example, sensor not
connected or faulty. This is a way of suppressing reliability problems and the
associated FAULT alarms.
Input block
If the out-of-service property of an input block is set [OoServ=True], the physical
input is disconnected from the present value ([PrVal] = [DefVal]) and any changes
in the physical input will not be transmitted to [PrVal]. Furthermore the reliability
[Rlb] and status flag [StaFlg] are also disconnected from the physical input. In this
state, the properties [PrVal] and [Rlb] can be modified for test purposes.
Output block
If the out-of-service property for an output block is set [OoServ=TRUE], the
physical output is disconnected from [PrVal]. Changes in [PrVal] will not be
transmitted to the physical output, which retains its last value. Furthermore, the
reliability [Rlb] and status flag [StaFlg] are also disconnected from the physical
output. In this state, [PrVal] and [Rlb] can be modified for test purposes. Other
functions that depend on these properties are not dependent on the [OoServ]
property. The [PrVal] is set in accordance with the priority array [PrioArr], but the
value is not transmitted to the physical output.
Alarm and event functions
Each input, output and value block can be enabled and disabled as an alarm
source. The blocks are configured by setting the relevant values at the block pins.
See Alarm Strategy.
Reliability [Rlb]
The reliability of the present value and of the physical input/output is represented
by the reliability pin [Rlb]. This makes it possible to detect and signal faults and
errors, such as addressing errors, sensor problems (short-circuit or open circuit)
and module faults (missing or incorrect modules). See Reliability Table.
Commissioning State [ComgSta]
The state of the I/O can be entered at [ComgSta], the commissioning state pin, in
the commissioning phase. The setting does not affect the program; it merely
serves as a kind of notepad for commissioning purposes.
The following states are available for selection:
● Checked
● Not Checked [DefVal]
● Periphery Defect or Missing
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●
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Cable Defect or Missing
I/O Defect or Missing
As these states are static, they must be set manually during commissioning.
Status Flag [StaFlg]
The status flag [StaFlg] indicates the state of the I/O block. This pin consists of four
Boolean values:
● IN_ALARM: Logic 1 (TRUE) if the event state pin [EvtSta] does not display
NORMAL as its value.
● FAULT: Logic 1 (TRUE) if the [Rlb] pin does NOT display the value
NO_FAULT_DETECTED.
● OVERRIDDEN: Logic 1 (TRUE) if the block point was overridden locally (for
example, manual switch on I/O module). If this flag is set, [PrVal] and [Rlb] will
no longer display any changes in the physical input/output.
● OUT_OF_SERVICE: Logic 1 (TRUE) if the out-of-service pin [OoServ] is active.
Default Value [DefVal]
For an input block, [DefVal] is transmitted to [PrVal] when [OoServ] is set to TRUE.
For an output block, value [DefVal] is transmitted to [PrVal] when none of the
priorities (1…16) is active.
17.2 Input Blocks
An input block is used to enable an input signal (for example, a measured value) in
the program to be handled as a process value.
Analog Input (AI)
The analog input is the logical image, or memory map, of an analog measured
value and describes its properties. The raw data is converted and made available
in the form of a current value (Present Value) at the block output for further
processing within the program.
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Conversion of the input signal with slope [Slpe] and intercept [Icpt].
● Interruption of input signal [OoServ] and replacement with [DefVal]
● Limit value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
Figure 215: Analog Input block
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Input Blocks
Processing and displaying
the current value
The measured raw value is converted into the measured present value in
accordance with a conversion curve. This present value is available at [PrVal] for
further processing within the program.
Slope/Intercept
The conversion curve is a linear function which takes the following form:
[PrVal] = Raw value * Slope + Intercept
The values for slope [Slpe] and intercept [Icpt] must be defined specifically for the
application concerned in accordance with the I/O system in use and the signal type.
For slope and intercept values for SBT products, see Slope [Slpe] and Intercept
[Icpt]. For sensors not listed, the following applies:
Calculating [Slpe] and
[Icpt]
The values for [Slpe] and [Icpt], which are to be entered in the block, must first be
calculated. These values are derived from the individual [Slpe] and [Icpt] values of
the signal type and the signal transducer in accordance with the following formula:
[Slpe] = (Slope SignalType / Slope SignalTransducer)
[Icpt] = (Intercept SignalTransducer / Slope SignalTransducer ) + Intercept SignalType
[Slpe] is calculated on the basis of:
[Slp] = (InterpolationPoint_y2 – InterpolationPoint_y1) / (InterpolationPoint_x2 –
InterpolationPoint_x1)
Binary Input (BI)
The binary input block is the logical image, or memory map, of a binary switch
value and describes its properties. The parameters of the physical value are set via
the polarity [Pol], and the value is then available as the present value for further
processing. The Present Value is monitored for a given state. For commissioning
and test purposes, or in the event of an error, the Present Value can be dissociated
from the process and overwritten with a replacement value.
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Inversion of the input value
● Interruption of input signal [OoServ] and replacement with [DefVal]
● Alarm value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
Figure 216: Binary Input block
Multistate Input (MI)
The multistate input block is the logical image, or memory map, of several binary
switch values or a direct hardware multistate value, and describes its properties.
The multistate capability is achieved by interconnecting a number of individual
binary states. The binary states are evaluated and mapped as integers. Each
integer in the series is allocated a text label which is further processed and
interconnected within the program as a current value. For commissioning and test
purposes, or in the event of an error, the Present Value can be dissociated from
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the process and overwritten with a replacement value. As an auxiliary function, the
runtime total for this multistate input can be registered and evaluated.
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Interruption of input signal [OoServ] and replacement with [DefVal]
● Alarm value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
● Hardware mapping
Figure 217: Multistate Input block
Pulse converter (pulse counter)
The pulse converter object cumulates pulses for a meter. The Pulse converter
object is used where meter values already manipulate in a meter object or where
changes of values are required to further process control programs. Applications
include: Establishing 24-hour/7-day/monthly meters, transmission by the minute of
meter values to peak load programs, etc. Precision and round off error based on
real arithmetic is possible.
Specific properties
Siemens
The counter value is scaled as a REAL number directly in the object using the
scaling factor. COV forming the Present_Value can be value or time-related and a
timestamp with the logged time is always provided with the Present_Value.
Reduction of Present_Value by a value (subtraction) is supported as a standard.
You can set it to a pre-defined value using a trigger function (proprietary
expansion).
The Pulse Converter object can be used in two different manners: Counting or
metering. The type of application is parameterized using the FnctMod parameter.
The referenced object, for example, an external device provides the pulse value:
● Present_Value for the pulse converter object represent the pulse count of the
referenced object: The difference to the last read value is added for each
record.
● Present_Value can be set via the system.
● After start-up, the pulse converter object encompasses the last stored counter
value:
● After a change in counter, the pulse converter object encompasses a false
counter value.
● Typical application: On-board I/O with pulse logging.
The referenced object, for example, an external device provides the absolute pulse
value:
● Present_Value from the pulse converter object represents the absolute counter
value of the referenced object.
● Under no circumstance may the Present_Value be set via the system.
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●
●
●
After start-up or a change in counter, the pulse converter object after includes
the correct counter value.
Typical applications:
– Access to an accumulator or pulse converter object is another BACnet
device
– I/O Open module or M-bus with counter value integration
– Integration of a device via LON
Incorrect applications: I/O module with pulse recording
Accumulator object (counter value)
The accumulator object can map counter states unchanged and free of errors due
to rounding off or add the counter pulse without loss and scale the same. The
accumulator object is suitable to displaying meter values that justify monetary
performance. For this type of counter values, manipulations such as monthly
values, etc., must never be made directly in the meter object.
The addition of counter pulses and scaling without loss is accomplished using
whole-number operations with residual value processing. The conversion of
physical pulses can be adapted using a presale parameter. The resulting
Present_Value is a scalable variable.
Present_Value depends on the function mode to synchronized adjustable to any
value using a physical meter with the last value prior to setting saved with a
date/time stamp.
17.3 Output Blocks
An output block is the logical image or memory map of a command, and describes
its properties. Within the program, the Present Value is made available to the block
as a program value. The block converts the program value and transmits the raw
data to the physical I/O.
If an output is deleted from an existing system in the course of a modification, the
I/O module will retain the last valid value which it received from the system. You
can return the I/O channel to the default status by switching the power off and on
again. This problem can be avoided by performing a complete download.
Binary Output (BO)
The binary output block is the logical image, or memory map, of a binary switch
command and describes its properties. Within the program it is made available to
the block as a program value, and its parameters are set via the "Polarity" pin. The
block converts this program value and transfers the raw data to the physical I/O,
where it is converted into a digital signal, for example, which drives the field device
via a contact.
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Inversion of the switch value and the feedback value (Polarity of feedback
[Bop])
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Feedback monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Configurable switch types (Normal, Trigger, Pushbutton, Pushbutton with delay)
● Runtimes and monitoring periods
● Switch-command delays
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Process monitoring [StaFlg]
Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
Figure 218: Binary Output block
Feedback monitoring for
dampers with one end
switch
To monitor the damper position of dampers with one end switch, the switch
position must be set by defining the polarity of the feedback signal [Bop].
OPEN end switch -> Feedback polarity [FbPol] set to NORMAL
CLOSED end switch -> Feedback polarity [FbPol] set to INVERTED
Feedback monitoring for
dampers with two end
switches
The monitoring of dampers with two feedback signals (Open/Closed) is
implemented via the address string of the Feedback Address [FbAddr]. The first
address in the string must be that of the end switch which indicates that the
damper is closed. The end switch indicating that the damper is open is set in the
second part of the address string.
Example with PX modular:
P= M1.K1; M2.K2 (D20)
● 1. 1st address: Damper-CLOSED switch
● 2. 2nd address: Damper-OPEN switch
● Feedback polarity [FbPol] NORMAL
M1.K1 = True; M2.K2 = False -> Feedback value: Closed
M1.K1 = False; M2.K2 = True -> Feedback value: Open
When the damper is being driven to the OPEN or CLOSED position, this transient
state [TraSta] is displayed. If the preset monitoring time is exceeded, an alarm is
initiated. If the damper fails to reach an end position, the alarm is reset again after
the monitoring time has expired. There is otherwise no automatic block reaction,
that is, if a switch response in the plant is required as a reaction to this alarm, this
response must be programmed in CFC via the disturbance output [Dstb].
Multistate Output (MO)
The multistate output is the logical memory map of a multi-state switching
command, and describes its properties. Within the program, the current value is
made available as a program value to the block and transmitted after conversion
into raw-data format to the physical I/Os. Here the raw data is converted into a
digital signal, for example, which drives the field device via a contact. It is also
possible to connect a multistate feedback signal, which is used for alarm evaluation.
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Output Blocks
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Feedback monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Configurable switch type (Normal, Motor, Trigger)
● Runtimes and monitoring periods
● Hardware mapping (refer to Section 0)
● Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
● Process monitoring [StaFlg]
Figure 219: Multistate Output block
Analog Output (AO)
The analog output is the logical image, or memory map, of an analog control
command and describes its properties. Within the program, the Present Value is
made available to the block as a program value. The block converts the program
value and transfers the raw data to the physical I/O, where it is converted into a
0…10 V signal, for example, to drive a field device.
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Conversion of the process value and feedback signal with slope [Slpe] and
● intercept [Icpt]
● Configurable switch type (Normal or Trigger)
● Limit value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Deviation monitoring
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Process monitoring [StaFlg]
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Analog Output
[PrioArr]
[PrVal]
[FbVal]
[FbVal] :=
Feedback Raw Value *Feedback Slope+ Feedback Intercept
If
[FbAddr]
Feedback_Raw_Value
Figure 220: Analog Output block
The value [PrVal] from the program is converted into the physical positioning value
by use of a conversion curve. This present value is then available at [PrVal] for
further processing in the program while at the same time, the raw data is
transmitted to the associated I/O system, where it is converted into an electrical
signal to drive the field device.
The conversion curve is a linear function which takes the following form:
Raw Value [RwVal] = [PrVal] * Slope + Intercept
The values for slope [Slpe] and intercept [Icpt] must be defined specifically for the
application concerned in accordance with the I/O system in use and the signal type.
For slope [Slpe] and intercept [Icpt] values for SBT products, see Slope [Slpe] and
Intercept [Icpt].
17.4 Value Objects
Value objects can be seen as virtual data points which are defined in the BACnet
standard and have the same functions as the I/O blocks.
● Analog value block
● Binary value block
● Multistate value block
The only difference, in the case of value blocks, is that it is not possible to define
physical connections to sub-components or components (for example, to I/O
modules) in the plant. The value objects BVAL, AVAL and MVAL are used in the
program whenever BACnet-defined functions, such as commands, alarm
generation and runtime totalizing are required, or when a value is to be modified
via an operator unit. Value blocks look like all other blocks, and can be connected
with other blocks.
Typical applications
Siemens
Value objects are used typically in aggregates as command control links
(PWR_CTL or CMD_CTL). The command control mechanism passes the
commands to the value object and derives the status from the BACnet referencing
system.
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Value Objects
DmpShofEh Ag:DmpShof
FanSu
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
On
On
EnCrit
ManSwi Cp:Ml
MI
EmgOff
On
On/P14
DmpShofOa Ag. DmpShof
ErcRo DmpShof
On/P14 Open/P14
OpSta
En
En
En
En
SmextEh
SmextSu
EmgOff
E,U
BI
SmextEh Cp:BI
E,U
BI
En
E,H
M
Sequence table
En
On
En
AO
OpMSwiCnv
Ax: DMUX8_BO
BVAL
FbVal
E,H
EnPgm
PrVal
MI
ValPgm
OpSta
OpModSwi Cp:MI
BO
Frost
KickDmp
Dstb
SmextSu Cp:BI
TSu
SpErcTSu
EnSfty
BI
EnCrit
E,U
ValSfty
SmextPrg
CMD_CTL
EnCrit
FireDet Cp:BI
EnCrit
OpSta
PltCtl Cp: CMD_CTL
FanEx
Ag: V(A,C-F) Fan1St
A-Transport
PrVal
En
On
En
O&M
TSu
EnSfty
MVAL
ValSfty
OpModMan
Cp:MVAL_OP
PrVal
Frost
EnPgm
PrVal
TOa
En
DefVal:Off
En
BVAL
PrVal
On
AO
FbVal
En
E,H
ValPgm
OpSta
Sched
Cp:BSCHED
Dstb
BO
KickDmp
PrVal
Figure 221: Use of the value blocks
Furthermore, the value objects can be used for alarm monitoring (reference values
or high/low limit value), or to determine and monitor operating hours. The value
objects designed specially for operation via BACnet client can be used, for
example, as a simple way of enabling the user to operate setpoints and switch
commands.
Analog Value (AVAL)
The analog value block provides access to the dataflow, that is, to signals and pins
with a Real number as the data type. The value objects can be inserted into the
program structure and interconnected in any configuration.
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Value Objects
17
This block is used when, for example:
● An alarm is to be created within the CFC chart as a commandable interface of
an aggregate (for example, limit monitoring of an output value of an aggregate).
● Access from the operator unit is required, in order to modify a value
The following functions are integrated into the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Limit value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Deviation monitoring
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Process monitoring [StaFlg]
Binary Value (BVAL)
The binary value block provides access to the dataflow, that is, to signals and pins
with a Boolean number as the data type. The value objects can be inserted into the
program structure and interconnected in any configuration.
This block is used when, for example:
● An alarm is to be generated as the commandable interface of an aggregate (for
example, monitoring of logic operations)
● The hours run are to be totalized after a logic operation
● Access from the operator unit is required, in order to modify a value
● Configurable switch types (normal, switch, pushbutton with delay)
The following functions are integrated into the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Process value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Configurable switch types (normal, switch, pushbutton with delay)
● Runtimes and monitoring periods
● Switch-command delays
● Process monitoring [StaFlg]
● Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
Multistate Value (MVAL)
The multistate value block provides access to the dataflow, that is, to signals and
pins with a Multistate number as the data type. The value objects can be inserted
into the program structure and interconnected in any configuration.
This block is used when, for example:
● An alarm is to be generated as the commandable interface of an aggregate (for
example, for limit monitoring)
● Access from the operator unit is required, in order to modify a value
● Hours run are to be totalized
The following functions are integrated in the block:
● Evaluation of the priority array [PrioArr]
● Interruption of the output signal [OoServ]
● Process value monitoring (OFFNORMAL alarm)
● Reliability monitoring [Rlb] (FAULT alarm)
● Change of state messages (events / system events)
● Runtimes and monitoring periods
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Value Objects for Operation
●
●
Runtime totalization and maintenance messages
Process monitoring [StaFlg]
17.5 Value Objects for Operation
To simplify operation, use the value objects BVAL_OP, AVAL_OP and MVAL_OP.
The blocks are specifically intended for the operation of setpoints via BACnet
clients. They do not require a manual override from the operator unit (for example,
PXM20). Value objects look like all other blocks, and can be connected with other
blocks. The blocks do not include alarm generation or runtime totalization.
17.6 Addressing the I/O Blocks
Logical I/O blocks allow the standardization of the inputs and outputs irrespective
of the hardware. The relationship between a given logical I/O and its physical
equivalent is established by assigning the address of the I/O system concerned.
This independence has the advantage that the functions of the block, as defined by
the BACnet standard and the specific Desigo PX enhancements, do not change.
The number of different I/O systems or physical I/Os can be expanded freely.
Identical compound
libraries
Another advantage is that the compound libraries are always identical. In the
engineering phase, they are adapted to the I/Os in the project by assigning the
appropriate addresses. The process values (0…10V, 0…25mA, signal contacts,
etc.) from the connected field devices are registered directly at the physical inputs.
The physical outputs deliver the process values (0…10V, switching stages 0 / I /II /
III, etc.) directly to the connected field devices.
The process values are transmitted in the form of raw data via the relevant medium
(for example, PPS2); the conversion of the raw value takes place within the block.
Rules:
● Values from the plant are measured and processed in Input blocks (Analog,
Binary or Multistate).
● Values to the plant are processed and transmitted by Output blocks (Analog,
Binary or Multistate).
Program in XWP
I/O module
Physical
input
T
R
Logical
input
Block
Logical
output
AI
BO
Island bus
Island bus
10664-24Z01en
Hardware independence
I/O module
Physical
output
R
Figure 222: Addressing the I/O blocks
I/O systems
To enable the process value of the logical I/O block to be allocated to the
appropriate physical I/O, the relevant address must be assigned. The address is
assigned as follows:
● Via automated assignment by the Point Configurator to the CFC
● Direct allocation to the I/O block in Xworks Plus (XWP)
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Figure 223: Assigning the address
The logical I/O blocks are designed for universal use in various I/O systems. The
specific address structures and hardware definitions are determined by the I/O
system, for example, the failsafe control value for the island bus.
In Desigo, they are as follows:
● Physical I/Os
● Values in a Desigo room unit, accessible via the PPS2 interface (does not
apply to Desigo S7)
● Data in the same or in another automation station, referenced by its Technical
Designation and accessed without a connection, peer-to-peer via BACnet
services.
For addressing I/O from Desigo S7, see Desigo S7.
Address prefix
The addressing syntax indicates the origin of the raw value. The syntax must
correlate with the actual physical inputs.
The prefixes for the various subsystems are as follows:
● "T=" for TX-I/O modules on an island bus-capable automation station PXC....D
● "C=" for on-board I/Os of the Desigo PX compact automation stations
● "B=" for referencing to BACnet objects
● "Q=" for QAX room units
● "L=" for LonWorks addressing
● "S=" for Simatic S7 addressing
● "M=" for PX-OPEN addressing
● "D=" for PX Open Diagnostic Addressing
For addressing with "P=", see Addressing Entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus.
For addressing with "S=", "M=" and "D=", see the corresponding expert
documentation.
For more information on TX-I/O, see TX-I/O Assortment overview (CM2N8170) and
TX-I/O Functions and operation (CM110561).
Addressing entries PX Modular (PXC100/200..D)
For PX compact, the TX-I/O module at the [IOAddr] pin start with a "T" (prefix: "T=").
Address syntax:
T= Module.I/O point (signal type)
Example: T=2.1 (Y10S)
The parameters no longer appear in the I/O address string for direct island bus
integration, but rather in the IOC (I/O configuration).
The only exception is the Info LED which must have the prefix "C=", because the
fixed address, 8.1, which is used for the Info LED may also be used by an I/O
module.
The Info LED for PX KNX and PX Open can also be addressed with C=8.1.
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Addressing the I/O Blocks
The following table shows the various address entries required when using the
modular series automation station in conjunction with TX-I/O-I/O modules.
Signal types shown in italics are used to map virtual modules for use with TX
OPEN at module level. Signal types AIS, AOS, DIS and DOS deliver a 16 bit value
with status information, while signal types AISL, AOSL, DISL and DOSL deliver a
32 bit value with status information. All other signal types deliver a 16/32 bit value
without status information.
While all the module types listed may be connected to any island bus addresses,
not all module types have 16 points.
Type
Module addressing
I/O point
Desigo TX-I/O
1...120
1...16
PX Info LED
8
1
Table 68: Addressing entries
Module type
Signal type
Example
Analog Input
R1K, P1K, P100, U10, I25, I420
R2500, R250 (only TX-I/O)
T=1.1 (R1K)
T1, NTC10K, NTC100K (only TX-I/O)
Analog Output
AI, AIS, AIL, AISL
T=2.1 (AIS)
Y10S
T=2.1 (Y10S)
Y250T
T=3.1 (Y250T)
PWM
Binary Input
Y420
T=34.1 (Y420)
AO, AOS, AOSL, AOL
T=36.1 (AOS)
D20, D20S
T=25.2 (D20)
D42, D250 (only PT-I/O)
DI, DIS, DIL, DISL
T=26.3 (DIS)
Counter Input
C
T=38.1 (C)
Info LED
Q_LED
C=8.1(Q_LED)
Binary Output
Q250_P, Q250A_P
T=12.1 (Q250_P)
Q250
T=1.1 (250)
QD, Q250B, (only PT-I/O)
T=14.1 (Q250) + T =15.1(D20)
DO, DOS, DOL, DOSL
T=15.2 (DOS)
D20
T=1.1 (D20) + T=1.2 (D20)
D42, D250 (only PT-I/O)
--
DI, DIS, DIL, DISL
T=7.1 (DIS)
Q250-P1 ... Q-P5
T=1.1 (Q250-P3)
Q-M1 ... Q-M4
T=1.1 (Q-M3)
QD-M2 (only PT-I/O)
--
DO, DOS, DOL, DOSL
T=26.3 (DIS)
Multistate Input
Multistate Output
Table 69: Addressing entries
Parameter values
Parameters are entered in the I/O address editor.
See Automation stations modular series PXC..D, PXC..-E.D, PXA40.. (CM1N9222).
Addressing entries PX Compact (PXC…)
The addressing procedure is almost identical for Desigo PX compact and for
Desigo PX modular. However, the valid address ranges and signal types are not
the same as those used for the addressing of individual TX-I/O modules.
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For PX compact, the "on-board" I/O modules at the [IOAddr] pin start with a "C"
(prefix: "C="). Address syntax:
C=Module.Channel (signal type, parameter)
Example: C=2.1 (Y10S, NO)
The table below shows the available address ranges and signal types, which vary
according to the Desigo PX compact automation station (each with its own
integrated, fixed configuration of I/Os) type.
PX compact up to
V4.0
UI
PXC12.D
PXC22.D
PXC36.D
PXC12-E.D
PXC22-E.D
PXC36-E.D
Signal type
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
1
1..4
1
1..12
1
1..18
Universal Input
UI5..UI8
UI5..UI16
UI7..UI24
–
2
–
2
–
2
–
DI
3
1..2
3
–
3
1..4
Binary Input
UO
DI1..DI2
4
1..4
Universal Output
DO
5
1..2
D20
DI1..CI4
4
AO1..AO4
Binary Output
R1K, U10, T1,
N1K, P1K, C,
D20, D20S
1..4
4
AO1..AO4
5
DO1..DO2
1..6
1..6
Y10S, Q250
AO1..AO6
5
DO1..DO6
1..8
Q250
DO1..DO8
Internal LED
8
1
8
1
8
1
Q-LED
PPS-2
1..5
1
1..5
1
1..5
1
R1K, U10, D20
Table 70: Addressing entries PX compact up to V4.0
Key:
1
PX Compact from Desigo
V5.0
PX compact from
V5.0
UIO
Universal I/O with
Q250
The existing UI and AO can be configured as AI, DI, CI, or AO.
Signal type of no application is loaded (wiring test):
PXC12..D, U1…U4: xx = Y10S, U5…U8: xx = R1K
PXC22..D, U1…U4: xx = Y10S, U5…U16: xx = R1K
PXC36..D, U1…U6: xx = Y10S, U7…U24: xx = R1K
PXC12.D
PXC22.D
PXC36.D
PXC12-E.D
PXC22-E.D
PXC36-E.D
Signal type
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
1
1..4
1
1..12
1
1..18
Universal I/O
UIO
Syntax for PPS-2 signal: Q = Room device number.object number (profile number). Up to five
devices can be connected.
U5..U8
4
1..4
U1..U4
U5..U16
4
1..4
U7..U24
4
U1..U4
1..4
U1..U6
R1K, U10, T1,
N1K, P1K, C,
D20, D20S
R1K, U10, T1,
N1K, P1K, C,
D20, D20S, Q250
Table 71: Addressing entries PX compact from Desigo V5.0
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DO1
U1
U2
U3
U4
U9
U10 U11
U12
U17
U18 U19
U20
HMI / TOOL
U5
U6
U7
U8
U13
U14 U15
U16
U21
U22 U23
U24
Figure 224: Layout of PXC36D housing with address ranges
See Automation stations, compact model PXC..D (CM1N9215).
Multiple use of sensors
Multiple use of I/O signals
Multiple use by addressing the physical I/Os in two or more logical I/O blocks (as
shown in the following figure) is not allowed.
Program in XWP
Block
T
AI
Island bus
R
AI
Island bus
10664-24z02en
I/O module
Figure 225: Avoid this multiple use configuration
If you wire it as in the figure above, Xworks Plus (XWP) determines multiple use
and generates an error message.
For the multiple use of output blocks, the plant will malfunction, because there will
then be two or more sources acting on one switching command. The effective
switching command (at the output) is the last one received (determined by the rule
"the last command takes precedence"). In other words, the order of processing
determines which source or origin will be linked to the output.
In CFC the same address can be allocated to two or more input or output blocks.
This multiple address allocation goes undetected when the program is compiled;
the automation station also fails to recognize the error (a reliability error is
generated and an error message is transmitted only in the case of multiple address
allocation with two different signal types).
Solution 1
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Many systems include a requirement for the multiple use of sensors. A typical
example of this is an outdoor air temperature sensor shared across systems. The
following example illustrates the simplest form of the multiple use of sensors:
In CFC the current value is transmitted for further use in the program by
interconnecting the blocks. The logical I/O block (Analog Input, {AI}) occurs in the
program once only, and its hardware-specific parameters only need to be set once.
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Block
17
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Addressing the I/O Blocks
I/O module
Analog input
Figure 226: Multiple use via data flow
Solution 2
The multiple use function can be implemented with a BACnet reference to the first
analog input block (Partial plant 1). In other words, the first block will receive the
island bus address at the [IOAddr] pin. The second analog input block (Partial plant
2) references the first AI (B=…) via the technical designation.
T
Figure 227: Multiple use via BACnet reference
Addressing multistate I/Os
Multistate input
The multistate value is made up of several separate binary measured values.
Addressing is via the input/output address [IOAddr]. In both the modular and the
compact series, the logical and physical I/O must be "located" in the same
automation station, but they do not need to be contiguous (for example,
C=5.1;5.3;5.5;5.6(Q250) is valid). The addressing cannot extend across
automation stations. The addresses must be on the same module for TX-I/O.
For information about adressing multistate I/Os with PTM, see Addressing
Multistate I/Os with PTM.
Simple mapping
Syntax: T=Module.I/O point;Module.I/O point;Module.I/O point;Module.I/O point
Examples:
● T=1.1
● T=1.1;1.2
● T=1.1;1.2;1.3
● T=1.1;1.2;1.3;1.4
● T=10.3
Up to four binary status values (for example, Off/St1/St2/St3/St4) can be registered.
The signals to be registered, which are addressed via Module.Channel, must
always be of the same hardware signal type. With the simple mapping procedure,
to enable the multistate input to interpret the current binary signals correctly, only
one binary signal may be present at any one time. If several binary signals are
present at once, this is displayed as an error at the [Rlb] pin.
The examples below show a possible application for multistate input blocks in
conjunction with the physical I/O modules. The example on the left of the diagram
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Addressing the I/O Blocks
is a multiple I/O module, while the one on the right shows the mapping of several
individual I/O modules in one multistate input block.
Multistate output
The multistate value from the program is converted in the Multistate Output block
into a switching command. Addressing is via [IOAddr]. For PX modular, the syntax
is as follows:
Syntax: T=Module.channel
Examples:
● Q-M1: T=1.1
● Q-M2: T=1.1
● Q-M3: T=1.1
● Q-M4: T=1.1
● Q250-P3: T=10.1
● DOS: T=24.7
Values with up to four stages can be processed. The signals to be registered,
which are addressed via Module.Channel, must always be of the same hardware
signal type. In the case of a multistate output on the hardware side, there is one
address only (this is only possible with PXC modular automation stations).
Error handling
If an automation station does not support a given address (for example, incorrect
syntax) or a given I/O system, this will lead to a reliability error, which will be
displayed at the [Rlb] pin.
Advanced mapping
(Multistate Input)
The manual switch can be encoded on the PX Compact in various ways, for
example:
● (Auto/Off/On) or (Off/Auto/On)
● (Auto/Off/S1/S2) or (Off/Auto/S1/S2)
So avoid having to keep adapting the data types and text groups in the system, the
manual switch must always be represented in the same way within the system:
● (Auto/Off/On)
● (Auto/Off/S1/S2)
A prerequisite for this approach is that it must be possible in the multistate input
block to configure the hardware coding and mapping to the standardized manual
switch. This is made possible with parameters in the address.
1_n-Mapping (Multistate
Input and Output)
Syntax:
T = Module.channel
C=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel (signal type,
a,b,c,d,e)
a represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,0,0)
b represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (1,0,0,0)
c represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,1,0,0)
d represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,1,0)
e represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,0,1)
Example: T=2.1
For the TX I/O addressing no additional information in the address string is added.
All information (signal type, mapping table, mapping rules, for example, up-down,
etc.) is configured in the I/O Address Editor and loaded in the automation station
with the IOC file.
Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4 (D20, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5)
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[PrVal]
Addr1
Addr2
Addr3
Addr4
17
Comment /
Text group
2
0
0
0
0
Off
1
1
0
0
0
Auto
3
0
1
0
0
Stage 1
4
0
0
1
0
Stage 2
5
0
0
0
1
Stage 3
Table 72: Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4 (D20, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5)
Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4 (D20, 2, 1, 5, 7, 9) ;-- with holes
[PrVal]
Addr1
Addr2
Addr3
Addr4
Comment /
Text group
2
0
0
0
0
On
1
1
0
0
0
Off
5
0
1
0
0
Comfort
7
0
0
1
0
Eco
9
0
0
0
1
StandBy
Table 73: Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4 (D20, 2, 1, 5, 7, 9) ;-- with holes
UpDown Mapping
(Multistate Input and
Output)
Syntax:
Application: Connecting/disconnecting further stages.
Example: Electric heating registers, multi-stage burners.
T=Module I/O point
C=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel (signal type,
UPDOWN)
Example: T=2.1
For the TX I/O addressing no additional information in the address string is added.
All information (signal type, mapping table, mapping rules, for example, up-down,
etc.) is configured in the I/O Address Editor and loaded in the automation station
with the IOC file.
Example: C=5.1;5.2;5.3;5.4(Q250,UPDOWN)
Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4(D20,UPDOWN)
[PrVal]
Addr1
Addr2
Addr3
Addr4
Comment /
Text group
1
0
0
0
0
Off
2
1
0
0
0
Stage 1
3
1
1
0
0
Stage 2
4
1
1
1
0
Stage 3
5
1
1
1
1
Stage 4
Table 74: Example: C=5.1;5.2;5.3;5.4(Q250,UPDOWN) and C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4(D20,UPDOWN)
With Up/Down mapping, more than one hardware input or output may be active.
Binary Mapping (Multistate Application: Output of an integer in binary form.
Input and Output)
Example: Binary electric heating coil.
Syntax: C=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel
(signal type, BINARY)
Example: C=5.1;5.2;5.3;5.4(Q250,BINARY)
Example: C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4(D20,BINARY)
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[PrVal]
Addr1
Addr2
Addr3
Addr4
Comment /
Text group
1
0
0
0
0
Off
2
1
0
0
0
Stage 1
3
0
1
0
0
Stage 2
4
1
1
0
0
Stage 3
5
0
0
1
0
Stage 4
6
1
0
1
0
Stage 5
1
1
1
1
Stage 15
...
16
Table 75: Example: C=5.1;5.2;5.3;5.4(Q250,BINARY) and C=2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4(D20,BINARY)
With binary mapping, more than one hardware input or output may be active.
BACnet addressing
Peer-to-peer
communication
Data can be exchanged via peer-to-peer communication.
The exchange takes place using the BACnet services defined in the BACnet
standard. The process employs mechanisms engineered in CFC which can be
tracked in online test mode, but which are based on BACnet objects and BACnet
services.
Engineering
When engineering the exchange of data in CFC, it is important to take note of the
following:
● Addressing is via [IOAddr].
● Data is exchanged only between BACnet objects. The attributes of the I/O
blocks and pins must be defined appropriately, and the information must also
be made available in the form of a BACnet object. For this purpose, the
attributes of this block or I/O must be defined correctly.
● In BACnet terminology, the I/O block is a client which fetches the required
value from an object defined as the server. This process is carried out using
services defined by BACnet, for example: The client subscribes to the relevant
object (the server) using the SubscribeCOV service. The server then supplies
the value via the BACnet service COVReporting whenever it changes by the
programmed value, COVIncrement. ReadProperty (polling) is another BACnet
service. Here, the value is read at regular predefinable intervals.
● Addressing is carried out via the Technical Designation (TD). Note, however,
that this Technical Designation must first be made known to the client in the
form of a reference address.
● The data is exchanged both within a given automation stations, and across
automation stations.
Address syntax
Addressing takes place via the input/output address [IOAddr] and always starts
with the prefix "B=".
The BACnet reference address is the same as the Technical Designation (TD) of
the value. The BACnet addressing syntax is as follows:
B=BACnetReference (BACnetConfig)
Example: B=Geb6'Lft3'FanSu'Mot'MntnSwi.PrVal(0)
Polling or COV procedure
The FB variable PollCyc is used instead of the prior BACnetConfig parameter in
the I/O address syntax, to distinguish between COV or polling:
FB variable IOAddr. FB variable PollCyc
BACnetConfig = 0 -> COV (Change of Value)
BACnetConfig = 1…65535 -> Polling in seconds
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17
In an automation station operating as a BACnet device, the maximum number of
simultaneously supported COV subscriptions is limited to 400.
The BACnet Device as BACnet Server supports a maximum of 400 subscriptions
from BACnet clients (PXM20, Web client, management station) or from other
BACnet devices via the BACnetReference.
A BACnet device operating as a BACnet client can also accommodate a maximum
of 100 subscriptions to other values via the BACnetReference.
If the COV procedure is selected, COVIncrement is used for analog objects to
define the value by which the present value must change to initiate a COV event.
Data output using
WriteProperty
Output objects can write their Present_Value to the properties of other objects or
command other value or output object.
Write without priority: Optional address string-Par(P=Number) no available.
Command with priority: Optional address string-Par(P=Number) available.
COV across sites
The value subscribed to must be available in the same BACnet network. Avoid a
COV across sites.
The DeviceID is used to access and subscribe freely to values in different BACnet
devices (especially in the case of third-party integration). The syntax is as follows:
B=[DeviceID]Objectname – where the object name can be any string required. The
DeviceID is entered in decimal (instance number or entire ObjectID).
PPS2 addressing
A PPS2 address is required when values are to be transmitted via the PPS2
interface. Addressing takes place via the input/output address [IOAddr] and always
starts with the prefix "Q=".
Address syntax
Up to five room units can be connected to one Desigo PX automation station and
addressed via the PPS2 interface. The addressing syntax is as follows:
Q=RoomUnitNumber.Object(Profile)
Example: Q=1.40 (1)
The functions available in the room unit are mapped directly to the I/O blocks. The
following elements of the address are predefined:
Type (standard BACnet objects)
Room unit
number
Object
Object description
Profile1
Example
Analog input
1…5
24
Setpoint correction
–
Q=1.24
Analog output
1…5
24
Setpoint correction
–
Q=2.24
Analog input
1…5
40
Room temperature
0, 1…6
Q=1.401
Analog output
1…5
195
Room temperature display
–
Q=5.195
Multistate input
1…5
205
Mode
–
Q=4.205
Multistate output
1…5
205
Mode
–
Q=2.205
Multistate output
1…5
206
Heating/Cooling display
–
Q=3.206
Table 76: Predefined address elements
Key:
1
The Profile relates to the configuration number shown in the next table.
