IxChariot® Performance Endpoints

IxChariot® Performance Endpoints
IxChariot® Performance Endpoints
Release 7.10
913-0951 Rev. A
December 2009
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913-0951 Rev. A
December 14, 2009
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
IxChariot Performance Endpoints Overview
What Is a Performance Endpoint? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Endpoint Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Displaying Endpoint Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
List of Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
What’s New in IxChariot 7.10? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Chapter 2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Operating System and Protocol Stack Support . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Performance Endpoint Support for IxChariot Functions . . . 2-3
IPv6 Test Module Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
MSS Option Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Performance Endpoint Support for QoS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Endpoint Computer Resource Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Generating Maximum Throughput. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
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Calculating Memory Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Endpoint Pair Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Endpoint Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Chapter 3
Endpoint Initialization File
Initialization File Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
endpoint.ini Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
Keyword Default Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
ALLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-3
SECURITY_AUDITING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
AUDIT_FILENAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-5
ENABLE_PROTOCOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-6
USE_ENCRYPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-6
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-7
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-8
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-8
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
MANAGEMENT_PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-10
DISABLE_DISCOVERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
REPORTING_TIMEOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Chapter 4
Ixia Load Module
Installing the Ixia Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Updating the Ixia Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1
About Stack Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1
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Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Message CHR0181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Starting and Stopping Ixia Endpoints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Stopping the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Restarting the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Supported Load Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Chapter 5
Android
About the Android Performance Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents of the tar File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Little Endian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-2
Installing the Android Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Extracting the Archive Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Installing the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Uninstalling the Android Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Configuring the Android Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring endpoint.ini. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-5
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . 5-5
Starting the Android Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Stopping the Android Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
How to Tell if the Performance Endpoint is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Chapter 6
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
About the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance Endpoint . . 6-1
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Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Installing the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Installing Directly from the iPhone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Installing from iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Uninstalling the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance
Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . 6-5
Starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
Stopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
How to Tell if the Performance Endpoint is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
Chapter 7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Linux 32-bit x86 Performance Endpoint File Names . . . . . . 7-1
Protocols Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
TAR-Based Endpoint Installation for 32-bit Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
RPM-Based Endpoint Installation for 32-bit Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
What Happens During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Removing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Removing the TAR-Based Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . .7-8
Removing the RPM Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
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Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints . . . . . 7-9
Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
Determining Your IP Network Address for TAR and RPM Linux . . . 7-9
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
Autostarting the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
Running Linux Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
Starting a Linux Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Linux Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Tell If a Linux Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-11
7-12
7-12
7-12
7-12
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Message CHR0181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Increasing the Number of Concurrent Connections . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Chapter 8
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
Supported Distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Installing x86-64 Linux Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . 8-2
TAR-Based Installation of the x86-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
RPM-Based Installation for the x86-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
What We Do During Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Removing x86-64 Linux Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Removing the TAR-Based Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . 8-6
Removing the RPM-Based Endpoint Package (Uninstall). . . . . . . . 8-7
Configuring x86-64 Linux Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8-7
8-8
8-8
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Running x86-64 Linux Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Autostarting the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Starting an x86-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Stopping an x86-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
How to Tell If an x86-64 Linux Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Increasing the Number of Concurrent Connections . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Message CHR0181. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Chapter 9
Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Supported Distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Supported Network Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
Installing the IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . 9-2
TAR-Based Installation of the IA-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
RPM-Based Installation for the IA-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
What We Do During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Removing the IA-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Removing the TAR-Based Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . .9-6
Removing the RPM-Based Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . .9-7
Configuring IA-64 Linux Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Configuration for TCP/IP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-7
9-8
9-8
9-8
Running IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Autostarting the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
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Starting an IA-64 Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Stopping a 64-Bit Linux Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
How to Tell If an IA-64 Linux Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Increasing the Number of Concurrent Connections . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Message CHR0181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Chapter 10 Linux on ARM Processors
Linux on ARM Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
About Endianness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Installing the Linux 32-bit on ARM Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
No Log Files are Created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TAR-Based Installation for Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoints . . . . .
What We Do During Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-2
10-2
10-2
10-3
10-3
Configuring the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint. . . . . . . . . 10-3
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-3
10-4
10-4
10-4
10-4
Running the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5
Starting the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clean-up After Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Tell if the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint is Active. . . . . . .
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10-5
10-6
10-6
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Chapter 11 Linux on Lexra
Installing the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
No log files are created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
TAR-Based Installation for Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoints. . . . . . 11-2
What We Do During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
Configuring the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint. . . . . . . . . 11-2
Configuration for TCP/IP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
Running the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4
Starting the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4
Stopping the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-4
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
How to Tell If the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . 11-5
Chapter 12 Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Performance Endpoint Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
File Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Linux kernel 2.4.30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Little Endian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
Installing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint . . . . . . . . 12-2
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
No Log Files are Created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
Linux 32-Bit on OpenWrt Endpoints Installation Instructions . . . . . 12-2
What We Do During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
Removing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint . . . . . . . 12-3
Removing TAR-Based Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Removing IPKG-Based Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
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TCP/IP Sockets Interface Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
Running the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint . . . . . . . . 12-4
Starting the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clean-up After Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Tell if the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint is Active. . . .
12-4
12-5
12-5
12-6
Chapter 13 Mac OS X
Platforms Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
Installing the Mac OS Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Endpoint (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Happens During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downgrading to an older version of the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-2
13-2
13-2
13-2
Configuring Mac OS X Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-3
13-3
13-3
13-4
Running Mac OS X Endpoints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-4
Stopping a Mac OS X Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Tell If a Mac OS X Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining CPU Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-5
13-5
13-5
13-5
13-5
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-5
Updates for Mac OS X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-6
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Chapter 14 Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Windows Operating Systems Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
Installation Requirements for the 32-bit Windows Endpoint 14-2
Installing the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-3
Performance Endpoint Filenames. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-4
User and System Permission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4
Before Installing an Older Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-5
Installing from CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
Installing from a Downloaded Executable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6
Silent Mode Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Installing the Windows Endpoint with SMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
What Happens During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Uninstalling the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9
Silent Mode Uninstall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
Removing the Endpoint Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
Configuring Windows Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
Windows Configuration for IPX and SPX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-11
Windows Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-12
Running Windows Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-13
Starting the Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Windows Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disable Your Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The SetAddr Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Tell If a Windows Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-13
14-13
14-14
14-14
14-15
14-16
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-16
Getting the Latest Fixes and Service Updates. . . . . . . . . 14-16
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Chapter 15 Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Operating Systems and Processors Supported . . . . . . . . 15-2
Supported Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Supported Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Installation Requirements for the Windows 64-Bit
Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Supported Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoint
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Performance Endpoint Filenames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User and System Permission Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interactive Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Silent Mode Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What We Do During Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-3
15-4
15-4
15-5
15-5
Uninstalling the Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Silent Mode Uninstall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Removing the Endpoint Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Configuring Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoints . . . . 15-7
64-bit Windows Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trying Out the TCP/IP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-7
15-7
15-8
15-8
Running Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance
Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-9
Starting a Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-9
Stopping a Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-9
If You Receive an Error 1920 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-9
Disable Your Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
Disable NIC Power Save Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
How to Tell If a Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint Is Active 15-10
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The SetAddr Utility for 64-bit Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-12
Getting the Latest Fixes and Service Updates. . . . . . . . . 15-12
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-12
Chapter 16 Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based
System
Operating Systems and Processors Supported. . . . . . . . . 16-1
Protocols Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Hardware and Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Installation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Performance Endpoint Filename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
User and System Permission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-2
Interactive Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-3
Silent Mode Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
What We Do During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
After Installation Is Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
TCP Port Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
Running the Performance Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
Starting the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Stopping the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
If You Receive an Error 1920 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Disable Your Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Disable NIC Power Save Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
How to Tell If a Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint Is Active . . 16-6
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Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Uninstalling the Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Control Panel Uninstall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Silent Mode Uninstall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-7
Chapter 17 Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile
5.0 and 6.0
Available Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
Network Protocol Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
Installation Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
Installing the Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-3
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrator Privilege Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Next Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-3
17-3
17-3
17-4
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device . . . . . . . . 17-4
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GUI Performance Endpoint Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CLI Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File-Storage Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-4
17-4
17-4
17-5
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . . . . 17-5
Windows CE Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
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Running Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0 Performance
Endpoints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Operations on GUI-Based Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-6
Operations on CLI-Based Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-8
Chapter 18 Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Available Performance Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
Network Protocol Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
Installation Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
Installing the Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-3
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-3
Administrator Privilege Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-3
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-3
Next Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-4
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device . . . . . . . . . 18-4
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-4
GUI Performance Endpoint Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-4
CLI Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-4
File-Storage Performance Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5
Removing the Performance Endpoint Package (Uninstall) 18-5
Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Configuration for TCP/IP . . . 18-6
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-6
Testing the TCP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-6
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-6
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Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance
Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-6
Operations on GUI-Based Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-6
Operations on CLI-Based Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-7
Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-8
Limitations of the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance
Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-8
Chapter 19 Sun Solaris
Platforms Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-1
Installation Requirements for Solaris Endpoints . . . . . . . . 19-1
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-2
Performance Endpoint File Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Defaults File for Solaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unattended Installation for Solaris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Happens During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-2
19-2
19-5
19-5
19-6
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall) . . . . . . . . . . . 19-7
Configuring Solaris Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-7
Configuration for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Your IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TCP/IP Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sockets Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-7
19-8
19-8
19-8
Running Solaris Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-9
Starting a Solaris Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-9
Stopping a Solaris Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-9
Cleanup after Unexpected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
How to Tell If a Solaris Endpoint Is Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
Disabling Automatic Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
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Logging and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
Known Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
Message CHR0181. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-11
Updates for Sun Solaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-11
Chapter 20 Web-Based Performance Endpoint
Web-Based Performance Endpoint Overview . . . . . . . . . . 20-1
Running the Web-Based Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-2
Starting the Endpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
Restarting the Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
Error Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
Compatibility with Other Endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
Stopping the Web-Based Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-4
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1
Chapter 1:
IxChariot Performance
Endpoints Overview
This guide contains information about the IxChariot Performance Endpoints,
which are available for more than 20 different operating systems and platforms.
All the information you need to install, configure, and run the Performance Endpoints in your network is included in this guide. In addition to topics discussing
issues common to all the endpoints, this guide also contain information about
each endpoint, organized in separate chapters.
This chapter includes the following topics:
•
What Is a Performance Endpoint? on page 1-1
•
Endpoint Versions on page 1-2
•
Displaying Endpoint Configuration Settings on page 1-2
•
List of Performance Endpoints on page 1-2
•
What’s New in IxChariot 7.10? on page 1-4
What Is a Performance
Endpoint?
IxChariot executes tests using endpoint computers. Each computer used as an
endpoint requires Performance Endpoint software. These programs operate in
the background, carrying out the instructs provides by IxChariot test scripts. Endpoints collect performance statistics while executing test scripts and send the statistics to the IxChariot Console, which produces reports reflecting the response
time, transaction rate, connectivity, and throughput in your system under test.
(Refer to the IxChariot Getting Started Guide for an overview of IxChariot operations.)
Once installed, performance endpoints rarely require any interaction with users.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
1-1
1
IxChariot Performance Endpoints Overview
Endpoint Versions
Endpoint Versions
With each new release of IxChariot, the endpoints are updated to support new
functionality. However, because some endpoint operating systems are rarely used
or provide limited support for IxChariot features, endpoints for a few operating
systems have been archived. These endpoints are still made available on the Performance Endpoints CD-ROM and on the Ixia Web site; however, they may not
support the latest capabilities of IxChariot. The Endpoint README file,
included in the root directory of the endpoint CD-ROM, provides a list of all
available endpoints and indicates their versions if they are different from the current endpoint level.
Displaying Endpoint
Configuration Settings
If you right-click a pair in the IxChariot Test window and select “Show endpoint
configuration...” from the drop-down menu, IxChariot displays an Endpoint Configuration window for that pair. This window displays all of the configuration
settings for each of the endpoints in the selected pair.
List of Performance Endpoints
Table 1-1provides a listing of all the current active Performance Endpoint, organized by operating system and platform.
Table 1-1.
1-2
Listing of Current Performance Endpoints
Performance Endpoint for …
See …
Android
Chapter 5, Android
Apple Mac OS X
Chapter 13, Mac OS X
iPhone 3G and iPod Touch
Chapter 6, iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Linux / ARM (µClibC)
Chapter 10, Linux on ARM Processors
Linux / ARM (Big Endian)
Chapter 10, Linux on ARM Processors
Linux / ARM (Little Endian)
Chapter 10, Linux on ARM Processors
Linux / ARM (Statically-linked,
Little-Endian)
Chapter 10, Linux on ARM Processors
Linux Lexra
Chapter 11, Linux on Lexra
Linux x86 / 32-Bit (i386)
Chapter 7, Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Linux x86 / 32-Bit (i386) RPM
distribution
Chapter 7, Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Linux x86 / 64-Bit (x86_64)
Chapter 8, Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
Linux x86 / 64-Bit (x86_64) RPM
distribution
Chapter 8, Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
IxChariot Performance Endpoints Overview
List of Performance Endpoints
Table 1-1.