The room unit is configured with this configuration number and appended to the
Room temperature object. Other objects are not assigned a configuration number.
Siemens
285 | 416
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Addressing the I/O Blocks
Only the relevant operating and process values are mapped in the I/O blocks,
rather than all objects of a room unit.
Six profiles have been defined to keep both the memory requirements and the
demands placed upon the user in practice to a reasonable level. If no profile
information is supplied, the predefined device-specific default value [DefVal] is
used. As an exception in the case of the QAX units, Profile No. 5 is used.
Configuration
Profile
1
2
3
4
5
6
StandBy
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Auto
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Fan1
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Fan2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
Fan3
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
Symbol Standby
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Symbol Auto
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Symbol Fan1
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Symbol Fan2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
Symbol Fan3
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
Enable operating mode
KonfLCD
TempUnit
Table 77: Room unit profile
This profile (or configuration number) is always valid for one room unit only. It is
used to configure the objects ConfigLCD and EnableOperatingMode and to define
how the room unit is to operate (for example, °C or °F).
In principle, the profile can be attached to any other object.
This configuration applies only to the QAX33.1 and QAX34.1 room units.
Configuration of the object ConfigLCD is only relevant in the case of the QAX34.1,
as this is the only unit with a display in °C or °F.
The configuration of the object EnableOperatingMode is only relevant in the case
of the QAX33.1 or QAX34.1, as only these two room units have the option of
selecting Fan1, Fan2 or Fan3.
Where QAX units without an address switch are still in use, only one room unit per
automation station can be integrated. The room unit number in such cases is then
"1".
LonWorks addressing
There are two ways to integrate data points from LonWorks devices:
● via Discipline I/O
● via standard inputs/outputs (the latter approach is only sensible with a small
number of data points to be integrated, for example, from third-party devices)
Address syntax
286 | 416
Siemens
The block registers the control variables and output variables of the RX devices
(outside the CFC chart) in accordance with the information in the [IOAddr] property
(Input/output address).
Addressing starts with the prefix "L=".
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Logical I/O Blocks
Discipline I/Os
Addressing via discipline
I/O
17
L=DeviceType DeviceNo. GroupIndex(MappingTableNo.)
● DeviceType: M (Master), S (Slave)
● DeviceNo: Field device identification number
● GroupIndex: Group identification: Up to 4 similar groups of an application unit
may exist in the field device (for example, lighting or window-blind groups). The
group index number is optional.
● MappingTableNo: Number of the mapping table which is valid for that
Discipline I/O.
More than one device can be specified for each [IOAddr] string. The devices are
separated with a semicolon. However, the maximum [IOAddr] string length of 60
characters must not be exceeded.
Desigo RXC
DeviceType
DeviceNo
GroupIndex
MappingTableNo
Example
RXC14
M
1…255
–
1…99
L=M14;M27(4)
M
1…255
–
1…99
L=M5;M11;M22;M109(91)
M/S
1…255
1…4
1…99
L=M13.2;S17.2(9)
RXC27
RXC5
RXC11
RXC22
RXC109
RXC13
RXC17
Table 78: Addressing via discipline I/O
Addressing via standard
I/O
L= DeviceType DeviceNo.GroupIndex(3RD[NVIndex.FieldIndex])
● DeviceType: M (Master). There are no slaves (S) with third-party devices There
is only ever one device.
● DeviceNo: Field device identification number
● GroupIndex: Group identification: Up to 4 similar groups of an application unit
may exist in the field device (for example, lighting or window-blind groups). The
group index number is optional.
● ObjectType: Constant for third-party devices: 3RD.
● NVIndex: Network variable referenced in the third-party device.
● FieldIndex: Element number, if the network variable is structured
Desigo RXC
DeviceType
DeviceNo
GroupIndex
ObjectType
NVIndex
FieldIndex
Example
e.g. RXC 26
M
1…255
1….4
3RD
1…255
1…32
L=M26(3RD[4.1])
Table 79: Addressing via standard I/O
KNX addressing
You can integrate data points from KNX devices as follows:
● See PX KNX, RXB integration - S-Mode (CM1Y9775)
● See PX KNX, RXB/RXL integration - Individual addressing (CM1Y9776)
● Address Info LED for PX KNX: D=1001
17.7 Discipline I/Os
Discipline I/Os are standardized combinations of inputs and outputs related to a
specific application. They have a predefined number of parameters.
Three different input variable types can be interconnected to Discipline I/Os:
● Simple value
● Trigger value
● Commandable value
Siemens
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Logical I/O Blocks
Reliability Table
Simple value
The input value can be connected via the data flow. In the engineering tool, this is
preceded by a function block or compound, for example, a Scheduler. However, if
the input value is not connected, it can also be modified via BACnet client. The
subsystem registers a change in the input value by comparing the value with the
process image and transferring it to the field devices.
Trigger value
This input value is the logical image, or memory map, of an analog positioning
command and describes its properties. Within the program, the Present Value is
made available to the block as a program value. The block transfers the program
value to the subsystem, from where it is transmitted to the field device.
Writing to this value acts as a trigger. This makes it possible, for example, to
generate the output of the same value (for example, Lighting 100%, followed later
by 100% again). In this case the subsystem registers the trigger value and
transmits the value to the devices. This capability is required when the same
variable can be modified from several sources (for example, when Desigo
management station writes 100.0%, the local operator unit writes 0.0% and the
user of Desigo management station wants to rewrite the value of 100.0%). The
sources can be BACnet clients or system function blocks.
Only analog trigger values may be used.
Commandable value
The input value is the logical image, or memory map, of an analog positioning
command and describes its properties. Within the program, the Present Value is
made available to the block as a program value. The block transfers the program
value to the subsystem, from where it is transmitted to the field device.
The commandable value is based on the BACnet priority-mechanism (which is the
same as for the output blocks – refer to Section 0). A commandable value can be
operated from various sources. Each source has its own priority. The sources are
mutually exclusive (interlock). The source with the highest priority prevails. for
example, Emergency = Priority 1, Façade control = Priority 6, Operator = Priority =
8). The sources can be BACnet operator units or system function blocks (grouping
function).
Only analog commandable values can be used.
17.8 Reliability Table
288 | 416
Siemens
Value (decimal)
Text
0
No error recognized.
1
No sensor.
2
Above the range.
3
Below the range.
4
Continuous loop.
5
Short circuit.
6
No output.
7
Unreliable other.
8
Process error
9
Multistate fault.
64
Subsystem not supported.
65
Subsystem feedback not supported.
66
Invalid address (syntax error).
67
Invalid feedback address (syntax error).
68
Invalid address value.
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Reliability Table
Value (decimal)
Text
69
Invalid feedback address value.
70
Invalid address parameter (syntax error).
71
Invalid feedback address parameter (syntax error).
72
Invalid address parameter value.
73
Invalid parameter value for feedback address.
74
Destination device unknown.
75
Feedback device unknown.
76
Destination object unknown.
77
Feedback object unknown.
78
Unsuitable destination type.
79
Unsuitable feedback type.
80
Unreliable destination object.
81
Unreliable feedback object.
82
Invalid subsystem (syntax error).
83
Invalid feedback subsystem (syntax error).
84
Memory full.
85
Unreliable target device.
86
Communication failure reported in subsystem.
87
Alarm in subsystem application.
88
Maximum BACnet references reached for device.
89
Reliable participant.
90
Feedback error reported in binary output.
91
Invalid reference: Address not valid.
92
Reference object cannot be commanded.
93
Actual operating mode not found in command list.
94
Invalid priority set for command (valid : 2,4,14,16).
95
Invalid object number configured in sequence table.
96
Invalid object type configured in sequence table.
97
Invalid step control configured in sequence table.
98
Neighboring object not reachable.
99
Command lists indicate different variables.
100
Invalid calendar reference.
101
Configured switch kind not supported by destination controller.
102
Multistate mapping error.
17
Table 80: Reliability table
Signal types in the automation station which are not supported also generate
reliability error message 72.
Siemens
289 | 416
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Logical I/O Blocks
Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
17.9 Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
[Slpe] and [Icpt] value exist for:
● I/O modules (PX Modular and PX Compact)
These values impact signal type (the I/O module).
● Siemens field devices
These values affect the combination of Slpe and Icpt values for the signal type,
the field device and its measurement and positioning range. XWP automatically
enters these values, and they can be changed there, for example, to consider
the line resistance of a sensor or to describe a third-party sensor.
● BACnet referencing
● PPS2 interface
The combined values [Slpe] and [Icpt] can be calculated as follows from individual
values for signal type (I/O module) and characteristic curve (field device):
Figure 228: Slope and intercept
Siemens Building Technologies field devices: XWP automatically enters the
combined values [Slpe] and [Icpt] (for the signal type, the field device and its
measurement or positioning range) on the I/O block.
Third-party field devices: You can calculate the value [Slpe] and [Icpt] using the
Intercept Calculator.
[Slpe] and [Icpt] Analog Input
TX- and PT-I/O modules
PX modular
290 | 416
Siemens
In the Desigo PX modular automation stations, the analog input block is used with
the following TX-I/O and PT-I/O modules:
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Logical I/O Blocks
Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
Signal type
measurement
Description
Standard measuring Resolution on the
range
bus
Value range on the
bus
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
R1K
LG-Ni 1000
-50 … 150 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 15000
0.01
0
P100
Pt100
0 … 250 Ohm
1/100 Ohm
0 ... 25000
0.01
0
R250
Resistance
0 … 250 Ohm
1/100 Ohm
0 ... 25000
0.01
0
Pt100_4
Pt100
-50 ... 600 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 40000
0.01
0
P1K
Pt1000
0 … 2 500 Ohm
1/10 Ohm
0 ... 25000
0.1
0
R2K5
Resistance
0 … 2 500 Ohm
1/10 Ohm
0 ... 25000
0.1
0
T1
PTC sensor
-50 ... 150 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 15000
0.01
0
Ni1K
LG-Ni 1000
-50 ... 180 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 18000
0.01
0
Pt1K375
Pt1000 (NA)
-50 ... 180 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 18000
0.01
0
Pt1K385
Pt1000 (EU)
-50 ... 600°C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 60000
0.01
0
NTC10K
NTC sensor
-40 ... 115 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 11500
0.01
0
NTC100K
NTC sensor
-40 ... 125 °C
1/100 °C
-5000 ... 12500
0.01
0
U10
DC 0 ... 10V
0 … 10 Volt
1/1000 V
0 ... . 10000
0.001
0
I420
DC 4 ... 20mA
4 … 20 mA
1/1000 mA
4000 ... 20000
0.001
0
I25/020 (Shunt 200
Ohm)
DC 0 ... 25mA
1 … 5 mA
1/1000 V
0 ... 5000
0.001
0
I25/020 (Shunt 100
Ohm)
DC 0 ... 25mA
0 … 10 mA
1/500 V
0 ... 5000
0.002
0
I25/020 (Shunt 50
Ohm)
DC 0 ... 25mA
0 … 20 mA
1/250 V
0 ... 5000
0.004
0
I25/020 (Shunt 40
Ohm)
DC 0 ... 25mA
0 … 25 mA
1/200 V
0 ... 5000
0.005
0
I25/020 TX-I/O*
DC 0 ... 20mA*)
0 ... 20 mA*
1/1000 mA
0 ... 20000
0.001*
0
U10 (Shunt 400
Ohm) TX-I/O*
DC 0 ... 25mA*)
0 ... 25 mA*
1/1000 V
0 ... 10000
0.0025*
0
17
Table 81: TX- and PT-I/O modules PX modular
Key:
*
I/O configuration PX
Compact
TX-I/O modules support only 0 ... 20 mA. For a range of 0 ... 25 mA, use the shunt for 400 Ohm
(0.1%, 1 W) and measure the voltage with U10.
The analog input block is used in the Desigo PX Compact PXC10 TL to PXC52
automation station in cases where an LG Ni1000 sensor (signal type R1K) or DC
0…10 V (U10) is connected to device terminals X1…X16 of Module 001.
The following information results:
Signal type measurement
Description
Standard measuring range
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
R1K
LG-Ni 1000
-50…150 °C
0.01
0
U10
DC 0…10V
0…10 Volt
0.001
0
Table 82: I/O configuration PX Compact
BACnet referencing
Reference to a value in another BACnet object. As the referenced value is already
available as a converted or resulting value, no conversion is required, that is, [Slpe]
must be defined as 1 and [Icpt] as 0.
The measured value from a room unit connected via the PPS2 interface. In the
analog input block, only Objects 24 (setpoint correction) and 40 (room temperature)
Siemens
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Logical I/O Blocks
Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
may be used. As the value is already available as a converted or referenced value,
no conversion is required, that is, [Slpe] must be defined as 1 and [Icpt] as 0.
PPS2 interface
[Slpe] and [Icpt] Analog Output
I/O modules PX modular
In the PX modular automation stations, the analog output block is used with the
following signal types:
Signal type positioning
Description
Standard measuring range
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
Y10S
DC 0…10 V
0 … 10 V
100
0
Y420
DC 4…20 mA
4 … 20 mA
160
4000
Y250T (P-bus)*
Three-point
AC 24…250 Volt
2.55*
0
Y250T (Island bus)*
Three-point
AC 24…250 Volt
100*
0
Table 83: I/O modules PX modular
Key:
*
I/O configuration PX
Compact
Value [Slpe] for Y250T is not a physical value, but rather a special code controlling output of the
AO to two relay outputs. This code differs between P-bus and island bus.
The analog output block is used in the PX compact automation stations, when
valves or actuators with DC 0…10 V control signals, signal type Y10S, are
connected to device terminals Y1…Y8 of Module 004.
Signal type positioning
Description
Standard measuring range
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
Y10S
DC 0…10 V
0 … 10 V
1000
0
Table 84: I/O modules PX Compact
PPS2 interface
Transfer of an analog control command to a room unit connected via the PPS2
interface. Only Object 195 (= Room temperature display) can be used in the analog
output block. As the value is already available as a converted or referenced value,
no conversion is required, that is, [Slpe] must be defined as 1 and [Icpt] as 0.
Line resistance with [Icpt]
For analog inputs (measurement of temperatures or resistances), most signal types
are calibrated at a line resistance of 1 Ohm. The [Icpt] can be changed at the AI
block if the line resistance deviates strongly from 1 Ohm.
Line resistance
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
Delta slope
Delta intercept
0 Ohm
0.0259740
-259.480519
0
0.259740
Default = 1 Ohm
0.0259740
-259.740260
0
0
2 Ohm
0.0259740
-260.000000
0
-0.259740
3 Ohm
0.0259740
-260.259740
0
-0.519481
0 Ohm
0.1
1
0
1
Default = 1 Ohm
0.1
0
0
0
2 Ohm
0.1
-1
0
-1
3 Ohm
0.1
-2
0
-2
P1K (Pt1000)
R2K5
P1K (0...2500 Ohm)
292 | 416
Siemens
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Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
Line resistance
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
Delta slope
Delta intercept
0 Ohm
0.01
1
0
1
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
0
0
0
2 Ohm
0.01
-1
0
-1
3 Ohm
0.01
-2
0
-2
0 Ohm
0.01
0
0
0
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
-1
0
-1
2 Ohm
0.01
-2
0
-2
3 Ohm
0.01
-3
0
-3
17
R250
R250
P100 (0...250 Ohm)*
Table 85: Measuring resistances (internal resolution = 1/10 Ohm)
Key:
*
PT-I/O modules
P100 is a four-wire type
Default line resistance = 0 Ohm
Line resistance not compensated
TX-I/O modules with
island bus integration
TX-I/O modules with
BIM integration
Pt100_4 is a four-wire type
Line resistance not compensated
R250 is a two-wire type
Default line resistance = 1 Ohm
Pt100_4 is a four-wire type
Default line resistance = 0 Ohm
Line resistance not compensated
R250 is a two-wire type, but must
be connected to four terminals
using bridges
Line resistance
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
Pt 1K 385
0 Ohm
0.01
0.259740
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
0
2 Ohm
0.01
-0.259740
3 Ohm
0.01
-0.519481
Pt 1K 375
0 Ohm
0.01
0.266667
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
0
2 Ohm
0.01
-0.266667
3 Ohm
0.01
-0.533333
Ni1K
0 Ohm
0.01
0.2
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
0
2 Ohm
0.01
-0.2
3 Ohm
0.01
-0.4
Siemens
Default line resistance = 0 Ohm
Default line resistance = 0 Ohm
Degrees per Ohm
Degrees per Ohm
3.85
0.259740
3.75
0.266667
5
0.2
293 | 416
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Slope [Slpe] and Intercept [Icpt]
Line resistance
[Slpe]
[Icpt]
T1
0 Ohm
0.01
0.096246
Default = 1 Ohm
0.01
0
2 Ohm
0.01
-0.096246
3 Ohm
0.01
-0.192493
Degrees per Ohm
Degrees per Ohm
9.57
0.104450 -50...0 °C
10.39
0.096246 0...50 °C
11.31
0.088417 50...100 °C
12.36
0.080893 100...150 °C
Pt100_4
Pt100 is a four-wire type, default line resistance = 0 Ohm
-> Line resistance is not compensated
Table 86: Measuring temperature (internal resolution = 1/100 °C)
Power surges on U10 inputs
The U10 inputs are designed for DC 0 ... 10 V with a narrower high / low tolerance
range. The input reports an error when a value is stored that outside this range. A
transient voltage suppressor can prevent an error message. A faulty response from
the analog signal supplied by the automation station can no longer be detected.
BSG61
0 ... 5 V
U10
U10
10563A22
U10
Zener diode
Voltage divider
Active setpoint adjuster BSG61
(Datasheet CE1N1992)
Slope must be adapted to 0...5 V Switch position 1 (Setpoint limit
(0.01 -> 0.005)
control) Setpoint 100%
Precision resistance, for
example, VISHAI MBB/SMA
0207
Table 87: Solution examples
[Icpt] and [Slpe] for BT devices
Note for all U10 inputs
294 | 416
Siemens
The physical inputs are designed for 0 -10V with narrow high and low tolerance
limits. If a value falls outside this range, the input transmits an error signal.
However, provided it is established that the peripheral devices are in order, an
error signal can be prevented by using a transient voltage suppressor (10 V Zener
diode and two resistors). A faulty response from the analog input signal supplied
cannot subsequently be detected in the automation station.
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Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
17
Figure 229: Example of a circuit including the QAF64 which transmits more than 10 volts
17.10 Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
Addressing entries PX modular (PXC…-U)
For the PX modular series, the P bus I/O modules at the Input-Output address pin
[IOAddr] start with the prefix: "P=".
Address syntax: P= Module.Channel (Signal type, parameter)
Example: P=2.1 (Y10S,15)
The exception is the Info LED which must have the prefix "C=" because the fixed
address 8.1, which is used for the Info LED may also be used by an I/O module.
Info-LED for PX KNX: D=1001.
The following table shows the various address entries required when using the
modular series automation station in conjunction with TX-I/O modules.
Type
Module addressing
I/O point or channels
Desigo TX-I/O
1...120
1...16
Desigo PT-I/O
1...255
1...8
PX Info LED
8
1
Table 88: Addressing entries
Module type
Signal type
Parameters
Example
Analog Input
R1K, P1K, U10, I25,
I420
-
P=1.1 (R1K)
AI, AIS, AIL, AISL
-
P=2.1 (AIS)
Y10S
NO, KEEP
P=2.1 (Y10S, KEEP)
0...30
P=2.1 (Y10S,15)
P100
T1 (only TX-I/O)
Analog Output
Siemens
295 | 416
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Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
Module type
Signal type
Parameters
Example
Y250T
1...13, 1...13
P=3.1 (Y250T,8)
P=3.1 (Y250T,8,10)
Y420
-
AO, AOS, AOSL, AOL
Binary Input
D20, D20S
P=34.1 (Y420)
P=36.1 (AOS)
-
P=25.2 (D20)
DI, DIS, DIL, DISL
-
P=26.3 (DIS)
Counter Input
C
-
P=38.1 (C)
Info LED
Q_LED
-
C=8.1(Q_LED)
Q250_P, Q250A_P
0, 1...600
P=12.1 (Q250_P)
Q250
-
P=1.1 (QD)
D42, D250 (only PT-I/O)
PX KNX: D=1001
Binary Output
QD, Q250B, (only PTI/O)
Multistate Input
P=14.1 (Q250)
DO, DOS, DOL, DOSL
-
P=15.2 (DOS)
D20
Binary - Mapping
P=1.1;1.2 (D20)
D42, D250 (only PT-I/O) Updown - Mapping
1:n - Mapping
Multistate Output
DI, DIS, DIL, DISL
P=7.1 (DIS)
Q250
Binary - Mapping
Q250B, QD (only PTI/O)
Updown - Mapping
Q250_P3
0, 1...600
P=1.1 (Q250_P3,120)
Q-M3
-
P=1.1 (Q-M2)
1:n - Mapping
QD-M2 (only PT-I/O)
DO, DOS, DOL, DOSL
P=1.1;1.2;1.3 (Q250)
P=1.1 (QD-M2)
-
P=26.3 (DIS)
Table 89: Addressing entries PX modular (PXC...-U)
Signal types shown in italics are used to map virtual modules for use with I/O
OPEN at module level. Signal types AIS, AOS, DIS and DOS deliver a 16 bit value
with status information, while signal types AISL, AOSL, DISL and DOSL deliver a
32 bit value with status information. All other signal types deliver a 16/32 bit value
without status information.
While all the module types listed may be connected to any P-bus addresses, not all
module types have 16 channels.
Parameter values
Parameter values for the analog output, binary output and multistate output blocks:
Y10S
Failsafe function (emergency control function) if the transfer of data over the P-bus
fails (for longer than 4 seconds) or in the event of a power failure. (an operating
voltage of AC 24 V must be available).
NO -> Module output signal goes to 0 V.
KEEP -> Module output signal remains at previous value.
0...30 -> Module output signal 0 = 0 V, 1 = 0.33 V, etc. , … 30 = 10 V.
Y250T
1…13, 1…13 Runtime ranges for On/Off signals (the ranges do not need to be the
same for On/Off). Values 1…13 correspond to the following runtimes:
1 = 8.5 ...13 seconds
2 = 13 ... 18 seconds
3 = 18 ...25 seconds
296 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Logical I/O Blocks
Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
17
4 = 25 ...35 seconds
5 = 35 ... 48 seconds
6 = 48 ... 66 seconds
7 = 1.1 ... 1.6 minutes
8 = 1.6 ... 2.3 minutes
9 = 2.3 ... 3.2 minutes
10 = 3.2 ... 4.5 minutes
11 = 4.5 ... 6.3 minutes
12 = 6.3 ... 9.0 minutes
13 = 9.0 ... 11 minutes
The PTM1.2Y250T(-M) module can only implement one runtime. It therefore uses
the opening-command runtime for closing commands.
Q250_P, Q250A_P,
Q250_P3 ….
0, 1…600 -> Pulse times, where 0 = 0.5 seconds and then 1 = 1 second, 2 = 2
seconds etc. up to 600 (=600 seconds).
Pulse times for island bus applications:
Values in the I/O address editor: 0...255 (corresponds to 0...25.5 seconds)
Default = 5 (corresponds to 0.5 seconds).
Addressing entries PX Compact (PXC…)
The addressing procedure is almost identical for Desigo PX compact and for
Desigo PX modular. However, the valid address ranges and signal types are not
the same as those used for the addressing of individual P-bus I/O modules.
For PX compact, the on-board I/O modules at the [IOAddr] pin start with a "C"
(prefix: "C=").
Address syntax: C=Module.Channel (Signal type, parameter)
Example:C=2.1 (Y10S, NO)
The table below shows the available address ranges and signal types, which vary
according to the Desigo PX compact automation station (each with its own
integrated, fixed configuration of I/Os) type.
Desigo
PX
compact
PXC10-TL1
PXC12
PXC22
PXC36
PXC12-T
PXC22-T
PXC36-T
PXC52
Signal
type
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Universal
Inputs
(UI: for
AI, DI)
1
1…4
1
1…6
X1…X6
1
1…8
X1…X8
1
1…12
X1…X12
1
1…16
X1…X16
Digital
Inputs
(DI)
(Counter
Input)
2
1…4
–
–
2
1…4
D1…D4
2
1…4
D1…D4
2
1…4
D1…D4
D20, C
Digital
Inputs
(DI)
3
1…4
–
–
–
–
3
1…8
D5…D12
3
1…12
D5…D16
D20
Analog
Outputs
(AO)
-
-
4
1…4
Y1…Y2
4
1…4
Y1…Y4
4
1…6
Y1…Y6
4
1…8
Y1…Y8
Y10S
Digital
Outputs
(DO)
5
1…2
5
1…2
51…54
5
1…6
51…56
5
1…8
51…58
5
1…12
51…62
Q250
Siemens
R1K,
U10, D20
T1, P1K,
N1K
297 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
17
Logical I/O Blocks
Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
Desigo
PX
compact
PXC10-TL1
PXC12
PXC22
PXC36
PXC12-T
PXC22-T
PXC36-T
PXC52
Signal
type
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Module
Channel
Manual
switch2
(only
PXC36S)
–
–
–
–
–
–
7
1…4
–
–
D_M3
LEDs
8
2…5
–
–
–
–
8
2…7
–
–
Q_LED
Info LED
8
1
8
1
8
1
8
1
8
1
Q_LED
PPS-2
signal3
3
1..5
3
1..5
3
1..5
3
1..5
3
1..5
R1K,
U10, D20
1
1…16
X1…X16
1…8
Y1…Y8
D20, C
R1K,
U10, D20
PXC52
from
Desigo
V54: Universal
Inputs /
Outputs
4
T1, P1K,
N1K,
Y10S
Table 90: Addressing entries PX compact (PXC...)
Key:
1
For PXC10-TL the two Alarm1/2 buttons and the DIL switches1/2 are mapped to the modules
with the Address 3.
2
The manual switch can only be loaded into the application if the DIL switches (in the cover of the
PXC36-S) are set correctly.
3
Syntax for PPS-2 signal: Q=Romm device number.Object number (profile number). Up to five
devices can be connected.
4
The current UI and AO can all be configured as AI, DI, CI, or AO.
Signal type if no application is loaded (wiring test): X1...X16 = Y10S, Y1...Y8 = R1K.
Module 4
For Module 4, the universal outputs (UO for AO and DO) not only control
proportional actuators (AO), but can also be used as binary switch commands (DO).
Analog Output = 0…10 V
Binary Output = DC 0 or 24 V, max. 22 mA with the use of an additional external
relay.
51..62 = MD005
D5..D16
MD003
GND
D5
GND
D6
D7
GND
D8
GND
GND
D1
GND
D2
D3
GND
D4
D9
GND
X12
X16
X10
X11
X1..16
MD001
X13
AC24V
26VA
X14
X15
CP CP+
D1..D4
MD002
Y1..Y8 = MD004
Figure 230: Layout of PXC52 housing with address ranges
298 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Logical I/O Blocks
Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
17
Addressing multistate I/Os with PTM
Multistate input
The multistate value is made up of several separate binary measured values.
Addressing is via the input/output address [IOAddr]. In both the modular and the
compact series, the logical and physical I/O must be located in the same
automation station, but they do not need to be contiguous. The addressing cannot
extend across automation stations. The addresses must be on the same module
for TX-I/O.
Simple mapping
Syntax: P=Module.Channel;Module.Channel;Module.Channel;Module.Channel
(Signal type)
Examples:
● P=1.1 (D20)
● P=1.1;1.2 (D20)
● P=1.1;1.2;1.3 (D20)
● P=1.1;1.2;1.3;1.4 (D20)
● P=10.3 (DIS)
Up to four binary status values (for example, Off/St1/St2/St3/St4) can be registered.
The signals to be registered, which are addressed via Module.Channel, must
always be of the same hardware signal type. With the simple mapping procedure,
to enable the multistate input to interpret the current binary signals correctly, only
one binary signal may be present at any one time. If several binary signals are
present at once, this is displayed as an error at the [Rlb] pin.
The examples below show a possible application for multistate input blocks in
conjunction with the physical I/O modules. The example on the left of the diagram
is a multiple I/O module, while the one on the right shows the mapping of several
individual I/O modules in one multistate input block.
Multistate output
The multistate value from the program is converted in the Multistate Output block
into a switching command. Addressing is via [IOAddr]. For PX modular, the syntax
is as follows:
Syntax: P=Module.Channel;Module.Channel;Module.Channel;Module.Channel
(signal type, parameter)
Examples:
● P=1.1 (Q250)
● P=1.1;1.2 (Q250)
● P=1.1;1.2;1.3 (Q250)
● P=1.1;1.2;1.3;1.4 (Q250)
● P=10.1 (Q250-P3,120)
● P=24.7 (DOS)
Values with up to four stages can be processed. The signals to be registered,
which are addressed via Module.Channel, must always be of the same hardware
signal type. In the case of a multistate output on the hardware side, there is one
address only (this is only possible with PXC modular automation stations).
Error handling
If an automation station does not support a given address (for example, incorrect
syntax) or a given I/O system, this will lead to a reliability error, which will be
displayed at the [Rlb] pin.
Advanced mapping (Multistate Input)
The manual switch can be encoded on the PX compact in various ways, for
example:
● (Auto/Off/On) or (Off/Auto/On)
● (Auto/Off/S1/S2) or (Off/Auto/S1/S2)
To avoid having to keep adapting the data types and text groups in the system, the
manual switch must always be represented in the same way within the system:
Siemens
299 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
17
Logical I/O Blocks
Addressing entries for PXC…-U, PTM and P-Bus
● (Auto/Off/On)
● (Auto/Off/S1/S2)
A prerequisite for this approach is that it must be possible in the multistate input
block to configure the hardware coding and mapping to the standardized manual
switch. This is made possible with parameters in the address.
1_n-Mapping (Multistate Input and Output)
Syntax: P=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel
(signal type, a,b,c,d,e)
a represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,0,0)
b represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (1,0,0,0)
c represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,1,0,0)
d represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,1,0)
e represents [PrVal] for HW-I/O (0,0,0,1)
Example: P=1.1;1.2;1.3;1.4 (D20, 1, 3, 2, 4, 5)
[PrVal]
Addr1
Addr2
Addr3
Addr4
Comment /
Text group
1
0
0
0
0
Auto
3
1
0
0
0
Stage 1
2
0
1
0
0
Off
4
0
0
1
0
Stage 2
5
0
0
0
1
Stage 3
Table 91: 1_n-Mapping (Multistate Input and Output)
UpDown mapping (Multistate Input and Output)
Application: Connecting/disconnecting further stages.
Example: Electric heating registers, multi-stage burners.
Syntax: P=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;module.channel
(signal type, UPDOWN)
With "Up/Down" mapping, more than one hardware input or output may be active.
Binary mapping (Multistate Input and Output)
Application: Output of an integer in binary form.
Example: Binary electric heating coil.
Syntax: P=Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel;Module.channel
(signal type, BINARY)
With binary mapping, more than one hardware input or output may be active.
300 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
18
18 Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation offers solutions with greater functionality and flexibility
allowing for energy-optimized plant operation without loss of comfort (efficiency
class A).
The DXR2 room automation stations are perfectly suited to exclusively automate
heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in a room. In addition, the DXR2 can be
extended with lighting and shading functions by adding devices with KNX PL- Link.
The PXC3 modular room automation stations are used in buildings with multiple
disciplines for room automation (HVAC, lighting, blinds) all combined in one system.
Desigo RX
Desigo RX is a proven room automation product range featuring comprehensive
communications and application functions for individual rooms. The product range
consists of three series of communicating room controllers (RXC…, RXB…, RXL…)
with operator units and predefined applications for HVAC, lighting, and blinds.
Desigo RX room automation is capable of autonomous operation. Integration of
LonWorks or KNX network via the system controllers provides for additional
functionality.
18.1 Desigo Room Automation
New guidelines to save energy and lower operating costs and greater requirements
for comfort and design require a more sophisticated interaction between a
building's various technical installations. The modular and compact room
automation stations combine lighting, shading, and HVAC in one total solution and
provide a direct connection to the automation stations via BACnet.
Overview of room automation stations
Product range
Configurable
Programmable
Applications and tool
Configurable with ABT Site
Programmable with library in ABT Pro
Communication (Backbone)
BACnet ethernet
BACnet MS/TP
BACnet ethernet
BACnet MS/TP
Communication with sensors and
actuators in room (integration)
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
KNX (with ETS)
DALI
System integration/functions
PXC..-E.D
PXG3.L
PXC..-E.D
PXC..-E.D
PXC..-E.D
Modular controller
PXC3.E..
I/Os
TXM
Compact controller
DXR2.E..
DXR2.M..
DALI extension
PXG3.L
DXR2.E..
DXR2.M..
PXC3.E16A
PXC3.E..A
Communication with room units
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
Room units
QMX3..
QMX3..
QMX3..
QMX3..
Touch screen
QMX7..
Table 92: Overview of room automation stations
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link (PeripheraL Link) connects communicating room and field devices
(room devices, sensors, actors) with the PXC3 room automation station.
DALI
DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) helps control lighting.
Siemens
301 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
18
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
18.1.1
Configurable
With DXR2.. up to two rooms can be automated for heating, ventilation, air
conditioning, shading, and lighting.
The stations communicate with each other and other system components,
depending on the type, via BACnet/IP (DXR2.E…) or BACnet MS/TP (DXR2.M...).
The room automation stations have a set number of I/O data points and an
onboard interface to KNX to connect field devices. The automation stations are
delivered with preloaded applications and only need to be configured.
A comprehensive library of proven, standardized applications is also available and
can be used instead of the preloaded applications. Buttons, sensors, and actuators
for lighting and shading are connected to the room automation stations via the KNX
PL-Link.
The preloaded and proven standardized applications in the library are configured
using ABT Site and offer a great deal of flexibility since the inputs and outputs of
the DXR2… can also be configured in addition to the functions.
See Range Description Desigo Room Automation (BACnet), Configurable Room
Automation (A6V10640595).
Topologies
Ethernet
DXR2.E..
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
BACnet/IP
Compact AC 230 V
DXR2.E..
°C
°C
°C
°C
Detector
AQR25...
Room sensor
PXC..-E.D
Compact AC 24 V
QMX3...
Detector
AQR25...
Room sensor
Room
operator units
QMX3...
Room
operator units
Figure 231: Compact DXR2 room automation stations for BACnet/IP
302 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Room Automation
18
Desigo Room Automation
BACnet/IP
Ethernet
PXG3.L
PXC..-E.D
Router
DXR2.M..
KNX PL-Link
KNX PL-Link
BACnet MS/TP
Compact AC 230 V
DXR2.M..
Compact AC 24 V
°C
°C
°C
AQR25...
Room sensor
°C
Detector
QMX3...
AQR25...
Room sensor
Room
operator units
Detector
QMX3...
Room
operator units
Figure 232: Compact DXR2 room automation stations for BACnet MS/TP
Applications
The following tables show the functions of the different applications of the DXR2
room automation stations.
Siemens
303 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
18
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
Application
Functions
Fan coil unit
●
Outside Air Damper
●
Single Speed Fan , Multi Speed Fan or Variable Speed Fan
●
Chilled water cooling coil
●
Direct expansion evaporator cooling coil
●
Heating/Cooling coil
●
Hot water heating coil
●
Electric heating coil modulating, single stage or two stage
●
Room temperature control by two-pipe system with change-over
●
Room temperature control by four-pipe system
●
Supply air temperature cascade control
●
Room dehumidification control
●
Air volume flow control
●
Rapid ventilation
●
Green leaf
●
Supply and extract air control
●
External flow control for VAV with integrated flow controller and differential pressure sensor
●
Internal flow controller and differential pressure sensor for damper actuator control
●
Internal flow controller and velocity sensor for damper actuator control
●
Chilled water cooling coil
●
Heating/Cooling coil
●
Hot water heating coil
●
Electric heating coil modulating, single stage or two stage
●
Room temperature control by two-pipe system with change-over
●
Room temperature control by four-pipe system
●
Supply air temperature cascade control
●
Air flow tracking for under/overpressure
●
Room dehumidification control
●
Room air quality control
●
Rapid ventilation
●
Green leaf
●
Chilled ceiling with chilled water
●
Heated/Chilled ceiling by two-pipe system with change-over
●
Heated/chilled ceiling by four-pipe system with 6 way valves
●
Heating ceiling with hot water
●
Hot water radiator
●
Electric radiator modulating or staged
●
Downdraft compensation for radiators
●
Condensation monitor
●
Room temperature control
●
Green leaf
Variable air volume
Radiator and chilled ceiling
304 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
Application
Functions
Fan powered box
●
Supply air control
●
External flow control for VAV with integrated flow controller and differential pressure sensor
●
Internal flow controller and differential pressure sensor for damper actuator control
●
Internal flow controller and velocity sensor for damper actuator control
●
Single Speed Fan , Multi Speed Fan or Variable Speed Fan
●
Chilled water cooling coil
●
Heating/Cooling coil
●
Hot water heating coil
●
Electric heating coil modulating, single stage or two stage
●
Room temperature control by two-pipe system with change-over
●
Room temperature control by four-pipe system
●
Supply air temperature cascade control
●
Room air quality control
●
Rapid ventilation
●
Green leaf
●
Manual switched control
●
Manual dimmed control
●
Automatic presence control
●
Automatic brightness control
●
Constant light control
●
Multi group constant light control
●
LED support on push buttons
●
Green Leaf - RoomOptiControl
●
Burn-in & operating hours function
●
Manual control
●
Automatic control with anti glare function and energy efficiency function
●
Green Leaf - RoomOptiControl
●
Collision detection
Four light groups
Two blinds
18
Table 93: Preloaded applications
Siemens
305 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
18
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
Application
Functions
Central functions
●
4x Control room operating mode groups with:
–
Room mode and room setpoint distribution to rooms
–
Start optimization switches the heating on at the appropriate time
–
Three delayed distribution groups of room operating mode for big buildings
●
1x Seasonal compensation of room temperature setpoints
●
2x Demand controlled hot water supply group
●
2x Demand controlled chilled water supply group with:
●
●
–
Condensation prevention shifts the base chilled water setpoint to avoid condensation at chilled
ceiling radiant devices
–
Two pipe changeover control handles the heating / cooling changeover for a two-pipe system
–
Free cooling manages the delivery of chilled water in situations where this can be done with
almost a zero expenditure of energy. For example, chiller plants with the possibility to cool the
water with the recoolers when outside conditions are favorable.
1x Demand temperature control group with:
–
Relief function opens additional VAV without demand to ensure stable working of the primary
plant
–
Changeover evaluation decide if the central air should be used for heating or for cooling
–
Dew point evaluation is used to dehumidify at the primary air handling unit to avoid condensation
in the rooms
–
Humidity demand evaluates room humidity to help the primary plant determine when to humidify
or dehumidify
–
Override function allows a technician or balancer to override the VAV applications for balancing
and commissioning
1x Demand controlled pressure control by either:
–
Supply VAV position evaluation helps to optimize fan speed by averaging the 10 highest supply
damper positions and providing this information to the central plant
–
Extract VAV position evaluation helps to optimize fan speed by averaging the 10 highest extract
damper positions and providing this information to the central plant.
–
Supply VAV flow deviation helps to optimize the fan speed by calculating the airflow deviation
through the supply VAV dampers
–
Extract VAV flow deviation helps to optimize the fan speed by calculating the airflow deviation
through the extract VAV dampers
–
Supply VAV flow saturation evaluation (air flow control loop cannot get enough air to reach
setpoint) evaluates the supply VAV saturation signals from the rooms to optimize the fan speed
–
Extract VAV flow saturation evaluation (air flow control loop cannot get enough air to reach
setpoint) evaluates the extract VAV saturation signals from the rooms to optimize the fan speed
–
Supply VAV setpoint evaluation with the summed setpoints of the supply VAV the fan's speed
can be set for an optimized fan speed when VAV positions and VAV flow rates are not known
–
Extract VAV setpoint evaluation with the summed setpoints of the extract VAV the fan's speed
can be set for an optimized fan speed when VAV positions and VAV flow rates are not known
Table 94: Loadable central functions
306 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Room Automation
Desigo Room Automation
Central functions
●
2x VAV supply fire emergency group with off, extract, pressurization or purge
●
1x Central weather station with:
–
Outside temperature
–
Outside brightness
–
Outside solar radiation
–
Outside wind speed
–
Outside precipitation
●
2x Light manual central operation group
●
1x Light central control group for emergency situations
●
4x Shading central facade functions with:
18
–
Central weather station brightness calculation supports facade automatic function
–
Glare protection function calculates the glare protection state by central weather station for all
facade
–
Annual shading calculates the glare protection state for all facade by in-formation from annual
shading computer
–
Thermal protection for unoccupied rooms by central global radiation sensor on weather station
–
Three delayed distribution groups for central blind commands for big buildings
●
2x Shading manual central operation with 3 delayed distribution groups for big buildings
●
1x Shading service ensures central commanding of blind group with high priority
●
1x Shading central protection for all blinds with:
–
Wind protection
–
Precipitation protection
–
Frost protection
–
Three delayed distribution groups for big buildings
Table 95: Loadable central functions (continued)
See Application Catalog.
Compact room automation stations
Figure 233: DXR2 automation stations
Communication
BACnet ethernet
DXR2.E09 DXR2.E09 DXR2.E10
-101A
T-101A
-101A
BACnet MS/TP1
DXR2.M09 DXR2.M09 DXR2.M10 DXR2.M11 DXR2.M12 DXR2.M12 DXR2.M18 DXR2.M18
-101A
T-101A
-101A
-101A
P-102A
PX-102A/B -101A
-102A
DXR2.E12 DXR2.E12 DXR2.E18 DXR2.E18
P-102A
PX-102A/B -101A
-102A
Applications
Room operating
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Heated / Chilled ceiling radiator
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fan coil unit
•
•
•
•
Siemens
•
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VAV system
•
•
•
Lighting
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Shading
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Central functions1
Housing
DIN
Flat
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Operating voltage
230V
24V
Inputs and outputs onboard
Digital inputs
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Universal inputs
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
Relay outputs
3
1
3
4
4
6
6
6
8
8
2
2
2
4
4
1
1
Triac outputs
3
Analog outputs (DC 0...10 V) 2
1
Pressure sensor
Maximum configuration
Number of I/O data points 3
30
30
30
30
30
60
60
60
Integrated power supply for KNX
(mA)
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
Table 96: Compact room automation stations
Key:
1
Cannot be combined with other applications.
2
Cannot be extended by KNX PL-Link inputs and outputs.
3
Total number of data point used by TX-I/O, KNX PL-Link and DALI. For details, see chapter
System Configuration.
See Compact room automation stations,
DXR2.E09.., DXR2.E09T.. (N9204).
See Compact room automation stations,
DXR2.E12P.. (N9205).
See Compact room automation stations,
DXR2.M09.., DXR2.M09T.. (N9206).
See Compact room automation stations,
DXR2.M12P.., DXR2.M18.. (N9207).
18.1.2
BACnet/IP, 230 V DXR2.E10..,
BACnet/IP, 24 V DXR2.E18..,
BACnet MS/TP, 230 V DXR2.M10..,
BACnet MS/TP, 24 V DXR2.M11..,
Programmable
The DXR2.. and PXC3.. room automation stations are programmable, based on
proven application blocks. Thus, solutions can be tailored to specific needs and
can achieve maximum efficiency and comfort.
See Range Description Desigo Room Automation (BACnet), Programmable Room
Automation - Emergency Lighting (A6V10640596), Programmable Room
Automation - Room Operation (A6V10640597), Programmable Room Automation Distributed Functions and Scenes (A6V10640598) and Programmable Room
Automation - Lighting Controls and DALI (A6V10640599).
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Topology
BACnet MS/TP
11043z31
BACnet/IP
PXG3.M
Router
DXR2.E..
Compact AC 230 V
DXR2.E..
Compact AC 24 V
DXR2.M..
KNX
Lighting
KNX
PXC3.E16A
Modules
KNX
Modular
KNX
PXC3.E7.. TX-I/O
Compact AC 230 V
DXR2.M..
Compact AC 24 V
DALI
°C
KNX
Third-party
devices
QMX7.E38 Touch
°C
°C
GLB/GDB..1E/KN
VAV compact controller
DALI
QMX3..
Third-party devices
room operator units
Room operator
units
Push button,
detector etc.
QMX3...
RXM21/39.1
Room oberator units
PL-Link I/O blocks
°C
AQR25..
Room sensor
RS/RL Modules
QMX3/AQR25..
QMX3..
Room units
Room operator
units
Push button,
detector etc.
Push button,
detector etc.
AQR25..
Room sensor
QMX3/AQR25..
RS/RL Modules
Room units
Push button,
detector etc.
Third-party
integration
AQR25...
Room sensor
Third-party
integration
Push button,
detector etc.
RS/RL Modules
RS/RL Modules
GLB/GDB..1E/KN
GLB/GDB..1E/KN
VAV compact controller
VAV compact controller
Third-party
integration
RS/RL Modules
GLB/GDB..1E/KN
GLB/GDB..1E/KN
VAV compact controller
VAV compact controller
Third-party
integration
Figure 234: Desigo Room Automation topology
Applications
A comprehensive block library for room automation is provided as part the scope of
delivery. The library contains predefined application functions for room climate,
lighting, shading, and superimposed room functions. The applications can be
combined with operating and display functions as required. The individual
application functions can be adapted to customer needs and are programmable.
The application functions do not depend on the selected field devices.
See Application Catalog.
Configuration of application functions
Many application functions are preconfigured and available in the library.
Retroactive configuration during engineering or commissioning is possible. Your
own configured application functions and entire rooms can be stored in a project
library.
Configuration of field devices
The application architecture does not depend on the field device interface. Field
devices can be connected directly to the PXC3 room automation station (via TX-I/O
modules) or via bus (KNX or DALI) or IP communication.
Many field devices are preconfigured and available in the library. Retroactive
configuration during engineering or commissioning is possible. Project-specific field
devices configured accordingly can be saved in a project library.
Modular room automation stations
PXC3 room automation stations with control functions for one or multiple rooms:
● Assume control functions for one or multiple rooms.
● Communicate with each other or other system components via BACnet/IP.
Scope and functionality of supported BACnet objects are matched to the
requirements of room automation.
● Provide a 2-port Ethernet interface for cost-effective cabling via daisy chaining.
● Contain bus supplies for island bus, KNX PL-Link, and DALI. Internal bus
supplies can be extended for island bus and KNX PL-Link as needed.
● Have an integrated web server for IP communication with QMX7.E38 touch
room operator units.
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See Room automation station PXC3.E7.. (CM1N9203) and Touch room operator
unit QMX7.E38 (CM1N9295).
Figure 235: PXC3 automation station
PXC3.E72
PXC3.E72A
PXC3.E75
PXC3.E75A
PXC3.E16A
4/8
4/8
8/16
8/16
N/A
BACnet/IP
BACnet/IP
BACnet/IP
BACnet/IP
BACnet/IP
QMX3
•
•
•
•
QMX7
•
•
•
•
•
Web based test and setup tool
•
•
•
•
•
B-ASC
B-ASC
B-ASC
B-ASC
B-ASC
•
•
•
•
•
Bus for I/O module
•
•
•
•
KNX PL-Link1 / KNX S-Mode
•
•
•
•
Typical number of rooms / room segments
System communication
HMI automation level
System functions (BACnet)
BACnet profiles
Programming
Peripheral bus
•
DALI
•
•
Maximum configuration
Number of I/O data points 2
140
140
280
280
64
Inputs/Outputs for TX I/O modules
72
72
200
200
0
Devices on KNX PL-Link
64
64
64
64
0
64
64
160
N/A
64
DALI ballasts
Integrated power supply for KNX (mA)
160
160
160
Table 97: Modular room automation stations
Key:
1
Dedicated devices with KNX PL-Link.
2
Total number of data points used by TX-I/O, KNX PL-Link and DALI. For details, see chapter
System Configuration.
TX-I/O modules
TX-I/O modules (TXM1) help connect field devices to the PXC3 room automation
station. Bus supply and interface modules (TXS1, TXA1) are available as an
accessory.
Figure 236: TX-I/O module
The following TX-I/O modules can be used with the PXC3 room automation station:
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●
TXM1.8T: Triac module with 8 outputs (AC 24 V) to control thermal and
motorized valve actuators (AC 24 V) for up to 4 actuators (3-point output) or 8
actuators (permanent contact or pulse width modulation).
● TXM1.6RL: Bistable relay module to switch lighting for up to 6 data points.
● TXM1.8RB: Relay module to control blind motors for up to 2 motors (3 end
switches) or 4 motors (2 end switches).
● TXM1.16D: Digital input modules for up to 16 data points.
● TXM1.8D: Digital input modules for up to 8 data points.
● TXM1.6R: Relay module for up to 6 data points.
● TXM1.8U: Universal module for up to 8 data points.
See TX-I/O Assortment overview (CM2N8170).
Compact room automation stations
Communication
BACnet ethernet
DXR2.E09 DXR2.E09 DXR2.E10
-101A
T-101A
-101A
BACnet MS/TP
DXR2.M09 DXR2.M09 DXR2.M10 DXR2.M11 DXR2.M12 DXR2.M18
-101A
T-101A
-101A
-101A
P
-1..A
DXR2.E12 DXR2.E18
P
-1..A
Housing
DIN
Flat
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Operating voltage
230V
24V
Inputs and outputs onboard
Digital inputs
1
1
1
1
1
2
Universal inputs
2
2
2
2
2
4
Relay outputs
3
1
3
4
4
6
6
8
2
2
4
Triac outputs
3
Analog outputs (DC 0...10 V)*
1
1
Pressure sensor
Maximum configuration
Number of I/O data points
30
30
30
30
30
60
Integrated power supply for KNX (mA)
50
50
50
50
50
50
Table 98: Compact room automation stations
Key:
1
Total number of data points used by TX-I/O, KNX PL-Link and DALI. For details, see chapter
System Configuration.
PXC3.E16A room automation station for lighting
The PXC3.E16A room automation station is tailored for challenging lighting
applications. All lighting applications that also run on the PXC3.E7.. are available.
The PXC3.E16A communicates via BACnet/IP with the DXR2.E.. and PXC3.E..
room automation stations. Using the on-board DALI interface, up to 64 ECGs
(electronic control gear) can be integrated in 16 groups. The PXC3.E16A can be
used for centralized lighting automations or, as applicable, as a supplement to a
decentralized HVAC installation.
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Example: Centralized lighting installation with decentralized HVAC installation
● DXR2.E.. to automate HVAC in the room
● Centralized installation with PXC3.E..A for lighting
Figure 237: Centralized lighting installation with decentralized HVAC installation
Example: Centralized lighting installation without HVAC installation
● One PXC3.E16A is centrally installed per DALI line
● Optional PXC3.E7..A
– To integrate buttons via KNX PL-Link
– To use TXM1 modules
– Three-phase power installation possible
Figure 238: Centralized lighting installation without HVAC installation
18.1.3
Rooms and Room Segments
There are two methods to structure a building:
● Rooms (with fixed walls)
● Room segments (typically based on movable walls)
One of the two methods or a mixture thereof is possible depending on the building
structure or required flexibility (for example, during the usage phase).
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Figure 239: Rooms and room segments
A room segment is the smallest indivisible element. A room comprises at least one
or several adjacent room segments. A room segment is defined and created only
once. Room segments are typically combined several times to rooms over the
course of a building's lifecycle.
18.1.4
Central Control Functions and Grouping
Grouping is used to implement central control functions and to coordinate demand
and forced signals from the various rooms in an entire building, building wing, floor,
etc.
Hidden behind the central control functions are system functions, such as operator
interventions (via BACnet clients, for example, a management station or via local
operator units), schedulers, automatic reactions, and data from a weather station.
Central functions influence:
● Room operating mode (occupancy and use in room)
● HVAC control via various setpoint requirements depending on the room
operating mode
● HVAC setpoints via a weather-dependent adjustment
● Lighting control
● Shading control (blinds)
Grouping can be used to coordinate demand, operating, and forced signals, that is:
● Request signals for hot water distribution (heating circuit)
● Request signals for chilled water distribution (cooling circuit)
● Record demand, operating, and forced signals for the primary air handling unit
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Figure 240: Grouping
Various sources are available for forming these central superposed functions:
● External system or third-party device
● System user via BACnet client
● Building user via BACnet client or local operator unit
● Scheduler or reaction program
● Superposed office based on grouping function
They are distributing after evaluating signals and commands via a Grouping
function.
One group master exists for each of the various categories which then forwards the
resulting information to all assigned group member (rooms). A group master can
for its part be a group member of a superposed group master.
18.1.5
Desigo Room Automation and the Management Level
See chapter Desigo Room Automation Integration.
18.1.6
Desigo Room Automation and the Automation Level
Alarming is triggered directly on the PXC3.E.. and DXR2.. room automation
stations. A primary automation station (typically PXC00.E-D) is only used for
calendars , schedulers and time setting. This simplifies engineering and reduces
the number of required system components.
18.2 Desigo RXC
The Desigo RXC room automation system controls and monitors comfort
conditions in individual rooms. It provides predefined solutions for HVAC, lighting
and blinds.
See Desigo RXC Room automation system, System description (CA110333).
The range consists of several controllers, operator units and predefined
applications. The applications are configured and downloaded into the controllers
with the RXT10 commissioning and service tool or a standard LNS tool.
See RXT10.3 commissioning and service tool User ’s Guide (CM110669) and
RXT10.5 commissioning and service tool User ’s Guide (CM110658).
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Desigo RXC
Desigo
management station
BACnet/IP
or
BACnet/LonTalk
10660Z12en_06
PXX-L..
PXX-L..
PXC50/100/200...E.D
PXC50/100/200...D
PXC50/100/200...E.DTX-I/OPXC50/100/200...D TXM1..
LONWORKS
LONWORKS
Third party
devices
Desigo RXC
QAX5...
Room automation
QAX...
Desigo RXC
QAX...
Room operator units
Room automation
Room operator units
Figure 241: RXC topology
Binding
When a LonWorks network is designed, bindings are created with a LonWorks tool
(RXT10 commissioning and service tool or a standard LNS tool). A binding is the
connection of network variables of the same type between different nodes.
Network variables connected in this way communicate implicitly, that is, if a value
changes, the new value is transmitted automatically. Transmit and receive times
are also monitored, making it possible to react to communications errors.
Discipline I/Os
Discipline I/Os are function block in the LonWorks system controller that gather
data from the RXC controller and make it available on the BACnet network.
Discipline I/Os are available for HVAC, lighting and blinds.
Floor Level Network (FLN) A Floor Level Network (FLN) is a communications network for room automation.
LonMark Interoperability
Association
The LonMark Interoperability Association is an association founded by the
manufacturers of LonWorks products, to define independent, interoperability
guidelines for LonWorks systems. The association is responsible for checking
compliance and for the certification of LonMark products.
LonWorks nodes
LonWorks nodes are devices that are connected to the LonWorks bus and
communicate with other LonWorks nodes.
Network variables (NV)
Network variables (NV) allow the exchange of data between different LonWorks
nodes. This type of communication is also called implicit, because transmission
and reception are automatic. Network variables may be input or output variables.
Room-based groups
The discipline I/Os representing the RXC controllers in a room are combined in the
LonWorks system controller into a room-based group. The result is a room view.
Cross-room groupings
A cross-room grouping contains all the control variables common to a given user
grouping (for example, North facade, Tenant A, West zone, etc.) and distributes
these control variables to the associated room or group members.
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Standard Network
Variable Type (SNVT)
A Standard Network Variable Type (SNVT) is a standard type of network variable,
which simplifies the communication between LonWorks nodes. Only network
variables of the same type can be connected. The SNVTs are defined in the SNVT
Master List provided by LonMark.
Supergenies
Supergenies are predefined graphics in the graphics library of the management
station. For each RXC application there is a supergenie that contains the main data
points. The information in the supergenies is the same as the information in the
binding templates in the RXT10 tool.
18.2.1
Product Range Overview
Desigo RXC is an innovative product range comprising controllers, extension
modules, and room units. Data communication is based on LonWorks.
Desigo RXC hardware
The range comprises compact and modular controllers, easy-to-operate room units
and room controllers.
The input and output configurations of the controllers, and the housing style are
fully optimized to suit their field of application. The modular controllers include
basic modules for HVAC control, which can be combined with extension modules
for control of lighting and blinds.
The HVAC functions are operated with standard room units or the compact
controller RXC10.5. The QAX50 and QAX51 configurable flexible room units are
available for combined operation (HVAC, lighting, blinds).
Communicating (RXB, RXC)
KNX
LonWorks
RXB21
RXC20
RXC30
RXC40
RXB22
RXC21
RXC31
RXC41
RXB24
RXC22
RXC32
RXB39
RXC39
Lighting and
blinds
VAV
Radiators and
chilled ceilings
Fan coil units
Device name
RXC10
Table 99: Desigo RX hardware
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PPS2 (RXC, RXB, PX)
Standard
enocean
18
LonWorks
Flush mounting Wireless
Flexible
QAX84
Lighting and
blinds
HVAC
Device name
QAX30
QAX33
QAX95
QAX50
QAX31
QAX34.3
QAX96
QAX51
QAX32
QAX39
QAX97
QAX98
Only for RXC &
RXB
Table 100: Desigo RX room units
Desigo RXC applications
The controllers and the QAX5.. flexible room units are loaded with application
software which contains the control program for the associated room or area.
Siemens Building Automation maintains a comprehensive library of applications
covering a wide range of HVAC and electrical applications.
See RXC application library Version 2 (CA110300).
Example: Fan coil system
T
T
T
LON
Controller
Figure 242: Example: Fan coil system
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Application
Name
Controller
FNC02
Two-pipe system with changeover
RXC20.5
RXC21.5
RXC39.5
FNC03
Two-pipe system with changeover and electric re-heater
RXC20.5
RXC21.5
RXC22.5
RXC39.5
FNC04
Four-pipe system
RXC20.5
RXC21.5
RXC39.5
FNC08
Four-pipe system with room supply air cascade control
RXC21.5
RXC39.5
FNC10
Two-pipe system with changeover and outside air
damper
RXC21.5
FNC12
Four-pipe system with outside air damper
RXC21.5
Table 101: Applications for RXC controllers
Common functions:
● Window contact, occupancy sensor, four operating modes
● Manual fan control with room unit
● Automatic fan control
● RXC20.5 single-speed, RXC21.5, RXC22.5 three-speed, RXC39.5 constant 010V
● Options with two-pipe systems: Heating only, cooling or changeover via bus
using LonWorks technology
18.2.2
RXC Applications
Desigo RXC applications are standard applications developed at HQ. They cannot
be modified for a specific project by the user. These applications are loaded to the
controller using the RXT10 commissioning and servicing tool or a standard LNS
tool (commissioning).
Applications of the same type are grouped into application groups. The complete
range of RXC applications is held in a library which is continuously expanded.
RXC applications
library
Application
group CLC
RAD
CLC01
CLC
CLC02
FNC
CLC03
Application
CLC03
Application
configuration
CLC
Electric radiator
Chilled ceiling with
electric radiator
On/Off or
modulating
INT
Temp. Setpoint
...
...
Figure 243: Hierarchical structure of the application library
RXC application library
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Siemens
The RXC application library contains application groups, each of which contains
applications of the same type. The RXC application library has a version number
which is defined in the RXC Valid Version Set. The Valid Version Set also defines
the version of each individual RXC application.
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The structure described above can be seen in the documentation and in the
implementation of the RXT10 commissioning and service tool.
Application groups
Similar application types are grouped into application groups. These differ from
each other in terms of how the functions are implemented. Thus, chilled ceiling with
radiator (CLC02) and chilled ceiling and electric radiator (CLC03) are two different
applications within the CLC group. The first of these two applications uses water
for heating, while the second uses electrical energy. The difference between
applications in the other groups follows a similar pattern.
The following application groups are available:
● 000: Basic applications (allow the RXC controllers to be used as I/O modules)
● RAD: Radiator applications
● CLC: Chilled ceiling applications
● FNC: Fan coil applications
● VAV: Variable air volume applications
● FPB: Fan-powered box applications (fan-assisted VAV)
● INT: Integrated applications (combined applications including lighting and/or
blinds)
● IRO: Integrated room operation applications (applications for the QAX50/51
flexible room units)
Individual applications
The individual application is designed for typical HVAC systems as commonly used
in practice in individual rooms, for example:
● FNC10: Two-pipe system with changeover and outside air damper
● VAV06: Single duct supply and extract air system with electric re-heater
Applications are modular in structure, and cover a specific combination of functions
which are always implemented in the same way, for example, operating modes
and setpoint derivation are identical in all applications (including those in different
application groups). Similarly, fan speed control is identical in all FNC applications.
Y [% ]
100
H ea ting
0
Co oling
TR
C om fort
P reC omfo rt
E co nomy
B uild in g prote ct io n
F r ost pr ote ct io n
Figure 244: Example: Operating modes
Key:
Y
Output signal
TR Room temperature
Each application has a defined number of configuration parameters with which the
application can be programmed for a specific project. These parameters consist
both of general values, for example, temperature setpoints, etc., and of specific
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Configuring applications
18.2.3
values for the respective application, for example, changeover configuration,
electric reheater, etc.
RXC and the Management Level
Generic and engineered operation is available at the management level. The
operation is explained below based on Desigo Insight.
Generic operation
For operation in the Object Viewer, no additional engineering is required in Desigo
Insight. Operation may be either via groups and rooms or directly via the discipline
I/Os.
Figure 245: Object Viewer with RXC integration
Engineered operation –
Plant Viewer
A typical requirement in the case of room integration is a graphical representation
of the building, showing the different floors and rooms. Desigo Insight supports the
generation of graphics and the integration of RXC.
Figure 246: RXC supergenie with a floor plan as the background
For each RXC application, there is a predefined graphic (supergenie) in the Desigo
Insight graphics library, containing the main data points. The information contained
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in the supergenies is the same as the information in the binding templates in the
RXT10 tool.
Figure 247: RXC supergenie
18.2.4
RXC and the Automation Level
Desigo RXC is integrated into the automation level with the LonWorks system
controller.
The main tasks of the system controller are:
● Mapping RXC data to BACnet objects
● Implementing higher-level functions (grouping, time schedules, etc.)
On the BACnet side of the LonWorks system controller, the RXC controllers can be
operated and monitored from a client (PXM20/40/50, management station). Data
can also be exchanged with the primary plant.
18.2.5
Mapping LonWorks in the LonWorks System Controller
RXC data in the LonWorks system controller is mapped by objects that assemble
the main functions of the RXC applications. The LonWorks system controller thus
operates as a data concentrator (the data points are not mapped individually).
These objects are referred to as discipline I/Os and are components of the block
library.
The following types of discipline I/Os exist:
● HVAC: Comprises all the HVAC information
● Light: Comprises all the information relating to a lighting group
● Sunblind: Comprises all the information relating to a blinds group
● Shared: Contains shared data points (for example, time schedules, occupancy
status, etc.)
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The discipline I/Os are defined according to the maximum principle, that is, one
HVAC discipline I/O contains all the information found in the HVAC part of the RXC
application. When mapping an application, however, only the specific data points
for that particular application are mapped to BACnet.
FNC04
FNC03
HVAC
discipline I/Os
FNC02
Inputs
CLC03
A discipline I/O
contains a
superset of the
data
Outputs
Only applicationspecific data is
mapped
FNC04
CLC02
CLC01
FNC04
FNC03
FNC02
Figure 248: Data points in the application
18.2.6
Groups in the LonWorks System Controller
The RXC controller data is grouped in the LonWorks system controller. The
discipline I/O is a preliminary form of grouping. It groups the data for the different
sections (HVAC, lighting and blinds) of the RXC applications into the associated
objects.
The LonWorks system controller has the following groups:
● Room-based groups (grouping of discipline I/Os into a room) > Compounds
● Multi-room groupings (groups of rooms) > Firmware
Room-based groups
322 | 416
Siemens
A room-based group is a structuring element. If more than one RXC controller is
installed in a room, only the discipline I/Os of the master controller is integrated. In
such cases, master and slave are connected at the field level. A room-based group
accommodates all the discipline I/Os of one physical room. This leads to a roombased view.
The second function of the room-based group is the mapping of applicationspecific data to BACnet, that is, the selection of those points of the discipline I/Os
which are needed for the RXC application concerned. Room-based groups are
compounds. There is a room compound for every RXC application.
CM110664en
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Room Automation
Desigo RXC
18
Room-based group
Shared
Light
Blinds
Room
RXC1
Shared
RXC2
HLK
Light
Shared
HLK
Light
RXC room controller
Figure 249: Room-based view
Grouping across rooms
A multi-room group contains all the control variables common to a given group of
users (for example, North facade, Tenant A, West zone etc.), and distributes these
control variables to the associated room or group members. For this reason, a
multi-room group contains two member lists, one for the referenced room and one
for the referenced group.
Multi-room groups take the form of blocks and are contained in the block library.
Referenced rooms
Referenced rooms are referenced via the discipline I/O of the room-based groups.
Only rooms connected to the same LonWorks system controller can be referenced.
The addressed rooms cannot be modified online.
Referenced groups
A multi-room group can also transmit values to another group, which may be
connected to the same or different LonWorks system controller. Up to five more
groups can be addressed. These references can be modified online.
A group can only distribute information. It cannot gather data.
X1
X2
X3
X1
X2
X3
A2
R101'HVAC
R102'HVAC
Room
Members:
__
Room
Members:
R101'HVAC
R102'HVAC
R101
R102
R201
R202
A1
A1
A1
A1
A2
A2
A2
A2
Group objects
System controller 2
Room objects
System controller 1
Figure 250: Multi-room groups
Group types
Siemens
The following group types are available:
HVAC functions:
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Room Automation
Desigo RXC
●
Changeover: Transmission of the changeover signal (LTHW or CHW in pipe
work)
● Setpoints: Basic setpoint correction and setpoint adjustments
● Emergency: Override of supply/extract air dampers in the event of fire/smoke
● Outdoor temperature: Distribution of outside air temperature
Electrical functions:
● Lighting: Transfer of lighting control and forced control of lighting
● Blind: Transfer of blind control and forced control of blinds
Time schedules:
● Building use: Transfer of values for the building use time schedule
● Room occupancy: Transmission of values for the room occupancy time
schedule
18.2.7
System Functions
System functions are higher-level functions which are typically applied to groups.
They are thus stored upstream of the groups and connected to them as part of the
data flow. System functions are implemented in the form of compounds and are
part of the compound library.
System functions
Group objects
Room objects
Floor
"Program" = System function
Cmd
R101'LightA
R102'LightB
Members:
X1
X2
X3
Members:
R101'HVAC
R102'HVAC
Emergency
Cmd
R101'LightA
R102'LightB
Members:
R101'HVAC
R102'HVAC
Members:
Figure 251: System functions
The following system functions are available:
● Summer/winter compensation: Adjusts the setpoints as a function of the
outdoor temperature. For example, the heating setpoint is raised in winter as
the outdoor temperature falls.
● Changeover: Is used when both heating and cooling are required in a room, but
only one water pipe is installed. The changeover information is mapped in the
LonWorks system controller and transmitted to the RXC controllers via the
groups. These switch between heating and cooling accordingly.
● Emergency override: Is used in emergencies (for example, fire) to force a
specific and immediate reaction from the ventilation system in the individual
room. Possible reactions are: Close damper, generate positive or negative
pressure, etc.
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Room Automation
Desigo RXB
18
18.3 Desigo RXB
The Desigo RXB room automation system controls and monitors comfort
conditions in individual rooms. It supplies predefined solutions for HVAC.
See RXB Room automation system - system overview (CM110380).
The range consists of controllers, operator units and predefined applications. The
applications are configured and downloaded with the ETS Professional
commissioning and service tool.
See Working with ETS (CM1Y9779).
RXB topology
The Desigo RXB room automation system is based on KNX/EIB technology. To
integrate Desigo RXB into the automation level, the RXB data is mapped to
BACnet.
Desigo
management station
PXM20
PXC50/100/
200...D
TX-I/O
PX KNX
system controller
10664 Z26en21_ RXB_06
BACnet
TX-I/O
Desigo RXB
Synco 700
Figure 252: RXB topology
Group address / Binding
A group address / binding is a connection of network variables of the same type
between different nodes. The group addresses / bindings are generated using ETS
(EIB tool software) when designing the KNX/EIB network. The bound network
variables communicate when changing the value and using a heartbeat.
Transmission and reception times are also monitored, allowing you to react to
communications errors.
Discipline I/Os
Discipline I/Os are function blocks in the PX KNX system controller, which gather
data from the RXB controller and make it available on the BACnet network.
Discipline I/Os are available for HVAC functions.
Konnex Association
The Konnex Association is an association founded by the manufacturers of
KNX/EIB products, to define interoperability guidelines for KNX/EIB systems. The
association is responsible for checking compliance and for the certification of
KNX/EIB products.
KNX/EIB nodes
A KNX/EIB node is a device which is connected to the KNX/EIB bus and
communicates with other KNX/EIB nodes.
Siemens
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Desigo RXB
Network variables (NV)
Network variables (NV) allow the exchange of data between different KNX/EIB
nodes. Network variables may be input or output variables.
Room-based groups
The discipline I/Os representing the RXB controllers in a room are combined in the
PX KNX system controller into a room-based group. The result is a room view.
Cross-room groupings
Cross-room groupings contain all the control variables common to a given user
grouping (for example, north facade, tenant A, west zone, etc.) and distribute these
control variables to the associated room or group members.
Supergenies
Supergenies are predefined graphics from the graphics library in the Desigo Insight
management station. For each RXB application there is a supergenie containing
the main data points.
PX KNX system controller
The PX KNX system controller comprises a PXC001(-E).D controller and loaded
PX KNX firmware. Communication takes place via BACnet/LonTalk (PXC001.D) or
BACnet/IP (PXC001-E.D). With the system controller, you can integrate the Synco
RMU710, RMU720, RMU730 and RMH760 controllers into Desigo.
PX KNX Tool
The PX KNX tool is used to configure the PX KNX system controller on the KNX
side.
18.3.1
Product Range Overview
Desigo RXB is an innovative range of controllers and room units. Data
communication is based on KNX/EIB technology.
Desigo RXB hardware
The range comprises compact controllers, easy-to-operate room units and
controllers in room-style housings. The input and output configurations of the
controllers, and the housing style are fully optimized to suit their field of application.
The HVAC functions are operated with standard room units or controllers in a
room-style housing.
Desigo RXB software
Each controller is loaded with a selection of application software which contains the
control program for the associated room or area within a room.
The ETS commissioning and service tool is used for the engineering and
commissioning of a network incorporating the Desigo RXB range. This tool also
supports the creation of communication bindings between KNX/EIB-compatible
devices (Desigo RXB or third-party devices).
Example: Fan coil system
T
T
T
KNX/EIB
Controller
Figure 253: Example: Fan coil system
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Room Automation
Desigo RXB
18
Application
Name
Controller
FNC02
Two-pipe system with changeover
RXB21.1/FC-10
FNC04
Four-pipe system
RXB39.1/FC-13
FNC08
Four-pipe system with room supply air cascade control
FNC20
Four-pipe system with damper control
FNC03
Two-pipe system with changeover and electric reheater
RXB22.1/FC-12
FNC05
Four-pipe system with electric reheater
RXB39.1/FC13
FNC10
Two-pipe system with changeover and outside air
RXB21.1/FC-11
FNC12
Four-pipe system with outside air
FNC18
Two-pipe system with changeover and radiator
Table 102: Applications for RXB controllers
Common functions:
● Window contact, occupancy sensor, four operating modes
● Manual fan control with room unit
● Automatic fan control (three speeds)
● Options with two-pipe systems: Heating only, cooling or changeover via
KNX/EIB bus
18.3.2
RXB and the Management Level
The integration of Desigo RXB into the management level is analogous to the
integration of Desigo RXC into the management level.
18.3.3
RXB and the Automation Level
Desigo RXB is integrated into the automation level with the PX KNX system
controller, which carries out the same tasks as the LonWorks system controller for
Desigo RXC.
18.3.4
RXB Applications
The existing Desigo RXB applications are identical to the RXC applications of the
same name. They cannot, however, be modified for a specific project by the user.
These applications are preprogrammed by groups in the controller and are
selected and parameterized using the ETS Professional commissioning and
service tool.
Applications of the same type are grouped into application groups. The technical
manual contains the complete range of RXB applications.
See RXB (KNX) Technical manual (CM110389).
RXB application library
The RXB application library contains application groups, each of which contains
applications of the same type. The RXB application library has a version number
which is defined in the RXB Valid Version Set. This Valid Version Set also defines
the version of each individual RXB application.
Application groups
Similar application types are grouped into application groups. These differ from
each other in terms of how the functions are implemented. Thus chilled ceiling with
radiator (CLC02) and chilled ceiling and electric radiator (CLC03) are two different
applications within the CLC group. The first of these two applications uses water
for heating, while the second uses electrical energy. The difference between
applications in the other groups follows a similar pattern.
The following application groups are available for RXB:
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●
●
●
CLC Chilled ceiling applications (not for Synco)
FNC Fancoil applications
VAV Variable air volume applications (not for Synco)
Individual applications
The individual application is designed analogous to RXC for typical HVAC systems
as commonly used in practice in individual rooms.
Configuring applications
Each application has a defined number of configuration parameters with which the
application can be programmed for a specific project. These parameters consist
both of general values (for example, temperature setpoints, etc.) and of specific
values for the application concerned (for example, changeover configuration,
electric reheater, etc.).