Listing of Current Performance Endpoints
Performance Endpoint for …
See …
Linux IA-64 (x86_64)
Chapter 9, Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Linux IA-64 (x86_64) RPM
distributions
Chapter 9, Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Microsoft Windows 2000/2003/XP
Chapter 14, Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Microsoft Windows 2000/2003/XP
- x86 / 64-Bit
Chapter 15, Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Microsoft Windows 2000/XP web-based
Chapter 20, Web-Based Performance
Endpoint
Microsoft Windows 2008 Server,
32-bit
Chapter 14, Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Microsoft Windows 2008 Server,
64-bit
Chapter 15, Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Microsoft Windows 2008 Server
R2 for Itanium-Based Systems
Chapter 16, Microsoft Windows Server
2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Microsoft Windows 7 Beta 32-Bit
Chapter 14, Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Microsoft Windows 7 Beta 64-Bit
Chapter 15, Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 / Mobile
5.0 / Mobile 6.0 (QoS support) for
ARM
Chapter 17, Microsoft Windows CE 5.0
and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 / Mobile
5.0 / Mobile 6.0 (QoS support) for
ARM (Win CE Version)
Chapter 17, Microsoft Windows CE 5.0
and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE
6.0
Chapter 18, Microsoft Windows
Embedded CE 6.0
Microsoft Windows Vista
Chapter 14, Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Microsoft Windows Vista - x86 /
64-Bit
Chapter 15, Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Open WRT Operating System
(Linux/MIPS) - ipk image
Chapter 12, Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS
Platforms)
Open WRT Operating System
(Linux/MIPS) - tar image
Chapter 12, Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS
Platforms)
Sun Solaris for SPARC
Chapter 19, Sun Solaris
Sun Solaris for x86 32-Bit
Chapter 19, Sun Solaris
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
1-3
1
IxChariot Performance Endpoints Overview
What’s New in IxChariot 7.10?
What’s New in IxChariot 7.10?
IxChariot 7.10 includes the following changes to the Performance Endpoints
library:
•
The Mac OS X Performance Endpoint is now a universal binary application,
supporting both PowerPC and Intel
•
New Intel Intanium Architecture (IA-64) Performance Endpoints are
available for Windows Server 2008 R2 and Linux Redhat Enterprise 5
(Itanium edition).
Refer to the IxChariot User Guide for a description of other new features and
enhancements in release 7.10.
1-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2
Chapter 2:
Performance Endpoint
Specifications
This chapter describes the resource requirements and the supported functions of
the IxChariot Performance Endpoints. It contains the following topics:
•
Operating System and Protocol Stack Support on page 2-2
•
Performance Endpoint Support for IxChariot Functions on page 2-3
•
Endpoint Computer Resource Guidelines on page 2-5
•
Endpoint Capabilities on page 2-9
The latest version of the endpoint software can always be downloaded free from
the Internet. A single installable file is available for each operating system. Endpoints are available for downloading at http://www.ixiacom.com/support/
endpoint_library.
You cannot run endpoint software from a CD-ROM; you must install it on a
computer.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2-1
2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Operating System and Protocol Stack Support
Operating System and Protocol
Stack Support
Table 2-1 identifies the supported operating systems and protocol stack software
for each currently-active endpoint. The table lists the software with which we
have tested the Performance Endpoints for each operating system.
Note: Versions listed are the earliest, not necessarily the only, versions
supported.
Table 2-1.Active Endpoints - Operating System Compatibility
Endpoint
OS version
TCP, UDP, RTP
IP Multicast
version
IPX/SPX
stack
Apple Macintosh (G4 and G5
processors)
OS X 10.3
included
included
no
Ixia Load Module
Linux - automatically
downloaded
included
included
no
Linux 32-bit (x86)
kernel 2.4.20
included
kernel 2.0.32
no
Linux 64-bit (x86-64)
kernel 2.4.20
included
kernel 2.4.0test742
no
Linux on ARM
kernel 2.4.20
included
kernel 2.4.20
no
Linux on Lexra
kernel 2.4.18
TCP and UDP
only
kernel 2.4.18
no
Linux on OpenWrt
kernel 2.4.30
included
kernel 2.4.30
no
Microsoft Windows 2000
Windows 2000
included
included
included
Microsoft Windows 7 (32-bit
and 64-bit editions)
Windows 7
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0,
Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Windows CE 5.0,
Windows Mobile 5.0,
Windows Mobile 6.0
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows
Embedded CE 6.0
Windows Embedded
CE 6.0
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows NT
Windows NT, SP4
included
SP3 (IGMPv1)
SP4 (IGMPv2)
included
Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 (32-bit edition)
Windows Server 2003
included
included
included
Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 (64-bit edition)
Windows Server 2003
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 (32-bit and 64bit editions)
Windows Server 2008
included
included
no
2-2
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Performance Endpoint Support for IxChariot Functions
Table 2-1.Active Endpoints - Operating System Compatibility (Continued)
Endpoint
OS version
TCP, UDP, RTP
IP Multicast
version
IPX/SPX
stack
Microsoft Windows Vista
(32-bit and 64-bit editions)
Windows Vista
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows XP
Windows XP (32-bit)
included
included
included
Microsoft Windows XP 64-bit
Edition
Windows XP x64 Edition
included
included
no
Microsoft Windows Server
2008 R2
Microsoft Windows Server
2008 R2
included
included
no
Sun Solaris for SPARC
Solaris v2.4
included
v2.4
no
Sun Solaris for x86
Solaris v2.4
included
v2.4
no
Performance Endpoint Support
for IxChariot Functions
The following table describes the basic Performance Endpoint capabilities for the
supported operating systems. (Refer to Performance Endpoint Support for QoS
on page 2-5 for information about QoS capabilities.)
Table 2-2.Performance Endpoint Capabilities per OS
Traceroute
CPU
Utilitization
VoIP
Tests
Video
Pair
Tests
IPTV
Tests
IPv6
Tests
802.11
Statistics
Apple Macintosh OS X
(G4 and G5 processors)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Ixia Load Module
Yesa
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Linux 32-bit (x86)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yesb
No
Linux 64-Bit x86-64)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yesb
No
Linux on ARM
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Linux on Lexra
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Linux on OpenWrt
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Microsoft Windows 2000
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yesb
Yes
Microsoft Windows 7
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yesb
Yes
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0,
Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
No
Noc
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Microsoft Windows
Embedded CE 6.0
No
Noc
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Microsoft Windows NT 4
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Endpoint OS
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2-3
2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Performance Endpoint Support for IxChariot Functions
Table 2-2.Performance Endpoint Capabilities per OS (Continued)
Traceroute
CPU
Utilitization
VoIP
Tests
Video
Pair
Tests
IPTV
Tests
IPv6
Tests
802.11
Statistics
Microsoft Windows Server
2003
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows
Server 2008
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows Vista
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yesb
Yes
Microsoft Windows XP
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yesb
Yes
Microsoft Windows XP 64-bit
Edition
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Microsoft Windows Server
2008 R2
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Sun Solaris for SPARC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Sun Solaris for x86
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Endpoint OS
a.Traceroute is support unless you use the endpoint address as the management address.
b.See “IPv6 Test Module Support on page 2-4.
c.Support for CPU Utilization on Windows CE is device-dependent. For more information, see http://
msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wcemain4/html/cerefGetIdleTime.asp.
IPv6 Test Module
Support
Currently, testing with version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPv6) is supported on
endpoints for Ixia Performance Endpoints, Windows 2003, Windows Vista,
Windows 7, Windows XP (32-bit and 64-bit), the Linux x86 endpoint, and the
Linux 64-Bit endpoint. You may need to configure IPv6 support on these operating systems before you begin testing. Refer to “IPv6 Configuration and Testing”
in the IxChariot User Guide for detailed information.
Linux kernel 2.4.20 is required for IPv6 support.
In addition, Windows 2000 provides unofficial support for IPv6, but it requires a
patch called the “Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000 Network Protocol Stack,” which you can download from the Microsoft web site.
MSS Option
Support
2-4
The Maximum Segment Size (MSS) is defined as the maximum number of bytes
in the TCP payload of an IP packet. The following Ixia Performance Endpoints
support the use of the MSS Option in testing:
•
Linux 32-bit (x86)
•
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
•
Linux on Lexra
•
Linux on OpenWrt
•
Linux on ARM
•
Linux on PowerPC
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Performance Endpoint Support for QoS
Refer to “Setting the Transmit MSS Option” in the IxChariot Scripts Development and Editing Guide for additional information.
Performance Endpoint Support
for QoS
The following table indicates the QoS support that the Performance Endpoints
provide for the supported operating systems.
Table 2-3.
Performance Endpoint QoS Support
Operating System
IP TOS
DiffServ
GQoS
Apple Macintosh
Yes
No
No
IxOS Load Module
Yes
Yes
No
Linux (all)
Yes
Yesa
No
UNIX (all)
Yes
Yes
No
Microsoft Windows NT
Yes
No
No
Microsoft Windows 2000
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (32-bit
and 64-bit editions)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 (32-bit
and 64-bit editions)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows XP (32-bit and 64-bit
editions)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows Vista (32-bit and 64bit editions)b
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows 7 (32-bit and 64-bit
editions)c
Yes
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0
No
Yes
No
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
No
Yes
No
a.integrated into 2.4 kernel.
b.supported via qWave.
c.supported via qWave.
Endpoint Computer Resource
Guidelines
Determining the computer requirements for a given endpoint can be challenging.
There are many variables involved, such as processor speed, operating system,
protocol stack, memory, disk space, and the underlying network.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2-5
2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Endpoint Computer Resource Guidelines
To determine your computer requirements, you must first define how you plan to
use IxChariot. The type of information you need depends upon your usage. The
following topics provide recommended endpoint computer specifications according to different testing scenarios.
This section includes the following topics:
Generating
Maximum
Throughput
•
Generating Maximum Throughput on page 2-6
•
Calculating Memory Requirements on page 2-6
•
Endpoint Pair Capacity on page 2-8
•
IxOS Endpoint Pair Capacities on page 2-9
The main factors in getting the most throughput from a computer are CPU speed
and memory. You need a CPU that is fast enough to match your network capacity, and with enough memory to hold the code and data used for the test. For best
throughput, we recommend using a 32-bit (or better) operating system. The
memory you need is based on your operating system. Make sure that you have
enough memory at the endpoints so that no swapping takes place while running a
test. The following table shows some guidelines in determining the best CPU for
different network speeds.
Table 2-4.
Guidelines for Selecting CPUs
Throughput
Recommended computer
less than 100 Mbps
PCI-based computer with a 32-bit operating system
100 to 200 Mbps
Pentium 166 or greater (consider multiple concurrent
pairs)
200 to 500 Mbps
Pentium II or greater (consider multiprocessors)
over 500 Mbps
Pentium III or greater, with the latest NICs (consider
multiprocessors)
Windows 2000/2003, Windows XP, and Linux yield the highest throughput. If
you test on one of the Windows OSs with the IxChariot benchmark script called
High_Performance_Throughput, the endpoints can make use of Microsoft’s
WinSock 2 overlapped I/O to achieve much greater throughput on high-speed
networks (100 MB and faster). In a test of Gigabit Ethernet throughput using
Windows 2000 Server and two Pentium III computers, each having two 933MHz processors, 1 Gigabyte of RAM, and a single Gigabit NIC, we generated
943 Mbps with six pairs.
Calculating Memory
Requirements
Endpoints are designed to run in any computer that has sufficient memory to run
the operating system well. If you plan to use multiple pairs on a single computer,
you may want to calculate the number of pairs that will run without causing the
operating system to swap either code or data.
The following table can be used to plan for multiple pairs. The Base RAM column indicates the amount of memory that is allocated by the endpoint before running any pairs. If the endpoint is not being used, this amount may go toward zero
2-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Endpoint Computer Resource Guidelines
if the operating system supports swapping. The protocol columns indicate the
amount of memory required for a pair of that protocol (“n/a” indicates that the
protocol is not supported by the endpoint).
Table 2-5.Calculating Memory Requirements
Base RAM
(in KB)
TCP KB/
pair
UDP KB/
pair
RTP KB/
pair
SPX KB/
pair
IPX KB/
pair
Apple Macintosh OS_X
(G4 and G5 processors)
2540
142 - 276
177-312
158-308
n/a
n/a
Ixia Load Module
1320
57-74
89-105
65-84
n/a
n/a
Linux 32-bit (x86)
1100
140-240
170-280
160-280
n/a
n/a
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
1260
150-260
200-300
150-260
n/a
n/a
Linux on ARM
308
55-67
92-108
67-85
n/a
n/a
Linux on Lexra
744
63-140
99-177
81-163
n/a
n/a
Linux on OpenWrt
316
76-96
56-64
68-84
n/a
n/a
Sun Solaris for SPARC
2200
58-85
103-128
110-150
n/a
n/a
Sun Solaris (x86)
4500
62-668
202-616
164-1028
n/a
n/a
Windows NT
2076
35-60
160-180
160-180
35-60
160-180
Windows CE 5.0, Windows
Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
277
44-70
196-436
700-773
n/a
n/a
Windows Embedded CE 6.0
277
44-70
196-436
700-773
n/a
n/a
Windows 2000
3220
200-430
240-400
200-330
35-60
160-180
Windows XP
2800
205-350
240-420
193-320
35-60
160-180
Windows XP 64-bit Edition
3800
219-388
272-438
226-374
n/a
n/a
Windows Vista (32-bit)
3500
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Windows Vista (64-bit)
3500
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Windows 7 (32-bit)
3500
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Windows 7 (64-bit)
4700
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Windows Server 2003 32-bit
Edition
3560
48-232
116
124
32-244
44-256
Windows Server 2003 64-bit
Edition
4748
64-344
148
144
n/a
n/a
Windows Server 2008 32-bit
Edition
3500
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Windows Server 2008 64-bit
Edition
4700
203-356
240-396
205-340
n/a
n/a
Operating System
These RAM usage numbers represent sending with the variable
send_datatype set to ZEROS. Other send_datatypes require memory buff-
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2-7
2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Endpoint Computer Resource Guidelines
ers roughly equivalent to the disk space of the .cmp file being used. Add 2
KBytes when using send_datatype = NOCOMPRESS. See the IxChariot Application Scripts guide for more information on script variables.
Endpoint Pair
Capacity
The following table identifies the maximum number of pairs supported by each
of the operating systems for which active Performance Endpoints are available.
These pairs ran on a 10 Mbps Ethernet LAN. The values in the pairs columns
represent the maximum number of pairs this computer supported as Endpoint 2
for a single test. We used the default values for all tests, with two exceptions: for
datagram testing, we lengthened the timeout values, as well as the
initial_delay in test scripts.
This table does not represent the full capacities of these operating systems and
stacks, just some representative tests we have run in our test lab.
Table 2-6.Endpoint Pair Capacity
2-8
Operating System
Installed
RAM
TCP pairs
RTP or
UDP pairs
SPX pairs
IPX pairs
Apple Macintosh OS X
512 MB
200
100
n/a
n/a
IxOS
Refer to IxOS Endpoint Pair Capacities on page 2-9.
Linux 32-bit (x86)
768 MB
300
180
n/a
n/a
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
768 MB
300
180
n/a
n/a
Linux on ARM
16 MB
15
15
n/a
n/a
Linux on Lexra
16 MB
20
5
n/a
n/a
Linux on OpenWrt
16 MB
106
55
n/a
n/a
Sun Solaris for SPARC
512 MB
100
80
n/a
n/a
Sun Solaris for x86
768 MB
500
200
n/a
n/a
Windows CE 5.0, Windows
Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
56 MB
85
35
n/a
n/a
Windows Embedded CE 6.0
56 MB
85
35
n/a
n/a
Windows NT/2000/XP
32 MB
500
100
300
100
Windows Vista
1 GB
3000
1000
n/a
n/a
Windows 7
1 GB
3000
1000
n/a
n/a
Windows XP x64 Edition
768 MB
175
120
n/a
n/a
Windows Server 2003
1 GB
3000
1000
n/a
n/a
Windows Server 2008
1 GB
3000
1000
n/a
n/a
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Endpoint Capabilities
IxOS Endpoint Pair Capacities
Table 2-7 lists the maximum number of pairs supported by the IxOS Performance Endpoint running on various load modules.
Table 2-7.
Ixia Load Module Pair Capacity - Maximum Pairs Supported
Ixia Load Module
Installed
RAM
TCP
Pairs
RTP or
UDP Pairs
IPX / SPX
Pairs
ALM1000T8
512 MB
500
500
n/a
TXS familya
256 MB
500
500
n/a
LM100TXS2
128 MB
150
150
n/a
LM100TXS8
128 MB
150
150
n/a
Encryption Load Module
512 MB
500
300
n/a
ATM Load Module
256 MB
150
100
n/a
10G Ethernet LSM
512 MB
500
200
n/a
XMV16 and XMV12Xb
1 GB
4,500
1,100c
n/a
a.The TXS family includes the following load modules: LM1000TXS1,
LM1000TXS4, LM1000STXS2, LM1000STX4, LM1000STXS4,
OLM1000STX24, OLM1000STXS24, LM1000SFPS4, and
LSM1000XMS12.
b.The maximum number of VoIP unidirectional pairs is 250, the maximum number of VoIP bidirectional pairs is 150, the maximum number of
video pairs is 50, the maximum number of IPTV pairs is 65, and the maximum TCP throughput is 932.866 Mbps.
c.The maximum number of UDP and RTP streaming pairs is 1,100. The
maximum number of reliable UDP pairs is 200.
Endpoint Capabilities
Related Topics
Performance Endpoint Support for IxChariot Functions on page 2-3
Operating System and Protocol Stack Support on page 2-2
The following table indicates which Performance Endpoints have been tested
with and are supported by Ixia products.
Table 2-8.
Endpoint Compatibility
Ixia Product
Performance Endpoint
Qcheck
IxChariot
Apple Macintosh (32-bit)
Yes
Yes
Ixia Load Module
Yes
Yes
Linux 32-bit (x86) – TAR
Yes
Yes
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
2-9
2
Performance Endpoint Specifications
Endpoint Capabilities
Table 2-8.
Endpoint Compatibility (Continued)
Ixia Product
2-10
Performance Endpoint
Qcheck
IxChariot
Linux 32-bit (x86) – RPM
Yes
Yes
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
Yes
Yes
Linux on ARM
Yes
Yes
Linux on Lexra
Yes
Yes
Linux on OpenWrt
Yes
Yes
Linux on PowerPC
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows CE
Yes
Yes
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Yes
Yes
Web-Based Performance Endpoint
Yes
Yes
Sun Solaris (SPARC)
Yes
Yes
Sun Solaris Endpoint (x86)
Yes
Yes
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
3
Chapter 3:
Endpoint Initialization
File
This chapter includes the following topics:
•
Initialization File Description on page 3-1
•
Keywords on page 3-3
Initialization File Description
An endpoint initialization file (endpoint.ini) is installed with each Performance
Endpoint. With this file, you can do the following:
•
Restrict the use of this endpoint to specific IxChariot or Qcheck Consoles.
•
Control which access attempts are logged in an audit file.
•
Change the filename of the audit file.
•
Enable only particular protocols on this endpoint for setup connections.
•
Require the endpoint to accept only encrypted data during test setup.
•
Set RAM and disk storage limits for payload data.
•
Set the desired sockets datagram send buffer size and receive buffer size for
video pairs, multicast video pairs, and IPTV pairs.
•
Require a clock synchronization for each test (if the endpoints use endpoint
internal timers as synchronizing mechanism).
•
Specify the QoS TOS value that will be used by the endpoint on the management network until the first management command is received and executed.
•
Sets values for the Ixia Discovery Server automatic registration process.
•
Set the timeout value for sending timing records to the IxChariot Console.
endpoint.ini is an editable text file. There is a separate copy for each operating
system.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
3-1
3
Endpoint Initialization File
Initialization File Description
endpoint.ini
Example
On most operating systems, this file is named endpoint.ini. This file has the
same format and structure on all the operating systems. Following is an example
of an endpoint.ini file:
;------------------------------------------------; ENDPOINT.INI file
ALLOW
ALL
SECURITY_AUDITING
NONE
AUDIT_FILENAME
endpoint.aud
ENABLE_PROTOCOL
ALL
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE
1073741824
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE
104857600
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE
10485760
USE_ENCRYPTION
OFF
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE
0
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE
0
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC
1
MANAGEMENT_PORT
80
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS
0
DISABLE_DISCOVERY
OFF
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS
IxDiscoveryServ
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT
10120
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS 0
REPORTING_TIMEOUT
0
;-------------------------------------------------
Keyword Default
Values
Here are the default contents of the endpoint initialization file. You can change
these keywords and their parameters to tailor individual endpoints for your
needs.
Table 3-1.
3-2
Endpoint Initialization File Defaults
Keyword
Default Value
ALLOW
ALL
SECURITY_AUDITING
NONE
AUDIT_FILENAME
endpoint.aud
ENABLE_PROTOCOL
ALL
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE
1073741824
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE
104857600
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE
10485760
USE_ENCRYPTION
OFF
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE
0
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE
0
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC
1
MANAGEMENT_PORT
10115
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS
0
DISABLE_DISCOVERY
OFF
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS
IxDiscoveryServ
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
Table 3-1.
Endpoint Initialization File Defaults (Continued)
Keyword
Default Value
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT
10120
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS
0
REPORTING_TIMEOUT
0
Keywords
This section describes the keywords that you can use in an endpoint.ini file:
ALLOW
•
ALLOW on page 3-3
•
SECURITY_AUDITING on page 3-4
•
AUDIT_FILENAME on page 3-5
•
ENABLE_PROTOCOL on page 3-6
•
USE_ENCRYPTION on page 3-6
•
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE on page 3-7
•
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE on page 3-8
•
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC on page 3-8
•
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE on page 3-9
•
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE on page 3-9
•
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE on page 3-9
•
MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10
•
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS on page 3-10
•
DISABLE_DISCOVERY on page 3-11
•
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS on page 3-11
•
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT on page 3-11
•
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS on page 3-12
•
REPORTING_TIMEOUT on page 3-12
This keyword determines which IxChariot or Qcheck Consoles can run tests
using this endpoint.
To allow any IxChariot or Qcheck Console to run tests on this endpoint, use the
ALL parameter, which is the installation default:
ALLOW ALL
However, the default “ALLOW ALL” is NOT RECOMMENDED. Although
“ALLOW ALL” makes it easy to install an endpoint and see that it’s running, it
also lets any user who can reach the endpoint potentially use that endpoint as a
traffic generator.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
To allow only specific users to run tests with this endpoint, remove the “ALLOW
ALL” line and specify one or more specific IxChariot or Qcheck Consoles by
their network addresses. You can specify more than one address per protocol. For
example,
ALLOW TCP 192.86.77.120
ALLOW TCP 192.86.77.121
Specify a connection-oriented protocol (that is, TCP or SPX) as the first parameter and its corresponding network address as the second parameter. (Endpoints
only listen for incoming tests on connection-oriented protocols.)
NOTE: Although you can ALLOW multiple addresses, IxChariot does not
support the concurrent use of a single endpoint with multiple IxChariot consoles.
That is, you cannot run tests from multiple consoles on the same endpoint at the
same time.
The network address cannot be an alias or hostname; that is, in TCP/IP it must be
an IP address in dotted notation, and in IPX/SPX it must be an IPX address with
hex network address and node address.
You cannot use the ALLOW parameter to restrict access from one endpoint to
another endpoint. The ALLOW parameter can only be used to permit (or prevent)
access from specific IxChariot or Qcheck Consoles to the endpoint at which the
parameter is defined.
If, for some reason, you need to restrict your endpoint to access only your own
computer, specify your own IP network address rather than 127.0.0.1. Specifying 127.0.0.1 (the equivalent of localhost) allows any other user who
specifies “localhost” as Endpoint 1 to access your computer as Endpoint 2.
SECURITY_
AUDITING
This keyword determines which access attempts the endpoint keeps track of in its
audit file. Here are the possible parameters:
Table 3-2.
Security Auditing
Parameter
Comment
NONE
Nothing is written to the audit file.
PASSED
Only access attempts that passed the ALLOW address check
are logged.
REJECTED
Only access attempts that failed the ALLOW address check
are logged.
ALL
Both passed and rejected access attempts are logged.
If a test initialization fails for a reason other than address checking, no entry is
made in the audit file.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
AUDIT_FILENAME
This keyword specifies the filespec for the audit file. See SECURITY_
AUDITING on page 3-4 to understand the types of events logged in its audit file.