18.3.5
Mapping RXB in the PX KNX System Controller
The RXB system is mapped to the PX KNX system controller with objects
analogous to RXC. These objects are called discipline I/Os and are components of
the block library.
See PX KNX, RXB integration – S-Mode (CM1Y9775).
The following types are available for RXB:
● HVAC: Comprises all the HVAC information
● Shared: Contains shared data points (for example, time schedules, occupancy
status, etc.)
18.4 Desigo RXL
The Desigo RXL room automation system controls and monitors comfort conditions
in individual rooms. It supplies predefined solutions for HVAC.
The range consists of controllers, operator units and predefined applications, which
are configured with the HandyTool QAX34.3 or the ACS.
See RXL Room automation system – system overview (CM110780).
RXL topology
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Siemens
The Desigo RXL room automation system is based on proprietary technology. To
integrate Desigo RXL into the automation level, the RXL data is mapped to BACnet.
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Room Automation
Desigo RXL
18
Desigo
management station
PXM20
PXC50/100/
200...D
TX-I/O
PX KNX
syste m controlle r
10 664 Z26en 21_ RXL_06
BACnet
TX-I/O
Desigo RXL
Synco 700
Figure 254: RXL topology
Individual addressing
Individual Addressing is engineering the field level using the HandyTool (QAX34.3)
or ACS.
Discipline I/Os
Discipline I/Os are function blocks in the PX KNX system controller that gather data
from the RXL controller and make it available on the BACnet network. Discipline
I/Os are available for HVAC functions.
Room-based groups
The discipline I/Os representing the RXL controllers in a room are combined in the
PX KNX system controller into a room-based group. The result is a room view.
Cross-room groupings
Cross-room groupings contain all the control variables common to a given user
grouping (for example, North facade, Tenant A, West zone, etc.) and distribute
these control variables to the associated room or group members.
RXB/RXL addressing tool
The RXB/RXL Addressing Tool is a Microsoft Excel workbook with macros for
defining the addresses and parameters for the controllers.
See PX KNX, RXB/RXL integration - individual addressing (CM1Y9776).
Supergenies
Supergenies are predefined graphics from the graphics library in the Desigo Insight
management station. For each RXL application there is a supergenie containing
the main data points.
PX KNX system controller
Desigo RXL uses the PX KNX system controller for integration into Desigo. The
hardware for this system controller consists of the PXC001(-E).D controller and the
loaded PX KNX firmware. Communication takes place via BACnet/LonTalk
(PXC001.D) or BACnet/IP (PXC001-E.D). With the system controller you can also
integrate the Synco RMU710, RMU720, RMU730 and RMH760 controllers into
Desigo.
HandyTool
The QAX34.3 room unit incorporates the HandyTool feature for setting the RXL
controller parameters.
ACS Service
ACS is the ACS tool for Synco.
Siemens
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Room Automation
Desigo RXL
18.4.1
Product Range Overview
Desigo RXL is an innovative and inexpensive range of controllers and room units.
Desigo RXL hardware
The range comprises compact controllers, easy-to-operate room units and
controllers in room-style housings. The input and output configurations of the
controllers, and the housing style are fully optimized to suit their field of application.
The HVAC functions are operated with standard room units or controllers in a
room-style housing.
Desigo RXL software
Each controller is loaded with a selection of application software which contains the
control program for the associated room or area within a room. The RXL controllers
are commissioned with the QAX34.3 commissioning and service tool or with ACS.
Example: Fan coil system
T
T
T
KNX/EIB
Controller
Figure 255: Example: Fan coil system
Application
Name
Controller
FNC02
Two-pipe system with changeover
RXL21.1/FC-10
FNC04
Four-pipe system
RXL39.1/FC-13
FNC08
Four-pipe system with room supply air cascade control
FNC20
Four-pipe system with damper control
FNC03
Two-pipe system with changeover and electric reheater
RXL22.1/FC-12
FNC05
Four-pipe system with electric reheater
RXL39.1/FC13
FNC10
Two-pipe system with changeover and outside air
RXL21.1/FC-11
FNC12
Four-pipe system with outside air
FNC18
Two-pipe system with changeover and radiator
Table 103: Applications for RXL controllers
Common functions:
● Window contact, occupancy sensor, four operating modes
● Manual fan control with room unit
● Automatic fan control (three speeds)
● Options with two-pipe systems: Heating only, cooling or changeover via
KNX/EIB bus
18.4.2
RXL and the Management Level
The integration of Desigo RXL into the management level is analogous to the
integration of Desigo RXC into the management level.
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18.4.3
18
RXL and the Automation Level
Desigo RXL is integrated into the automation level with the PX KNX system
controller, which carries out the same tasks as the LonWorks system controller for
Desigo RXC.
18.4.4
RXL Applications
The existing Desigo RXL applications are identical to the RXC applications of the
same name. They cannot, however, be modified for a specific project by the user.
These applications are preprogrammed by groups in the controller and are
selected and parameterized using the QAX34.3 or ACS commissioning and service
tool.
Applications of the same type are grouped into application groups. The technical
manual contains the complete range of RXL applications.
See RXL Technical manual (CM110789).
RXL application library
The RXL application library contains application groups, each of which contains
applications of the same type. The RXL application library has a version number
which is defined in the RXL Valid Version Set. This Valid Version Set also defines
the version of each individual RXL application.
Application groups
Similar application types are grouped into application groups. These differ from
each other in terms of how the functions are implemented. Thus, chilled ceiling with
radiator (CLC02) and chilled ceiling and electric radiator (CLC03) are two different
applications within the CLC group. The first of these two applications uses water
for heating, while the second uses electrical energy. The difference between
applications in the other groups follows a similar pattern.
The following application groups are available for RXL:
● CLC: Chilled ceiling applications
● FNC: Fan coil applications
● VAV: Variable air volume applications
Individual applications
The individual application is designed analogous to RXC for typical HVAC systems
as commonly used in practice in individual rooms.
Configuring applications
Each application has a defined number of configuration parameters with which the
application can be programmed for a specific project. These parameters consist
both of general values (for example, temperature setpoints, etc.) and of specific
values for the application concerned (for example, changeover configuration,
electric reheater, etc.).
18.4.5
Mapping RXL in the PX KNX System Controller
The RXL system is mapped to the PX KNX system controller with objects
analogous to RXC. These objects are called discipline I/Os and are components of
the block library.
See Desigo TRA: QMX3... Engineering and commissioning guide (CM111044).
The following types are available for RXL:
● HVAC: Comprises all the HVAC information
● Shared: Contains shared data points (for example, time schedules, occupancy
status, etc.)
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Desigo Open
19
Desigo RXL
19 Desigo Open
Desigo Open lets you integrate devices and systems from different manufacturers
into the Desigo system. Integration with Desigo Open offers:
● Standardized automated functions, operating and monitoring of the entire
building
● Single-station operation, common view and display. Simplified multidisciplinary
operation, common reporting and common alarm management.
● Peer-to-peer interaction, communication on the automation level, automated
interactions and data exchange
● Comfort combined with lower energy consumption. New opportunities to save
energy with systems that communicate among themselves. Improved
performance, efficiency evaluation, flexibility and ability to modify system
operation and configuration without re-cabling or new hardware.
● Engineering of integrated solutions in Xworks Plus (XWP)
● Reduced risk thanks to standard solutions. Clear functions that cover the most
important standard protocols.
Topology
Third-party devices and systems can be integrated with Desigo on all levels.
Desigo
management station
Management level
BACnet
Third-party system
Third-party
system
10660Z04en_07
BACnet/LonTalk or BACnet/IP
Automation level
Router
L ONWORKS
System controller
PXC50/100/200..D
TX-I/O
Modular
Modules
SX Open
TX Open
PX KNX
PXC...D
System controller
PXC001..D
Compact
PX Open
PXC001..D
RS232
RS485
Adapter
LONWORKS
Field and
room level
QAX9..
EnOcean
RXZ97.1/KNX
Room units
Third-party
system
LONWORKS
RXC
Room
controller
Third-party
system
Modbus
M-bus
Peer-to-peer communication via BACnet
OPC
Third-party system
Third-party system
several protocols
Figure 256: Topology
Which protocols does
Desigo support?
Desigo Open System
Protocol
Management station
SCADA, etc.
SX Open
OPC to BACnet
PX Open
Modbus, KNX/EIB, LonWorks, M-Bus, SCL, etc.
TX Open
Modbus, M-Bus, GENIbus, etc.
Room level (Desigo Room Automation and DALI, KNX, EnOcean, LonWorks
RX)
Table 104: Supported protocols
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Integration on Management Level
Which plant sections can
be integrated into Desigo
on which level?
Desigo Open system
Desigo Open application
Data points
Desigo management station
CC, Insight Open, SX Open
1,000 - 10,000
19
Energy monitoring, fire security,
access control and security
Desigo PX
SX Open, PX Open
50 - 2,000
Power distribution, refrigeration
machines
Desigo TX-I/0
TX Open
Max. 160
Pumps, variable speed drives,
meters, etc.
Desigo Desigo Room
Automation / RX
PXC3
16 DALI groups
Lighting and blinds
Table 105: Integration of plant sections
Desigo Insight is the current management station, Desigo CC is the new
management station.
SDKs
If a solution is not supported by HQ and RCs need a specific solution, HQ offers
Software Development Kits (SDKs) for experts. The regional companies can
develop their own solutions using Software Development Kits (SDKs).
The following SDKs are available:
● PX Open platform SDK
● TX Open platform SDK
19.1 Integration on Management Level
The integration of third-party devices and systems on the management level is
appropriate:
● For monitoring and operating plants that are not time-critical
● When process communication with other automation stations is not needed
19.1.1
Desigo Insight
The Desigo Insight Open OPC platform allows the exchange of information
between the Desigo management level and third-party systems and devices. OPC
is a standard way of connecting software using Microsoft DCOM (Distributed
Component Object Model) technology.
The Desigo Insight Open OPC platform supports the Data Access Custom
Interface V1.0a and V2.03 OPC service.
See OPC Platform data sheet (CA1N9751).
Citect drivers
The third party integration into Desigo Insight is based on Citect drivers.
Networking with OPC
There are two ways of networking using OPC:
● For systems with several management stations: One management station can
have both the OPC server and the OPC client. The other management stations
receive the data via the Desigo Insight I/O server.
● For systems with one management station: If the OPC server and OPC client
cannot be on the same management station, you can use one PC with the
OPC server and another PC with Desigo Insight and the OPC client. They will
communicate via Ethernet using Microsoft DCOM.
OPC Import Tool
The OPC import tool:
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Desigo Open
Integration on Management Level
●
●
Facilitates the import of OPC data into Desigo Insight
Allows the visualization of third-party automation systems by using the OPC
technology
● Automates the process of creating Citect databases and setting-up the Citect
communication forms
The Citect data is then imported into the Desigo Insight database to allow
seamless integration with the third party automation system.
See OPC Import Tool User's Guide (CA1Y9751).
EIB client
The Insight Open EIB client is a standard integration solution for the
communication and exchange of information between Desigo Insight and an EIB
network, based on the OPC standard.
See EIB client data sheet (CA1N9752).
BACnet client
The Insight Open BACnet client is a standard integration solution for the
communication and exchange of information between Desigo Insight and a BACnet
network. OPC forms the basis of the solution.
See BACnet client data sheet (CA1N9753).
LON client
The Insight Open LON client is a standard integration solution for the
communication and exchange of information between Desigo Insight and a
LonWorks network. OPC forms the basis of the solution.
See LON client data sheet (CA1N9754).
Simatic S7
The Insight Open Simatic S7 solution is a standard integration solution for the
communication and exchange of information between the Simatic S7 PLC and
Desigo Insight. OPC forms the basis of the solution.
See Simatic S7 data sheet (CA1N9756).
19.1.2
Desigo CC
BACnet
BACnet is a widely used communication protocol for building automation and
control networks. It defines a number of objects, services and data link layers. It is
an essential part of Desigo CC's openness for integrating any third-party devices,
using the BACnet/IP protocol. An online auto-discovery and alternatively an offline
EDE import are available for integrating third-party devices.
See BACnet 3rd party Integration Guide (A6V10446271).
BTL
Desigo CC is compliant with BACnet revision V1.13 of the latest BACnet Standard
135-2012. The compliance and interoperability has been tested. For more
information, see (http://www.bacnetinternational.net/btl).
Modbus-TCP
A native Modbus-TCP driver lets you integrate a Modbus TCP server and
subsequent Modbus RTU devices via a protocol converter. An offline importer
supports the engineering workflow for integrating Modbus data points.
See Modbus Integration Guide (A6V10438039).
OPC
OLE for Process Control (OPC) is a communication standard for exchanging data
between windows based software applications and process control hardware
without any proprietary restrictions. It is a client/server technology, where one
application acts as the server providing data, and another acts as a client using
data. The most common specification Data Access (DA) defines a set of objects,
interfaces and method to facilitate the interoperability. OPC has been extended to
become a cross-platform communication standard, named OPC Unified
Architecture (OPC UA).
For more information about OPC, see the documentation by the OPC Foundation
(www.opcfoundation.org) and the OPC Training Institute (www.opcti.com).
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Integration on Management Level
19
OPC DA client
An OPC client interface lets you integrate any OPC server, using the Data Access
specification. An offline Importer supports the engineering workflow to integrate
OPC items.
See OPC Server Integration Guide (A6V10415483).
OPC DA server
An OPC server option provides a freely configurable set of data points for
integration in any enterprise system, using the OPC DA standard. Each data point
(object) is represented by several OPC items, providing the relevant readable and
writable object property information.
See OPC DA Server Manual (A6V10415485).
The Desigo CC OPC server is officially tested and certified by the OPC foundation
(https://opcfoundation.org/products/view/251).
OPC UA server
OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) clients can connect to the Desigo CC OPC DA
server using the OPC DA/UA wrapper, provided with the Desigo CC setup. The UA
wrapper meets the security model of mutual authentication for a trusted connection
between the OPC UA server and the OPC UA client.
See OPC DA Server Manual (A6V10415485).
Simatic S7
A native S7 Ethernet driver lets you integrate S7-300 and S7-400 or S7-400H PLC.
You can use the CP for Ethernet or the built-in PNIO interface on the S7 hardware.
An offline importer supports the engineering workflow for integrating S7 data points.
See Simatic S7 Integration Guide (A6V1042787).
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a data communication protocol
for monitoring devices and applications on a network. It is an Ethernet based
protocol for retrieving management data from networked devices, and exposing
this data as properties.
SNMP gives you the capability to monitor a device, for example, a printer or UPS,
which is not directly configured on a computer, but can be reached through a
network link.
Device monitoring capabilities are provided by device manufacturers via a
Management Information Base (MIB) text file, which describes the structure of the
device management data. MIB files use a hierarchical namespace containing
object identifiers (OID). Each OID identifies a property that can be read or written
via SNMP.
Desigo CC has an SNMP Manager feature for reading and writing information from
SNMP agents.
See SNMP Application Guide (A6V10455382).
Web services
Using RESTful technology, Desigo CC provides alarm, object and time series data
via web based services for supervising management stations or other third-party
external applications.
19.1.3
SX Open
SX Open is a configurable third-party system - BACnet/IP gateway. It allows the
data exchange between third-party systems and the Desigo system in an IP
network. That means, Desigo automation stations (peer-to-peer communication) or
a BACnet management station. Multiple BACnet servers can be defined in the
gateway and third-party data points can be mapped to standard BACnet objects.
The mapping supports functional and signal mapping. Alarms, trends and
schedules can be defined in the BACnet server. With SX Open you can integrate
any number of data points. There are two application types.
SX API
Siemens
SX API is the basic software with an Application Programming Interface (API). With
the API you can independently develop other applications using Microsoft® Visual
Studio, if necessary. This lets you integrate other third-party systems, protocols,
and drivers.
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SX OPC
The predefined SX OPC application contains an OPC DA client that can connect to
respective OPC servers of the third-party system and map their domain to the
respective BACnet objects and properties.
Engineering
Engineering is carried out with the SX Configurator (a predefined Excel sheet) in
which the allocation of OPC objects and BACnet objects can be configured line by
line. You can also enable additional functions, such as alarm, scheduler, trend and
individual mapping functions.
See SX OPC SX Configurator User's Guide (CM110702) and SX Open
Engineering Guideline (CM110700).
Licensing
SX Open is available for both application types in four different license models,
graded according to the number of BACnet I/O and value objects.
● Tiny for up to 200 BACnet objects
● Light for up to 2,000 BACnet objects
● Regular for up to 5,000 BACnet objects
● Full for up to 20,000 BACnet objects
The license is linked with the hardware in use (the physical MAC address). A
registry key is generated with the license. The licenses can be ordered and
downloaded via CGU Web.
All third-party software is available directly from the appropriate producer as
described in the application guide. The number of configured BACnet objects are
relevant for licensing.
Installation
SX OPC operates under Microsoft Windows. The SX OPC setup file including the
function block library and the SX OPC documentation can be downloaded from the
intranet.
See SX Open data sheet (CM1N9745).
19.2 Integration on Automation Level
The integration of third-party devices and systems on the automation level is
appropriate when:
● Cross-communication to other PX or BACnet devices is needed
● System functions (for example, alarms, trends, schedulers) are needed
The PX Open Platform comprises:
● PXC001.D system controller for the integration of KNX, Modbus, M-Bus and
SCL via BACnet/LonTalk
● PXC001-E.D system controller for the integration of KNX, Modbus, M-Bus and
SCL via BACnet/IP
● PXA40-RS1 and PXA40-RS2 option modules for additional data points
The automation stations have interfaces to RS232, RS485 and KNX.
Xworks Plus (XWP) is used to engineer all solutions. Various compounds and
blocks are available.
PXC001..D supports the firmware versions V4.1, V5.0, V5.1 and V6.0.
The following solutions on the PX Open platform are available:
● PX KNX
● PX Modbus
● PX M-Bus
● PX SCL
● PX RS-Bus
● PX Pronto
● PX Open Plattform (SDK)
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Data points
PXC001.D
PXC001-E.D
PXA40-RS1
PXA40-RS2
PX KNX
2,000
2,000
N/A
N/A
PX Modbus
250
250
800
2,000
PX M-Bus
250
250
800
2,000
PX SCL
250
250
800
1,000
PX RS-Bus
2,000
2,000
N/A
N/A
PX Pronto
2,000
2,000
N/A
N/A
19
Table 106: Data points
The platform for integrating LonWorks compatible third-party devices consists of:
● System controller PXC00.D and automation station PXC50.D, PXC100.D or
PXC200.D for integrating LonWorks devices via BACnet/LonTalk
● System controller PXC00-E.D and automation station PXC50-E.D, PXC100E.D or PXC200-E.D for integrating LonWorks devices via BACnet/IP
● PXX-L11 and PXX-L12 expansion modules for 60 and 120 LonWorks devices
PXC00..D with PXX-L11/L12 supports the firmware versions V4.1, V5.0, V5.1 and
V6.0.
PXC50..D, PXC100..D and PXC200..D with PXX-L11/L12 support the firmware
versions V5.0, V5.1 and V6.0. For information about the system limits, see chapter
System Configuration.
PX KNX
PX KNX connects KNX networks with Desigo and maps the group addresses to
BACnet datapoints. PX KNX can handle the following main tasks:
● Data compression on the automation level (group functions)
● Time control
● Alarming, device monitoring
● Trend storage
● Mapping the Desigo RXB and RXL applications to BACnet for operating and
monitoring
PX KNX supports the integration of:
● KNX S mode third-party devices
● RDF, RDG and RDU room thermostats
● RXB and RXL room automation stations
The PXC001.D system controller can integrate KNX via BACnet/LonTalk. The
PXC001-E.D system controller can integrate KNX via BACnet/IP. PX KNX is
preinstalled on PXC001..D controllers.
PX Modbus
PX Modbus connects Modbus devices or networks supporting the Modbus protocol
to the Desigo system and maps their data points to BACnet data points. PX
Modbus is particularly suitable for integrating industrial controls or chillers and
linking them to the automation process.
The PXC001.D system controller can integrate Modbus via BACnet/LonTalk. The
PXC001-E.D system controller can integrate Modbus via BACnet/IP. The PXA40RS1 and PXA40-RS2 option modules support additional data points.
See PX Modbus (CA2N9772).
PX M-Bus
PX M-Bus connects the M-Bus consumption meters to the Desigo system and
maps meter readings and device-related meter information to BACnet data points.
PX M-Bus handles the following main activities:
● Measurement of consumption data and remote monitoring of max. 250
consumption and heat meters
● Compression of data from consumption and heat meters at the automation
level
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● Alarm handling, device monitoring
● Trend storage to record meter readings
The PXC001.D system controller can integrate M-Bus via BACnet/LonTalk. The
PXC001-E.D system controller can integrate M-Bus via BACnet/IP. The PXA40RS1 and PXA40-RS2 option modules support additional data points.
See PX M-Bus (CM2N9774).
PX SCL
PX SCL lets you quickly develop simple protocol solutions. The script control
language from XWP is used with an interpretable environment and lets engineers
create a solution. The solution cannot be used for complex protocols and solutions.
It is used to develop other applications, such as local serial printer driver and pager
applications.
The PXC001.D system controller can integrate SCL via BACnet/LonTalk. The
PXC001-E.D system controller can integrate SCL via BACnet/IP. The PXA40-RS1
and PXA40-RS2 option modules support additional data points.
The regional companies develop the necessary protocols themselves.
The hotel management system Fidelio can be integrated into Desigo via PX SCL.
See PX SCL (CA2N9773).
PX LON
PX LON connects LonWorks networks to Desigo and maps Standard Network
Variables (SNVT) to BACnet data points. The main functions of PX LON are:
● Compression of Desigo RXC room automation stations and third-party data
● Mapping Desigo RXC applications to BACnet for operation and monitoring
(grouped as HVAC, lighting and blind control functions)
● Higher-level control and optimization functions, such as room and zone-based
groups, time control, and system functions, such as changeover,
summer/winter compensation, etc.
● Alarm handling, device monitoring
● Trend storage
PX LON maps RXC applications in such a way as to produce a room view. This
enables the rooms to be grouped together, for example, for shared occupancy
programs, or for shared commands for the control of lighting or blinds.
The PXC00.D system controller and the PXC50.D, PXC100.D and PXC200D
automation stations can integrate LonWorks devices via BACnet/LonTalk. The
PXC00-E.D system controller and the PXC50-E.D, PXC100-E.D and PXC200-E.D
automation stations can integrate LonWorks devices via BACnet/IP. With the PXXL11 and PXX-L12 expansion modules you can connect 60 and 120 devices.
PX Open Platform SDK
HQ provides the PX Open Platform Software Development Kit (SDK) for experts in
the regional companies.
19.3 Integration on Field Level
The integration of third-party devices and systems on the field level is appropriate:
● For communicative pumps, meters, etc.
● For small numbers of data points (10 to 100/160 data points)
TX Open is suitable for the integration of a few data points (from 10 to 160 data
points). These data points can be processed further in the automation system or
used for visualization in the management station.
● The current TX Open module TXI1.OPEN supports up to 100 data points and
has an RS232/RS485 interface.
● The new TX Open module TXI2.OPEN supports up to 160 data points and has
in addition an ethernet connection for remote access, diagnosis and remote
engineering.
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Bus/USS/GENIbus master. The values of the Modbus/M-Bus/GENIbus/G120P
data points and the status of the existing data connection with the data points are
transmitted to the automation station via the island bus and mapped to BACnet
objects in the automation station. This way, the Modbus/M-Bus/GENIbus/G120P
data points can be made available to all the devices and applications in the Desigo
system.
The PXC50..D, PXC100..D and PXC200..D automation stations support TX Open.
You can attach up to five TX Open modules to one PXC automation station.
Xworks Plus (XWP) is used to engineer all solutions. Various compounds are
available, for example, for pumps, variable speed drives and heat meters.
Predefined solutions allow for simple commissioning. Solutions for Grundfos, Wilo,
Danfoss and G120P are delivered as part of the HQ CAS Library. For M-bus and
Modbus, sample solutions serving as device description templates are provided
(TX Open templates).
The following solutions on the TX Open platform are available:
● TX Modbus
● TX M-Bus
● TX G120P/SED2
● TX Grundfos via GENIbus
● TX Open platform (SDK)
TX Modbus
TX Modbus supports Modbus RTU, Wilo pumps and variable speed drives.
TXI2.OPEN supports 160 data points. They may be distributed in any fashion to
the devices for the Modbus system. The number of devices is only limited by the
160 data points.
See TX Modbus Engineering Guide (CM110571).
TX M-Bus
TX M-Bus supports templates for meters. The regional companies can create
templates. You need a level converter for TX M-Bus. TXI2.OPEN supports 160
data points. They may be distributed in any fashion to the devices for the M-bus
system. The number of devices is only limited by the 160 data points.
See TX M-Bus Engineering Guide (CM110572).
TX G120P
TX G120P supports the integration via the Modbus and USS protocol. You can
integrate up to eight G120P variable speed drives per TX Open module into the
Desigo system.
See TX G120P Engineering Guide (CM110576).
TX SED2
TX SED2 supports the integration via the USS protocol. You can integrate up to
eight SED2 variable speed drives per TX Open module into the Desigo system.
You can add new G120P variable speed drives to an existing TX Open (USS) with
already installed SED2 drives, for example, when:
● A defective SED2 needs to be replaced with a G120P in an existing project
● An existing project with installed SED2 drives needs to be extended with a new
G120P
See TX SED2 Engineering Guide (CM110573).
TX Grundfos via GENIbus
TX Grundfos supports the integration of Grundfos via GENIbus. You can integrate
up to eight Grundfos pumps into the Desigo system.
See TX Grundfos / GENIbus Engineering Guide (CM110574).
TX Open Platform (SDK)
HQ provides the TX Open Platform Software Development Kit (SDK), including
training, for experts in the regional companies. The training course provides the
necessary tools and knowledge to create new protocol applications.
19.4 Integration on Room Level
See chapter Network Architecture.
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Solutions for Critical Environments
Desigo Insight Pharma Solution (DIPS)
20 Solutions for Critical Environments
Desigo Insight Pharma solution (DIPS) is a key component of the Siemens
Compliance Solution and provides support for secure lifecycle management of the
most important electronic data sets. Together with the InfoCenter Suite, DIPS
provides a comprehensive solution for managing electronic data sets while
simultaneously maintaining the highest level of compliance requirements.
DIPS offers additional functionality for data security and tracing required of Desigo
Insight to meet FDA regulation 21 CFR Part 11.
InfoCenter Suite is an instrument to archive, administer and log business-critical
data for compliance reports. InfoCenter Suite was specially developed for critical
installations with high amounts of data, offline storage requirements and special
client access requirements. The functions are primarily designed for the security
and management of valuable information and compliance with compliance
regulations.
20.1 Desigo Insight Pharma Solution (DIPS)
The Desigo Insight Pharma Solution (DIPS) is an integral part of Desigo Insight.
Database audit trail for
GxP critical data
The audit trail functionality monitors and logs any insertion, update or deletion of
GxP critical data in Desigo Insight as well as data, stored in the audit trail, trend or
system activity log databases.
See Desigo Insight - Audit trail for critical environments (CM110796).
Actions triggered by Desigo Insight applications are logged in a system activity log
and do not impair audit trail performance. Attempts to manipulate data of actions
triggered by external clients are logged by the audit trail.
See Desigo Insight - Operating the management station (CM110588).
Database Audit Viewer
The database audit view allows user to display, search and filter the online audit
trail. The application is used to generate audit reports that can be printed as well.
Layout and report contents encompass the same data and structures as the
viewer's operator interface.
The user can use the view to display database audit trail information from the
online database as well as archived audit trail data (for example, XML archive file
produced by a previously existed Pharma solution). The results of the MD5
checksum verification are issued and integrated in the report when displaying the
archived data.
Standard report templates are available allowing the user to created ad hoc of
planned reports - based on the audit trail of system activity (log) data in PDF format,
for example. Reports may also be generated from the archived data.
Expanded data backup of
all databases
Desigo Insight supports the system's ability to be restored. Hourly backups of all
database transaction logs and complete, daily database backups that significantly
reduce any potential data loses during a system failure.
The backup files are used to restore a system after a system failure. The
procedure for restoring is documented per industry requirements. So that the
system can be fully restored to the state prior to the system failure.
The expanded data backup functionality requires a Windows server operating
system. The function can be used for all Desigo Insight project types that meet
these requirements – no dependent on other DIPS functions.
Data archiving in XML
The aforementioned audit trail is archived automatically per customized settings for
archiving time and data storage period. The archived data is available as an option
in a readable from (XML). This open data format ensures that electronic data sets
is available during the entirety of the data storage period – often decades – by the
industry. The validity of the data can be verified via a MD5 checksum.
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For trending and system activities in Desigo Insight, the XML archiving methods
can be used as an option for open long-term alternative to the archiving as part of
Desigo Insight.
Mandatory comments for
user acts
The option Mandatory Comments is supported exclusively together with Desigo PX
(PXC...D).
For projects in a critical environment, the user must enter a comment (reason) for
each change made on the management station, before the change is executed.
Multiple comments are possible for the same actions (or log entry), and comments
can no longer be changed once they are entered.
Mandatory comments can be switched on or off via the System Configurator. The
function can be used for all Desigo Insight project types – not dependent on other
DIPS functions.
Technical principles
DIPS Insight protects the GxP-relevant data from unauthorized access at database
level. This ensures that GxP-relevant data cannot be altered after the fact.
However, should someone be able, for whatever reason, to access the data, any
changes made by that person are recorded in a separate audit trail.
Figure 257: Desigo Insight Pharma Solution (DIPS)
Each attempt to breakthrough database security, is registered and all changes
made are annotated in the audit trail database per FDA requirements.
Desigo Insight can always access the Audit, Log, Trend and System databases.
The audit trail database is an integral part of the Desigo Insight project and is thus
installed with the other databases on the same server.
If Desigo Insight is installed on the same server as InfoCenter, you need a second
SQL license, even if InfoCenter has its own SQL license.
The InfoCenter SQL license applies only for InfoCenter and cannot be used for
other software which also requires an SQL server.
User access to Database
Audit Viewer
Siemens
All information via the audit trail can be viewed using the database audit viewer.
Users authorized to start the view are set in the System Configurator as all other
Desigo Insight applications.
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Solutions for Critical Environments
InfoCenter Suite
Figure 258: Database Audit Viewer
You can use the viewer to create report on individual events.
20.2 InfoCenter Suite
The main functions of InfoCenter Suite are:
● Secure GxP data logging
● Management, archiving and queries
● Report generation and exception reports
● Supports digital signatures
InfoCenter can log and administer the following data from Desigo Insight:
● Trend data (offline trend)
● Alarm data
● System activities in the log database including user actions
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Figure 259: InfoCenter Report Manager
Software components
The InfoCenter Suite consists of the following software components:
● InfoCenter Server
● InfoCenter Administrator
● InfoCenter Report Manager
● InfoCenter web and spreadsheet clients
Server
The server serves as an interface between client applications and the Microsoft
SQL server database where the information is stored. The SQL server database
engine offers an open, flexible platform for all data storage requirements. Close
integration with the SQL server enables an integrated and trouble-free installation
procedure where five client software licenses for end users are available with
InfoCenter.
Administrator
InfoCenter Administrator is a client application for the management and
administration of information in the InfoCenter Server. Activities:
● Administer access to data in the InfoCenter
● Define data logging and program the time period
● Create derived points, including MKT and formula calculations
● Comment on and change data and management of the audit trail
● Administer archiving
● Administer and review audit trail and comments
Report Manager
The InfoCenter Report Manager represents the interface for queries to the
InfoCenter Server and generates reports based on configurable templates. Report
objects may include bars, columns, scatter and Venn diagrams and min/max lines,
fonts and sizes, colors and definitions for the axes. Reports with precise data/time
information and text fields can be created together with table objects. The statistic
table object calculates and derives critical data to quickly recognize performance
problems.
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InfoCenter Suite
Alarm analysis report generation serves to recognize problems for alarms and to
compile critical alarm data and statistics. Each point include the number of alarms,
their length each and the highest alarm stage. Statistics for each point include the
average alarm time, the longest alarm time and highest achieved alarm stage.
Reporting based on exception offers users only relevant information without
displaying all the data. Such exceptions can be encoded in red to immediately see
when a point exceeds or drops below the defined range. Altered or commented
data, or data with an unusual quality attribute are also recorded in report.
Access and security
The InfoCenter Server acts as the interface between the client applications and the
SQL server database. The InfoCenter Server administers all application-specific
Windows Services and the communication between the client applications and
Microsoft SQL server.
Integrated security protocols in the Windows Server combined with the functions
ensures the integrity of the information controlled by the InfoCenter Suite.
Integrated security means that the data in the InfoCenter database meets the audit
standards FDA 21 CFR Part 11 for electronic data sets and signatures.
A hierarchical tree of all data points allow users to search data based it user
requirements rather than being forced to work with a fixed technical system
structure. Access rights to point information via InfoCenter Report Manager, web
and spreadsheet clients are set in the InfoCenter Administrator. This ensures that
users see on the data required for their work.
Figure 260: InfoCenter Security Tree
Report templates and the generated reports can be released for joint use or access
can be limited by assigning them to certain users.
Digital signatures
Reports in the InfoCenter Suite can be generated in PDF format and stored
electronically. The Report Manager opens the appropriate program (for example,
Adobe Acrobat) when an electronic report is displayed as a PDF.
Add-ins in Adobe Acrobat support a digital signature of these reports, while
InfoCenter Suite takes care of report security and corresponding management. The
main signature functions in the Adobe Acrobat interface includes verification of
signature, tracing changes to reports and comparing report versions.
Audit trail
Expanded functions in the InfoCenter Administrator ensure detailed and secure
tracing of changes in data for audits.
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All previous changes are saved in the system so that auditors and end users can
view the revision history for a specific point at any time. Each entry or change
includes Windows account users, date, time and reason for the change.
Spreadsheet
Siemens
Microsoft Excel and InfoCenter Server together provide effective data analysis and
report options for the InfoCenter Suite. The InfoCenter spreadsheet is an add-on to
Microsoft Excel to dynamically query data in the InfoCenter directly from the Excel
interface.
See Infocenter Spreadsheet (149-198P25eu).
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Data Evaluation and Reporting (ADP/CC)
Advanced Data Processing (ADP)
21 Data Evaluation and Reporting (ADP/CC)
Energy management in the building is becoming more important. Furthermore, a
high degree of availability and optimum use of operational and process data takes
on an increasingly greater roll.
Advanced Data Processing (ADP) guarantees the complete processing and display
of all data stored long term in the PDM database and generates powerful reports in
any number of combinations and over adjustable time periods. The reports can be
displayed and printed in various forms.
Consumption Control (CC) lets you respond quickly to changes in prices or in
building use. In this process, CC takes account of seasonal or environmental
influences and creates meaningful reports, which can be used as a basis for
energy-saving measures.
21.1 Advanced Data Processing (ADP)
Advanced Data Processing (ADP) guarantees the complete processing and display
of all operational data.
See Advanced Data Processing (CM2B8705).
ADP can be used to analyze the optimization potential of a property. It supports
efficient and economic building operation. High availability and optimum use of
data for the building automation and control systems are of particular importance.
ADP generates powerful reports based on the data stored in the PDM database in
any combination over a selectable time period. The reports can then be displayed
and printed in various forms.
See Process Data Manager (CM2B8736).
Figure 261: A comparison of temperature characteristic curves
With the aforementioned properties, ADP has significantly expanded possibilities
vis-à-vis the report function in the Report Viewer, which is provided as a standard
feature with Desigo Insight.
Strengths of ADP
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The ADP program displays process data:
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Advanced Data Processing (ADP)
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Main functions
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21
ADP analyzes operational weaknesses and monitors and evaluates the
appropriate optimization measures. It allows energy efficient and transparent
building operation.
Visualization of process data using graphic images or tables or combination of
both forms. ADP offers an integrated worksheet program. You can export data
to Microsoft Excel.
The program offers documentation on compliance with required operating
states, emission laws and production conditions.
Long-term data evaluation: As part of documentation required under ISO9000,
you can query long-term archived operational data at any time and process it
as ADP reports.
The program offers report templates to efficiently generate ADP reports.
Simple calculation of consumption and costs.
Strong integration and high degree of consistency with Desigo Insight:
– Uniform database and licensing
– Consistent operation and display of ADP trend reports and in the Desigo
Insight Trend Viewer
– ADP reports can be queried by Desigo Insight Plant Viewer with a simple
click of the mouse.
As shown in the figure below, all building data required by ADP is available in the
PDM database. ADP lets you visualize the data individually or in any combination.
ADP has six main functions:
● Report definition:
– Comprehensive calculations for trend data
– Define data series where the data is compiled and displayed in reports for
comparison purposes.
– Define report display formats (lists, tables, Excel and trend).
– Define time trigger for a report.