The default filename, in endpoint.ini, is endpoint.aud. If no drive or path
is specified, the audit file uses the drive and path of the endpoint program.
This file contains at most two lines for each endpoint pair that is started on this
endpoint. These two lines represent the start of an endpoint instance and the end
of that instance.
Each line written to the audit file consists of a set of information about the endpoint instance and what it has been asked to do. The information is written in
comma-delimited form, so you can load the audit file into a spreadsheet or database. When the audit file is created, an initial header line explains the contents of
the subsequent entries.
The following table shows the fields of each entry in the audit file:
Table 3-3.
Audit File Contents
Field
Comment
Time
The date and time when the entry was created, in
the local time zone.
Action
Whether this entry indicates that an endpoint
instance was “Started” or “Ended.”
Endpoint
Whether the endpoint is in the role of Endpoint 1
or Endpoint 2.
Protocol of IxChariot
Console
The network protocol used to contact Endpoint 1.
Network Address of
IxChariot Console
The network address as seen by Endpoint 1. If
you encounter problems setting up your ALLOW
entries, this is the value to use for the protocol
address.
Security Result
Whether this SECURITY_AUDITING “passed” or
was “rejected.” If this is an entry for an “Ended”
action, this field is reported as “n/a.”
Endpoint Partner Protocol
The network protocol used to run the test with our
partner endpoint.
Endpoint Partner Address
The network address of our partner endpoint.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
ENABLE_
PROTOCOL
This keyword lets you control which connection-oriented protocols this endpoint
uses to listen for setup connections. This does not affect the network protocols,
which can be used to run tests. Here are the possible parameters:
ALL
SPX
TCP
In general, you should use the ALL setting (the default). Specify protocols explicitly to reduce the overhead of listening on the other protocols or if you’re encountering errors when listening on the other protocols.
See the discussion of the ALLOW keyword (refer to ALLOW on page 3-3) for
information about support of the datagram protocols, IPX, RTP, and UDP.
USE_
ENCRYPTION
This keyword specifies whether or not the endpoint will use encrypted data during test setup. It takes the values described in Table 3-4.
Table 3-4.
USE_ENCRYPTION Settings
Setting
Description
OFF
The endpoint will not accept encrypted data.
ON
The endpoint will accept only encrypted data.
For Endpoint 1, this setting determines whether the endpoint will require
encrypted data from the IxChariot Console. If the parameter is set to ON, then
Endpoint 1 will reject unencrypted setup flows sent from the Console.
For Endpoint 2, this setting determines whether the endpoint will require
encrypted data from Endpoint 1. If the parameter is set to ON, then Endpoint 2
will reject unencrypted setup flows sent from Endpoint 1,
Endpoint 1, however, can send either encrypted or unencrypted data to
Endpoint 2, regardless of the setting of the USE_ENCRYPTION flag. The possible combinations are described in Table 3-5.
Table 3-5.
3-6
Effect of Encryption Settings
If Endpoint 1 USE_
ENCRYPTION
Setting is:
And Endpoint 2
USE_ENCRYPTION
Setting is:
OFF
OFF
Endpoint 1 accepts only
unencrypted data from the
Console, and sends unencrypted
data to Endpoint 2.
ON
OFF
Endpoint 1 accepts only
encrypted data from the Console,
and sends unencrypted data to
Endpoint 2.
Then …
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
Table 3-5.
Effect of Encryption Settings (Continued)
If Endpoint 1 USE_
ENCRYPTION
Setting is:
And Endpoint 2
USE_ENCRYPTION
Setting is:
OFF
ON
Endpoint 1 accepts only
unencrypted data from the
Console, and sends encrypted
data to Endpoint 2.
ON
ON
Endpoint 1 accepts only
encrypted data from the Console,
and sends encrypted data to
Endpoint 2.
Then …
Refer to the IxChariot User Guide for more information about encrypting setup
data.
Note: The encrypted setup flows feature is available in IxChariot release 6.30
and higher. Note that both the IxChariot Console and the IxChariot Performance
Endpoints must be running a supported release level (6.30 or higher) for full
feature support.
SOCKET_SEND_
BUFFER_SIZE
This keyword specifies how much send buffer space the operating system should
allocate for the sockets datagram service. The value that you specify is a request
only. Each operating system sets its own maximum value and may or may not
allocate all of the buffer space that you request.
This keyword is applicable only to the following pair types:
•
Video pairs
•
Multicast video pairs
•
IPTV pairs
Syntax:
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE <value in bytes>
Example:
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE 32768
Set the value to zero to indicate that the operating system default value should be
used:
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE 0
Note: For IPTV tests, you can also set the connection send and receive buffers
through the IxChariot Console and through API calls. However, the endpoint.ini
setting overrides those settings.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
SOCKET_
RECEIVE_
BUFFER_SIZE
This keyword specifies how much receive buffer space the operating system
should allocate for the sockets datagram service. The value that you specify is a
request only. Each operating system sets its own maximum value and may or
may not allocate all of the buffer space that you request.
This keyword is applicable only to the following pair types:
•
Video pairs
•
Multicast video pairs
•
IPTV pairs
Syntax:
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE <value in bytes>
Example:
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE 524288
Set the value to zero to indicate that the operating system default value should be
used:
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE 0
Note: For IPTV tests, you can also set the connection send and receive buffers
through the IxChariot Console and through API calls. However, the endpoint.ini
setting overrides those settings.
FORCE_
CLOCKSYNC
This keyword specifies whether or not endpoints will synchronize their clocks
before each test run.
Syntax:
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC <0 or 1>
where
• 0 specifies that a forced synchronization per test run is not required. In this
case, the endpoints will periodically synchronize their clocks based on the
estimated clock deviation computed from previous synchronizations.
• 1 specifies that the endpoints must synchronize their clocks before the start
of each test run.
Note: This keyword is applicable only if the endpoints use endpoint internal
timers as synchronizing mechanism. It has no effect if the clock synchronization
run option is set to Ixia hardware timestamps or external device.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
MAX_PAYLOAD_
DISK_USAGE
This keyword defines the upper limit for the amount of payload data to be stored
on permanent storage (such as hard disk).
Syntax:
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE <value in bytes>
Example:
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE 1073741824
This example limits the amount of payload data that can be stored on disk to
1 GB.
For platforms with no disk, the default value is 0 MB.
MAX_PAYLOAD_
MEMORY_USAGE
This keyword defines the upper limit for the total amount of payload data that
can be stored in RAM. The cumulative size of all payload files stored in memory
cannot exceed this limit.
Note that payload data shared by multiple pairs will be downloaded only once.
While this increases setup efficiency and reduced the total setup time, it also
means that if the download of the payload fails, all pairs using that payload will
abort with an error message.
Syntax:
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE <value in bytes>
Example:
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE 10485760
This example limits the amount of payload data that can be stored in RAM to
10 MB.
For platforms with no disk, the default value is 100 MB.
PAYLOAD_
MEMORY_LIMIT_
USAGE
This keyword specifies the maximum size of a payload file that can be stored in
memory. Any payload file that exceeds this value will be stored on disk.
For example, if you set the PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE to 5 MB,
and you have one payload file that requires 4.9 MB of storage and another payload file that requires 5.01 MB, the first will be stored in memory and the second
will be stored on disk,
Syntax:
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE <value in bytes>
Example:
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE 104857600
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
This example limits the amount of FEPL that can be stored in RAM to 100 MB.
For platforms with no disk, the default value is 100 MB.
MANAGEMENT_
PORT
This keyword specifies the TCP port that the endpoint will use for management
traffic. If the keyword is omitted, the management port defaults to 10115.
Syntax:
MANAGEMENT_PORT <port number>
Example:
MANAGEMENT_PORT 80
Notes:
•
For any given test, all endpoints and the IxChariot Console must use the same
port number. If the port numbers differ, the test setup phase will fail.
•
If you use a packet inspection firewall and you set port 80 as the management
port, the firewall may reject packets carrying the management traffic.
•
If the specified port is taken by another application (such as an IxChariot
script), the endpoints will report an error.
•
This keyword is valid for TCP only. The management port is not configurable
for SPX transport: it is set at 10117.
•
Clock synchronization traffic uses the same port as that selected for management traffic.
Refer to the IxChariot User Guide for instructions for setting the management
port for the IxChariot Console.
INITIAL_
MANAGEMENT_
TOS
This keyword specifies the QoS TOS value that will be used by the endpoint on
the management network until the first management command is received and
executed.
Syntax:
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS <tos>
Example:
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS 32
Notes:
•
<tos> must be a decimal number between 0 and 255.
•
Any invalid <tos> value will be reset to 0.
Refer to the IxChariot User Guide for instructions for detailed information about
setting QoS values for IxChariot management traffic.
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
DISABLE_
DISCOVERY
This keyword specifies whether the automatic endpoint registration with the Ixia
Discovery Server should be disabled.
Syntax:
DISABLE_DISCOVERY <ON or OFF>
Example:
DISABLE_DISCOVERY ON
Notes:
DISCOVERY_
SERVER_
ADDRESS
•
The default value is OFF, meaning that the automatic endpoint registration
with the Ixia Discovery Server is enabled (that is, it is not disabled).
•
This feature is supported by all of the Microsoft Windows performance endpoints (including Windows CE) and all of the Linux performance endpoints.
None of the other performance endpoints support the feature.
•
To disable the feature on a supported platform, un-comment the line and set it
to ON.
•
To enable the feature on a supported platform, simply leave the statement
commented-out, or the value to OFF.
•
For the unsupported platforms, leave this option commented-out.
This keyword specifies the Ixia Discovery Server IP address or name used in the
automatic registration process.
Syntax:
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS <address>
Example:
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS IxDiscoveryServ
Notes:
DISCOVERY_
SERVER_PORT
•
This feature is supported by all of the Microsoft Windows performance endpoints (including Windows CE) and all of the Linux performance endpoints.
None of the other performance endpoints support the feature.
•
For supported platforms, un-comment the line and set it to the desired
address.
•
For the unsupported platforms, leave this option commented-out.
This keyword specifies the port that the Ixia Discovery Server uses in the automatic registration process.
Syntax:
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT <port>
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Endpoint Initialization File
Keywords
Example:
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT 10120
Notes:
DISCOVERY_
INTERVAL_
BETWEEN_
CONNECTS
•
This feature is supported by all of the Microsoft Windows performance endpoints (including Windows CE) and all of the Linux performance endpoints.
None of the other performance endpoints support the feature.
•
For supported platforms, un-comment the line and specify the desired port
number.
•
For the unsupported platforms, leave this option commented-out.
This keyword specifies the interval (in seconds) at which the endpoint will try to
connect to the Ixia Discovery Server used in the automatic registration process.
Syntax:
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS <interval>
Example:
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECTS 30
Notes:
REPORTING_
TIMEOUT
•
The default value is 0, which means that the endpoint will try to connect only
once.
•
If the value is greater than 0, the endpoint will try to connect at the specified
interval until the connection is successful.
•
The maximum value is 2,000,000.
•
This feature is supported by all of the Microsoft Windows performance endpoints (including Windows CE) and all of the Linux performance endpoints.
None of the other performance endpoints support the feature.
•
For supported platforms, un-comment the line and specify the desired value.
•
For the unsupported platforms, leave this option commented-out.
This keyword specifies the interval (in seconds) after which the endpoint will
abandon efforts to connect to its partner to send the timing record reports.
The valid range of values is from zero through 999,999 seconds. If the value is
set to zero, IxChariot will use the default timeout interval (130 seconds).
Syntax:
REPORTING_TIMEOUT <interval>
Example:
REPORTING_TIMEOUT 180
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4
Chapter 4:
Ixia Load Module
Ixia provides Performance Endpoint software for several operating systems,
including the Linux operating system that runs on Ixia load module ports. The
Ixia Load Module Performance Endpoint allows you to use Ixia ports in much
the same manner as other Performance Endpoints. This chapter provides instructions for using the Ixia Load Module Performance Endpoint, organized into the
following chapters:
•
Installing the Ixia Performance Endpoint on page 4-1
•
Logging and Messages on page 4-2
•
Starting and Stopping Ixia Endpoints on page 4-2
•
Optimization on page 4-3
•
Supported Load Modules on page 4-3
Installing the Ixia Performance
Endpoint
Installation of the Ixia Load Module Performance Endpoint software is not
required. Stack Manager automatically loads the Performance Endpoint software
to the port CPU.
Updating the Ixia
Performance
Endpoint
If you need to update or replace the Ixia Load Module Performance Endpoint
with another version, copy the endpoint.tar file to the C:\Program
Files\Ixia\IxChariot\Packages folder, replacing the existing archive version. (You
can obtain the endpoint.tar file from Customer Support, the Ixia web site, or the
IxChariot distribution CD.)
About Stack
Manager
IxChariot 6.10 (and higher) includes Stack Manager as an integrated tool for
configuring Ixia ports for use in IxChariot tests.
Stack Manager is supported by IxOS 4.0 and higher. However, not all versions of
IxOS support every feature in Stack Manager. Refer to the “IxOS Support” topic
in the Stack Manager User Guide for a list of the features supported in each
version of IxOS.
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Ixia Load Module
Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
The endpoint maintains logs in /var/log/endpoint.log. The log file is created
when an error occurs.
To view an error log, the log file should be moved over to the IxChariot Console
and then viewed with the error log viewer, available in the Tools menu from the
IxChariot Console main window.
Message CHR0181
You may receive message CHR0181 while running a test. If the error was
detected at the Linux computer, it says that the endpoint program on Linux has
run out of system semaphores. Each instance of Endpoint 1 requires a system
semaphore. The maximum number of semaphores is not configurable on Linux,
which is hard-coded to a large value (128). To avoid this problem, stop other programs that use semaphores or decrease the number of tests that use the computer
as Endpoint 1.
Starting and Stopping Ixia
Endpoints
IxChariot Performance Endpoints on Ixia ports are automatically started when
the Linux-based processor on the port is booted. If necessary, the procedures in
this section can be used to stop the Performance Endpoint and restart it. One
manner in which the Performance Endpoint may be restarted is to reboot the port
using IxServer. This can be accomplished in one of three ways:
1. Restart IxServer on the chassis. This is the most extreme means of accomplishing the reboot. All use of all ports on the chassis will be immediately
aborted. To accomplish this, you must:
a: Access the chassis’ console.
b: Exit the running IxServer process. You will be asked for a confirmation of
the termination; answer “yes”.
c: Restart IxServer by double clicking the IxServer icon on the desktop.
2. Restart the individual ports using IxServer. To accomplish this, you must:
a: Access the chassis’ console.
b: In the IxServer window, select Tools..Diagnostics.
c: For each port with an IxChariot endpoint that needs to be restarted:
i:
Enter the card and the port in the fields provided.
ii: Press the LP Reboot button.
3. Follow the two steps listed below.
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Ixia Load Module
Supported Load Modules
Stopping the
Endpoint
In order to stop the IxChariot Performance Endpoint on an Ixia port, it is necessary to telnet to that port. The IP address of each port is of the form:
<base octet 1>.<base octet 2>.<card>.<port>
Base octet 1 and base octet 2 are the first two octets of the chassis base address.
The default base address is 10.0.0.0. Card and port are the card and port number
of the individual port. Thus, to telnet to the first port on card three for a chassis
with a default base address, one would type:
telnet 10.0.3.1
The user name is root and no password is needed.
Once you are logged in, you are talking to a Linux system. It is necessary to find
and kill all endpoint processes. Use the following two steps:
1. Type: ps | grep endpoint.
2. For each of the numbers in the pid column, type the command:
kill <pid>
Restarting the
Endpoint
The IxChariot Performance Endpoint may be restarted using the following command, using the telnet session started in the previous section:
/bin/endpoint &
Supported Load Modules
Refer to the Release Notes for a list of the Ixia load modules that are supported in
IxChariot tests.
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Ixia Load Module
Supported Load Modules
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5
Chapter 5:
Android
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Android performance endpoint. Android, developed by the Open Handset Alliance, is a software platform for mobile devices, such as smartphones and netbooks. The Android platform encompasses an operating system, middleware, an
SDK, and mobile applications.
This chapter includes the following topics:
•
About the Android Performance Endpoint on page 5-1
•
Installing the Android Performance Endpoint on page 5-2
•
Uninstalling the Android Performance Endpoint on page 5-4
•
Configuring the Android Performance Endpoint on page 5-4
•
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint on page 5-5
About the Android Performance
Endpoint
This section identifies the requirements for installing and running the Android
performance endpoint.
Requirements
Here is what you need to run the Android performance endpoint program:
•
A device that supports the Android operating system, release 1.5. (which is
based on Linux kernel version 2.6.27).
•
Two MBytes of free RAM.
•
The Android SDK installed on a Windows or Linux machine (to copy the performance endpoint files to the Android device).
Ixia has tested the performance endpoint using the Android Dev Phone 1, model
G1, manufactured by HTC.
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Android
Installing the Android Performance Endpoint
Distribution
The Android performance endpoint is provided as a single tar file. You can
install it from the IxChariot CD-ROM or download it from the Ixia web site.
The performance endpoint file is named pe_android_Mm.tar, where “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version. For example, the
performance endpoint for Release 7.0 is named pe_android_70.tar.
Contents of the tar
File
Little Endian
The performance endpoint tar file contains the following files:
•
the performance endpoint executable.
•
the endpoint.ini file. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
•
the echr.msg file, which contains the text messages that will be displayed by
the performance endpoint and by the IxChariot Console.
•
the README file.
•
the Ixia EULA (End-User License Agreement).
•
the cmpfiles directory, containing files with the .cmp file extension. These
files contain data of different types, such as typical text or binary data. They
are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data
types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network
hardware and software.
This performance endpoint is designed for Android devices with ARM little
endian CPUs. (Little endian architectures store the most significant byte in a
memory location with the highest address.)
Installing the Android
Performance Endpoint
Installing the Android performance endpoint entails the following activities:
extracting the contents of the tar file onto a Windows or Linux machine; then
installing the extracted files onto the Android machine.
Extracting the
Archive Contents
You use a Windows or Linux machine to extract the archive contents and copy
the files to the Android machine. The following instructions assume that you
obtained the performance endpoint tar file from the Ixia web site.
To decompress the performance endpoint files:
1. Log on to the Windows or Linux machine, using an account with administrator privileges. On a Linux machine, you will log in as root.
2. cd to the directory where you will extract the archive contents.
3. Extract the archive contents:
tar -xvf pe_android_Mm.tar
The files are extracted to a /temp directory. See Contents of the tar File on
page 5-2 for a description of the files.
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Android
Installing the Android Performance Endpoint
Installing the
Performance
Endpoint
Once you have extracted the contents of the tar file onto a Windows or Linux
machine, you are ready to install those files onto the Android device.
To install and start the performance endpoint:
1. Install the Android SDK on a Windows or Linux machine.
You obtain the SKD from this location: http://developer.android.com/sdk/.
2. Use a USB cable to connect the your Android device to the Windows or
Linux machine.
3. Navigate to the following directory in a command line window:
android-sdk-windows-1.5_r2\tools\
4. Enter the following commands:
a: adb push <path-to-the-temp-folder>\endpoint /data/
local/temp/endpoint
b: adb push <path-to-the-temp-folder>\endpoint.ini /data/
local/temp/endpoint.ini
c: adb push <path-to-the-temp-folder>\echr.msg /data/
local/temp/echr.msg
d: adb push <path-to-the-temp-folder>\cmpfiles\*.* /data/
local/temp/cmpfiles
e: adb shell
f: cd /data/local/temp/
g: su
h: chmod 750 endpoint
i: ./endpoint &
For example:
adb push
D:\Ixia\IxChariot\7.0\7.0.28.63\Disk1\endpoint\android\
temp\endpoint /data/local/7.0.28.63/endpoint
adb push
D:\Ixia\IxChariot\7.0\7.0.28.63\Disk1\endpoint\android\
temp\endpoint.ini /data/local/7.0.28.63/endpoint.ini
adb push
D:\Ixia\IxChariot\7.0\7.0.28.63\Disk1\endpoint\android\
temp\echr.msg /data/local/7.0.28.63/echr.msg
adb push
D:\Ixia\IxChariot\7.0\7.0.28.63\Disk1\endpoint\android\
temp\cmpfiles\*.* /data/local/7.0.28.63/cmpfiles
adb shell
cd /data/local/7.0.28.63/
su
chmod 750 endpoint
./endpoint &
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
5-3
5
Android
Uninstalling the Android Performance Endpoint
Uninstalling the Android
Performance Endpoint
Follow these steps to uninstall the Android performance endpoint:
1. Log on to the Windows or Linux machine, using an account with administrator privileges. On a Linux machine, you will log in as root.
2. Navigate to the following directory in a command line window:
android-sdk-windows-1.5_r2\tools\
3. Enter the following commands:
a: adb shell
b: cd /data/local/temp/
c: ./endpoint -k
d: rm endpoint
e: rm endpoint.ini
f: rm echr.msg
g: rm cmpfiles/*.*
Configuring the Android
Performance Endpoint
The performance endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do
not need to update the configuration files for your communications software.
However, your communications software must be configured and running correctly.
Supported
Protocols
The performance endpoint for Android supports IPv4 over TCP, UDP, and RTP.
It does not support IPv6, IPX, SPX, or APPC.
To use domain names, you need either a Domain Name Server (DNS) set up in
your network or an /etc/hosts file on each device.
Configuring
endpoint.ini
To modify the performance endpoint configuration file (endpoint.ini):
1. Manually modify the endpoint.ini file on Windows or Linux machine.
2. Then upload the file using the Android Debug Bridge (adb) shell on the
Android device.
Refer to Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for detailed information about the
endpoint.ini options.
5-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Android
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Log Files
The default log directory is named /var/log/. If this directory is not available, the
performance endpoint will use /data/local/ as an alternate log directory.
Starting and Stopping the
Performance Endpoint
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the performance
endpoint program.
Starting the Android
Performance
Endpoint
Use the following steps to manually start the endpoint program at a command
prompt:
1. Log on to the Windows or Linux machine, using an account with administrator privileges. On a Linux machine, you will log in as root.
2. Navigate to the following directory in a command line window:
android-sdk-windows-1.5_r2\tools\
3. To start the endpoint, enter the following commands:
a: adb shell
b: ./endpoint &
The optional “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the program should run in the
background.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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5
Android
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint
Stopping the
Android
Performance
Endpoint
Use the following steps to manually stop the endpoint program at a command
prompt:
1. Log on to the Windows or Linux machine, using an account with administrator privileges. On a Linux machine, you will log in as root.
2. Navigate to the following directory in a command line window:
android-sdk-windows-1.5_r2\tools\
3. To start the endpoint, enter the following command:
a: adb shell
b: ./endpoint -k
The -k command-line option kills any endpoint process running on that device.
You should see the message “Sent exit request to the running
endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has been sent a request to
stop.
If the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program,
you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command.
How to Tell if the
Performance
Endpoint is Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if a performance endpoint is
active. For example:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the performance endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to
this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
5-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
6
Chapter 6:
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint.
This chapter includes the following topics:
•
About the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance Endpoint on page 6-1
•
Installing the Performance Endpoint on page 6-2
•
Uninstalling the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance Endpoint on page 6-3
•
Network Configuration on page 6-4
•
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint on page 6-5
About the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Performance Endpoint
This section identifies the requirements for installing and running the iPhone 3G/
iPod Touch performance endpoint.
Requirements
Here is what you need to install and run the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance
endpoint program:
•
An iPhone 3G or an iPod Touch device, firmware version 2.2.1 or 3.0.
•
Two MBytes of free RAM on the device.
•
An iTunes Store account.
•
iTunes running on a computer.
Ixia has tested the performance endpoint using an iPhone 3G and an iPod Touch,
each with 128 MBytes of installed RAM.
Distribution
The iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint is distributed through the
Apple App Store, the same as any other iPhone application.
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6-1
6
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Installing the Performance Endpoint
Installing the Performance
Endpoint
This section provides instructions for downloading and installing the iPhone 3G/
iPod Touch performance endpoint.
Prerequisites
To download and manage applications from the Apple App Store, you must have
an iTunes Store account and you must have iTunes running on a computer.
Installing Directly
from the iPhone
Follow these steps to download the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint
directly from an iPhone 3G device:
1. Connect to the Internet.
2. Start App Store.
3. Use “Ixia Endpoint” to search for the application.
4. Locate the application in the list, then tap Get App.
5. Sign in to your account, then tap OK.
App Store starts downloading the application to your iPhone. The performance
endpoint icon appears on your Home screen and shows the status of the download and installation. Once the download is complete, the icon remains on the
screen, as shown in Figure 6-1 on page 6-3.