● Report display:
– Reports can be displayed or printed manually or automatically at
predefined times.
– The time period, that is, the time and date range to be covered by a report
and the report start time can be freely selected.
● Simple and fast access:
– The reports can be run and printed using Internet Explorer in a Web display
format (Trend + Table).
– Simply click a desktop link to run the reports.
● Access via Web
● Support of contractibility (Scopes)
● Quickly restores archive data thanks to a data-series oriented archive
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Data Evaluation and Reporting (ADP/CC)
Budget Monitoring
Figure 262: All building data required by ADP is available in the PDM database
21.2 Budget Monitoring
Consumption Control (CC) supports building managers in monitoring the budget
and helps the manager reduce energy costs.
See Consumption Control (CM2B8716).
CC processes manually entered consumption data or data recorded by the building
automation and control system. CC quickly reacts to changes in prices or building
usage. CC takes into account seasonal or environmental influences and creates
powerful reports, which can be used as a basis for energy-saving measures.
Figure 263: CC shows consumption data
CC is an independent component of a fully integrated software package and meets
the requirements of modern facility managers. The entire service pack is called
Computer-Aided Facility Management Services (CAFMS).
An integrated facility management system includes the following components:
● Building operation, control and maintenance management
● Consumption monitoring
21.3 Linking with Desigo Insight
We assume that the subsystems were engineered and the data points imported to
Desigo Insight. Afterward, each subsystem regularly sends the trend log values to
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Desigo Insight. Each subsystem has its own mechanism that triggers or waits for
the transmission of data, until Desigo Insight requests the data.
In a next stage, the trend log profile (name of the trend logs) is imported to PDM.
The name of the ADP/CC data series is formed from it.
Finally, PDM must be set up to periodically read trend log values, for example,
PDM requests newly incoming trend log data on a daily basis. In this case, PDM
reads only data that is one-day old.
If ADP/CC is installed on a Desigo system later, there may already be archived
trend log values. The first time trend-log data is uploaded, PDM can read the
Desigo Insight archive even when it is located on separate files that are outside the
trend database.
Desigo Insight
ADP / CC
Trend DB
Archive DB
Regular reads
s
Fir
PDM DB
d
ea
er
m
i
tt
Archive Files
Figure 264: Linking with Desigo Insight
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Desigo S7 Automation Stations
Linking with Desigo Insight
22 Desigo S7 Automation Stations
Desigo S7 offers an expansion of the Desigo product portfolio with Simatic S7 for
applications requiring programmable logic controllers (PLC) at the automation level.
Desigo S7 uses the components spectrum for the Simatic S7-300, supplemented
by the BACnet communications processor CP 343-1 BACnet.
Desigo
Terminal Server
with high availability solution
RDT client
PXM20-E
Opartor unit
BACnet/IP
Ethernet
RS232
PXM10
PCX100/200-E.D
TX-I/0
Modular
modules
RS232
Operator unit
S
TOUCH
SIMATIC S7 300
CP343-1BACnet
TP177B
Automations station
Communication processor
Touch panel
PXM10
PXC...D
Operator unit
Compact
PROFIBUS DP / PROFINET/IP
Peripheral device system
ET200S
Figure 265: Desigo S7 topology
The most important features are:
● Usage of Simatic S7 components and tools (input and output components,
network adapters, Step7 Manager, CFC Tool) in one integrated Desigo System
● HVAC library with standardized and test blocks and applications
● Use of standard communication BACnet, Ethernet TCP/IP, PROFINET,
PROFIBUS DP, KNX, ASI, Modbus
● Decentralized periphery ET 200S for distributed plants, larger distances, use of
integrated motor starts and a high degree of accuracy
Desigo S7 is designed for S7-300 automation stations.
H/F systems from the Simatic family are not supported.
Desigo S7 supports BACnet/IP at 10/100 bps for connecting Desigo Insight or
other BACnet clients and for peer-to-peer data exchange with Desigo PX or other
BACnet servers. On the field level, PROFIBUS/IP and PROFINET are supported
directly. Other Simatic S7 stations are connected via Ethernet/IP or the PROFIBUS
S7 Protocol.
PXM20-E cannot be used for Desigo S7.
Market performance packages
Desigo S7 includes the market performance packages:
● Desigo S7 Building Solution
● Desigo S7 Building Integration
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Product Range Overview
22
Desigo S7 Building
Solution
The market performance package Desigo S7 Building Solution lets you expand a
Desigo system using Simatic S7. Desigo S7 Building Solution is a complete
solution for industrial building automation and control. It expands the Desigo
system using Simatic S7 components and tools. The package uses the Desigo S7
HVAC library which is modeled on the Desigo application library.
It includes the following expansions, in addition to the communications processor
CP 343-1 BACnet:
● Desigo S7 Library
● Desigo S7 Basis Tool
Desigo S7 Library
The Desigo S7 Library consists of an HVAC block library based on the proven
Desigo applications concept and functionality of the Desigo PX firmware library and
the HVAC compound library. The compound library includes preconfigured,
documented and tested applications as the basis for project-specific applications.
Desigo S7 Basis Tool
The Desigo Basis Tool is an engineering tool based on the CFC Standard Tool. It
provides consistent data and efficient engineering thanks to a common data basis
for automation software and BACnet configuration. The Desigo Basis Tool is fully
integrated into the Simatic tool environment. Software changes are possible during
operation (delta download).
Desigo S7 Building
Integration
The market performance package Desigo S7 Building Integration allows for
seamless integration of existing Simatic S7 automation stations into the Desigo
system via BACnet communication.
In addition to using existing Simatic S7 and tools together with the CP 343-1
BACnet communication processor, the market performance package also includes
the Desigo S7 Mapping Tool.
Desigo S7 Mapping Tool
The Desigo S7 Mapping Tool maps process data to BACnet objects and has
conversion functions for adapting the format.
Runtime protection
The licensing model from SICLIMAT is used for Desigo S7. Licensing costs
depend on the number of BACnet objects used for the building solution market
performance package. The license key must be entered on the corresponding pin
for block AS_BASIC.
The license key is part of the project data in the mapping tool for the market
performance package.
22.1 Product Range Overview
Simatic S7 automation station
The modular automation station Simatic S7 for all industrial plants and for HVAC
applications for industry and infrastructure. The modular, fan-free design, simple
implementation of distributed structures, and user-friendliness of Simatic S7 make
it the convenient and cost-effective solution for a wide range of functions.
Several CPUs with different levels of performance, plus an extensive range of
modules with numerous convenient functions enable the user to select only the
modules actually required for the application concerned. If the required function is
later extended, the automation station can simply be upgraded as required, by
adding further modules.
A Simatic S7 system comprises:
● A central processing unit (CPU): Different CPUs are available for various
performance ranges, to some extent, CPUs with integrated PROFINET or
PROFIBUS DP interfaces.
● Signal modules (SM) for digital and analog inputs and outputs
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Product Range Overview
●
●
Communication modules (CP) for bus coupling and point-to-point connections
Power supply modules (PS) for connection of the Simatic S7 to a supply
voltage of AC 120/230 V or DC 24 V
Usage scenarios:
● Connected to BACnet/IP, Ethernet TCP/IP system bus
● Stand-alone, with local TP177B touch panel
Communications processor CP 343-1
The communications processor CP 343-1 BACnet for the Simatic 300 automation
station allow for cross-electrical and mechanical installation building automation
and control and process automation. For example, you can use Simatic S7
automation stations and Desigo PX automation stations at the same time in plants
and buildings.
The communications processor communicates via with Desigo Insight via
BACnet/IP. It can also directly exchange data peer-to-peer between Desigo PX
and Simatic S7.
The CP 343-1 BACnet communications process for Simatic S7-300 automation
stations exchanges data between a S7 automation station and Desigo automation
stations including as third-party providers of BACnet clients.
Simatic ET 200 S
In conjunction with Simatic S7, digital and analog inputs and outputs can be linked
to the central control system via the PROFINET or PROFIBUS DP field bus system.
The peripheral devices can perform central control sub-functions independently.
Sections of the plant can be tested and commissioned in advance. In the event of
an error, stand-alone elements can continue to operate autonomously.
TX-I/O for Simatic
The PROFINET BIM allows you to use TX-I/O modules in plants with Simatic S7
via PROFINET communications.
This allows you to take advantage of the TX-I/O module benefits featuring, for
example, integrated local manual operation, cheaper integration of analog signals,
and support of typical HVAC field devices in plants with Simatic S7.
Engineering occurs via the standard PROFINET engineering workflow (Simatic
Manager). TX-I/O properties are available in the product range-specific device root
file (GSDML file) of the Profinet BIM. The GSDML file serves as engineering basis.
SBT TP177B touch panel
The SBT TP177B touch panel serves to locally operate and monitor the Simatic S7
automation station. It provides access to all data points and the associated
parameters (for example, messages and switch commands) in all plant. Normally
the unit is built into the control panel door.
The SBT TP177B enables the user to locate faults, operate and optimize the
operation of plant and equipment such as heating coils and fans, and modify switch
times.
Ordering
All Simatic components are ordered via the standard horizontal path at SIEMENS
for the relevant region.
The CP341-1 BACnet is ordered directly by SBT at the Distribution Center
Nuremburg.
The touch panel TP177B is ordered via the configuration center at SBT Zug.
Desigo S7 tools and library are downloaded via the SBT Standard Download
Server.
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System Limits
22
22.2 System Limits
The following table shows the system limits for Desigo S7:
Item
Limits
Configured alarm recipient (number of entries on the NC recipient list)
30
Number of peer to peer objects by BACnet (as client)
approx. 50
COV subscriptions as server (If > 400 decrease of updating performance)
approx. 400
BACnet object in the CP for building integration
approx. 1000
Number of BACnet I/O objects including typical HVAC application* for building solution:
CPU 314
..314-1AG13 / 96 KB
approx. 20
CPU 314
..314-1AG14 / 128 KB
approx. 40
CPU 315-2DP
..315-2AG10 / 128 KB
approx. 40
CPU 315-PN/DP
..315-2AH14 / 256 KB
approx. 150
CPU 315-PN/DP
..315-2EG10 / 128 KB
approx. 40
CPU 315-PN/DP
..315-2EH13 / 256 KB
approx. 50
CPU 317-2DP
..317-2AJ10 / 512 KB
approx. 200
CPU 317-PN/DP
..315-2EJ13 / 512 KB
approx. 200
CPU 317-PN/DP
..315-2EK13 / 1000 KB
approx. 200
CPU 317-PN/DP
..317-2EK14 / 1000 KB
approx. 800
CPU 319-PN/DP
..318-3EL00 / 1400 KB
approx. 800
Number of function block instances in the CFC chart
32767
Trend Log – limited only by available RAM in the CPU
Depends on RAM*
Scheduler – limited only by available RAM in the CPU
Depends on RAM*
Calendar – limited only by available RAM in the CPU
Depends on RAM*
Max. number of TP177 on a CPU
3
Max. number of CPUs on a TP177
4
Communication between S7-Station (send – receive)
Max. 3 partner
Max. 200 Bytes
Min. clock pulse 5 sec. for send
Table 107: Desigo S7 system limits
Key:
*
A calculation table is available for a more precise calculation.
22.3 Alarm Management
Alarm Management in Desigo S7 is almost identical to alarm management in
Desigo PX. The BACnet objects displayed in the following figure are equipped with
intrinsic reporting. The objects report alarms to the assigned notification class
objects. The notification class objects forward the alarms to the assigned BACnet
clients.
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Alarm Management
Figure 266: Alarming and Eventing
Desigo S7
Desigo PX
Principle
The Notification Class (NOTIFCL) is local and applies
per automation station only.
Notification Class is a server function that applies
globally for the entire site.
Number of Notification
Class objects
One NOTIFCL required per automation station in the
Global chart.
All entries are made in this block.
48 NOTIFCL blocks per automation station in the
Global chart.
Number of alarm classes
32 alarm classes (only 6 are used in the library).
16 alarm classes (only 6 are used in the library).
Table 108: Notification Class Object [NOTIFCL]
See Desigo S7 Building Integration (CM110890).
Detailed differences in the implementation
The following figure shows a typical application of blocks associated with the alarm
strategy.
Figure 267: Alarm blocks
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Control Concept
Desigo S7
Desigo PX
Number of objects
One CMN_ALM per BACnet hierarchy
A CMN_ALM block per plant
Function
Gather alarms
Gather and filter alarms
22
Map to BACnet hierarchy
Mechanism
Interconnect: All alarmable blocks must be
interconnected to the CNM_ALM.
Referencing – automatic
Unwired object must be individually acknowledged via
a BACnet client.
Table 109: Common alarm [CMN_ALM]
Alarms can be acknowledged via the TP177B, which is wired on the CMN_ALM Acknowledge a BACnet hierarchy level.
Alarmable blocks not interconnect on the CMN_ALM may only be operated via a
BACnet client, for example, Desigo Insight.
Desigo S7
Desigo PX
Principle
Interconnected with CMN_ALM (optional functionality)
Integrated in CMN_ALM
Number of objects
One block per BACnet hierarchy
A CMN_ALM block per plant
Number of filters
Four filters per block – multiple blocks may be used
Five filters
Table 110: Alarmfilter [ALM_FIL]
Function
Desigo S7
Desigo PX
Light control
Compound solution using the same functional scope
Flash speed depends on the alarm input
Table 111: Request indicator [REQ_IND]
22.4 Control Concept
Open-loop control strategy
The control strategy of the Desigo S7 building solution market performance
package is identical to the control concept for Desigo PX. Desigo S7 cannot,
however, reference BACnet to interfaces for other blocks for technical reasons. As
a result, all bindings between the blocks are wired.
Control blocks cannot use the PX look-ahead mechanism.
Interconnection in CFC and not BACnet referencing is used for superposed control
blocks to communicate with the commanding aggregates.
In contrast to Desigo PX, the scheduler cannot switch the objects to be controlled
via BACnet communication, but rather via wiring.
Control strategy
The control strategy for Desigo S7 is similar to the control strategy for PX.
The strategy comprises the following function blocks:
● PID_CTR: As individual controlled or wired (FmHigher/ToLower). It can be
used as a sequence controller. The block is mapped on a standard BACnet
loop object. This expands the interface for Desigo S7.
● CAS_CTR: A cascade controller like in PX.
● SEQLINK: The block binds multiple PID_CTR blocks to a sequence controller.
The block offers benefits primarily during engineering (PX).
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Desigo S7 Block Library
22.5 Desigo S7 Block Library
Block concept
The block concept for the building solution market performance package is the
same as for Desigo, that is, interfaces and function distribution are the same.
Deviations to these concepts are explicitly described in this document.
The block interfaces correspond to BACnet version 1.5.
Changes to data types
The building solution market performance package is used to engineer the
standard CFC editor. To this end, some data types, which are specially supported
in Desigo, were changed at the block interfaces. The data types can still be
operated. The changes primarily effect time data types Long Duration and Short
Duration and date formats using jokers.
Storage for an optimized concept was selected. There are short and long runtimes
or monitoring times.
Command Control CMD_CTL
The block ensures that individual plant aggregates (optimized for ventilation plants)
are switched on or off in a certain order.
The differences to Desigo PX are:
● The normal signal flow between the blocks (interconnection) is used to
exchange data with the aggregates. The Standard CFC Editor does not contain
a Plant Control Editor. CMD_CTL cannot be used to reference aggregates via
BACnet.
● CMD_CTL has only two priorities for commanding: High priority (for example,
safety) and low priority (for example, program). The interconnection determine
the priority on the aggregate.
● The LookAhead function is not available on CMD_CTL.
● The CMD_CTL does not have switch-on and off delays. They must be
implemented on the aggregates. The OpSta feedback is used to consider
delays for switching.
● The CMD_CTL does not have a BACnet alarm function.
The control strategy itself is, however, identical to Desigo PX.
Power Control PWR_CTL
The block ensures that individual plant aggregates (optimized for ventilation plants)
are switched on or off in a certain order and at certain output.
The differences to Desigo PX are:
● The normal signal flow between the blocks (interconnection) is used to
exchange data with the aggregates. The Standard CFC Editor does not contain
a Plant Control Editor. PWR_CTL cannot be used to reference aggregates via
BACnet.
● PWR_CTL has two priorities for commanding: High priority (for example, safety)
and low priority (for example, program). The interconnection determine the
priority on the aggregate.
● The LookAhead function is not available on PWR_CTL.
● PWR_CTL does not have a BACnet alarm function.
I/O blocks
Emergency operation
(local override)
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Manual operation can be recorded directly on the I/O Module using Desigo. For
Desigo S7, local manual override is logged on the module level via its own
feedback signal. The blocks BO, AO and MO have the pin [Ovrr] for this purpose.
In contrast to Desigo, the value of manual operation is not issued on PrVal.
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Operating States
22
Peer-to-peer blocks
Blocks AO_PTP, BO_PTP and MO_PTP (FB327) write a value to the BACnet
object (command via BACnet). The block is used to write a process value via
BACnet to another automation station (commanding).
Memory optimized block pins
The pin sequence on Desigo S7 blocks differ from the sequence for Desigo, since
they are memory optimized (application-oriented in the case of Desigo).
Dynamic memory ranges
The block TRNDLOG stores the BACnet values on the CPU.
Alarm blocks (CMN_ALM, ALM_FIL)
The differences to Desigo PX are:
● In Desigo S7, all notification classes are compiled in block NOTIFCL.
● The Common Alarm block in the CFC is nested with the block generating the
alarm.
Device object
Each automation station contains a device object, which in turn contains the device
and system information for that automation station. The device object is a standard
BACnet object, representing the entire Desigo S7 automation station and, among
other, includes a list of all processed BACnet objects.
22.6 Operating States
The following table shows the operating states in Desigo S7:
S7-CPU RUN
Normal operation - application software is processing
S7-CPU STOP
Digital outputs are reset. Application software and BACnet communication are not processed.
The STOP state is achieved:
- After a fatal error in the S7 CPU
- During initial configuration
- During a full download
- When the operator uses the STOP switch
- When operated with the S7 – Manager
BACnet – IP RUN
BACnet/IP allows Ethernet communication including BACnet/IP and S7 communication.
BACnet communication can also be interrupted in RUN mode. Reasons:
- No BACnet configured (S7 – hardware configuration)
- Reconfiguration is running
- Fatal error BACnet – CP
BACnet – IP STOP
BACnet/IP allows PG functions via Ethernet, for example, restart or diagnostics.
The STOP state is achieved due to:
- Fatal error BACnet - CP
- User operation
Table 112: Desigo S7 operating states
22.7 Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
The following table shows some examples of errors and their effects:
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Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
Error
Effect
1) Fatal error in S7-CPU, for example, memory command
code.
S7 goes to STOP.
2) Potentially dangerous process state in S7-CPU, for
example, faulty I/O periphery.
The application is no longer processed.
All binary outputs are reset.
An alarm is sent via BACnet.
BACnet communication is stopped.
S7 must be restarted locally or via remote following troubleshooting.
3) Non-critical error in S7-CPU
An alarm is sent via BACnet.
4) Critical error BACnet-CP, for example, memory.
BACnet communication is stopped.
BACnet communication must be restarted locally or via remote following
troubleshooting.
5) Non-critical error BACnet-CP, for example, buffer
overloaded.
An alarm is sent via BACnet.
Table 113: Errors and effects
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System Configuration
Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
23
23 System Configuration
System overview
Figure 268: System overview
Terms
Desigo system
Siemens
Covers all the devices on the MLN (Management Level Network), ALN (Automation
Level Network) and FLN (Field Level Network).
One Desigo system may comprise several BACnet internetworks. These are
connected into a system with the Desigo management station. In this case, a
management station appears as a BACnet device in several BACnet internetworks.
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System Configuration
Error Sources and Monitoring Functions
BACnet internetwork
A BACnet internetwork consists of one or several BACnet networks. Individual
BACnet networks are connected to BACnet routers.
Each BACnet device can communicate with another BACnet device in the
internetwork. A BACnet device in one internetwork cannot communicate with a
device in another internetwork.
A Desigo management station can be used to integrate the operation of several
BACnet internetworks and other systems (see Desigo system).
When defining the system configuration, FLN integrations (LonWorks, KNX) are
also added to the BACnet internetwork. In this way, the Desigo system can be
seen as a combination of several BACnet internetworks. Technically, the individual
FLN devices are not BACnet devices. They do not communicate via the BACnet
protocol.
BACnet PTP internetwork
A BACnet PTP internetwork is connected to Desigo Insight via BACnet PTP
communication.
BACnet PTP communication uses modem (telephony) or null-modem (RS232)
connections. Owing to the slow rate of data transfer via these connections, the
limits are lower for a BACnet PTP internetwork. Modem-based PTP connections
are considered obsolete and are therefore no longer used.
The BACnet PTP communication connects BACnet networks via BACnet half
routers. When Desigo Insight uses several modems to establish simultaneous
connections to different BACnet PTP internetworks, these are interconnected into
one BACnet internetwork. Consider this when defining individual BACnet PTP
internetworks, to ensure that network and site numbers, etc. are unique.
In Desigo Insight only one PTP internetwork can be defined (this defines the type
of connection). All sites are assigned to this network by one or more BACnet PTP
internetworks. When communication is established by a BACnet PTP internetwork
(PX) it is not possible to identify the specific BACnet PTP internetwork concerned.
This problem is solved by fixed allocation to a Desigo Insight PTP internetwork.
BACnet network
A quantity of BACnet devices connected within an IP or LonTalk or MS/TP network
with specific (that means, the devices are in the same BACnet Broadcast Domain)
limits. In the case of the LonTalk or MS/TP network, the limit is physical. In the
case of an IP network, the network can be physically the same, but the limit is
determined by different UDP ports.
Local communication between two BACnet devices in a BACnet network is not
visible in another BACnet network.
IP segment
Sub-area of an IP network. IP segments are connected by IP routers.
In order to ensure that BACnet communications (Broadcasts) can always take
place across IP routers, BBMDs (BACnet Broadcast Management Devices) are
required. PXG3.. and PXG80-N and PXC…-E.D or PXC..-U over IP can be
configured as BBMDs. Individual BACnet devices in an IP segment can register
with a BBMD as foreign devices.
LonWorks segment (ALN)
Sub-area of a BACnet/LonTalk network. LonWorks segments are connected by
LonWorks routers. In most cases it is not necessary to divide a BACnet/LonTalk
network into several LonWorks segments (ALN).
It is not possible to use a LonWorks router because of the restricted length of the
data packets. An L-Switch can be used as a router on the ALN.
LonWorks segment (FLN)
Sub-area of a LonWorks network. LonWorks segments are connected by
LonWorks routers.
An L-Switch or a LonWorks router can be used as a router on the FLN.
LonWorks trunk (FLN)
Comprises all the devices connected on the FLN side of the PXC00.D/-E.D + PXXL1…. Consists of one or several LonWorks segments (FLN).
A LonWorks trunk (FLN) is the equivalent of a LonWorks network (FLN).
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Technical Limits and Limit Values
23
PX KNX integration
Comprises all the devices connected on the FLN side of the PXC001.D/-E.D or the
PXC00-U with extension module PXA30-K11.
PX site
A Desigo PX automation system site.
The PX BACnet devices which control the plant in a PX site are interconnected via
the global objects and the primary copy procedure.
A PX site is independent of the limits affecting the BACnet network. A site can
extend over several BACnet networks. One BACnet network may include several
sites. All the associated limits must be maintained simultaneously.
A PX site cannot be extended beyond the limits of a BACnet internetwork. This is
particularly important in the case of BACnet PTP internetworks.
PX plant
A PX plant is part of a PX site and generally comprises several partial plants (plant
structure).
A PX plant can be distributed over several PX BACnet devices. In principle PX
BACnet devices can be distributed to different BACnet networks. However, owing
to the communications load between partial plants, this is not recommended.
The plant structure is mapped to BACnet by means of hierarchy objects. Operator
units with generic operation (PXM20, PX Web) automatically read this structure.
BACnet MS/TP
A BACnet MS/TP network is a BACnet network that is physically based on EIA-485
and operated using a BACnet-specific MasterSlave/TokenPassing data link
protocol (see BACnet standard clause 9). An MS/TP network is linked via a
BACnet router to a BACnet/IP or BACnet/LonTalk network.
Desigo Room Automation
Includes the BACnet devices connected directly to BACnet/IP or BACnet MS/TP,
used for room automation.
These BACnet devices are not part of a PX site. There is no connection via global
objects and the primary copy procedure.
Desigo Room Automation
system functions
In Desigo Room Automation, primary subsystem control functions are centralized
as Desigo Room Automation system functions.
PX system functions
A PXC.. of a PX site as PX system function can assume Desigo Room Automation
subsystem functions such as scheduling, life check, time synchronization for a
Desigo Room Automation system function group for BACnet devices for room
automation.
System function group
A Desigo Room Automation system function group cannot be identified or defined
via the network topology. Engineering the Desigo Room Automation system
functions of the PX system functions determines the Desigo Room Automation
system function group.
For more information, see chapter System Overview and Network Architecture.
23.1 Technical Limits and Limit Values
There are two types of limits:
● Technical limits (hard-coded limits) are maintained by technical means. They
cannot be exceeded.
● Recommended limits (soft limits) are not enforced by technical means. They
can be exceeded.
The limits are defined to ensure the full and correct functioning of the system.
Consult Headquarters before exceeding the recommended limits. HQ can
modify the recommended limits on the basis of new findings at any time.
Changes are notified in Facts bulletins.
Certain limits cannot be verified (for reasons of cost or quantity). These limits are
identified in this document as follows:
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System Configuration
Networks
Limit type
Identification
Example
Technical limit verified
Limit*
60* RXC integrated with PXC00.D/E.D+PXX-L11/12 per
LonWorks Trunk
Technical limit NOT verified
[Limit*]
[50*] IP segment per BACnet/IP network
Recommended limit verified
Limit
30 PX per BACnet/LonTalk network
Recomended limit NOT verified
[Limit]
[1'000] PX per BACnet internetwork
Limit subject to proviso (refer to footnotes)
(Limit)
(10)9 PXM20 per BACnet internetwork
Table 114: Verified and non-verified limits
23.2 Networks
The following table shows the maximum number of elements, permitted in a
network area.
The columns show the network area. The rows show the maximum number of
elements permitted in the network area. For example, network area: BACnet
internetwork; number of elements: BACnet/LonTalk network. Maximum number of
BACnet/LonTalk networks per internetwork = 100.
Number of
elements / Per
network area
Desigo
system
BACnet
internetwork
BACnet
BACnet/
PTP inter- IP
network
network
BACnet
MS/TP
network
BACnet/
LonTalk
network
LonWorks LonWorks PX KNX
trunk
segment inte(FLN)
(FLN)
gration
PX site
Desigo topology
BACnet
internetwork
200
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BACnet PTP
internetwork
118
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BACnet/IP
network
n/a
1
[1]19
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[total 20]
BACnet/LonTalk
network
[3]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BACnet MS/TP
network
n/a
[50]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
PXG3 (BACnet
router)
n/a
[100]
[30]
[100]
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
IP segment
n/a
10* 6a /
[50*] 6b
10* 6a /
[50*] 6b
10* 6a /
[50*] 6b
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
LonWorks
segment (ALN)
n/a
[100]
[30]
n/a
n/a
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
PX site
[1,000]
[30]
5
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
PX plant
[4,000]
[2,000]
[60]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
100
LonWorks trunk
(FLN)
[200]
[100]
[30]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[50]
LonWorks
segment (FLN)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[5]
n/a
n/a
[250]
[200]
[100]
[30]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[50]
[2,000]
[1,000]9
[30]
[200]8
n/a
30
n/a
n/a
n/a
50/10017
PX KNX
integration
Desigo devices
PX… without
DXR2/PXC315
362 | 416
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System Configuration
Networks
BACnet
BACnet/
PTP inter- IP
network
network
BACnet
MS/TP
network
BACnet/
LonTalk
network
LonWorks LonWorks PX KNX
trunk
segment inte(FLN)
(FLN)
gration
23
Number of
elements / Per
network area
Desigo
system
BACnet
internetwork
PX site
PXC3 (Desigo
Room
Automation)
n/a16
[500]
n/a
[200]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a15
DXR2 (Desigo
Room
Automation)
n/a16
[1,000]
n/a
[200]20
3221
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a15
Desigo CC
10
10
n/a
10
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Desigo Insight /
Desigo Insight
Terminal Server /
Desigo Web13
10
10
1
10
n/a
[5]
n/a
n/a
n/a
1010
PXM20
n/a
(10)9
10
n/a
n/a
10
n/a
n/a
n/a
total 1510
PXM20-E
n/a
(50)9
[20]
[50]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
total 1510
PXA30-W1/W2,
PXA40-W1/W2
(integrated web
server)
n/a
(15)9
[15]
[15]
n/a
[15]14
n/a
n/a
n/a
total 1510
Desigo Xworks
Plus (XWP)
(commissioning)12
n/a
[10]
[10]
[10]
n/a
[5]
n/a
n/a
n/a
total 1510
Total LonWorks
nodes (RXC,
QAX50/51, thirdparty)
[40,000]
[20,000]
[6,000]
n/a
n/a
n/a
3002
60
n/a
[10,000]
RXC integrated
[20,000]
[5,000]
[3,000]
n/a
n/a
n/a
60* 7a /
[120*]7b
60
n/a
[5,000]
QAX50/QAX51
[20,000]
[10,000]
[,000]
n/a
n/a
n/a
[120]
[40]5
n/a
[5,000]
RXB
[8,000]
[2,000]
[1,200]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
454
[2,000]
RXL
[8,000]
[2,000]
[1,200]
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
454
[2,000]
LonWorks router
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a3
[4]
n/a
n/a
n/a
LonWorks
physical repeater
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[1]
[5]
1
n/a
n/a
L-Switch
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
[1]
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
System devices
Data points and BACnet objects
Physical data
points
[100,000]
[100,000]
[3,000]
[20,000]
[1,920]22
[3,000]
n/a
n/a
n/a
[6,000]
Total BACnet
objects
[500,000]
[100,000]
[30,000]
[100,000]
[3,000]
[30,000]
n/a
n/a
n/a
[50,000]
Trendlog object
[30,000]
[2,500]
[200]
[2,500]
[540]
[600]
n/a
n/a
n/a
[1,000]
Table 115: Number of elements per network area
Key:
Siemens
n/a
Not applicable.
–
No restrictions.
2
Not the same as the number of integrated devices ( PXC00.D/-E.D + PXX-L…).
3
LonWorks routers must not be used at the automation level.
4
Limit applies only if this device type is used exclusively.
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5
Observe the Installation guidelines Desigo RXC for LPT 10 devices (QAX5x) and the bus power
supply.
6a
Limit when PXG80-N is configured as a BBMD (BDT: max. 10. FDT: max. 10.).
6b
Limit when PXC…U over IP is configured as a BBMD (BDT: max. 50. FDT: max. 50.). Also
applies to PXC…-E.D and PXG3.
7a
Limit for PXC00.D/-E.D + PXX-L11.
7b
Limit for PXC00.D/-E.D + PXX-L12.
8
Limit for PX devices without Desigo Room Automation (due to PX web support of a PX site). Do
not exceed the number of PXC devices per site.
9
The limit on the number of PX automation stations per internetwork can only be maintained if no
PX clients (PXM20, PXM20-E, PXG80-W/WN, PXA40-W1/W2 or PXA30-W1/W2) are used. PX
clients limit the permissible number of PX per internetwork. The values can be obtained by
reference to the relevant automation station columns. The restricted view option does not affect
the system configuration of PX clients.
10
The number of temporary alarm receivers in a PX is a technical limit. The recommended limit is
lower. This takes account of the fact that additional devices may be connected for service
purposes.
11
The number of temporary alarm receivers in a PX is a technical limit. The recommended limit is
lower. This takes account of the fact that additional alarm receivers (third-party) may have entries
in this list.
12
Parallel engineering (commissioning ) is possible subject to the following restrictions:
- Node setup: Only one XWP per LonTalk/IP segment.
- Download and online operation: only one XWP for each automation station.
13
A maximum of two Desigo Insight Terminal Servers may be operated concurrently. A maximum
of two Desigo web clients (server) may be operated concurrently.
14
Only PXA30-W1/W2 (together with PXC..U) can be used in BACnet/LonTalk networks.
15
Desigo Room Automation automation stations do not belong to a PX site (no primary copy
function).
16
Max. 3,0000 rooms/project on CC, 4,000 rooms/project and 2,000 rooms/site on Desigo Insight.
Additional Desigo Room Automation system function PX required. See chapter Desigo Room
Automation System Function Group.
17
50: If Lon PX exists in the PX site. 100: If no Lon PX exist in the PX site (only IP PX).
18
These limits in the Desigo system refer in particular to Desigo Insight. The limits may be
significantly lower due to the PTP connection(s) outside the Desigo system and their technical
limitations. Examples of such limitations outside the Desigo system can include available
bandwidth for the PTP link or available modem speeds.
19
This limit can be exceeded if all BACnet devices are located within the same IP subnetwork, or if
no communication between the various BACnet/IP networks is required.
20
These limits apply only to IP-based DXR2 devices.
21
These limits apply to MS/TP-based DXR2 devices.
22
Max. number of physical data points for DXR2.M18 is 1,920 (60 I/Os per device and 32 devices
per MS/TP trunk).
For more information about networks, see Application Guide for IP Networks in
Building Automation Systems (CM110668).
23.2.1
Desigo Room Automation System Function Group
A Desigo Room Automation system function group comprises parts of the Desigo
Room Automation automation stations on the BACnet internetwork. Grouping
occurs based on Desigo Room Automation automation stations aassignment to PX
system function responsible for the Desigo Room Automation subsystem functions.
Desigo Room Automation defines Desigo Room Automation system functions
comprising life check, time synchronization, and scheduling.
364 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
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System Configuration
Networks
23
The current limits for the Desigo Room Automation system function group are
mainly imposed by life check and scheduling carried out by the Desigo Room
Automation system function PX. To this end, the total number of the following
external BACnet references are planned per Desigo Room Automation system
function PX used: Approximately 200 (on PX V5.x) or approximately 500 (on PX
V6.0).
A PXC3 generally controls several (about 5..8) multiple rooms. The number of
rooms in the Desigo Room Automation system function group are the decisive
factor for some limits.
Desigo Room Automation automation stations are not part of a PX site. Data are
not aligned between the primary PX site and the Desigo Room Automation
automation stations.
Desigo Room Automation automation stations cannot be operated using the
generic operator units PXM20, PXC20-E, PXA30-W1/W2, PXA40W1/W2
(integrated web server) or XWP. Desigo Room Automation automation stations do
not support the PX concept for generic operation.
Desigo Room Automation automation stations do not support BBMDs. This
restricts the BACnet/IP network, that is, all Desigo Room Automation automation
stations and their Desigo Room Automation system function PX or a PXG router
must be located in the same IP segment.
Desigo Room Automation automation stations without own alarming
The Desigo Room Automation system function PX takes over the alarm functions
Item
Limit
Description
Trend per room
5
Assumption: An average of max. 5 trend points are logged.
Assumption for logging interval: 15 minutes.
Rooms with three alarms per room
60*
Max. number of rooms per Desigo Room Automation system function
group at three alarms per room.
The number of Event Enrollment objects with external BACnet
references that must reliably be supported by the Desigo Room
Automation system function PX is limited.
Rooms with two alarms per room
100
Max. number of rooms per Desigo Room Automation system function
group at 2 alarms per room.
The number of Event Enrollment objects with external BACnet
references that must reliably be supported by the Desigo Room
Automation system function PX is limited.
Event Enrollment objects with external
BACnet references
220
Max. number of Event Enrollment objects with external BACnet
references in the Desigo Room Automation system function group.
Event Enrollment objects on the Desigo Room Automation system
function PX are used for the alarms per room and for the PXC3 life
check.
PXC3
50
Max. number of PXC3 per Desigo Room Automation system function
group.
Central time synchronization serves as a limit. The Desigo Room
Automation system function PX list for time synchronization recipients
is limited.
Note: This limit should never be reached. Assumption: One PXC3
controls an average of min. 5 rooms. As a result, max. 15 to 20 PXC3
are assigned to one Desigo Room Automation system function PX.
Table 116: Desigo Room Automation automation stations without own alarming
Key:
*
60 rooms are an estimation based on the assumptions: about 3 alarms per room and ~5 rooms
per PXC3.
The values listed in this table are guide values.
Siemens
365 | 416
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System Configuration
Networks
A more precise calculation would have to be based on the rule that the amount of
PXC3-based alarms plus the amount of PXC3 themselves may not exceed the
maximum number of external BACnet references.
60 rooms thus translate into 60x3 = ~180 alarms and 60/5 = ~12 PXC3, resulting in
~192 external BACnet references. This is a conservative estimation compared to
the ~220 max. allowed external references.
Desigo Room Automation automation stations with own alarming
Item
Limit
Description
Trend per room
5
It is assumed that a maximum of 5 trend points are logged on
average. Assumption for the trend interval: 15 minutes.
Number of external BACnet references
500
Maximum number of external BACnet references that support a
Desigo Room Automation system function PX. The Desigo Room
Automation system function PX requires external references for the
life check and for scheduler functions. Examples of objects with
external references:
- EventEnrollment: 1reference
- Schedule: 1-5 references
Event Enrollment per Desigo Room
Automation automation station
1
Number of Event Enrollment objects required on the Desigo Room
Automation system functions PX for the life check per Desigo Room
Automation automation station.
Sample number of Desigo Room Automation
automation stations per Desigo Room
Automation system function group
250
Desigo Room Automation system function PX with maximum
scheduler functions.
The limit designates the maximum number of Desigo Room
Automation automation stations in the Desigo Room Automation
system function group. In this example, it is assumed that the
following scheduler objects are available on the Desigo Room
Automation system function PX:
- Maximum number of scheduler objects
- Per scheduler object, maximum number of external references
Sample number of Desigo Room Automation
automation stations per Desigo Room
Automation system function group
500
Desigo Room Automation system function PX without scheduler
functions.
The limit designates the maximum number of Desigo Room
Automation automation stations on the Desigo Room Automation
system function group. In this example, it is assumed that no
scheduler objects are available on the Desigo Room Automation
system function PX.
Table 117: Desigo Room Automation automation stations with own alarming
366 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
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System Configuration
23
Devices
23.3 Devices
23.3.1
Item
PXC..D/-U Automation Stations / System Controllers
PXC..-E.D
PXC...D
PXC..-T.D
PXC52
(PPC)
PXC64 /
128-U
PXC50.D
PXC100.D
PXC200.D
PXC00.D
PX Open10
PX KNX9
modular
PXC50.E.D
PXC200E.D
PXC00-E.D
modular
PXC100E.D
modular
modular
PXC001.D
PXC001E.D +
PXA40-RS..
PXC001.D
PXC001E.D
or
or
PXC00-U +
PXC00-U + PXA30-K11
PXA30-RS..
PXC-NRUF
compact
Temporary alarm
receiver1
18*
18*
18*
18*
18*
18*
18*
18*
Configured alarm
receivers2
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
[1,400*]
400*
400*
650*
400*
BACnet references
COV server resources 3
BACnet references
COV client
resources 4
PXC36-E.D
950*
650*
650*
650*
650*
PXC50-E.D
950*
PXC100E.D 950*
PXC200E.D 950*
PXC00-E.D
950*
Total BACnet objects
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
[4,000]
Number of function
block instances
(application size)
1,900*
1,900*
1,900*
1,900*
2,900*
1,900*
2,900*
2,900*
100
100
100
200
350
200
600
100
20
20
20
20
20
20
120
20
1517
1517
5018
5018
5018
5018
1517
PXC001:501
1517
PXC001:501
7
7
Trend log5
Trend log
multiple19
Scheduler
10
Calendar14
10
50
50
50
50
10
10
PXC001:50
PXC001:50
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
n/a
5
5
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
5
n/a
n/a
Gem. Bel.
Einheiten
I/O-Mod.6
52*
200* 15
(350)15
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total number of data
points (TX-/I/O, PTM
and TX Open)
n/a
n/a
200*
200* 15
(350) 15
n/a
n/a
n/a
TX Open per island
bus
n/a
n/a
516
516
516
n/a
n/a
n/a
PXX-PBUS
n/a
n/a
1
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
P bus BIM
TXB1.PBUS12
n/a
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Dynamic calendar
objects20
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
Dynamic event
enrollment objects 20
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
PXM10
PPS2 devices
(e.g. QAX3.x,
RXZ90.1)
(ALN)8
Physical data points
I/O module (TX-I/O,
PTM)
Siemens
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System Configuration
Devices
Item
PXC..-E.D
PXC...D
PXC..-T.D
PXC52
(PPC)
PXC64 /
128-U
PXC50.D
modular
modular
PXC50.E.D
PXC100.D
PXC100E.D
PXC200.D
PXC200E.D
modular
modular
PXC00.D
PX Open10
PX KNX9
PXC00-E.D
PXC001.D
PXC001E.D +
PXA40-RS..
PXC001.D
PXC001E.D
or
or
PXC00-U +
PXC00-U + PXA30-K11
PXA30-RS..
PXC-NRUF
compact
Dynamic notification
class objects20
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
50*
Dynamic schedulers
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
10*
Dynamic trend log
objects20
100*
100*
100*
100*
100*
100*
100*
100*
Dynamic trend log
multiple objects 20
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
20*
Table 118: Automation stations / system controllers PXC..D/-U
Key:
n/a
Not applicable
1
PXM20, PX-Web and XWP are temporary alarm receivers.
2
Desigo CC and Desigo Insight are configured as an alarm receiver.
The number of entries in the notification class is limited to 20. The total number of different
configured alarm receivers across all notification classes is limited to 30.
3
Max. number of SubscribeCOV requests which can be accepted.
Example: 400 1 client and 400 values 2 clients and 200 values.
4
Max. number of BACnet client references, values read from or written to (commanded) your own
automation station or a remote automation station.
BACnet client references are used in Input, Output, Scheduler, Trendlog and Group objects (all
NameRef_Type inputs with AddrKind = B). The configured alarm receivers of the Notification
Class objects do NOT require any BACnet client references.
The available number of BACnet client references shall address not more than 50 different
remote automation stations. If this value is exceeded the number of BACnet broadcast messages
on the network will increase.
5
Every active Trendlog object needs a BACnet reference.
Trends need 12 bytes per entry (irrespective of data type). Max. 64 KB can be allocated to the
log buffer (approx. 5,000 entries) for each Trendlog object. These log buffers are assigned in DMAP RAM. If the log buffer size is changed and there is insufficient D-MAP RAM available, the
Reliability property of the Trendlog object is set to Memory limit reached.
6
Max. number of physical data points (TX-I/O module) for PXC64-U is 200.
Max. number of physical data points (TX-I/O module) for PXC128-U is more then 200, however
the reaction times are in accordance with following table and the system limits to consider.
The number of physical data points influences the reaction time of the application. If minimum
reaction times are specified, the number of physical data points may have to be reduced.
The following relationship between reaction times and the number of physical data points can be
assumed:
- up to 150 physical data points = Reaction times < 1s
- up to 250 physical data points = Reaction times 1…2 s
- up to 350 physical data points = Reaction times 2…3 s
368 | 416
Siemens
8
The address of the PPS-2 devices QAX84.1 and RXZ90.1 is always 1 (no address selection).
9
PX KNX = PXC001.D / PXC001-E.D or PXC00-U with extension module PXA30-K11 and with
PX KNX firmware loaded.
10
PX Open = PXC001.D / PXC001-E.D with option module PXA40-RS1/RS2 or PXC00-U or
PXC64-U with extension module PXA30-RS… and with PX Open firmware loaded.
14
Maximum 30 calendar entries.
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
15
23
Max. number of physical data points for PXC100.D/-E.D is 200.
Max. number of physical data points for PXC200.D/-E.D is more then 200, however the reaction
times are in accordance with following table and the system limits to consider.
The number of physical data points influences the reaction time of the application. If minimum
reaction times are specified, the number of physical data points may have to be reduced.
The following relationship between reaction times and the number of physical data points can be
assumed:
- up to 150 physical data points = Reaction times < 1s
- up to 250 physical data points = Reaction times 1…2 s
- up to 350 physical data points = Reaction times 2…3 s
16
Max. 5 TX Open per PXC50/100/200…D.
17
Number of switching times per day: 10; max. 5 BACnet references.
18
Number of switching times per day: 20; max. 5 BACnet references.
19
Every active trendlog multiple object needs a BACnet reference per logged value.
5 logged values are assumed for the number of trendlog multiple objects (number of Trendlog /
5).
Trends need 12 bytes per entry (irrespective of data type).
Max. 64 KB can be allocated to the log buffer (approx. 5,000 entries) for each trendlog object.
These log buffers are assigned in D-MAP RAM.
If the log buffer size is changed and there is insufficient D-MAP RAM available, the Reliability
property of the Trendlog object is set to Memory limit reached.
20
Dynamic objects are counted the same as non-dynamic objects for total limits.
D-MAP RAM
If the whole D-MAP RAM is taken up with trendlog objects, a delta (differential)
download will no longer be possible.
The overall size of the free and used D-MAP RAM can be viewed with XWP,
Desigo CC, Desigo Insight or the PXM20 unit. The information concerned is stored
in the device object under the memory statistics property [MemStc].
Access rights
management
Access rights are managed via USPRF. You can define a maximum of 10 user
groups and 20 users. 10 user groups and 6 users are already predefined as a
template (global chart).
23.3.2
LonWorks System Controllers
Device combination: PXC00.D/-E.D + PXX-L11/12
Item
Limit
LonWorks devices:
PXX-L11
60* (for example: 5 Group Members are defined, that means 5 x 12 = 60 COV resources are needed)
PXX-L12
120*
Max. number of integrated LonWorks devices covers RXC..., QAX50/QAX51 and third-party
LonWorks devices.
Discipline I/Os
[600] max. number of discipline I/O objects
Groups
[50] max. Number of groups
Room members
No limits
Group members
Cross-disciplinary groups can have more than 5 destinations. The number of cross-disciplinary groups
depends on the COV client resources (max. 250). A different number of COVs is required, depending
on the group type. These must be multiplied by the number of destinations.
Table 119: LonWorks system controllers
Calculation basis:
Siemens
369 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
HVAC
CHOGRP
1 COV client resource per destination
SPGRP*
12 COV client resources per destination
EMGGRP
1 COV client resource per destination
Lighting
LIGHTGRP
2 COV client resources per destination
Blinds
BLSGRP
4 COV client resources per destination
Building use
USEGRP
3 COV client resources per destination
Room occupancy
OCGRP
3 COV client resources per destination
LonWorks system controllers with physical I/Os and TX Open
Device combination: PXC50/100….D + PXX-L11/12
If the PXC50/100…D is used instead of the PXC00…D as a system controller,
physical I/Os can be integrated via TX-I/O modules and TX Open data points. The
reaction time can be greater for a larger number of physical I/Os or TX Open data
points, and depending on the complexity of the CFC program.
23.3.3
Automation Stations with LonWorks Integration
Device combination: PXC50/100/200…D mit PXX-L11
The modular automation stations PXC50/100/200.D and PXC50/100/200-E.D allow
the integration of LonWorks devices (RXC…, QAX50/QAX51 and third-party
devices) via PXX-L11 in addition to the use of I/O modules or third-party devices
via TX Open.
The integration on PXC50…D is limited to a maximum of 10 LonWorks devices.
The integration of LonWorks devices for PXC100/200…D is limited by response
times.
The following values can be assumed for reaction times depending on the number
of physical data points:
Reaction times depending on number of
physical data points
Without LonWorks devices
Up to 5 LonWorks devices
5 to 20 LonWorks devices
Max. 150 data points
< 1s
1-2s
3-4s
Max. 250 data points
1-2s
2-3s
4-5s
Max. 350 data points
2-3s
3-4s
5-6s
Table 120: Reaction time
23.3.4
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D)
These limits also apply to PXC00-U + PXA30-RS.
Item
Limit
Description
Modbus data points
[250*]
Max. number of data points per PX Modbus.
SCL data points
[250*]
Max. number of data points per PX SCL.
M-bus data points
[250*]
Max. number of data points per PX M-bus.
M-bus meters
[250]
Max. number of M-bus meters in PX M-bus applications.
Table 121: PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D)
23.3.5
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS1)
These limits also apply to PXC00-U + PXA30-RS1.
370 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
Item
Limit
Description
Modbus data points
[800*]
Max. number of data points per PX Modbus.
SCL data points
[800*]
Max. number of data points per PX SCL.
M-bus data points
[800*]
Max. number of data points per PX M-bus.
M-bus meters
[250]
Max. number of M-bus meters in PX M-bus applications.
23
Table 122: PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS1)
23.3.6
PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS2)
These limits also apply to PXC00-U + PXA30-RS2.
Item
Limit
Description
Modbus data points
[2,000*]
Max. number of data points per PX Modbus.
SCL data points
[1,000*]
Max. number of data points per PX SCL.
M-bus data points
[2,000*]
Max. number of data points per PX M-bus.
M-bus meters
[250]
Max. number of M-bus meters in PX M-bus applications.
Table 123: PX Open Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D + PXA40-RS2)
23.3.7
PX KNX Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D)
These limits also apply to PXC00-U + PXA30-K11.
The maximum number of devices only applies in cases where only one device type
is used. The following formula applies to mixed operation with third-party devices:
50 * RXB/RXL + third-party devices < 2,000 data points.
Item
Limit
Description
KNX/EIB data points
[2,000*]
Max. number of KNX data points that can be integrated (KNX
communication objects).
RXB
45
Max. number of RXB devices per KNX (approx. 50 KNX data points
per RXB, depending on the application).
RXL
45
Max. Number of RXL devices per KNX (approx. 50 KNX data points
per RXL, depending on the application).
Table 124: PX KNX-Integration (PXC001.D/-E.D)
23.3.8
Item
TX OPEN (TXI1.OPEN)
TX Open Integration (TXI1.OPEN)
Limit
Description
100*
Max. number of data points per TX Open.
Table 125: TX Open Integration (TXI1.OPEN)
23.3.9
TX Open Integration (TXI2.OPEN)
Item
Limit
Description
TX OPEN (TXI2.OPEN)
160*
Max. number of data points per TX Open.
Table 126: TX Open Integration (TXI2.OPEN)
Siemens
371 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
23.3.10 Number of Data Points on Desigo Room Automation
Automation Stations
Number of data points on the TX-I/O subsystem
Every used data point on TX-I/O is counted.
ASN
Product description
Data points
Description
TXM1.6RL
6 I/O relay modules, bistable
max. 6
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
TXM1.8RB
8 I/O blinds modules
max. 8
Used TX-I/Os are counted (1 data point per
relay).
TXM1.8T
8 I/O triac modules
max. 8
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
TXM1.8U
8 I/O universal modules (DI, AI, AO)
max. 8
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
TXM1.6R
6 I/O relay modules
max. 6
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
TXM1.8D
8 I/O digital input modules
max. 8
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
TXM1.16D
16 I/O digital input modules
max. 16
Used TX-I/Os are counted.
Table 127: Number of data points on the TX-I/O subsystem
Number of data points on DALI subsystem
Each individually controlled DALI lighting group and each individually controlled
ECB counts as 1 data point.
ASN
Product description
Data points
Description
PXC3.E7xA
Automation station
max. 64
DALI lighting groups and/or individual DALI
ECBs are counted.
PXC3.E16A-100A
Table 128: Number of data points on DALI subsystem
Additional DALI limits:
● Max. number of devices: 64
● Max. number of addresses: 64
● Max. number of groups: 16
Number of data points on KNX PL-Link subsystem
KNX PL-Link devices have a set count whereas KNX S-Mode devices are counted
according to the used group addresses.
ASN
Product description
Data points
Description
RXM21.1
Fan coil PL-I/O
5
Fixed count
RXM39.1
Fan coil PL-I/O
5
Fixed count
QMX3.P02
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
9
Fixed count
QMX3.P30
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
1
Fixed count
QMX3.P36
Freely configurable flush-mounted room unit
3
Fixed count
QMX3.P34
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
3
Fixed count
QMX3.P37
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
11
Fixed count
QMX3.P70
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
3
Fixed count
QMX3.P74
Freely configurable operator unit, wall
mounted
5
Fixed count
372 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
23
ASN
Product description
Data points
Description
AQR253…
Flush-mounted room sensor with:
1-3
AQR257…
Front module
Fixed count, 1 data point per measured value
(optional potential-free, passive NTC sensors
are not counted)
Base module
UP220/31
Switch interface
4
Fixed count
UP221/x
Single switch
2
Fixed count
UP222/x
Double switch
4
Fixed count
UP223/x
Triple switch
6
Fixed count
UP287/x
Quadruple switch
8
Fixed count
UP258D1x
Occupancy, light sensor
2
Fixed count
UP255/D12
Brightness sensor
1
Fixed count
RL260xx
4 x binary input
4
Fixed count
RL512xx
1 x light 16A
1
Fixed count
RL513xx
3 x light 6A
3
Fixed count
RL521xx
2 x blinds
4
Fixed count
RS510xx
2 x light 10A
2
Fixed count
RS520xx
1 x blind
2
Fixed count
RS525xx
1 x light universal dim
1
Fixed count
UP285/x
1 x switch
2
Fixed count
UP286/x
2 x switch
4
Fixed count
UP287/x
4 x switch
8
Fixed count
UP510/xx
2 x light 10A
2
Fixed count
UP520/xx
1 x blind
2
Fixed count
UP525/xx
1 x light universal dim
1
Fixed count
GLB181.1E/KN
Damper actuator VAV KNX, AC 24 V, 10 Nm
2
Fixed count
GDB181.1E/KN
Damper actuator VAV KNX, AC 24 V, 5 Nm
2
Fixed count
KNX S-Mode
Third-party device
Group addresses used are counted
Table 129: Number of data points on KNX PL-Link subsystem
Additional PL-Link limitations:
● Max. number of devices: 64 on PXC3.xx
● The range of the Individual Address (IA) can be defined as follows in Desigo
Room Automation V6.0:
– S-Mode: 1 … 179
– KNXnetIP: 180 und 181
– PL-Link devices: 182 … 250
– Desigo Room Automation automation station: 251
– Max. number of KNX S-Mode group addresses: 238
23.3.11 Number of Data Points for PXC3
A PXC3.E72x supports max. 4 rooms or 8 room modules and is limited to 72 TXI/O data points.
A PXC3.E.75 supports max. 8 rooms or 16 room modules and is limited to 200 TXI/O data points.
These criteria must be satisfied to be able to select the correct PXC…:
Siemens
373 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
●
●
The physical TX-I/O data points used
The total number of I/O data points used from TX-I/O, KNX PL-Link, and DALI
ASN
Physical TX-I/O data points used
Total I/O data points (TX-I/O, DALI, KNX PL-Link)
PXC3.E16A
n/a
64
PXC3.E72
72
140
PXC3.E72A
72
140
PXC3.E75
200
280
PXC3.E75A
200
280
Table 130: Number of data points for PXC3
Web clients for room operation
Item
QMX7.E38 and standard web
clients 1
Limit
Description
8
Recommended number of web clients that can simultaneously access
a PXC3.
Templates with standard background pictures 2 6
Maximum number of different templates which are using the default
background pictures.
Customized background pictures 2
Maximum total size of all customized background pictures (the PNG
file format is used as a reference).
1.5 MB
Table 131: Web clients for room operation
Key:
1
Restriction: When using standard web clients (web browser on PCs, smart phones, tablets, etc.),
the screen display and operation (touch or mouse) are neither modified nor tested for the
available browsers.
2
Valid values when using 8 room applications at the boundary of maximum system limits.
23.3.12 Number of Data Points for DXR...
ASN
Max. number of onboard IO- and PL-Link data points
Description
DXR2.x11
30
1 DI, 2 UI, 6 Triac, 2 AO
DXR2.x12P
30
1 Pressure, 1 DI, 2 UI, 6 Triac, 2 AO
DXR2.x12PX
60
1 Pressure, 1 DI, 2 UI, 6 Triac, 2 AO
DXR2.x18
60
2 DI, 4 UI, 8 Triac, 4 AO
DXR2.x09
30
1 DI, 2 UI, 3 AO, 3 Relay
DXR2.x09T
30
1 DI, 2 UI, 4 Triac, 1 AO, 1 Relay
DXR2.x10
30
1 DI, 2 UI, 4 Triac, 3 Relay
Table 132: Number of data points for DXR…
Web clients for room operation
Item
QMX7.E38 and standard web
clients 1
Limit
Description
3
Recommended number of web clients that can simultaneously access
a DXR2.
Templates with standard background pictures 2 2
Maximum number of different templates which are using the default
background pictures.
Customized background pictures 2
Maximum total size of all customized background pictures (the PNG
file format is used as a reference).
1.5 MB
Table 133: Web clients for room operation
374 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
23
Key:
1
Restriction: When using standard web clients (web browser on PCs, smart phones, tablets, etc.),
the screen display and operation (touch or mouse) are neither modified nor tested for the
available browsers.
2
Valid values when using 8 room applications at the boundary of maximum system limits.
23.3.13 PXM20 Operator Unit
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
50
Number of PX that can be operated.
The visibility of the PX automation stations can be limited on the
BACnet network. This is only useful if the site is restricted to one
BACnet network.
For hardware series A devices (1 MB memory), the number of PX
automation stations per site should be limited to 30.
Alarm administration
BACnet objects in alarm per site
Only the alarms from the site where the user is logged on are
displayed (PXM20 self-registers as temporary alarm recipient for all
devices of a site).
50*
Maximum number of BACnet objects per site.
The administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per site
is limited. Others cannot be displayed or operated in Alarm Viewer
when there are more BACnet objects in alarm.
Alarm History
50*
Maximum number of entries in the Alarm History. The oldest entries
are deleted when this limit is exceeded.
Table 134: PXM20 operator unit
23.3.14 PXM20-E Operator Unit
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
[200]
Number of PX that can be operated.
The visibility of the PX automation stations can be limited on the
BACnet network. This is only useful if the site is restricted to one
BACnet network.
Alarm administration
Only the alarms from the site where the user is logged on are
displayed. (PXM20-E self-registers as temporary alarm recipient for all
devices of a site).
BACnet objects in alarm per site
[250*]
Maximum number of BACnet objects per site.
The administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per site
is limited. Others cannot be displayed or operated in Alarm Viewer
when there are more BACnet objects in alarm.
Alarm History
[100*]
Maximum number of entries in the Alarm History.
The oldest entries are deleted when this limit is exceeded.
Table 135: PXM20-E operator unit
Siemens
375 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
23.3.15 PXM10 Operator Unit
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
1*
Only the connected automation station / system controller can be
operated.
Alarm administration
Management of the alarms of the PXC to which the PXM10 is
connected.
BACnet objects in alarm per PXC
25*
Max. number of BACnet objects in alarm per PXC.
The management of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per PXC
is limited. Others cannot be displayed or operated in Alarm Viewer
when there are more BACnet objects in alarm.
Table 136: PXM10 operator unit
23.3.16 PXA30-W0 and PXA40-W0 Web Controller Option
Modules
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
1*
Only one PX with web controller can be operated, with attached
module PXA30/40-W0.
Alarm administration
Alarm Viewer only handles the alarms from the local device.
SMS/Email messages
50*
Maximum number of SMS/email messages that can be sent.
There is a limit to the number of messages sent by SMS/email. If
more than this number of BACnet objects are in alarm in the BACnet
internetwork, no SMS/email objects will be sent for these.
Alarm History
[250*]
Maximum number of entries in the Alarm History.
The oldest entries are deleted when this limit is exceeded.
Web graphic pages
[100]
Number of web graphics: Limited at present by the available memory
for the sum of all files of max. 7 MB.
Objects per web graphics page
60
Number of objects per web graphic.
Web clients
4
Number of simultaneously active web clients.
Table 137: Web-Controller Optionsmodule PXA30-W0 und PXA40-W0
PXA40-W0 can only be used together with PXC00/100/200-E.D (BACnet/IP).
PXA30-W0 can only be used together with PXC00/64/128-U.
23.3.17 PXA30-W1/W2 and PXA40-W1/W2 BACnet/IP Web
Controller Option Modules
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
[20]
Number of PX that one web controller can operate.
Alarm administration
Management of all alarms in the BACnet internetwork (from all sites)
(PXA30/40-W1/W2 registers as a temporary alarm recipient with all
devices in the BACnet internetwork).
In Alarm Viewer, only the alarms from the site where the user is
logged on are displayed.
However, alarms from all sites can be forwarded via SMS and/or
email.
BACnet objects in alarm per internetwork
376 | 416
Siemens
1,000*
Maximum number of BACnet objects in the alarm per BACnet
internetwork.
Administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per BACnet
internetwork is limited. Others are not handled when there are more
BACnet object in alarm.
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
Item
Limit
Description
BACnet objects in alarm per site
250*
Maximum number of BACnet objects per site.
23
The administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per site
is limited. Others cannot be displayed or operated in Alarm Viewer
when there are more BACnet objects in alarm.
SMS/Email messages
50*
Maximum number of SMS / email messages that can be sent.
The number of messages sent via SMS/email is limited. No
SMS/emails messages are sent when there are more BACnet object
in alarm in the BACnet internetwork.
Alarm History
[250*]
Maximum number of entries in the Alarm History.
The oldest entries are deleted when this limit is exceeded.
Web graphic pages (VV2 only)
[100]
Number of web graphics: Limited at present by the available memory
for the sum of all files of max. 7 MB.
Objects per web graphics page (VV2 only)
60
Number of objects per web graphic
Web clients
4
Number of simultaneously active web clients
Table 138: PXA30-W1/W2 and PXA40-W1/W2 BACnet/IP web controller option modules
PXA40-W1/W2 can only be used together with PXC00/100/200-E.D (BACnet/IP).
PXA30-W1/W2 can only be used together with PXC00/64/128-U.
23.3.18 PXA30-W1/W2 BACnet/LonTalk Web Controller Option
Modules
Item
Limit
Description
PX (no PXC3)
[15]
Number of PX that one web controller can operate.
Alarm administration
Management of all alarms in the BACnet internetwork (from all sites)
(PXA30/40-W1/W2 registers as a temporary alarm recipient with all
devices in the BACnet internetwork).
In Alarm Viewer, only the alarms from the site where the user is
logged on are displayed.
However, alarms from all sites can be forwarded via SMS and/or
email.
BACnet objects in alarm per internetwork
100*
Maximum number of BACnet objects in the alarm per BACnet
internetwork.
Administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per BACnet
internetwork is limited. Others are not handled when there are more
BACnet object in alarm.
BACnet objects in alarm per site
50*
Maximum number of BACnet objects per site.
The administration of the number of BACnet objects in alarm per site
is limited. Others cannot be displayed or operated in Alarm Viewer
when there are more BACnet objects in alarm.
SMS/Email messages
50*
Maximum number of SMS / email messages that can be sent.
The number of messages sent via SMS/email is limited. No
SMS/emails messages are sent when there are more BACnet object
in alarm in the BACnet internetwork.
Alarm History
[50*]
Maximum number of entries in the Alarm History.
The oldest entries are deleted when this limit is exceeded.
Web graphic pages (VV2 only)
[100]
Number of web graphics: Limited at present by the available memory
for the sum of all files of max. 7 MB.
Objects per web graphics page (VV2 only)
60
Number of objects per web graphic
Web clients
4
Number of simultaneously active web clients
Table 139: PXA30-W1/W2 BACnet/LonTalk web controller option modules
PXA40-W1/W2 can only be used together with PXC00/100/200-E.D (BACnet/IP).
Siemens
377 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
PXA30-W1/W2 can only be used together with PXC00/64/128-U.
23.3.19 PXG3.W100 Desigo Web Server
General
Item
Limit
Automation station (PX…)
Description
Unlimited number of PX (limited only by the BACnet object and the
number of customized views).
Adhere to the specified Desigo PX.. limits.
Configuration data size
7 MB*
Limited by the available memory for all configuration data
(Configurationdata.tar).
BACnet objects, total number
2,000*
Max. number of BACnet objects engineered on PXG3.W100.
Permanently displayed BACnet objects
300
Total number of permanently displayed BACnet objects which are
updated by PXG3.W100.
Customized Views
25*
Max. number of customized views (memory limit of PXG3.W100).
Table 140: General
Customized views
Item
Limit
Description
BACnet objects
100*
Max. number of BACnet objects per customized view.
Trends
10
Number of trends per customized view.
Scheduler
10
Number of schedulers per customized view.
Graphics pages
5
Number of graphics pages per customized view.
Table 141: Customized views
Graphics pages
Item
BACnet objects
Limit
Description
60*
Max. number of BACnet objects per graphics page.
Table 142: Graphics pages
Connected web clients
Item
Limit
Description
Touch panel
10*
Max. number of touch panels per PXG3.W100 with overview pages.
Web clients, max. system design
3*
Max. number of registered users per PXG3.W100, where the limit of
permanently displayed BACnet objects of all clients may not be
exceeded at maximum system design1.
At low system design, more than 3 users can be logged in
concurrently.
Example: 1 customized view at 3 graphics pages at 10 BACnet
objects each. If 10 web clients are connected to it, the system limit
(300 permanently displayed BACnet objects) is reached.
All system limits must be adhered to simultaneously.
Table 143: Connected web clients
Key:
378 | 416
Siemens
CM110664en
2017-05-31
System Configuration
Devices
1
23
An example of a maximum system design:
- 20 customized views
- 5 graphics pages per customized view
- 20 BACnet objects per graphics page. System limit: 2000 BACnet objects total and 100 BACnet
objects per customized view.
- 3 Web clients with the above design. System limit: 300 permanently displayed BACnet objects.
- 10 trends per customized view
- 10 schedulers per customized view. System limit: The configuration data size < 7MB applies to
all of the above.
23.3.20 PXG3.L and PXG3.M BACnet Routers
Item
Limit
Description
BDT (Broadcast Distribution Table)
[50*]
Max. number of BBMDs (BACnet Broadcast Management Devices) in
a BACnet internetwork. If a BACnet router is in its own IP segment, it
must be configured as a BBMD.
FDT (Foreign Device Table)
[50*]
Maximum number of foreign devices which can register with the
BACnet router.
Desigo CC and Desigo Insight management stations in a remote IP
segment count as foreign devices.
Ethernet bit rate
10/100 Mbit/s
The router supports 10/100 Mbps.
MS/TP telegrams
[100 - 140] pkt/s
@115,200 bps
The BACnet router integrates BACnet MS/TP not as a field bus in the
network. The router operates transparently and routes all data traffic
addressed to the subnet. This is why global broadcast telegrams
negatively impact transmission performance of the router and end
devices.
[-120] pkt/s
@76,800 bps
Max. [~4,5] KB/s
Recommendation: Do not carry out time and security-critical process
controls using BACnet MS/TP.
Depends on baudrate, number of nodes and maximum number of
data frames (N max_info_frames).
BACnet/LonTalk
[100 - 120] pkt/s
@78 KB/s
Max. [~4,5] KB/s
BACnet/IPv4
[~2500] pkt/s
Max. [~500] KB/s
BACnet/IPv6
1
The BACnet router integrates one (1) BACnet/LonTalk network. The
router operates transparently. The same restrictions apply to global
broadcast telegrams as for MS/TP.
The BACnet router can route between two BACnet/IP networks. The
BACnet/IP networks have different UDP ports.
The BACnet router integrates one (1) BACnet/IPv6 network. The
router works transparent, but when connection ports for BACnet/IPv4
and BACnet/IPv6 are used simultaneously, make sure that no
unintentional ethernet loops are created on the IT side.
Table 144: PXG3.L and PXG3.M BACnet routers
23.3.21 PXG80-N BACnet Router
Item
Limit
Description
BDT (Broadcast Distribution Table)
10*
Max. number of BBMDs (BACnet Broadcast Management Devices) in
a BACnet internetwork. If a BACnet router is in its own IP segment, it
must be configured as a BBMD.
FDT (Foreign Device Table)
10*
Maximum number of foreign devices which can register with the
BACnet router.
Desigo CC and Desigo Insight management stations in a remote IP
segment count as foreign devices.
Ethernet bit rate
10 Mbit/s
The router only supports 10 Mbps. Use dual-speed hub/switch.
Table 145: PXG80-N BACnet router
Siemens
379 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
23
System Configuration
Devices
23.3.22 SX OPC
Item
Limit
Description
SX OPC applications
1
SX OPC application per PC. The performance depends on the PC
hardware.
OPC server
[10]
Max. number; OPC data access 2.x or 3.0 specification.
BACnet objects
20,000*
Maximum number of BACnet objects.
Configured alarm recipients
3*
Temporary alarm receiver
20*
Minus configured alarm recipients.
Alarm-generating objects
[2,000]
Alarm-generating objects (of total 20,000 BACnet objects).
SX BACnet references client resources 1
[1,000]
Trendlog objects
1000
Maximum number.
Scheduler program / Scheduler objects
[15]
Per BACnet server.
Calendar objects
[10]
Table 146: SX OPC
Key:
1
Max. number of BACnet client connections (COF or polling), that is, values read from or written to
(commanded) the own automation station or a remote automation station.
BACnet client connections are used in Input, Output, Scheduler, Trendlog and Group objects (all
NameRef_Type inputs with AddrKind = B). The configured alarm receivers of the Notification
Class objects do NOT require any BACnet client references.
The available number of BACnet client references does not address more than 50 different
remote automation stations.
23.3.23 Desigo CC
Ensure that your project does not violate any of the listed system limitations.
Item
Limit
Maximum number of objects
handled by the Management
System Server
150,000 (requires HW Category D, restricted to 2 languages)
Maximum number of Installed
Clients
10
Maximum number of Windows
App and Web Clients
27
Maximum number of active Web
service sessions
100
Maximum number of FEPs
5
Maximum number of drivers per
FEP and Server
5
Maximum of tags exposed by the
OPC Server
40,000
Minimum network throughput for
Windows App or Web Clients
using VPN
Minimum 512 kbps up / 6 Mbps down (ADSL)
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Item
Limit
Alarm load (rate of new alarms)
Desigo CC has been tested for the alarm loads listed below. Do not exceed:
23
Constant load of 1 alarm per second in average
10 alarms per second in average over a time period of 20 minutes
50 alarms per second over a time period of 20 seconds (alarm burst) (the test was measured with one
alarm burst per hour).
"Alarm per second" indicates the arrival of a new event/fault/alarm and includes the handling cycle
until it is closed later. If Operating Procedures (OPS) are used during event handling, the maximum
load is reduced depending on the complexity of the OPS.
Maximum number of Activity logs
per day
1,000,000
Maximum number of Event
records per day
1,000,000
Maximum number of Trend
records per day
4,200,000
Table 147: Desigo CC system limits
For further system configurations of the Desigo CC management platform, see
Desigo CC System Description Part C Appendix (A6V10415500).
Desigo CC V2.1 does not support Terminal Server.
Visonik is not integrated in Desigo CC.
NCRS is not integrated in Desigo CC.
NITEL is not integrated in Desigo CC.
Unigyr is not integrated in Desigo CC.
A pharma solution will be implemented in Desigo CC V3.0.
23.3.24 Desigo CC with Desigo Room Automation
Item
Limit
Description
Rooms per Desigo CC device
[3,000]
Max. number of rooms per Desigo CC V2.1 device.
Table 148: Desigo CC with Desigo Room Automation
23.3.25 Desigo CC with PX Subsystem
Item
Limit
Description
BACnet internetworks
10
Internetwork can be extended with additional FEPs.
Max. FEPs: 5
Connected sites
80*
Max. number of sites that can be simultaneously connected.
This corresponds as well to max. 80 defined sites, since Connect
does not exist.
Defined users
[100]
Max. number of definable users.
This is not a fixed, definable limit. Theoretically, the maximum number
would be 65535, but that does not make much sense.
Active users
10
Max. number of users that can be active at the same time.
The limits for maximum number of clients apply to operating a PX
subsystem through Desigo Web.
BACnet objects
[65,000]
Max. number of physical BACnet objects (corresponds to 150,000
data points).
Table 149: Desigo CC with PX subsystem
Siemens
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23.3.26 Desigo Insight General Limits
The limits are valid per Desigo Insight project.
Item
Limit
Description
Physical data points
[100'000*]
Citect tags
[200'000*]
Users
[100]
Defined.
Users
10
Concurrently active for Desigo Insight workstation.
Users
14
Concurrently active for Terminal Server (7 per server) – 32 bit.
Users
40
Concurrently active for Terminal Server (20 per server) – 64 bit.
Users
100
Concurrently active for Web Server (50 per server).
Citect graphic pages
[2'000]
Data points on one side
200
Typically 50.
To ensure satisfactory performance, do not use more than 50 data
points per page for web pages.
RX displayed on one page
[100]
Typically one floor.
Reaction time when opening a graphic
Typically 4s
Depends on topology, hardware configuration, project size, user
activity, etc.
Online trends per desktop user
[100]
Channels (curves).
Online trends per desktop user
[150'000]
Number of trend values sampled online.
This restriction limits the length of time an online trend may run:
Max. 24 hours of live sampling, with 100 channels and a sample rate
of 1 minute.
With fewer channels or a reduced number of samples, the running
time can be increased.
Online trends per server (RDT or Web)
[100]
Channels (curves).
The limits are per server. Correspondingly fewer trend channels per
web or RDT client can be used.
Online trends per server (RDT or Web)
[150'000]
Number of values sampled online.
This restriction limits the length of time an online trend may run:
Max. 24 hours of live sampling, with 100 channels and a sample rate
of 1 minute.
With fewer channels or a reduced number of samples, the running
time can be increased.
Tendlog values per day
[3'000'000]
We recommend no more than 100,000 queries of trend log values per
day via PTP. The maximum data amount can be limited by projectspecific engineering.