6-2
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Uninstalling the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance Endpoint
Figure 6-1.
iPod Screen Showing the Ixia Endpoint Application
When you connect the iPhone to your computer, iTunes automatically syncs the
applications installed on iPhone to your iTunes library.
Installing from
iTunes
You can also download the performance endpoint using iTunes on your computer. In this case, iTunes will automatically sync the application to your iPhone
the next time that you connect the iPhone to your computer.
Uninstalling the iPhone 3G/
iPod Touch Performance
Endpoint
You use the standard iPhone procedures to remove the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
performance endpoint from an iPhone 3G/iPod Touch device. To delete an App
Store application:
1. Touch and hold the application icon on the Home screen until the icon starts
to wiggle.
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6
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Network Configuration
2. Tap the black dot with an “x” in the corner of the application.
3. Tap Delete
4. Press the Home button to save the changes.
You can reinstall any application and any associated data from your iTunes
library if you previously backed up the application by syncing it to your computer.
Network Configuration
The performance endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do
not need to update the configuration files for your communications software.
However, your communications software must be configured and running correctly.
Supported
Protocols
The iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint supports IPv4 over TCP,
UDP, and RTP. It does not support IPv6, IPX, SPX, or APPC.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Log Files
6-4
No log files are created for the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint
Starting and Stopping the
Performance Endpoint
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the performance
endpoint program.
Starting
To start the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint, tap its icon on the
screen.
Stopping
To stop the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint, press the Home button. (Pressing the Home button exits from any application and displays the home
screen.
How to Tell if the
Performance
Endpoint is Active
While the iPhone 3G/iPod Touch performance endpoint is running, it displays
the performance endpoint version number, as shown in Figure 6-2.
Figure 6-2.
Active iPhone 3G/iPod Touch Performance Endpoint
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6
iPhone 3G/iPod Touch
Starting and Stopping the Performance Endpoint
6-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
7
Chapter 7:
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for 32-bit Linux running on Intel x86 processors.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Linux 32-bit x86 Performance Endpoint File Names on page 7-1
•
Protocols Supported on page 7-2
•
Installation Requirements on page 7-2
•
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints on page 7-3
•
Removing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints on page 7-8
•
Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints on page 7-9
•
Running Linux Endpoints on page 7-11
•
Logging and Messages on page 7-13
Endpoints are also available for the Linux AMD64 processor architecture. Refer
to Chapter 8, Linux 64-Bit (x86-64) for more information.
Linux 32-bit x86 Performance
Endpoint File Names
Ixia provides two versions of the 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoint:
•
pelnx_Mm.tar.gz – Zipped tar file
•
pelnx_Mm.rpm – RPM (Red Hat Package Manager) distribution file
where “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version.
For example, pelnx_650.rpm is version 6.50 of the RPM distribution Performance Endpoint.
The two Performance Endpoints are the same: only the distribution method differs. This chapter provides installation instructions for both.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Protocols Supported
Protocols Supported
The 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoint uses the Sockets interface shipped
with Linux to support the following transport layer protocols:
•
TCP
•
UDP
•
RTP
The Performance Endpoint supports both IPv4 and IPv6. IPX, SPX, and other
network protocols are not supported.
Installation Requirements
Here are the requirements for installing and running the Linux x86 Performance
Endpoint:
•
A 32-bit x86 computer capable of running Linux well. We recommend a CPU
such as an Intel Pentium III or better.
•
A minimum of 64 MBytes of RAM.
The total RAM requirement depends on RAM usage of the underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent endpoint pairs. For tests involving
over one hundred connections through a single endpoint, additional memory
may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 8 MBytes of space available.
•
Linux kernel 2.4.20 or better.
Note: Linux kernel 2.6.18 is required for IPTV testing.
We have tested with Linux distributions that implement Linux kernel 2.4.20.
We have not tested this version of Performance Endpoint with earlier versions
of the Linux kernel.
The Performance Endpoint requires the Linux operating system to enable
“pthreads support” (which is at least version 2.0.6 of glibc). TCP/IP networking and corresponding networking hardware must be installed and configured, plus ELF support. Some older installations of Linux may not have this
installed. At the Web site www.linuxdoc.org/HOWTO/Glibc2-HOWTO.html,
you can find information about Linux, as well as download the file glibc2.0, which you need to have loaded to install the endpoint. We have changed
our installation procedures to check for this file, as it is required to run the
endpoint.
Note that older versions of the Linux kernel may not properly support IPv6.
•
7-2
An Acrobat Reader to view PDF files. Acrobat readers are loaded on most
computers for viewing other documents, but if you do not have one, they are
available at Adobe’s Web Site: www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
Installing 32-bit Linux x86
Endpoints
This section provides installation instructions for both versions of the 32-bit
Linux x86 Performance Endpoint:
TAR-Based
Endpoint Installation
for 32-bit Linux
•
TAR-Based Endpoint Installation for 32-bit Linux on page 7-3
•
RPM-Based Endpoint Installation for 32-bit Linux on page 7-5
•
What Happens During Installation on page 7-7
First, make sure that you are logged in as a “root” user. Also, remember that all
commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the following procedure. The
following instructions explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and
from the Ixia web site.
Installation from CD-ROM
To install the 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoint from a CD-ROM:
1. Log in as root.
2. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
3. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
4. The CD-ROM contains an archive of the endpoint package. First use the rm
command to ensure a clean temporary install directory. Then use the tar
command to extract the archive contents from the CD-ROM:
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
tar -xvf /cdrom/endpoint/linux/pelnx_Mm.tar
5. Next, run the endpoint’s installation script to install the endpoint:
./endpoint.install
6. You will see the license agreement, presented with the “more” command.
Press the spacebar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license.”
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/ixia. During installation you
will see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see
the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
7-3
7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating from
$oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the warnings
displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
7. After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount the
file system from the CD-ROM:
umount /cdrom
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically
if the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the
endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
8. To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints on page 7-9 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used
in testing and monitoring.
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint you’ve downloaded from the Ixia web site:
1. Log in as root.
2. Use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (we’ll use
/tmp in this example).
3. Save the endpoint to the /tmp directory.
4. Uncompress the endpoint by using the uncompress command:
cd /tmp
uncompress pelnx_Mm.tar
tar –xvf pelnx_Mm.tar
5. From the directory where you’ve downloaded the endpoint, run the endpoint’s installation script:
./endpoint.install
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/ixia. During installation, you
will see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see
the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating from
$oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the warnings
displayed above for further explanation.
7-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically
if the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the
endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
6. To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints on page 7-9 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used
in testing and monitoring.
Unattended Installation for TAR-Based Linux
You can install the endpoint silently, that is, without providing any additional
user input.
Complete the steps, as described in TAR-Based Endpoint Installation for 32-bit
Linux on page 7-3, through the tar command. Next, run the endpoint’s installation, adding the “accept_license” parameter:
./endpoint.install accept_license
RPM-Based
Endpoint Installation
for 32-bit Linux
First, ensure that you are logged in as a “root” user. Also, remember that all commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of
uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the following procedure. The following instructions explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from
the World Wide Web.
Installation from CD-ROM
To install the 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoint from a CD-ROM:
1. Log in as root.
2. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
3. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
4. Copy the pelnx_Mm.rpm file from the CD-ROM to a local directory (like
tmp, for example).
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
7-5
7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
cp /cdrom/endpoint/linux/pelnx_Mm.rpm /tmp
5. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
rpm -Uvh /tmp/pelnx_Mm.rpm
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention
to the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message
“Installation of endpoint was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating from
$oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the warnings
displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
6. After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount the
file system from the CD-ROM.
umount /cdrom
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints on page 7-9 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used
in testing and monitoring.
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint you’ve downloaded from the Ixia web site:
1. Log in as root.
2. Use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (we’ll use
/tmp in this example).
3. Save the pelnx_Mm.rpm file to the /tmp directory.
4. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
cd /tmp
rpm -Uvh pelnx_Mm.rpm
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention
to the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message
“Installation of endpoint was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating from
$oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the warnings
displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
7-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Installing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints on page 7-9 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used
in testing and monitoring.
What Happens
During Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed into
the directory /usr/local/ixia. A directory is created with the following contents:
•
The executable programs
•
The README file
•
Various install and uninstall programs
•
The directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
•
The file endpoint.ini
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring
this file for individual endpoints.
The installation program stops any copy of the endpoint program currently running and starts a copy of the newly installed endpoint. You can run tests immediately, without restarting your computer.
Our software displays information on how to update your system to have the endpoint start automatically upon restarting.
No changes are made to the PATH environment variable of the root user.
Should you have reason to install an older endpoint, you should delete any
safestore files using the following steps:
1. Stop the endpoint.
2. Delete the safestore files from the endpoint directory (or from the directory
specified by the SAFESTORE_DIRECTORY keyword in endpoint.ini). Safestore files have an extension of .q*; you may delete them using the command:
rm *.q*.
3. Uninstall the current endpoint.
4. Install the desired endpoint.
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7-7
7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Removing 32-bit Linux x86 Endpoints
Removing 32-bit Linux x86
Endpoints
Instructions for uninstalling 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints is provided
below, for both TAR-based packages and RPM-based packages.
Removing the TARBased Endpoint
Package (Uninstall)
You must be logged in as root to remove the endpoint package.
If you need to remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, first stop the
endpoint program (if it is running) using the following command:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
Then use the following command to remove the endpoint:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint.remove
If the removal is successful, you will see the following: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/
Ixia, except for any files that were added to this directory that were not present
at installation, such as the endpoint.ini file. This command does not delete
the directory. The remove program does not automatically delete files added to
the directory that you may need if you reinstall the product.
If anything goes wrong during the process of uninstalling the endpoint, a reinstalled endpoint may not run. You may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for
the hidden file /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a
command. This file should be manually removed. Enter the following command:
rm /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
Removing the RPM
Endpoint Package
(Uninstall)
You must be logged in as root to remove the endpoint package.
Use the following command to uninstall the Linux x86 Performance Endpoint:
rpm -e endpoint
If the removal is successful, you will see the following: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/
ixia, except for any files that were added to this directory that were not present
at installation, such as the endpoint.ini file. This command does not delete
the directory. The remove program does not automatically delete files added to
the directory that you may need if you reinstall the product.
If anything goes wrong during the process of uninstalling the endpoint, a reinstalled endpoint may not run. You may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for
the hidden file /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID. You can use the
command ls -a to view hidden files. Then enter the following command to
delete it:
rm /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints
Configuring 32-bit Linux x86
Performance Endpoints
The 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your communications software must be configured and
running correctly. Take the following steps to verify that your network is ready
for testing and/or monitoring:
1. Determine the network addresses of the computers for use in tests.
2. Verify the network connections.
Let’s look at TCP/IP to see how to accomplish these tasks.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a
set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202. The alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember, such
as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain Name
Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Determining Your IP
Network Address for
TAR and RPM Linux
To determine the IP address of the local computer you are using, enter the following at a command prompt:
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
/sbin/ifconfig
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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7
Linux 32-Bit (x86)
Configuring 32-bit Linux x86 Performance Endpoints
Testing the TCP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To try
out the connection from one computer to another, enter the following:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx -c 1
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
then the Ping worked. Otherwise, there will be a delay, and you’ll see
1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet
loss
This means that the Ping failed, and you cannot reach the target computer.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints
involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Autostarting the
Endpoint
For the endpoint to automatically start when your computer restarts, you must
update your system rc scripts.
If your Linux system uses rc.local, which is used by some older Linux systems, add the following line to the rc.local file:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint 1>>/var/local/endpoint.console
2>&1 &
Don’t forget the ampersand (&) at the end of the line. If this character is not
included, the boot process does not continue, and you may be unable to log in at
the Console.
If you have previously installed the endpoint in a Ganymede directory, the install
script displays the following message:
The endpoint install directory now uses $installPath
instead of $oldInstallPath. If your rc.local referenced
$oldInstallPath, you should change it to use the new
directory.
If your Linux system is more recent, it probably supports System V init rc
scripts. Red Hat software uses this type of init rc files. Copy usr/local/
ixia/rc2exec.lnx to the appropriate places. For example, with Red Hat
Linux 5.0, you may run these commands:
cp /usr/local/Ixia/rc2exec.lnx /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint
ln -fs /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint /etc/rc.d/rc2.d/
S81endpoint
ln -fs /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint /etc/rc.d/rc3.d/
S81endpoint
ln -fs /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint /etc/rc.d/rc6.d/
K81endpoint
For Red Hat Linux 5.2 or later, the recommended commands are the following:
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cp /usr/local/Ixia/rc2exec.lnx /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint
/sbin/chkconfig endpoint reset
Running Linux Endpoints
The following sections describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program, and how to examine error log files if a problem occurs.