Trendlog objects
[10'000]
The defining limit is the number of trendlog values per day. The
maximum number of trendlog objects is based on the assumption that
approximately 100 values are recorded per trendlog object per day.
We recommend no more than 1,000 queries of trend log values per
day via PTP. The maximum data amount can be limited by projectspecific engineering.
Trendlog values available in database
[135'000'000]
135 million. If 3,000,000 values are logged daily, the database
capacity must be set to 1 month. At 2 million, capacity can be
increased to 2 months, that is, users can view trends from the past 2
months without having to get them from the archive.
Log entries per day
[32'000]
The system is able to process 1 entry per second. A higher load is
possible for a brief period (max. 500 per minute). To ensure the max.
number of entries in the database is not exceeded, 32,000 entries per
day cannot be exceeded for 1-month database capacity (2 months:
16,000, 3 months: 11,000, 1 year: 2750).
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Item
Limit
Description
Log entries available in database
[1'000'000]
1 million. If 10,000 entries are logged daily, database capacity can be
set at 3 months, that is, users can view log entires from the past three
months without having to get them from the archive.
Active alarms in alarm database
[400]
Alarms per minute (including routing)
3
Average per day. Typical maximum is 1.
Alarms are processed, for example, acknowledged and forwarded.
Alarms per alarm cascade
[350]
Alarm cascades may occur up to once per day.
Communication time for an event
Typically 3s
Depends on topology, hardware configuration, project size, user
activity, etc.
Typically 10 … 15 s for web pages, depending primarily on network
bandwidth.
Queued router jobs
[5000]
Including unacknowledged popup
Router groups
[500]
SMS recipients
[100]
Router table entries
[1000]
Report definitions
[1'000]
Alarm report entries
[1'000]
Alarm reports executed
[720]
Per day, if the number of entries in average in the alarm database is <
100.
Log report entries
[1'000'000]
Given by the max. number of log entries in the database.
Log reports executed
[144]
Per day, if the number of entries if the average number of entries in
the log database is < 100,000.
Point report entries
[10'000]
Including emergency lighting and group reports
Point reports executed
[288]
Per day, if the number of online objects per report is < 500 and is
already limited accordingly in the address binding (does not apply to
telephony connections).
Maximum number of Reaction Processor
entries
[1'000]
Maximum number of entries in the reaction catalog.
Maximum number of output objects
[300]
Maximum number of output objects in the reaction catalog.
Reaction time on COV
Typically 3s
Reaction time to COVs.
Time resolution for reaction entries
[1 min]
Time resolution for reaction time entries.
Sites
[1'000]
Simultaneous connections to sites
[8]
Serial.
Simultaneous connections to sites
[255]
LAN/WAN
Maximum number scope rules per definition
[50]
Maximum number of entries for rules in the scope designer per scope
definition (valid for categories and disciplines).
Maximum number scope definitions for
categories
[unlimited]
Maximum number of scope definitions for categories in the System
Configurator.
Maximum number scope definitions for
disciplines
[unlimited]
Maximum number of scopes definitions for disciplines in the System
Configurator.
Maximum number scope definitions per user
group / user
[25]
Maximum number to a user group / user assigned scope definition
(total number – valid for categories and disciplines).
The main factor is the number of simultaneously run reports and
hence, the number of objects of the same type (alarm, log or online
entries) that are read simultaneously.
Table 150: Desigo Insight general limits
Siemens
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System Configuration
Devices
Reaction times with Desigo Web are slower than with Desigo Insight or Desigo
Insight Terminal Server. Reaction times are highly dependent on the available
bandwidth and the contents of the requested page.
The values defined above for trend, logging, alarms, reporting and reactions refer
to the limits for the application concerned. Above all, a limit is imposed in the
network by the number of channels available. This means that Desigo Insight
cannot run in a stable manner if all these applications are operated at or close to
their upper system limits. The channels available vary depending on the
subsystem (see the following chapters).
23.3.27 Desigo Insight Terminal Server
Item
Limit
Description
Remote Desktop Client per Server
7
32-bit: The limit is heavily dependent on the performance of the server
(CPU, memory). Min. memory required: 512 MB + 256 MB per active
client.
Remote Desktop Client per Server
20 - 40
64-bit: The limit is heavily dependent on server performance (memory,
CPU). Minimum RAM: 512 MB basic required + 256 MB per active
client.
Minimum Bandwith
56 kb/s
Recommended: 100 kbps or higher.
Desigo Insight Terminal Server requires Windows 2008 R2 or
Windows 2012 Server.
Table 151: Desigo Insight Terminal Server
23.3.28 Desigo Insight with Desigo Room Automation
Item
Limit
Description
Rooms per site
[4,000]1
Max. number of rooms per Desigo Insight site.
Table 152: Desigo Insight with Desigo Room Automation
Key:
1
Desigo Insight can import up to 2,000 rooms in one site. If more rooms are needed, you must
engineer an additional site. The Desigo Insight Group Editor cannot handle groups over multiple
sites.
23.3.29 Desigo Insight with PX Subsystem
Item
Limit
Description
BACnet internetworks
200 IP + [3
For each data link layer a BACnet internetwork is configured in Desigo
LonTalk] + 1* PTP Insight. Several internetworks could be created for LonTalk and IP.
For PTP connections (remote sites) only one internetwork can be
defined.
Update channels
[1'000]
Max. number of simultaneously active BACnet COVs (Change of
Value).
Load due to the Reaction Processor in Desigo [100]
Insight
Per PX controller (25% of 400 channels).
Connected sites
Max. number of concurrently connected sites.
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Siemens
255*
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System Configuration
Devices
Item
Limit
Description
Defined sites
[1'000]
Max. number of sites which can be defined.
Defined users
[100]
Max. number of users which can be defined.
Active users
10
Max. number of users which can be active simultaneously.
23
When operating a PX subsystem via Desigo Web or Desigo Insight
Terminal Server, the limits on the maximum number of clients apply.
BACnet objects
[100'000]
Max. number of BACnet objects that can be integrated into Desigo
Insight.
Table 153: Desigo Insight with PX subsystem
23.3.30 Desigo Insight with Visonik DCS
Item
Limit
Description
Desigo Insight per subsystem / device
[4]
Perr Visonik DCS.
Desigo Insight per subsystem device
[10]
Per Visonik system network.
DCS objects
[100'000]
Max. number of DCS objects that can be integrated into
Desigo Insight.
Connected sites
20
Max. number of concurrently connected sites.
Update channels (COV based)
[1'400]
Per Visonik DCS.
Load due to the Reaction Processor in Desigo [350]
Insight
Per DCS (25% of 1400 channels).
Table 154: Desigo Insight with Visonik DCS
23.3.31 Desigo Insight with Integral NCRS Controller
Item
Limit
Description
Number of Desigo Insight workstations or
servers per NCRS system controller
2*
Max. number of active connections per NCRS (for more connections,
additional NCRS controllers are required).
NCRS objects/blocks
[200'000]
Max. number of NCRS objects that can be integrated into Desigo
Insight.
Connected sites
[50]
Max. number of concurrently connected sites.
Update channels (COV based)
512*
Per NCRS connection.
Load due to the Reaction Processor in Desigo [128]
Insight
Per NCRS (25% of 512 channels).
Table 155: Desigo Insight with Integral NCRS controller
23.3.32 Desigo Insight with Integral NITEL Interface
Item
Limit
Description
Number of Desigo Insight workstations or
servers per NITEL communications interface
1*
Max. number of concurrently active connections per NITEL.
NITEL/RS data point objects
[200'000]
Max. number of RS data points that can be integrated into Desigo
Insight.
Connected sites
8
Max. number of concurrently connected sites.
Siemens
A maximum of 4 dial-up connections may be defined per NITEL
(additional NITEL communications interfaces are required in the case
of several concurrent connections, max. 3 allowed per RS bus).
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Item
Limit
Description
Update channels (COV based)
[200]
Per NITEL.
Load due to the Reaction Processor in Desigo [25]
Insight
Per NITEL (25% of 100 channels).
Users in Desigo Insight Terminal Server mode 1*
for NITEL Terminal (per NITEL)
Max. number of users.
Users in Desigo Insight Terminal Server mode 1*
for RS access (per NITEL)
Max. number of users.
This interrupts the operation of the other Desigo Insight applications.
This interrupts the operation of the other Desigo Insight applications.
Table 156: Desigo Insight with Integral NITEL interface
23.3.33 Desigo Insight with Unigyr
Item
Limit
Description
Desigo Insight per subsystem/device
2
Per Unigyr BLN.
If more than 2 Desigo Insight workstations are used, I/O servers are
required on the LAN.
Unigyr controllers per system
200
Typical limit 30.
200 controllers with remote connections (as in Unigyr system).
Number of Profibus cards per PC
See Unigyr limitation.
Unigyr physical data points per system
[6,000]
Typical limit 3,000.
An average of 30 Citect tags is required per physical data point.
Unigyr parameters/pins per system
[200,000]
Typical limit 30,000.
The number of Unigyr parameters/pins is limited by the permissible
number of Citect tags.
The number of Citect tags per I/O server is limited.
Connected sites
[4]
Max. number od concurrently connected sites.
Limited by the permitted number of I/O servers.
Transfer rate at BLN
[10 values/s]
Transfer rate over dialup telephone network
[2 values/s]
Typical value with 30 controllers.
Table 157: Desigo Insight with Unigyr
23.3.34 Desigo Insight with OPC/SCADA Subsystem
Item
Limit
Description
Number of remote OPC Servers that can be
integrated to one I/O server machine
[32*]
There is a maximum limit of 32 remote OPC servers, for each of which
one board and one port must be created.
Maximum number of variable tags per I/O
Server
[25,000]
For every additional 25,000 tags, use additional I/O server(s).
Maximum number of variable tags per OPC
I/O device
[300]
Each OPC server can be configured as a multiple I/O device, thereby
creating multiple logical groups.
If OPC quality stamps and timestamps are engineered, these are
counted as additional tags.
Minimum OPC group refresh rate
1,000 ms
Depending upon the machine resource consumption, the refresh rate
may have to be increased.
Minimum alarm scan period
500 ms
Depending upon the machine resource consumption, the scan period
may have to be increased.
Maximum number of alarm tags (of all types)
running on the same machine as the I/O
server
[5,000]
If the number of alarm tags exceeds 5,000, we recommend that you
run the alarm server on a separate machine.
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System Configuration
Devices
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Item
Limit
Description
Maximum number of trend tags
[5,000]
If the number of trend tags exceeds 5,000, we recommend that you
run the alarm server on a separate machine.
Only periodic trend tags are supported.
Minimum sample period for trend tags
1* sek
Maximum load on trend export
[1,000 samples /
minute]
Minimum bandwidth required between
I/O/trend/alarm server and clients
[100 Mbit/s]
The trend export load is calculated as follows: Number of trend tags,
sample period and export upload period. If the load exceeds this
amount, we recommend that you run the trend server on a separate
machine and use SQL server edition instead of MSDE.
Table 158: Desigo Insight with OPC/SCADA subsystem
23.3.35 Desigo Insight Pharma Solution
The integrated Pharma solution introduced as part of Desigo Insight V4.0, with the
functions Audit Trail and XML archive file format, is also an integral component of
Desigo Insight V6.0. The mandatory comment option is supported as part of the
standard license as of Desigo V5.0 together exclusively with Desigo PX.
With Desigo Insight V5.0, the high requirements placed on IT integration,
availability and long-term data backup are tested and secured.
23.3.36 Desigo Connect
Item
Limit
Description
Data connections
200
Max. number of definable data connections.
Desigo Connect allows the exchange of data between the automation
stations of a PX site and the automation stations of a Unigyr, Integral
or Visonik site via Desigo Insight.
The Unigyr, Integral and Visonik sites cannot exchange data between
themselves.
The data exchange is only possible when the Desigo Insight
management station is active. The exchange of critical values is not
permitted.
Table 159: Desigo Connect
23.3.37 Desigo Reaction Processor
Item
Limit
Description
Maximum number of entries
[1,000]
Maximum number of entries in the reaction catalog.
Maximum number of output objects
[300]
Maximum number of output objects in the reaction catalog.
Reaction time on COV
[3 Sek]
Reaction time to COVs.
Maximum reaction frequency
[1/5 Sek]
The maximum frequency of all reactions, that is, a reaction can be
processed every 5 seconds.
Maximum number of reactions
[10,000/24h]
The maximum number of all reactions that can be processed during a
24 hour period.
Limit: Load created by Reaction Processor in
Desigo Insight
Siemens
Limit control of load created by reaction program.
[100]
Per PX compact (25% of 400 channels).
[400]
Per PX modular (25% of 1600 channels).
[350]
Per DCS (25% of 1400 channels).
[128]
Per NCRS (25% of 512 channels).
[25]
Per NITEL (25% of 100 channels).
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Table 160: Desigo Reaction Processor
23.3.38 ADP/CC
Item
Limit
Description
ADP/CC clients
[99]
Max. 99 clients (hard coded).
Database size [GB]
[10]
Limitation with Microsoft SQL Server 2012 R2 Express.
Database size [GB]
-
No limit with SQL server.
- Excel data series
[128]
Max. number of data series in Excel.
- List data series
[256]
Max. number of data series in list.
- Trend data series
[10]
Max. number of data series in trend.
- Values per data series
[10,000]
Max. number of values per data series in a trend.
Link to Desigo from V2.3
[255]
Links to Desigo Insight as of V2.3 with DataStudio.
Links to other SBT systems and devices
[255]
Links to DataStudio with Unigyr, TS1500, MS2000, Siclimat, and
Desigo Insight V1.1.
ADP reporting series
Direct link to DataComm with Visonik.
CC node in the building structure
[1,000]
1,000 nodes recommended (technical limit is 9,500* nodes).
CC meters
[2,000 – 4,000]
Depends on PC performance.
Table 161: ADP/CC
23.3.39 InfoCenter
Item
Limit
Description
InfoCenter clients
[99*]
Max. 99 clients with the SQL server.
Database size [GB]
[6]
For active and auxiliary databases.
Auxiliary databases
[20]
Max. number of auxiliary databases.
- Import data series
[50,000]
Max. number of trend data series from data servers (recommended).
- Extracted values
[10,000]
Max. number of summary data series.
- Tree branches
[2,000]
Max. number of branches in the hierarchical structure.
- InfoCenter users
[1,000*]
Max. number of users per Windows users group.
- Data collection performance
50,000
Max. number of records per data sampling intervall.
- Links to Desigo Insight
[5]
Links to Desigo Insight with InfoCenter data server.
- Links to OPC server
5*
Links to OPC servers with the InfoCenter OPC option.
- Report templates
[1,000]
Max. number of report templates.
- Data series per graph
10
Max. number of data series per graphic template.
- Data series per report object
50*
Max. number of data series per report object template.
InfoCenter reporting series
Report Manager
Table 162: ADP/CC
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23
23.3.40 Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Item
Limit
Description
Length of site name
9
Max. 9 characters.
Number of XWP per BACnet internetwork
(parallel engineering)
10
Parallel engineering is possible under the following limitations:
Node setup: Only one XWP per LonWorks/IP segment.
Download and online operation: Only one XWP per automation
station.
Number of I/O function block instance per
plan
200
The number of I/O function block instances are limited per plan
(compound). Mapping of function blocks on BACnet sets the limit. The
limit is lower for other function blocks mapped to BACnet.
Table 163: Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP)
Problems with a high
number of data points per
automation station
When the maximum number of data points for a PXC..U is reached (350), it may no
longer be possible to load the program into the PX automation stations due to the
number of data blocks generated during compilation.
In this case, carry out the following steps on the PX automation station:
1. Reload parameters.
2. Run Reorganize in the PX Design Manager.
3. Go to Tools > Settings > Compilation download and select the Compress
check box.
4. Recompile the data.
5. Perform a full download.
Figure 269: Compress data blocks in PX
23.3.41 Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT)
Item
Limit
Description
Function blocks
[8,000]
Max. number of function blocks per application function.
Table 164: Desigo Automation Building Tool (ABT)
Siemens
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Applications
23.4 Applications
23.4.1
Peak Demand Limiting (PDL)
Item
Limit
Comment
Monitored loads
[28*]
Max. number of monitored loads.
Tariff limits
4*
Max. number of configurable tariff limits.
Cycle time [ms]
500
Minimum cycle time required to ensure the functioning of the PDL
application.
To guarantee the cycle time, use a PX modular automation station
(PXC64/128 U, PXC 100/200…D, PXC12/22/36…D, or PXC52 from
hardware version D).
Do not use the the automation station with the PDL application to
control any other plant.
The PDL application must be confined to one automation station only.
Limit control is binary only (enabled/disabled). Step control (Stage1,
Stage2, Stage3) or modulating control (0…100%) is not possible.
Commissioning and operation are only possible with XWP.
There is no provision for backward compatibility with future PDL
applications.
Table 165: Peak Demand Limiting (PDL)
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Compatibility
Glossary
24
24 Compatibility
For information on the system compatibility with the Desigo CC management
station, see Desigo CC System Description (A6V10415500).
For information on the compatibility of Desigo S7 with other Desigo system
components, see chapter Desigo S7 Automation Stations.
24.1 Glossary
Abbreviations
The following abbreviations are used in this document:
Abbreviation
Description
ABT
Automation Building Tool (XWP program component for engineering Desigo Room Automation)
ADP
Advanced Data Processing
AS
Automation Station
BOS
Branch Office Server
CC
Desigo CC management station / Consumption Control
CAS
Corporate Application Solutions (standard PX application libraries provided by HQ)
DCM
Desigo Configuration Module
Desigo PX
Compact and modular automation stations and system controllers (PXC…D and PXC..-U)
DI
Desigo Insight
DIGG
Desigo Insight Graphic Generator
DNT
Discovery Network Tool
DPT
Desigo Point Test Tool (for Desigo PX)
DTS
Desigo Toolset
ETS
Engineering Tool Software (KNX commissioning tool for RXB and KNX third-party devices)
FEP
Front End Processor (the computer serving as the interface between the automation level and
Desigo CC)
FW
Firmware
HQ
Headquarters of Siemens Building Technologies in Zug (Switzerland)
HW
Hardware
IE
Internet Explorer
IIS
Internet Information Services
LED
LibSet Extension of Desigo (assigned LibSet numbering system displaying functional extensions
of Libsets)
LibSets
Library Set. Standard application libraries. Each LibSet delivery is assigned to a Desigo system
version.
LMU
Library Maintenance Utility (library maintenance tool for XWP)
OS
Operating System
Operator units
Operator units Desigo Touch and Web (PXM40/50 with PXG3.W100), PXM20(-E), PXM10, PX
Web and Desigo Insight
RC
Regional Company (Siemens regional company)
RXT
LonWorks commissining tool for RXC
SD
System Design (part of the Desigo tool set)
SP
Service Pack
Siemens
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Compatibility
Desigo Version Compatibility Definition
Abbreviation
Description
SSA
Service & Setup Assistant (commissioning tool for Desigo Room Automation)
SW
Software
V5.1 SP
Service Pack version for Desigo V5.1
VVS
Valid Version Set (set of released versions)
WEoF
Internal Siemens PC standard (only relevant for Siemens employees)
XWP
Desigo Xworks Plus
Table 166: Abbreviations
Terms
The following terms are used in this document:
Term
Description
Project data
Desigo engineering and project data required to create runtime systems, but that are no longer
needed for operation (offline data).
Runtime system
Firmware (loaded) installed on the hardware of the customer plant or software with compiled
project data including libraries (online data).
New
New Desigo customer project with no Desigo runtime system and project data.
Extension
Existing plant or installation (existing Desigo runtime system with project data) that is being
expanded or extended (for example, additional buildings).
Migration
Replacement of existing plant or installation (existing Desigo / Visonik / Unigyr / Integral runtime
system with project data) by new technology with a change of software and/or hardware.
Upgrade
Functional improvement to existing plant or installation (existing Desigo runtime system with
project data) by deploying developments for a new Desigo system version.
Update
Existing plant or installation (existing Desigo runtime system with project data) is updated within
the same version (for example, to eliminate errors with a service pack).
Project data conversion
Online Desigo project data from earlier Desigo versions > V2.3x are migrated to the current
ABT/XWP V6.0 version when opened in ABT/XWP V6.0.
During conversion, the existing database structure and/or associated tool landscape is migrated to
the latest version. A conversion always impacts all project data of a tool project.
The project data and libraries remain unchanged. The runtime system (online project data) does
not change, that is, the original version status remains as is.
Table 167: Terms
24.2 Desigo Version Compatibility Definition
General definition
The Desigo V6.0 version compatibility describes the compatibility of Desigo
products:
● Within a Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) project (incl. ABT/SSA)
● With the same tool project data
● On a Desigo V6.0 runtime system
The compatibility also comprises Desigo project data at both the management level
and room automation linked to the same Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) project.
Any reference to Desigo V5.1 also includes the Service Pack version for Desigo
V5.1 (V5.1 SP) unless otherwise mentioned.
Desigo system versions
The term refers to the various development phases of the Desigo building
automation and control system. The currently supported versions are:
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● Desigo V2.2
● Desigo V2.3
● Desigo V2.35
● Desigo V2.36
● Desigo V2.37 (Desigo Insight V3)
● Desigo V4.0
● Desigo V4.1
● Desigo V5.0
● Desigo V5.1
● Desigo V6.0
Desigo CC supports Desigo PX V5.1 SP and V6.0.
24.3 Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics
24.3.1
Compatibility with BACnet Standard
Desigo V6.0 supports the following BACnet protocol revisions:
● Desigo Insight: 1.13
● Desigo CC: 1.13
● Desigo Room Automation devices: 1.13
● Desigo PX, PXM20: 1.12
● PXG3.W100: 1.10
● PXG3 router: 1.10
There are third-party BACnet devices on the market that support higher BACnet
protocol revisions.
Figure 270: BACnet protocol revision
Desigo V6.0 does not support BACnet protocol revision functions higher than
V1.13. Usually, BACnet devices of a specific BACnet protocol revision fully support
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Compatibility
Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics
earlier revision functions (downward compatibility). However, since this is not true
in all cases, we recommend that you verify the compatibility in each case.
For an overview of the BACnet functions supported in Desigo, see BACnet
Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement (PICS) (CM110665).
UTF-8 and ANSI 3.4
BACnet protocol revision 1.10 introduced UTF-8 instead of ANSI 3.4.
If ANSI 3.4 / UTF-8 is used for BACnet communications, and if devices featuring
BACnet protocol revision < 1.10 (prior to Desigo V5.0) communicate with devices
of BACnet protocol revision ≥ 1.10 (from Desigo V5.0):
● Received BACnet character strings of type ANSI 3.4 are handled properly, as
only ANSI X3.4 code points (0..127) are sent that have coding identical to UTF8.
● Sent BACnet character strings of type UTF-8 are added properly to data
storage by Desigo devices < V5.0, provided the code points are in the range
0..127.
● If the code points are in range 128..255, UTF-8 coding (multibyte) is interpreted
as ISO-Latin-1 (1 byte) and taken over into data storage. As a result, the data
storage does not match the received string ("René" becomes "René").
To read back this type of string, Desigo devices < V5.0 use ANSI conversion
and only code points in the range 0..127 are sent ("René" becomes "RenA.").
● If the code points are in the range 128..255, UTF-8 coding (multibyte) is
rejected either by third-party devices with BACnet protocol revision < 1.10 (not
ANSI X3.4), or not interpreted along a defined rule.
● Desigo V5.0 supports UTF-8 coding for code points in the range 0..255.
● The following applies from Desigo V5.1:
– Desigo PX / Desigo Room Automation fully supports UTF-8 coding.
– Desigo Insight supports UTF-8 coding with the limitation that only the code
points for one (1) code page can be correctly displayed.
Create and delete BACnet
objects
As of Desigo V5.1 a function is available for Desigo Insight and PXC automation
stations to create and delete dynamic BACnet objects. If you use this function with
an older version, an error message will appear.
The function can be used on Desigo PXC automation stations. Desigo Room
Automation room automation stations PXC3 are not supported.
Third-party devices can be processed using the same functionality as long as they
support creating and deleting BACnet objects. The function can be used, for
example, by Desigo Insight together with third-party device controllers and similarly
by a third-party management station with PXC automation stations, as long as they
are enabled to do so.
PXM20 operating units do not display dynamic objects.
Backup and restore
BACnet devices
With the BACnet backup and restore function you can upload saved program data
(application program) from a BACnet device to Desigo Insight and restore it to the
same or a new BACnet device.
The backup and restore function can only be run if the third-party BACnet devices
support it.
The backup and restore function is supported by PXC3 room automation stations
from Desigo version V5.0.
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Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics
Compatibility Desigo
Insight
Figure 271: Version compatibility
For information on creating and deleting BACnet objects and backing up and
restoring BACnet devices, see Desigo Insight Engineering of user functions
(CM110592).
Compatibility Desigo CC
24.3.2
Desigo CC is designed as an open system and supports a variety of open
protocols and IT standards. The information in the following sections compile the
most important information on Desigo CC compatibility taken over from the Desigo
CC System Description (A6V10415500).
Compatibility with Operating Systems
Microsoft client operating systems
The following table shows which Microsoft client operating systems are compatible
with Desigo V6.0.
Desigo version
Compatibility with Microsoft client operating systems
V6.0
Windows 7 Professional /
Ultimate / Enterprise
32-Bit
64-bit
Windows 7 / Windows XPVMware Professional / Ultimate
Windows 7 64-bit (physical host)
Windows 8.13 Professional /
Enterprise
32-bit
64-bit
Windows XP 32-bit (virtual client)
XWP
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
ABT
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
ABT Site4
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Desigo CC
No
Yes5
See chapter Compatibility with
VMware
No
Yes
Desigo Insight
Yes2
Yes1
See chapter Compatibility with
VMware
No
Yes1
RXT10.3
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
RXT10.53
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
Yes
Yes
See chapter Compatibility with
VMware
Yes
Yes
Table 168: Compatibility with Microsoft client operating systems
Key:
1
Including InfoCenter V1.7 and ADP/CC V6.0
2
Including ADP/CC V6.0
3
From Desigo V5.1 SP
4
As a stand-alone installation
5
Windows 7 Professional SP1
Unlisted Microsoft client operating systems/editions (especially Home Premium)
are not supported.
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Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics
BOS only supports server operating systems.
Microsoft server operating systems
The following table below shows which Microsoft server operating systems are
compatible with Desigo V6.0 (the compatibility applies only to the Desigo V6.0
products listed below).
The end user is responsible for the correct licensing of any third-party licenses.
Desigo version
Compatibility with Microsoft server operating systems
V6.0
Windows Server 2008 (with
SP3) Standard / Enterprise
Windows Server 2008 R2
(with SP1) Standard /
Enterprise
Windows Server 2012 R23
Standard
32-bit
64-bit
64-bit
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes1
Yes2
No
Yes
Yes
Desigo CC
Desigo Insight
Branch Office Server (BOS)
Table 169: Compatibility with Microsoft server operating systems
Key:
1
Including InfoCenter V1.7 and ADP/CC V6.0
2
Including ADP/CC V6.0
3
From Desigo V5.1 SP
Unlisted Microsoft server operating systems/editions are not supported. They can,
however, be used for stand-alone SQL servers and file hosts.
24.3.3
Compatibility with SQL Servers
The following table shows which Microsoft SQL server versions are compatible with
Desigo V6.0.
Desigo version
V6.0
Compatibility with Microsoft SQL servers
SQL server 2012
SQL server 2014
SQL Server 2016
Standard
Express
Standard
Express
Standard
Express
64-bit
64-bit
64-bit
64-bit
64-Bit
64-Bit
Desigo CC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Desigo Insight1, 2, 3
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Branch Office Server (BOS)
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
Table 170: Compatibility with Microsoft SQL servers
Key:
1
Including ADP/CC V6.0
2
InfoCenter V1.7 supports only SQL Server 2014 32-bit standard. SQL 2014 32-bit can be
installed in parallel to a 64-bit SQL server.
3
MS SQL Express is supplied with the product installation DVD (Microsoft SQL Server 2014
Service Pack 2, Express Edition, Version 12.0.5000.0).
Unlisted SQL server versions/editions are not supported. Only the SQL server (as
mere database server) can be operated on either a 32-bit or 64-bit operating
system. At the product level, only 32-bit components are supported.
The Branch Office Server (BOS) is compatible with the following operating systems:
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●
Microsoft operating systems on SQL Server 2005 Express / 2005 Standard (on
Windows 2003 R2 Server, 32-bit edition).
● Microsoft operating systems on SQL Server 2008 Standard (on Windows
Server 2008 R2, 64-bit edition).
For detailed information on Desigo Insight, see chapter Management Level Desigo
Insight and Upgrade Management Level.
24.3.4
Compatibility with Microsoft Office
The following table shows which Microsoft Office versions are compatible with
Desigo V6.0.
Product
Version
Microsoft Office Versions
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) (including ABT/SSA
and other additional tools)
V6.0
MS Office 2007 (32-bit edition)
Desigo CC
V6.0
MS Office 2010 (32-bit edition)
MS Office 2007 (Standard, Small Business,
Professional, Enterprise)
MS Office 2010 (Standard, Small Business,
Professional, Enterprise)
MS Office 2013 (Standard, Small Business,
Professional, Enterprise)
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
V6.0
Desigo Insight
MS Office 2007 (32-bit edition SP2)
MS Office 2010 (32-bit edition)
MS Office 2013 (32 and 64-bit edition)
Table 171: Compatibility with Microsoft Office
24.3.5
Compatibility with Web Browsers
Desigo Touch and Web
Desigo Touch and Web support Desigo as of V4.0.
When using PXC3 room automation stations, note that the existing Desigo version
does not yet support lighting and blinds functions of Desigo Touch and Web.
The following web browsers (standard clients) are supported in addition to the PXM
touch panels:
Recommended web browser for standard operator units. Official support by
Siemens BT:
● Firefox from V4.0
Tested and released browsers. Minor deviations of display and operation to the
recommended browsers are possible. Official support by Siemens BT:
● Microsoft Internet Explorer from V10
● Safari iPad2/iPad3
Min. tested browsers. No support by Siemens BT:
● All other HTML 5.0-capable browsers, such as Chrome 10.0 and Safari 5
ABT/SSA
Supports HTML 5.0 capable browsers with native SVG format.
Desktop browser:
● Firefox as of V4.0
● Microsoft Internet Explorer as of V10
● Google Chrome 10.0
● Safari 5.1
Mobile browser:
● Firefox mobile 16
● Google Chrome mobile 18
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Compatibility
Desigo V6.0 System Compatibility Basics
●
●
Android 4.0
Safari iOS 5
Desigo CC
Supported web browser:
● Microsoft Internet Explorer 10
For notes on Desigo CC web client running in a browser shell, see Desigo CC
System Description (A6V10415500).
Desigo Insight V6.0
Supports HTML 5.0-capable browsers with native SVG format.
● Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 and 11
● Mozilla Firefox ESR from V45
● Google Chrome from V50
Browsers with Adobe SVG plugin are not supported.
PX Web with PXA30/40W..
A Microsoft Internet Explorer V6 and higher web browser is required to create and
change graphical pages.
See Web Controller Commissioning and Configuration Roller (CM110763).
24.3.6
Compatibility with VMware (Virtual Infrastructure)
The following table shows which VMware versions are compatible with Desigo
V5.0/6.0.
Product
Version
VMware version
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) (including ABT/SSA and other V5.1
additional tools)
V6.0
Desigo Insight
VMware Workstation 10/11/12
Desigo CC
V2.1
VSphere 6.0, ESXi 6.0b
Desigo Insight
V5.1
VSphere 5.5
V6.0
VSphere 6.0
V6.0 SP2
VSphere 6.5
Table 172: Compatibility with VMware
24.3.7
Compatibility of Software/Libraries on the Same PC
The installed Desigo software and LibSets (standard application libraries) on the
same PC must have the same version.
You can install Desigo Insight V6.0, Desigo CC V6.0, RXT10.3/RXT10.5 (if
required) and Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) V6.0 on one PC in any order. But you
must install the libraries at the end.
Restrictions
RXT10.5 is only supported as of Desigo V5.1 Service Pack.
RXT10.3 and RXT10.5 do not operate if installed in the same Windows
environment. The corresponding LNS server versions are not compatible. Solution:
Install one of the two components in a VMware.
Installing Desigo software from different systems versions on the same PC is not
supported. Check operating system compatibility prior to installing.
24.3.8
Hardware and Firmware Compatibility
Desigo V6.0 hardware and firmware is only partially compatible to products from
earlier versions in the same Desigo project runtime system.
BACnet peer-to-peer communication between Desigo PX devices from Desigo
V2.2 to Desigo V6.0 is guaranteed (see chapter Automation Level Desigo PX /
Room Automation).
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Restrictions
24
As soon as an automation station or a system controller with Desigo V6.0 firmware
is used in a runtime system, all operating clients, such as PXM20, PXM20-E, PXWeb, and Desigo Insight must be upgraded to Desigo V6.0 . Otherwise, only
limited operation is available.
No Desigo firmware ≥ V4 is available for PX Web interface PXG80-W(N).
24.3.9
Backward Compatibility
Desigo V6.0 software and libraries are downwards compatible. Desigo V6.0
products can process data compiled with earlier versions.
Restrictions
After upgrading Desigo project data for a Desigo software product to V6.0, the data
can only be accessed or processed with the appropriate software/LibSets for
Desigo V6.0.
24.3.10 Forward Compatibility
As of Desigo V6.0, Desigo Insight management stations V5.1 SP2 can be used
with Desigo Room Automation / PX automation stations V6.0 (upward compatible)
as long as no new V6.0 Desigo Room Automation / PX automation station
functionality is used. In this case, a forwards compatibility patch must be installed
for Desigo Insight V5.1 SP2.
Restrictions
This is beneficial in simple project situations, for example, for extending an existing
plant by just a few automation stations without any additional functionality or new
hardware device types. A firmware downgrade to the automation station or an
upgrade to the management is no longer necessary in this case.
See also chapters Management Level Desigo Insight , Upgrade to PX / Desigo
Room Automation Automation Level and VVS Desigo V6.0.
24.3.11 Engineering Compatibility
All project data on all system levels (automation level with room automation and
management level) must have the same LibSet with the same LibSet version
number (for example, V6.xxxx-xx) for unlimited engineering of tested Desigo
solutions (libraries).
Restrictions
Library extensions for V6.0 cannot be used during engineering if the upgrade of a
Desigo runtime system > V2.3x occurs on only a portion of the project data to V6.0
(for example, only Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP), but not Desigo Insight).
The library extensions cannot be used in the other project data (system levels) if
during engineering only part of the Desigo project data uses a higher LibSet
(higher version number) with extended application scope (for example, in RX, but
not Desigo Xworks Plus and Desigo Insight).
24.3.12 Compatibility with Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
The Desigo Configuration Module (DCM) version supplied with the relevant Desigo
system covers the available Desigo product scope.
When importing DCM projects from earlier DCM versions, the project is converted
to the status and options of the current DCM version. After conversion, the project
data can only be revised in the current DCM version.
DCM projects from DCM version 5.0 support import.
DCM requires Microsoft Office.
24.3.13 Compatibility with InfoCenter
InfoCenter V1.7 is compatible with the following Desigo Insight versions:
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Compatibility
When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
●
●
●
Desigo Insight V4.1 SP1 (only if you don’t use the trendlog interrupted function)
Desigo Insight V5.1 SP2
Desigo Insight V6.0
24.4 When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
PX and PXC
If you want to use an automation station or a system controller (PXC…) with
Desigo V6.0 firmware, you must upgrade all operating clients to Desigo V6.0, if you
intend to use the new functions.
PXC3x
The following requirements must be met to upgrade firmware on PXC3 room
automation stations (Desigo Room Automation) from Desigo V5.x to Desigo V6.0:
● ABT Pro project data is available.
● ABT project is converted to V6.0.
● Room automation station in ABT still has version V5.x.
● DNT is installed.
● V6.0 firmware is available.
● The administrator password V5.x for the room automation station is known (it is
visible in ABT Pro under project settings).
Do the following to upgrade firmware on a PXC3x room automation station from
Desigo V5.x to V6.0:
1. Room automation station: Restore Desigo V5.x parameters with ABT Pro.
2. Management station: Save trend data (if available).
3. ABT Pro: Delete (clear) room automation station application (but not the entire
device).
4. DNT: Load firmware.
5. ABT Pro: Upgrade room automation station to Desigo V6.0. Requirement: ABT
Pro Library V6.0 is installed.
6. Room automation station: Run a full compile.
7. Room automation station: Load program.
8. ABT-SSA: Check if the room automation station changes to operational after
loading.
9. ABT-SSA: Check if the TX, KNX PL-Link and DALI (if available) buses are
operational.
If a PXC3 already has the Desigo V6.0 firmware, newer V6.x firmware versions
must be loaded with ABT Startup.
If the load of a PXC3 in V5.x approaches the upper load limit, the program may not
be able to be loaded after a firmware upgrade. In this case, the PXC3 must be
replaced by a PXC3x-100 of the new series.
Stricter guidelines for passwords apply after a firmware upgrade to V6.0. The user
profile is loaded by ABT Site after the program is loaded by ABT Pro. The V5.x
password is no longer valid at this point.
24.4.1
Management Level Desigo CC
For information about the system compatibility of the Desigo CC management
station, see Desigo CC System Description (A6V10415500).
24.4.2
Upgrade required
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An upgrade from Desigo Insight V1 or V2.2 - V5.1 to Desigo Insight V6.0 may be
necessary under the following circumstances:
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When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
●
●
●
●
●
●
24
As soon as at least one automation station or one system controller is used
with Desigo V6.0 firmware in the runtime system (project) (see also chapter
VVS Desigo V6.0).
When at least one Desigo Room Automation / PX automation station is used
with Desigo V6.0 firmware in the runtime environment (project), that is, and a
new function introduced as part of Desigo V6.0 (see also chapter VVS Desigo
V6.0).
When a BACnet third-party device is used in the runtime environment using
BACnet protocol revision > 1.5.
When a certified management station is required in the runtime system as per
BACnet B-AWS.
When a certified management station is required in the runtime system as per
AMEV MBE-A or MBE-B.
To allow the use of an additional application scope for Desigo V6.0.
Upgrade not required
An upgrade to Desigo Insight V6.0 ist not required:
● If Desigo Insight V5.1 SP2 is installed and Desigo Room Automation / PX
automation stations with Desigo V6.0 firmware are used in the runtime
environment (project), but no functions are used that were introduced with
Desigo V6.0 (see also chapter Upgrade to PX / Desigo Room Automation
Automation Level and VVS Desigo V6.0).
In this case, a forward compatibility patch must be installed for Desigo Insight V5.1
SP.
Upgrade recommended
For Desigo Room Automation Desigo Insight can stay on version 5.1 under the
following circumstances, an upgrade is however still recommended:
● Keep Desigo Room Automation V5.1 functionality:
– Upgrade the firmware of Desigo PXC3 room automation station from
Desigo V5.1 to V6.0 in order to profit from error corrections to Desigo
Room Automation PXC3 FW V6.0.
– Exchange a defective PXC3 with a PXC3 with firmware V5.1.
● If only the QMX3 room operator units for wall mounting1 are used in an existing
PXC3 V5.0 room automation station:
– Visualization in Desigo Insight with QMX3.P36 functionality only.
– Upgrade of the PXC3 FW from V5.0 needed.
In all cases observe the Desigo Room Automation system compatibility.
Key:
1
Restrictions
Valid only for QMX3.P34, QMX3.P74, QMX3.P37, QMX3.P02 (V5.0 function as in QMX3.P36).
All Desigo Insight management stations (project) must have the same version.
Minimum hardware requirements of Desigo Insight
For more information, read the up-to-date Release Notes.
24.4.3
Automation Level Desigo PX / Desigo Room Automation
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) and Automation Building Tool (ABT)
Upgrading projects (while simultaneously converting and upgrading the project
data of a tool project as well as the libraries used) to XWP/ABT V6.0 may be
required under the following circumstances:
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Compatibility
When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
●
When at least one automation station or system controller is used with Desigo
V6.0 firmware in the runtime system to allow the use of an additional
application scope for Desigo V6.0.
● When automation stations are used in the runtime system as per AMEV
profiles AS-A or AS-B are required (as of Desigo V5.1 firmware on the
automation stations).
● To be able to use the Desigo V6.0 tool environment.
The existing engineering and commissioning tool ABT V6.0 for Desigo Room
Automation supports all existing runtime systems from Desigo V5.0. It contains all
required firmware versions and application libraries from V5.0.
For Desigo Room Automation the firmware of the PXC3 room automation stations
can be upgraded from Desigo V5.0 to V5.1, without updating the rest of the runtime
system.
For details, see chapter Upgrade PX / Desigo Room Automation automation level .
Touch and Web is already supported from Desigo V5.0 (from XWP V5.00.282
including patches).
What does conversion and upgrade mean?
Conversion means to upgrade the saved project data from the current XWP tool
version to a higher tool version (for example, from XWP V4.x, or XWP/ABT V5.0 to
XWP/ABT V5.1).
This conversion does not change the automation level system version of the
project (that is, an automation station with system version V4 remains as is in the
project).
A conversion of the XWP/ABT data structure always impacts all project data of a
tool project.
Upgrade means to upgrade the automation level system version to a higher
version (for example, system version V5.0 to automation station system version
V5.1).
With XWP V6.0 after upgrading, first check the CFC log file (CFC > Options > Log
file) for connection losses between the function objects in the CFC caused by
different pin assignments and designations in Desigo V5.1. Upgrade errors must
be corrected manually in the CFC.
Conversion and/or upgrade of the former Desigo LibSet V5.1 to Desigo LibSet
V6.0 has been carried out already and is provided on the Desigo LibSet installation
CD. Conversion and/or upgrade is necessary for RC and local libraries. To do this,
use the Library Maintenance Utility (LMU).
For details, see chapter Upgrade PX (CAS) Libraries.
Room automation stations or automation stations and system controllers with
firmware V2.x - V5.1 and V6.0 may be operated in the same runtime system.
An upgrade to firmware V6.0 of existing PXC3 room automation stations or PXC
automation stations and system controllers (V2.2 – V5.1) is only required when one
of the conditions mentioned above must be met.
Restrictions
When engineering a tool project, all tool installations must have the same version
as the project.
Branch Office Server (BOS)
XWP/ABT V6.0 can be used only in Branch Office Server (BOS) version V6.0
(BOS versions < V6.0 are not compatible).
Desigo PX / Desigo Room Automation
An upgrade of previously programmed and commissioned Desigo Room
Automation room automation stations or PXC automation stations / system
controllers (PXC...) <= V6.0 to Desigo V6.0 SP firmware is required:
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When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
24
●
Generally:
– To permit the use of additional Desigo V6.0 products and application scope
on the Desigo Room Automation / PX device in question.
● For V5.0 on V5.1:
– To use additional V5.1 product and application scope and for Desigo V5.1
on the PXC3/PXC in question.
– When the use of certified devices as per AMEV AS-A or AS-B is demanded
by the runtime system.
– To integrate BACnet/IPv6 devices into the Desigo system (a router
PXG3.M/.L with V5.1 firmware is required).
● For V2.2-V4.1:
– If the automation station / system controllers are to be used as Desigo
Room Automation system function controllers for the PXC3 room
automation stations (Desigo Room Automation) for alarm and schedule
system functions.
– When the runtime system requires the use of certified devices with BACnet
revision 1.10.
● For V2.2 to V2.37:
– To allow storage of project data (engineering data storage on the plant) to
all automation stations / system controllers PXC…D, and PXC52 (from
Index D), and PXC-NRUF.
For Desigo Room Automation the firmware of the PXC3 room automation stations
can be upgraded from Desigo V5.0 to V5.1 / V5.1 SP, without updating the rest of
the runtime system.
For details, see chapter Upgrade PX / Desigo Room Automation Automation Level .
Desigo Touch and Web (for PXM touch panel) has already been supported in
Desigo V5.0 (from tool version XWP V5.00.260 including patches).
When converting and upgrading a plant <= Desigo Room Automation V5.1 to
Desigo Room Automation V6.0, the individual address (IA) on the PL-Link
subsystem must be set as per the number of data points on KNX PL-Link
subsystem specifications. Failure to comply with the specifications can result in a
fault on the plant.
Restrictions
Siemens
Scheduler programs of the Desigo Room Automation room automation stations
can be operated and their alarm functions displayed via the operator units Desigo
Touch and Web (calendar objects are not supported), PXM20, PXM20-E, and PX
Web using the associated Desigo Room Automation system function controllers
(automation stations / Desigo PX system controller). Further Desigo Room
Automation functions are not supported by these operator units.
Desigo Touch and Web (for PXM Touch Panel) is used exclusively with PXC
automation stations and system controllers from firmware V4.0 (BACnet Rev. 1.5).
The modular Desigo PX automation stations / system controllers
PXC00/50/100/200-E.D from firmware version V5.0 are supported as Desigo Room
Automation system function controllers for the PXC3 room automation stations. For
performance reasons, use PXC00-E.D where possible.
The local operator unit PXM10 cannot be used together with the following devices:
● PXC3 room automation stations (Desigo Room Automation)
● PX KNX (in PXC00-U or PXC001.D/PXC001-E.D)
● PXG3.L/PXG3.M (BACnet router)
● PXG3.W100 (web interface BACnet/IP of Desigo Touch and Web)
No I/O modules may be connected to the system controller LonWorks PXC00(E).D.
Automation stations PXC50/100/200.D for BACnet/LonTalk communications
cannot be equipped with option module PXA40-W… (no PX Web possible).
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When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
The modular series PXC…D (Desigo PX) and the PXC3 room automation stations
(Desigo Room Automation) do not have a PPS2 connection.
Upgrading a BACnet primary server of a PX site to increase the system limits (for
example, up to 100 PXC..D per PX site):
● Increasing the system limits by upgrading a primary server is recommended
only for existing sites featuring primary servers and firmware version V4 or
higher. And, only if no changes to the site’s functional scope and system limits
are made.
● Upgrading V2.x primary servers only to extend the system limits is not
supported.
● Version-related limits continue to apply to each device of the site (for example,
no limit extensions with BACnet/LonTalk, but only for BACnet/IP
communication).
When replacing the primary server, the same firmware version must be used that is
available in the device to be replaced (for example, replacement FW V4.x by FW
V4.x, FW V5.x by FW V5.x). Within the same site, a firmware upgrade of the
primary server at the same time also means changes to the communication with
other PXC automation stations. This is true in particular for the replication of global
objects in a PX site (for example, calendar, notification class, user profile).
The compact automation station PXC-NRUF only runs from Desigo V2.37 firmware.
Upgrading PXC-NRUF firmware to Desigo ≥ V6.0 is required if BACnet Rev. 1.12
is needed.
The Desigo V6.0 firmware exclusively runs on the following devices:
ASN
Product range
DXR2
Desigo Room Automation (from V6)
PXC00(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXC001(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXC50(-E).D
Desigo PX (from V5)
PXC100(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXC200(-E). D
Desigo PX
PXC3.7..(A)
Desigo Room Automation (from V5)
PXC3.E16A
Desigo Room Automation (from V6)
TXI1.OPEN
Desigo PX
TXI2.OPEN
Desigo PX
PXC12(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXC22(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXC36(-E).D
Desigo PX
PXG3.L/ PXG3.M
Desigo PX
PXG3. W100 (web interface for PXM touch panel)
Desigo PX
PXC-NRUF
Desigo PX
QMX7.E38
Desigo Room Automation (from V5.1 SP)
PXM20(-E)
Desigo PX
PXM40/50
Desigo PX
TXB1.P-BUS
Desigo PX
PXX-L11/12
Desigo PX
PXX-PBUS
Desigo PX
Table 173: Devices on which Desigo V6.0 firmware can run
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When to Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
24
Desigo PXR / LonWorks system controller
Migration of previously programmed and operational V2.2 - V2.37 system
controllers PXR11/12 to Desigo V6.0 using PXC00(-E).D+PXX-L11/12 is required:
● To use LNS based LonWorks standard tools NL220 (Newron System) or
LonMaker (Echelon) as an alternative to RXT10.3/RXT10.5 together with the
RXC Link plug-in. This applies to projects based on LNS TE and OpenLNS.
● When the runtime system (project) requires the use of certified devices with
BACnet rev. 1.12.
There is no need to exchange existing PXR11/12 devices. Migration to PXC00(E).D with a PXX-L…is only required if the aforementioned conditions are required.
24.4.4
Desigo TX-I/O
TX-I/O modules
Product range
TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1. TXM1.
8D
16D
8U
8U-ML 8X
8X-ML 6R
6R-M 8P
6RL
8RB
8T
Desigo Room Automation
modular room automation
stations PXC3 (from index D)
•
•
•
-
-
-
•
-
-
•
•
•
Desigo PX modular room
automation stations PXC..D
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•1
-
•
Table 174: Compatibility of TX-I/O modules with PXC..D and PXC3 automation stations
Key:
1
Restrictions
Directly switched lighting applications (by the user) are not supported by the PXC..D automation
stations. For this reason, the configured button function of the digital input modules is not
available together with the PXC…D automation stations.
A firmware update or upgrade from TX-I/O modules is not possible (except for
TXI1.OPEN and TXI2.OPEN).
24.4.5
Restrictions
TX Open
The TXI1.OPEN and TXI2.OPEN TX Open modules can only be used together
with the PXC50/100/200(-E).D automation stations.
24.4.6
Desigo RX
Nides.RX
PXR-xx
PXX-Lxx
Phased out Q1/2010
Phased out Q4/2011
Released with Desigo V4
< V4
≤ V5
≥ V4
Supports RXCxx.1 devices
•
•
•
Supports RXCxx.1 devices
-
•
•
Description
Desigo version
Table 175: Desigo RX
RXT10.3 (RXC project
data)
RXT10.3 supports:
● Desigo V2.x projects with PXR and NIDES integration
● The new LNS database version 3.2x
RXT10.5 (RXC project
data)
RXT10.5 was introduced as part of Desigo V5.1 SP and is not backwards
compatible to RXT10.3. The project data can, however, be taken over after an
export from RXT10.3 to RXT10.5.
RXT10.5 supports only system integration via the PXX L11/L12 Controller.
Siemens
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Compatibility
Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
NIDES and PXR are not supported and the corresponding projects must be
maintained using RXT10.3.
You can only use LON standard tools NL220 (Newron System) or LonMaker
(Echelon) with project data from LonWorks PXC00(-E).D or PXC50/100/200 (-E).D
system controllers (from V5.0).
24.4.7
Libraries
Converting or upgrading existing Desigo V2.x/V5.0 V4.x libraries is required:
● To be able to use XWP/ABT V5.1.
● To allow the use of an additional application scope for Desigo V5.1.
● When an automation station, a system controller or room automation station is
used with Desigo V5.1 firmware in the runtime system.
● To make changes to old PX programs engineered with libraries V4.1 (or earlier)
with Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP).
LibSet
Desigo LibSets have been converted and/or upgraded to Desigo LibSet V6.0 and
have been provided on the Desigo LibSet installation CD.
Restrictions
All Desigo software and LibSets must be on the same PC and have the same
system version.
RC and local libraries
Converting and/or upgrading is necessary for RC and local libraries at the
automation level. To do this, use the Library Maintenance Utility (LMU).
For details, see chapter Upgrade PX (CAS) Libraries.
Restrictions
Mixing different versions of PX libraries on devices (PX...) is not allowed within the
same application. This applies to CAS libraries, RC libraries, and local libraries.
24.5 Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
Restriction
Unless otherwise described, the upgrade to Desigo V6.0 must occur in stages as
per the system versions.
24.5.1
Upgrade Management Level
Note the following when upgrading versions of the Desigo management stations.
Desigo CC version
Desigo system version
Unterstützte SQL server version
V2.0
V5.1
SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 20012
V2.1
V6.0
SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
Table 176: Desigo CC upgrade
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24
Desigo Insight version
Desigo system version
Citect version
Supported SQL Server versions
V1.1
V1.1
Citect 5.5
SQL Server 2000
V2.2
V2.2
Citect 5.5
SQL Server 2000
V2.3
V2.3
Citect 5.5
SQL Server 2000
V2.35
V2.35
Citect 5.5
SQL Server 2000
V2.35
V2.36
Citect 5.5
SQL Server 2000
V3.0
V2.37
Citect 6.1
SQL Server 2005
V4.0
V4.0
Citect 6.1
SQL Server 2005
V5.0
V5.0
Citect 6.1
SQL Server 2005
V5.1
V5.1
Citect 7.2
SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
V6.0
V6.0
Citect 7.2
SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
V6.0 SP2
V6.0 SP2
Citect 7.2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016
Table 177: Desigo Insight upgrade
Citect supports upgrades only via one version at a time, that means, upgrades
must be carried out from Citect V5.x to Citect V6.x, or from Citect V6.x to Citect
V7.x. That’s why upgrades from Citect V5.x to Citect V7.x must always be carried
out via an interim version Citect V6.x.
Microsoft does not support the direct upgrading of SQL server 2000 to SQL server
2012/2014.
Desigo Insight
Siemens
Upgrade from Desigo Insight V3.0 ... V5.1 SP to Desigo Insight V6.0:
1. Back up Desigo Insight V3.0 ... V5.1 SP project data and genie libraries.
2. Keep both project and SQL installation on SQL2005 as is.
3. Install Desigo Insight V6.0.
4. Update Desigo Insight V3.0 ... V5.1. SP project data to V6.0 using the Desigo
Insight V6.0 Project Utility.
5. Upgrade the trend archive with the Desigo Insight V6.0 Project Utility.
6. Install LibSet V6.0.
Upgrade from Desigo Insight < V3.0 to Desigo Insight V6.0:
1. Save Desigo Insight < V3.0 project data and genie libraries.
2. Start Desigo Insight V4.1 SP on a separate PC or virtual machine.
3. Update Desigo Insight < V3.0 project data V4.1 SP with the aid of the Desigo
Insight V4.1 SP Project Utility.
4. Upgrade the trend archive with the Desigo Insight V4.1 SP Project Utility.
5. Save Desigo Insight V4.1 SP project data and genie libraries.
6. Install Desigo Insight V6.0.
7. Update Desigo Insight V4.1 SP project data to V6.0 with the aid of the Insight
V6.0 Project Utility.
8. Upgrade the trend archive with the Desigo Insight V6.0 Project Utility.
9. Install LibSet V5.1.
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24
Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
Desigo Insight upgrade
V2.3
SQL 2000
Citect 5.x
V2.35
SQL 2000
Citect 5.5
V3.0
SQL 2000
Citect 6.1
Citect graphics upgrade to Citect V6.1 mandatory
SQL 2005
Citect 6.1
V4.0
SQL 2005
Citect 6.1
V4.1
SQL 2005
Citect 6.1
V5.0
SQL 2008
Citect 6.1
V5.1
SQL 2012
Citect 7.2
V6.0
SQL 2014
Citect 7.2
Target:
SQL Server 2008R2
V2.2
MSDE
Citect 5.x
Target:
SQL Server 2012
V1.1
MSDE
Citect 5.x
Upgrade Desigo Insight V4.1 SP
Desigo Insight V6.0
SQL Server 2008R2 SP2 / SQL Server 2012 / SQL Server 2014
Citect 7.2
Figure 272: Desigo Insight Upgrade
Restrictions
All Desigo Insight management stations for a runtime system must have the same
version.
All Desigo software and LibSets for a project must have the same system version.
Versions < ADP/CC V6.0 are not compatible with Desigo V6.0, if ADP and Desigo
V6.0 are installed on the same PC.
For details about upgrading the management level, see Desigo Insight - Installation
& Configuration (CM110591).
ADP/CC
Upgrade from ADP/CC version >= 3.1-x to ADP/CC V6.0:
1. Upgrade software to ADP/CC V6.0.
2. Migrate database from MSEE (SQL Server 2005) to MSEE (SQL Server 2012).
3. Migrate IV1/IV2 to IV3 plug-in with ToolboxNET.
Upgrade from ADP/CC version = 3.0 to ADP/CC V6.0:
1. Upgrade software to ADP/CC V4.1-2.
2. Migrate database and archive files (Sybase, QRACLE or MSDE (SQL server
2000 to MSEE or SQL server 2005)).
3. Upgrade software to ADP/CC V6.0.
4. Migrate database from MSEE (SQL Server 2005) to MSEE (SQL Server 2012).
5. Migrate IV1/IV2 to IV3 plug-in with ToolboxNET.
Upgrade from ADP/CC version < 3.0 to ADP/CC V6.0:
1. Upgrade software to ADP/CC 3.0.
2. Install Sybase Central 6.0.3, if the database version is still Sybase 5.
3. Upgrade database to Sybase 6.0.3 if the database version is still Sybase 5.
4. Upgrade database to Version 1.8 if the database version is still < 1.8.
5. Upgrade database to version 3.0.
6. Upgrade software to ADP/CC V4.1-2.
7. Migrate database and archive file (Sybase, QRACLE or MSDE (SQL server
2000 to MSEE or SQL server 2005).
8. Upgrade software to ADP/CC V6.0.
9. Migrate the database from MSEE (SQL server 2005) to MSEE (SQL server
2012).
10. Migrate IV1/IV2 to IV3 plug-in with ToolboxNET.
24.5.2
Desigo Xworks Plus
408 | 416
Siemens
Upgrade PX / Desigo Room Automation Automation Level
The Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) V6.0 engineering and commissioning tool supports
all existing runtime systems, beginning from Desigo V2.2 to V5.x, which were
created in the Desigo Toolset (DTS) or Desigo Xworks ≤ V5.1.
CM110664en
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Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
24
Desigo PX
All required firmware versions and application libraries are included. Converting
and/or upgrading with the Library Maintenance Utility (LMU) is necessary for RC
and local libraries at the automation level.
When you decide to use XWP V6.0 proceed as follows:
Case 1
Extend an existing Desigo project < V5.1. The existing runtime system will not be
upgraded to firmware Desigo V6.0.
1. Open the existing project in Desigo XWP V6.0. XWP data storage is converted
automatically to XWP V6.0.
2. Read back the parameters.
3. Edit your project as needed.
4. The firmware on the automation station or system controller does not need to
be changed.
Result:
The Desigo PX project data was not upgraded (conversion only) to Desigo V6.0.
The entire project can only be processed with XWP V6.0.
Case 2
Extend an existing Desigo project ≤ V5.1. The firmware Desigo V6.0 is to be used
in the existing runtime system to be able to use the new V6.0 features.
1. Open the existing project in Desigo XWP V6.0. XWP data storage is converted
automatically to XWP V6.0.
2. Read back the parameters.
3. Upgrade the project data from PX automation stations or system controllers to
Desigo V6.0 where the firmware needs to be upgraded to Desigo V6.0.
4. Edit your project as needed.
5. The firmware V6.0 must be loaded on the impacted automation stations/system
controllers.
Result:
The Desigo PX devices were upgraded to Desigo system version V6.0.
The entire project can only be processed with XWP V6.0.
Restrictions
Not all Desigo PX devices in the field can be upgraded to firmware Desigo V6.0.
Automation Building Tool
(ABT)
The engineering and commissioning tool ABT V6.0 for Desigo TRA supports all
existing runtime systems starting from Desigo V5.0. It contains all required
firmware versions and application libraries from V5.0.
Desigo TRA
For existing Desigo TRA V5.x projects the following steps are recommended for
the change to Desigo TRA V6.0:
1. Upgrade all XWP/ABT V5.x PC installations to XWP/ABT V6.0.
2. Convert all Desigo TRA V5.x projects to Desigo TRA V6.0 projects with
XWP/ABT V6.0 (Offline).
3. Work with XWP/ABT V6.0 taking into account the TRA system compatibility
with:
– Existing PXC3 V5.x room automation stations where the TRA V5.x
functionality in existing or additional rooms still meets the requirements.
– Existing PXC3 V5.x room automation stations where on demand the new
V5.1 / V5.1 SP functionality (QMX3 room operator units for wall mounting
or QMX7) is needed in existing or additional rooms.
– Existing or new PXC3 where the complete V6.0 functionality is needed in
additional or new rooms.
Siemens
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Compatibility
Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
TRA application
Extension with
V5.1 functionality
Desigo TRA
PXC3
firmware
XWP/ABT
Desigo TRA HQ
application library
Desigo Insight Desigo PX…D/U
(including TRA
system functions
group controller)
V5.1
V5.1
TRA03_V5.0_HQ
_ABT1.1
V5.1
- If only V5.1 functionality
is required.
V5.1 SP
V5.1 SP
TRA03_V6.0_HQ
_ABT1.1
V5.1 SP
- To benefit from error
corrections of TRA PXC3
firmware. And application
of QMX7.
V6.0
V6.0
TRA03_V6.0_HQ
_ABT1.2
V5.1 SP1
V6.0
V6.0
TRA03_V6.0_HQ
_ABT1.2
V6.0
Continuation or
maintenance:
≥V5.0
- To exchange a defective
PXC3 with a new PXC3
with the current firmware.
No downgrade required.
Upgrade for
complete V6.0
functionality
If new TRA functionality is
required by V6.0
Table 178: Desigo TRA system compatibility
Key:
1
Restrictions
In this case, a forward compatibility patch must be installed for Desigo Insight V5.1 SP2.
Restricted readback of minor Command and Device objects properties which were
changed in the runtime system after the last read back with ABT V5.1 or ABT V6.0.
Affects upgrades of PXC3 room automation stations from Desigo 5.1 to V6.0 with
XWP/ABT V6.0 without readback done previously.
Affected BA Object Properties
Description
ActnTbl
Action table
ActnTxt
Action text
EnMem
Enable memorize
Des
Description
ObjNam
Object name
Table 179: Command object
Affected BA Object Properties
Description
Locat
Location
RstNfRcp
Restart notific. recipients
TioBck
Timeout for backup
Des
Description
Table 180: Device object
QMX7
QMX7 is provided from Desigo V5.1 SP. This requires the following versions:
● ABT V5.1 SP
● Application library V5.1 SP
● PXC3 FW V5.1 SP
Restrictions
Projects under older versions, such as V5.0, must be upgraded to ≥V5.1 SP
(System Version Set).
Branch Office Server
(BOS)
Procedure for upgrading XWP and BOS from the previous version to the latest
version:
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Upgrade to Desigo V6.0
24
1. Check in previous version of XWP using the presious version of BOS.
2. Install new BOS version.
3. Continue with new XWP version only.
You do not need to upgrade all tool project data of all automation stations, system
controllers or room automation stations to V6.0.
In a Desigo runtime system, existing PX automation stations, system controllers or
room automation stations may remain unchanged on Desigo ≤ V5.x even after a
conversion to the V6.0 tool environment.
Restrictions
When engineering a tool project, all tool installations must have the same version
as the project.
All Desigo software and LibSets must be on the same PC and have the same
version.
24.5.3
Upgrade RX Room Automation
RXT10.x project data
All Desigo software and LibSets must be on the same PC and have the same
system version.
RXC HW and applications
V2 to V4.1 to V5.x
Existing RXC (to V4.1) and RXC V5.x devices can be commissioned with
RXT10.3/RXT10.5. A tool workflow supports exchanging RXC (to V4.1) for RXC
V5.x devices.
24.5.4
Upgrade PX (CAS) Libraries
Libraries at the automation level must be converted and upgraded.
LibSet
Former Desigo LibSets have been converted and/or upgraded to Desigo LibSet
V6.0 and provided on the Desigo LibSet installation CD.
RC and local libraries
Use the Library Maintenance Utility (LMU) to upgrade existing Desigo
V2.x/V4.x/V5.x RC or local libraries to Desigo V6.0. If the LMU is not available,
contact your local RC representative for upgrading.
First back up the library folder …\All Users\Application
data\Siemens\Desigo\Toolset\XwpData so that you do not lose existing RC or local
PX libraries.
Conversion or upgrading always applies to the entire library for RC or local libraries.
Restrictions
Do not mix different versions of PX libraries (CAS libraries, local libraries and RC
libraries) on one Desigo PX.
All Desigo software and LibSets must be on the same PC and have the same
system version.
In a Desigo V2.x/V4.x/V5.x runtime system, existing PX automation stations or
system controllers may remain on Desigo V2.x/V4.x/V5.x, even after data
conversion to V6.0:
● The automation station or system controller remains on V2.x. The data was not
upgraded.
● You must use Xworks Plus (XWP) from V4.0 forward.
● The automation station or system controller are no longer compatible with DTS
or Xworks Plus (XWP) V2.x.
24.5.5
Upgrade TRA Libraries
The Automation Building Tool (ABT) scope of delivery contains libraries with
conversion and/or upgrades.
Siemens
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Compatibility
Siemens WEoF Clients
The ABT V6.0 engineering and commissioning tool for Desigo TRA supports all
existing runtime systems from Desigo V5.0. It contains all required firmware
versions and application libraries from V5.0.
If only QMX3 room operator units for wall mounting are used, you can upgrade the
firmware of the PXC3 room automation stations (Desigo TRA) from Desigo V5.x to
V6.0 without upgrading the entire runtime system. Use the special TRA library.
24.6 Siemens WEoF Clients
This information is only for Siemens employees who use a WEoF client PC.
24.6.1
Desigo Software
All Desigo V6.0 software programs and LibSets (LED) operate on the Siemens
WEoF client.
Minimum user level required
Version
Desigo product compatibility
Standard User
V6.0
Desigo Configuration Module (DCM)
Standard User
V6.0
Desigo Insight (including DIGG)
Permanent Open User
V6.0
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) including PX firmware library
(FW), Automation Building Tool (ABT) and additional tools
Permanent Open User
V6.0
Branch Office Server (BOS)
Permanent Open User
V6.0
RXT10 (including RX library)
Permanent Open User
ADP/CC V6.0
ADP/CC
Permanent Open User
V6.0
HQ and RC libraries
Table 181: Desigo Software with WEoF
Desigo Insight ≥ V5.1 requires an HTML 5.0-capable browser with native SVG
format.
24.6.2
Third-Party Engineering Software
The ETS standard tool from the Konnex Association (www.konnex.org) is used to
engineer and commission KNX S-Mode / EIB segments (for RXB and KNX/EIB
third-party devices) at the field level.
The following standard Lon tools can be used from Desigo V4 instead of
RXT10.3/RXT10.5:
● NL220 (Newron System) www.newron-system.com
● LonMaker (Echelon) www.echelon.com
NL220
LonMaker
ETS 3.0 Professional
Operating System
Windows XP Professional
Windows XP Professional
Windows XP Professional
WEoF client
WEoF
WEoF
WEoF
Minimum user level required
Standard User
Standard User
Standard User
Table 182: Third-party software with CAT2
24.7 Migration Compatibility
Migration of Xworks Plus (XWP):
Described in
Requirements
CM110776
Automation Level Engineering Manual
CM110563
Replacement of legacy I/O modules by TX-I/O modules or workarounds
Table 183: Migration of Xworks Plus (XWP) for all subsystems
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Compatibility
Hardware Requirements of Desigo Software Products
24
Migration of Unigyr:
Described in
Requirements
CM110496
Unigyr tools V7.61 with Unigyr automation level V7.64
CM110491
Unigyr with Desigo Insight V1.1
CM110496
Unigyr with Unigyr Insight
Table 184: Migration of Unigyr
Migration of Integral:
Described in
Requirements
CM110499
NCRS from V3.1 (only automation level)
CM110498
NITEL from V1.31 (only automation level)
CM110497
Integral with Desigo Insight V1.1
Table 185: Migration of Integral
For replacing Integral RS modules (NRUA, NRUB, NRUC, and NRUD) with PXC
AS and PXC-NRUD modules, Desigo supports the use of PXC-NRUD modules
with PXC100/200(-E).D (from Desigo ≥ V4.1) and PXC50(-E).D (from V5.0).
Migration of Visonik:
Described in
Requirements
CM110497
DCS from V22.16 Patch 195 or V24.16 Patch 195 (server with automation level)
CM110491
Visonik with Desigo Insight V1.1
CM110497
DCS with Visonik Insight
Table 186: Migration of Visonik
24.8 Hardware Requirements of Desigo Software
Products
The following table shows the minimum hardware and software requirements of
Desigo software products.
Siemens
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CM110664en
2017-05-31
24
Compatibility
Hardware Requirements of Desigo Software Products
Product
Version
CPU
Frequency
Storage
Hard disk
Other
Desigo Configuration
Module (DCM)
V6.0
Compatible with
Intel and AMD
technology
1.6 GHz
1 GB RAM
40 GB HD
Desigo Xworks Plus
(including ABT/SSA
and other additional
tools) or ABT Site
(stand-alone)
V6.0
Compatible with
Intel and AMD
technology
> 1.6 GHz (> 3
GHz)
6 GB RAM (>
16 GB RAM)
50 GB HDD* with Monitor: 1366x768
good performance Recommended for
(HDD at very fast ABT 1680x1050
access times)
DVD
(SSD drive)
(USB port for SSADNT as alternative to
ethernet connection)
Multiple core
processors, for
example, for VMware
Branch Office Server
(BOS)
V6.0
Compatible with
Intel and AMD
technology
> 1.6 GHz (2.5
GHz)
4 GB RAM (8
GB RAM)
HDD size
depending on
project data
volume
RXT10.3 / RXT10.5
-
Compatible with
Intel and AMD
technology
> 1.6 GHz
4 GB RAM
HDD size
depending on
project data
volume
ADP/CC
V6.0
Compatible with
Intel and AMD
technology
> 1.6 GHz
4 GB RAM
HDD size
depending on
project data
volume
PCI slot or PC card
(Typ II) or USB2
Table 187: Minimum hadware requirements of Desigo software products
Key:
*
Desigo Xworks Plus (XWP) requires ca. 1.4 GB memory. Automation Building Tool (ABT)
requires ca. 1-2 GB memory. Uncompressed project data requires an additional 0.5 MB memory
per data point (reference value). The performance depends on available memory.
The indicated values apply to a host installation. For stable and reliable operation
of VMware, CPU and RAM requirements are higher.
Values in (…) are recommended, especially if Automation Building Tool (ABT) is
installed on a 64-bit operating system, to allow for larger projects (up to 12 PXC3
with 8 rooms each per ABT project). For details, see chapter Compatibility with
Operating Systems.
16 GB RAM are recommended if two Automation Building Tool (ABT) satellite
projects are opened at the same time, and if in ABT two PXC3 are to be online at
the same time.
Configure SSDs for a long life. See Microsoft documentation (Windows 7 & SSD).
ABT projects require ca. 2.5 times more memory per PXC3 room automation
station compared to PXC automation stations.
Parallel port or USB port for license dongle.
For online functions you need:
● LonWorks interface card or LonWorks dongle
● Ethernet interface
● Connection cable for automation stations
● USB port for P-bus BIM connection
The following software is required:
● Windows 7 Professional/Ultimate/Enterprise 64- or 32-bit edition (XWP only XP
Mode) or Microsoft Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3
● Microsoft Office 2003/2007/2010
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Compatibility
VVS Desigo V6.0
24
● Acrobat Reader 6.0 or higher (optional installation with tool installation)
● WinZIP
● .NET Framework >= V3.5 (version 3.5 is available on the tool DVD)
For the minimum hardware and operating system requirements for Desigo Insight,
see chapter Management Level Desigo Insight .
24.9 VVS Desigo V6.0
The following table shows the firmware versions delivered with Desigo V6.0
resulting in the valid VVS V6.0.xxx. For firmware compatibility, see also chapter
Automation Level Desigo PX/TRA.
Desigo hardware products
Firmware version
Required firmware loader
PXM20
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PXM20-E
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PXC compact (PXC...D)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
V6.00.000
PXC modular (PXC...D)
V6.00.184
V6.00.000
PXX-L11/12 and PXX-PBus
V6.00.184
V5.00.001
PXC modular (PXC...-U)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
TXI1.OPEN (TX Open module)
IOOPEN 4.00.224
-
MODBUS_HQ_ V4.00.242
MBUS_HQ_ V4.00.234
SED2_HQ_ V4.00.226
GENIBUS_HQ_ V4.00.232
TXB1.P-BUS
V1.1.34
-
PXC3.xxx-100A (Desigo TRA)
V01.20.yy.xxx
-
PXC3.7.. (Desigo TRA)
V01.20.yy.xxx
DXR2 (-variants)
V01.20.yy.xxx
-
PX KNX (in PXC00-U)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PX M-Bus (in PXC00-U)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PX Modbus (in PXC00-U)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PX SCL (in PXC00-U)
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
PX KNX (in PXC001..D)
V6.00.184
V6.00.000
PX M-Bus (in PXC001..D)
V6.00.184
V6.00.000
PX Modbus (in PXC001..D)
V6.00.184
V6.00.000
PX SCL (in PXC001..D)
V6.00.184
V6.00.000
PXG3.M/.L (BACnet router)
V01.15.15.xxx
-
PXG3.W100 (web interface for PXM touch panel)
V01.15.35.xxx
-
PXC-NRUF AS Integral Migration
V6.00.184
V5.00.000
Table 188: VVS Desigo V6.0 firmware
The versions listed correspond to the latest state upon delivery release of Desigo
V6.0. As part of continuous product improvements, more current firmware versions
(with higher numbers) may be delivered.
For the current state, see the current release notes of the product.
Siemens
415 | 416
CM110664en
2017-05-31
Issued by
Siemens Switzerland Ltd
Building Technologies Division
International Headquarters
Gubelstrasse 22
CH-6301 Zug
+41 41-724 24 24
www.siemens.com/buildingtechnologies
Document ID: CM110664en
Edition: 2017-05-31
© Siemens Switzerland Ltd, 2015
Technical specifications and availability subject to change without notice.
Technical Principles
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