Starting a Linux
Endpoint
The endpoint program is installed so that it starts automatically each time Linux
is rebooted.
• On Slackware, it sends its screen output to file /var/adm/
endpoint.console.
• On Red Hat, it sends its screen output to file /var/local/
endpoint.console.
If you want to see any error messages generated at this endpoint, enter the following command:
tail -f /var/local/endpoint.console
The detailed information about the start and stop of each individual connection
pair is written to file endpoint.aud. The contents of this file vary depending on
how you’ve set the SECURITY_AUDITING keyword in your endpoint.ini
file.
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for more information about
endpoint.aud and SECURITY_AUDIT settings.
Instead of automatic startup, you can choose to manually start the endpoint program at a command prompt. Ensure that you are logged in as a “root” user. To
start the endpoint, enter the following:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint &
The “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should run in the
background. The screen output from the endpoint program is interleaved with
other UNIX commands. Just press Return to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the
endpoint program was started or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running (see the section, How to Tell If a Linux Endpoint Is Active on page 712 for more information). If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183 but it
appears that the endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup.
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Check for the hidden file /usr/local/Ixia/IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using
the ls -a command. This file should be manually removed.
Stopping a Linux
Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same computer and
enter the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process
running on that computer. You should see the message “Sent exit request
to the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has
been sent a request to stop.
If, for some reason, the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running
endpoint program, you may need to use the UNIX “kill -TERM” command.
Avoid using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean
up what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors on page 7-12).
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k”. If that does not stop the
endpoint, kill the endpoint using the UNIX kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If a
Linux Endpoint Is
Active
Use traditional UNIX commands to determine if a Linux endpoint is active. At a
command prompt, enter:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
366
367
368
369
Disabling Automatic
Startup
p0
p0
p0
p0
S
S
S
S
0:00
0:00
0:00
0:00
\_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
|
\_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
|
\_/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
|
\_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
If you run a Linux system that uses rc.local to invoke applications, remove the
invocation of /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint from /etc/rc.d/rc.local.
If you use a Linux system that supports System V style init rc scripts, remove
/etc/rc.d/rc2.d/S81endpoint from /etc/rc.d/rc2.d.
If you are using Red Hat Linux versions 5.2 or later, and have enabled the automatic startup through the CHKCONFIG utility, you can also disable the automatic
startup through the CHKCONFIG utility. Here is the syntax to use the CHKCONFIG
utility to disable the automatic startup:
/sbin/chkconfig -del endpoint
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Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in
the following file:
/var/log/endpoint.log
A log file is not created until an error occurs. To view an error log, use the program named FMTLOG. FMTLOG reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
/usr/local/Ixia/fmtlog /var/log/endpoint.log
>output_filename
The endpoint code does a lot of internal checking on itself. Our software captures
details related to the problem in an ASCII text file:
/var/local/assert.err
Save a copy of the file and send it to us via email for problem determination.
Message CHR0181
You may receive message CHR0181 while running a test. If the error was
detected at the Linux computer, it says that the endpoint program on Linux has
run out of system semaphores. Each instance of Endpoint 1 requires a system
semaphore. The maximum number of semaphores is not configurable on Linux,
which is hard-coded to a large value (128). To avoid this problem, stop other programs that use semaphores or decrease the number of tests that use the computer
as Endpoint 1.
Increasing the
Number of
Concurrent
Connections
Some parameters are tuned in Linux by rebuilding the Linux kernel. If you’re
adventurous and skilled enough, you can change the number of concurrent endpoint connections. Consult your Linux documentation for information about
increasing the maximum open files allowed per process (this probably involves
redefining NR_FILES and other macros). Alternatively, search Linux newsgroups on the Internet (using DejaNews, for example) for something like “max
open files per process.”
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Chapter 8:
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Performance Endpoint software for 64-bit Linux distributions running on
x86-64-based architectures.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Supported Distributions on page 8-1
•
Installation Requirements on page 8-1
•
Installing x86-64 Linux Performance Endpoints on page 8-2
•
Removing x86-64 Linux Endpoints on page 8-6
•
Configuring x86-64 Linux Endpoints on page 8-7
•
Running x86-64 Linux Endpoints on page 8-8
•
Logging and Messages on page 8-11
Supported Distributions
These performance endpoints are supported on the following x86-64 Linux distributions:
•
Redhat Enterprise Server
•
SuSE 9.2
Refer to Chapter 7, Linux 32-Bit (x86), of this manual for detailed information
about Performance Endpoints for 32-bit versions of Linux.
Installation Requirements
Here is what you need to run the endpoint program with x86-64 Linux:
•
A computer capable of running a 64-bit Linux distribution.
The 64-bit version of the Linux Performance Endpoint requires an
x86-64-compatible CPU, such as the AMD Opteron and AMD Athlon processors, or Intel Pentium 4 and Xeon processors with EM64T.
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•
At least 64 MBytes of random access memory (RAM).
The total RAM requirement depends on RAM usage of the underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent endpoint pairs. For tests involving
over one hundred connections through a single endpoint, additional memory
may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 24 MBytes of space available.
•
Linux kernel 2.4 with pthreads support (which is at least version 2.2 of glibc).
TCP/IP networking and corresponding networking hardware must be
installed and configured, plus ELF support.
•
Linux kernel 2.4.20 is required for IPv6 support.
•
An Acrobat Reader to view the PDF files.
Acrobat readers are loaded on most computers for viewing other documents,
but if you don’t have one, they are available at Adobe’s Web Site:
www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.
Installing x86-64 Linux
Performance Endpoints
This section provides installation instructions for both versions of the x86-64
Linux Performance Endpoint:
TAR-Based
Installation of the
x86-64 Linux
Endpoint
•
TAR-Based Installation of the x86-64 Linux Endpoint on page 8-2
•
RPM-Based Installation for the x86-64 Linux Endpoint on page 8-4
•
What We Do During Installation on page 8-5
First, make sure that you are logged in as a “root” user. Also, remember that all
commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters shown. The following instructions
explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from the World Wide
Web.
Installation from CD-ROM
To install the endpoint from a CD-ROM, do the following:
1. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
2. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
3. The CD-ROM contains an archive of the endpoint package. First use the rm
command to ensure a clean temporary install directory. Then use the uncompress and tar commands to extract the archive contents from the CD-ROM:
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
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Use the following commands to extract the archive contents:
uncompress /cdrom/endpoint/linux
/pelinux_amd64_610.tar.gz
tar -xvf ./pelinux_amd64_610.tar
4. Next, run the endpoint’s installation script to install the endpoint:
./endpoint.install
5. You will see the license agreement, presented with the “more” command.
Press the space bar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license” and press the ENTER key.
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/Ixia. During installation you will
see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount the file
system from the CD-ROM:
umount /cdrom
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically if
the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/Ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, your endpoint should be ready to be used in
testing and monitoring.
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint downloaded from the World Wide Web, do the following:
1. First use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (we’ll
use /tmp in this example).
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
2. Save the endpoint to the /tmp directory.
3. Use the uncompress and tar commands to extract the archive contents.
Use the following commands to extract the archive contents:
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uncompress ./pelinux_amd64_610.tar.gz
tar -xvf ./pelinux_amd64_610.tar
4. From the directory where you’ve downloaded the endpoint, run the endpoint’s installation script:
./endpoint.install
5. You will see the license agreement, presented with the “more” command.
Press the space bar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license” and press the ENTER key.
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/Ixia. During installation you will
see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically if
the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/Ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, your endpoint should be ready to be used in
testing and monitoring.
Unattended Installation
You can install the endpoint silently: that is, without providing any additional
user input.
Complete the first three steps in the procedures described above (through the tar
command). Next, run the endpoint’s installation, adding the “accept_license”
parameter:
./endpoint.install accept_license
RPM-Based
Installation for the
x86-64 Linux
Endpoint
8-4
Use the RPM-based installation if you are installing the endpoint on Red Hat or
SuSE 64-bit Linux distributions.
First, make sure that you are logged in as “root”. Also, remember all commands
and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the text. The following instructions
explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from the World Wide
Web.
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Installation from CD-ROM
The following instructions describe how to install the endpoint on a computer
with a CD-ROM drive.
1. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
2. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
3. Copy the RPM file from the drive to a local directory (for example, tmp).
cp /cdrom/endpoint/linux/pelinux_amd64_610.rpm /tmp
4. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
rpm -Uvh /tmp/pelinux_amd64_610.rpm
5. After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount
the file system from the CD-ROM:
umount /cdrom
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention to
the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation
of endpoint was successful.”
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint downloaded from the World Wide Web, do the following:
1. First, use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory
(we’ll use /tmp in this example).
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
2. Save the endpoint to the /tmp directory.
3. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
rpm -Uvh /tmp/pelinux_amd64_610.rpm
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention to
the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation
of endpoint was successful.”
What We Do During
Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed into
the directory /usr/local/Ixia. A directory is created with the following contents:
• the executable programs;
• the README file;
• various install and uninstall programs;
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• the directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND
commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
• the file endpoint.ini. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for
information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
The installation program stops any copy of the endpoint program currently running and starts a copy of the newly installed endpoint. You can run tests immediately, without restarting your computer.
Our software displays information on how to update your system to have the endpoint start automatically upon restarting.
No changes are made to the PATH environment variable of the root user.
Should you have reason to install an older endpoint, you should delete any
safestore files taking the following steps:
1. Stop the endpoint.
2. Delete the safestore files from the endpoint directory (or from the directory
specified by the SAFESTORE_DIRECTORY keyword in endpoint.ini). Safestore files have an extension of .q*; you may delete them using the command:
rm *.q*.
3. Uninstall the current endpoint.
4. Install the desired endpoint.
Removing x86-64 Linux
Endpoints
Instructions for uninstalling x86-64 Linux endpoints is provided below, for both
TAR-based packages and RPM-based packages.
Removing the TARBased Endpoint
Package (Uninstall)
You must be logged in as root to remove the endpoint package. If you need to
remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, first stop the endpoint program (if it is running) using the following command:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
Then use the following command to remove the endpoint:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint.remove
If the removal is successful, you will see the following: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/
Ixia, except for any files that were added to this directory that were not present
at installation, such as the endpoint.ini file. This command does not delete
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the directory. The remove program does not automatically delete files added to
the directory that you may need if you reinstall the product.
If anything goes wrong during the process of uninstalling the endpoint, a reinstalled endpoint may not run. You may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for
the hidden file /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a
command. This file should be manually removed. Enter the following command:
rm /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
Removing the RPMBased Endpoint
Package (Uninstall)
You must be logged in as the root user to remove the endpoint package. If you
need to remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, you must first stop the
endpoint program (if it is running). To do so, enter the following command:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
Use the following command to remove the endpoint:
rpm -e endpoint
If the removal is successful, you will see the following message: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/Ixia,
except for any files that were added to this directory following the installation
(such as the endpoint.ini file). The directory is not removed, nor does the remove
program automatically delete files added to the directory that you may need if
you reinstall the product.
Configuring x86-64 Linux
Endpoints
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. Take the
following steps to verify that your network is ready for testing and/or monitoring:
•
Determine the network addresses of the computers for use in tests.
•
Verify the network connections.
The following topics explain how to accomplish these tasks for TCP/IP.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a
set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202. The alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember, such
as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain Name
Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local computer you are using, enter the following at a command prompt:
/sbin/ifconfig
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Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To try
out the connection from one computer to another, enter the following:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx -c 1
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
the Ping worked. Otherwise, there will be a delay, and you’ll see
1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet
loss
This means that the Ping failed, and you cannot reach the target computer.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Running x86-64 Linux Endpoints
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program, and how to examine error log files if a problem occurs.
Autostarting the
Endpoint
For the endpoint to automatically start when your computer restarts, you must
update your system rc scripts.
Use the following command:
cp /usr/local/Ixia/rc2exec.lnx /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint
/sbin/chkconfig endpoint reset
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Starting an x86-64
Linux Endpoint
The endpoint program is installed so that it starts automatically each time Linux
is rebooted.
It sends its screen output to file /var/local/endpoint.console.
If you want to see any error messages generated at this endpoint, enter the following:
tail -f /var/local/endpoint.console
The detailed information about the start and stop of each individual connection
pair is written to file endpoint.aud. The contents of this file vary depending on
how you’ve set the SECURITY_AUDITING keyword in your endpoint.ini file.
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for more information about
endpoint.aud and SECURITY_AUDIT settings.
Instead of automatic startup, you can choose to manually start the endpoint program at a command prompt. Ensure that you are logged in as a “root” user. To
start the endpoint, enter the following:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint &
The “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should run in
the background. The screen output from the endpoint program is interleaved with
other Linux commands. Just press RETURN to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the
endpoint program was started or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running. If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183, but it appears that the
endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for the
hidden file /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a
command. This file should be manually removed.
Stopping an x86-64
Linux Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same computer and
enter the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process
running on that computer. You should see the message “Sent exit request
to the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has
been sent a request to stop.
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If for some reason the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program, you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command. Avoid
using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean up
what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in the following topics).
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k” (described above). If that
does not stop the endpoint, kill the endpoint using the Linux kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If an
x86-64 Linux
Endpoint Is Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if an x86-64 Linux endpoint is
active. At a command prompt, enter:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
Disabling Automatic
Startup
Use the following command to disable the automatic startup:
Increasing the
Number of
Concurrent
Connections
Some parameters are tuned in Linux by rebuilding the Linux kernel. If you’re
adventurous and skilled enough, you can change the number of concurrent endpoint connections. Consult your x86-64 Linux documentation for information
about increasing the maximum open files allowed per process (this probably
involves redefining NR_FILES and other macros). Alternatively, search Linux
newsgroups on the Internet for something like “max open files per process.”
8-10
/sbin/chkconfig --del endpoint
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in
the following file:
/var/log/endpoint.log
The log file is not created until an error occurs. To view an error log, use the program named FMTLOG. FMTLOG reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
/usr/local/Ixia/fmtlog /var/log/endpoint.log
>output_filename
The endpoint code performs a good deal of internal checking. Our software captures details related to the problem in an ASCII text file:
/var/local/assert.err.
Save a copy of the file and send it to us via email for problem determination.
Message CHR0181
You may receive message CHR0181 while running a test. If the error was
detected at the Linux computer, it says that the endpoint program on Linux has
run out of system semaphores. Each instance of Endpoint 1 requires a system
semaphore. The maximum number of semaphores cannot be configured on
Linux, which is hard-coded to a large value (128). To avoid this problem, stop
other programs that use semaphores or decrease the number of tests that use the
computer as Endpoint 1.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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8
Linux 64-Bit (x86-64)
Logging and Messages
8-12
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
9
Chapter 9:
Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Performance Endpoint software for 64-bit Linux systems running on machines
that use the Intel Itanium architecture (also referred to as the IA-64 architecture).
Topics in this chapter:
•
Supported Distributions on page 9-1
•
Installation Requirements on page 9-2
•
Supported Network Protocols on page 9-1
•
Installing the IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint on page 9-2
•
Removing the IA-64 Linux Endpoint on page 9-6
•
Configuring IA-64 Linux Endpoints on page 9-7
•
Running IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoints on page 9-8
•
Logging and Messages on page 9-11
Supported Distributions
Ixia has tested this Performance Endpoint only on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4.
Refer to Chapter 7, Linux 32-Bit (x86), of this manual for detailed information
about Performance Endpoints for 32-bit versions of Linux.
Supported Network Protocols
The IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint uses the Sockets interface to the TCP/IP
support shipped with Linux. IPv6 is supported. IPX, SPX, or other network protocols are not supported in this version.
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Installation Requirements
Installation Requirements
Here is what you need to run the endpoint program with IA-64 Linux:
•
A computer capable of running Linux Itanium edition. This includes an Itanium or Itanium 2 CPU.
•
At least 64 MBytes of random access memory (RAM).
The total RAM requirement depends on RAM usage of the underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent endpoint pairs. For tests involving
over one hundred connections through a single endpoint, additional memory
may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 8 MBytes of space available.
•
An Acrobat Reader to view the PDF files.
Acrobat readers are loaded on most computers for viewing other documents,
but if you don’t have one, they are available at Adobe’s Web Site:
www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.
Installing the IA-64 Linux
Performance Endpoint
This section provides installation instructions for both versions of the IA-64
Linux Performance Endpoint (TAR-based and RPM-based):
TAR-Based
Installation of the
IA-64 Linux
Endpoint
•
TAR-Based Installation of the IA-64 Linux Endpoint on page 9-2
•
RPM-Based Installation for the IA-64 Linux Endpoint on page 9-4
•
What We Do During Installation on page 9-6
First, make sure that you are logged in as a “root” user. Also, remember that all
commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters shown. The following instructions
explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from the World Wide
Web.
For all the file names, M represents the major version and m represents the minor
version.
Installation from CD-ROM
To install the endpoint from a CD-ROM, do the following:
1. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
2. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Installing the IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint
3. The CD-ROM contains an archive of the endpoint package. First use the rm
command to ensure a clean temporary install directory. Then use the tar
command to extract the archive contents from the CD-ROM:
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
tar -zxvf ./pelinux_ia64_Mm.tar.gz
(where M represents the major version and m represents the minor version.)
4. Next, run the endpoint’s installation script to install the endpoint:
./endpoint.install
5. You will see the license agreement, presented with the “more” command.
Press the space bar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license” and press the ENTER key.
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/Ixia. During installation you
will see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see
the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
6. After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount the
file system from the CD-ROM:
umount /cdrom
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically if
the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/Ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, your endpoint should be ready to be used in
testing and monitoring.
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint downloaded from the World Wide Web, do the following:
1. First use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (we’ll
use /tmp in this example).
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
2. Save the endpoint to the /tmp directory.
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Installing the IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint
3. Use the following command to extract the archive contents:
tar -zxvf ./pelinux_ia64_Mm.tar.gz
(where M represents the major version and m represents the minor version.)
4. From the directory where you’ve downloaded the endpoint, run the endpoint’s installation script:
./endpoint.install
5. You will see the license agreement, presented with the “more” command.
Press the space bar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license” and press the ENTER key.
The endpoint installs itself in /usr/local/Ixia. During installation you will
see several status messages. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation of endpoint was successful.”
The installation script and temporary directory are not removed automatically if
the installation is successful. If you need the disk space after installing the endpoint, you may delete the temporary directory and installation script.
To remove the temp files, enter:
rm -fr temp
rm endpoint.install
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /usr/
local/Ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program. Enter the
more command to view the README file:
more /usr/local/Ixia/README
When you’ve completed installation, your endpoint should be ready to be used in
testing and monitoring.
Unattended Installation
You can install the endpoint silently: that is, without providing any additional
user input.
Complete the first three steps in the procedures described above (through the tar
command). Next, run the endpoint’s installation, adding the “accept_license”
parameter:
./endpoint.install accept_license
RPM-Based
Installation for the
IA-64 Linux
Endpoint
9-4
First, make sure that you are logged in as “root”. Also, remember all commands
and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the text. The following instructions
explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from the World Wide
Web.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Installing the IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoint
For all the file names, M represents the major version and m represents the minor
version.
Installation from CD-ROM
The following instructions describe how to install the endpoint on a computer
with a CD-ROM drive.
1. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
2. Enter the following commands, assuming your CD-ROM drive device name
is /dev/cdrom and you are able to create a temporary directory named
cdrom:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/cdrom /cdrom
3. Copy the pelinux_ia64_Mm.rpm file from the CD-ROM drive to a local
directory (for example, tmp).
cp /cdrom/endpoint/linux_ia64/pelinux_ia64_Mm.rpm /tmp
(where M represents the major version and m represents the minor version.)
4. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
rpm -Uvh /tmp/pelinux_ia64_Mm.rpm
5. After the installation is complete, use the UMOUNT command to unmount
the file system from the CD-ROM:
umount /cdrom
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention to
the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation
of endpoint was successful.”
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint downloaded from the World Wide Web, do the following:
1. First, use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (this
procedure uses /tmp as the install directory).
cd /tmp
rm -fr temp
2. Save the endpoint to the /tmp directory.
3. Use the RPM command to install the endpoint:
rpm -Uvh /tmp/pelinux_ia64_Mm.rpm
(where M represents the major version and m represents the minor version.)
During installation, you will see several status messages. Pay close attention to
the output. When the installation is successful, you see the message “Installation
of endpoint was successful.”
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Removing the IA-64 Linux Endpoint
What We Do During
Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed into
the directory /usr/local/Ixia. A directory is created with the following contents:
• the executable programs;
• the README file;
• various install and uninstall programs;
• the directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND
commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
• the file endpoint.ini. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for
information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
The installation program stops any copy of the endpoint program currently running and starts a copy of the newly installed endpoint. You can run tests immediately, without restarting your computer.
No changes are made to the PATH environment variable of the root user.
Should you have reason to install an older endpoint, you should delete any
safestore files taking the following steps:
1. Stop the endpoint.
2. Delete the safestore files from the endpoint directory (or from the directory
specified by the SAFESTORE_DIRECTORY keyword in endpoint.ini). Safestore files have an extension of .q*; you may delete them using the command:
rm *.q*.
3. Uninstall the current endpoint.
4. Install the desired endpoint.
Removing the IA-64 Linux
Endpoint
Instructions for uninstalling the IA-64 Linux endpoint are provided below, for
both TAR-based packages and RPM-based packages.
Removing the TARBased Endpoint
Package (Uninstall)
You must be logged in as root to remove the endpoint package. If you need to
remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, first stop the endpoint program (if it is running) using the following command:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
Then use the following command to remove the endpoint:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint.remove
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Configuring IA-64 Linux Endpoints
If the removal is successful, you will see the following: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/
Ixia, except for any files that were added to this directory that were not present
at installation, such as the endpoint.ini file. This command does not delete
the directory. The remove program does not automatically delete files added to
the directory that you may need if you reinstall the product.
If anything goes wrong during the process of uninstalling the endpoint, a reinstalled endpoint may not run. You may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for
the hidden file /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a
command. This file should be manually removed. Enter the following command:
rm /var/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
Removing the RPMBased Endpoint
Package (Uninstall)
You must be logged in as the root user to remove the endpoint package. If you
need to remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, you must first stop the
endpoint program (if it is running). To do so, enter the following command:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
Use the following command to remove the endpoint:
rpm -e endpoint
If the removal is successful, you will see the following message: “Removal of
endpoint was successful.” This removes the files from /usr/local/Ixia,
except for any files that were added to this directory following the installation
(such as the endpoint.ini file). The directory is not removed, nor does the remove
program automatically delete files added to the directory that you may need if
you reinstall the product.
Configuring IA-64 Linux
Endpoints
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. Take the
following steps to verify that your network is ready for testing and/or monitoring:
•
Determine the network addresses of the computers for use in tests.
•
Verify the network connections.
The following topics explain how to accomplish these tasks for TCP/IP.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a
set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202. The alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember, such
as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain Name
Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Running IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoints
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local computer you are using, enter the following at a command prompt:
/sbin/ifconfig
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Testing the TCP
Connection
It is recommended that you use Ping to verify connectivity to your endpoint computers. Before starting a test, make sure that you can run Ping successfully from
the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1,
and between each pair of endpoints involved in the test.
Running IA-64 Linux
Performance Endpoints
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program, and how to examine error log files if a problem occurs.
Autostarting the
Endpoint
For the endpoint to automatically start when your computer restarts, you must
update your system rc scripts.
Use the following command:
cp /usr/local/Ixia/rc2exec.lnx /etc/rc.d/init.d/endpoint
/sbin/chkconfig endpoint reset
Starting an IA-64
Linux Endpoint
The endpoint program is installed so that it starts automatically each time Linux
is rebooted.
It sends its screen output to file /var/local/endpoint.console.
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Running IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoints
If you want to see any error messages generated at this endpoint, enter the following:
tail -f /var/local/endpoint.console
The detailed information about the start and stop of each individual connection
pair is written to file endpoint.aud. The contents of this file vary depending on
how you’ve set the SECURITY_AUDITING keyword in your endpoint.ini file.
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for more information about
endpoint.aud and SECURITY_AUDIT settings.
Instead of automatic startup, you can choose to manually start the endpoint program at a command prompt. Ensure that you are logged in as a “root” user. To
start the endpoint, enter the following:
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint &
The “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should run in
the background. The screen output from the endpoint program is interleaved with
other Linux commands. Just press RETURN to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the
endpoint program was started or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running. If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183, but it appears that the
endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for the
hidden file /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a
command. This file should be manually removed.
Stopping a 64-Bit
Linux Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same computer and
enter the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
/usr/local/Ixia/endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process
running on that computer. You should see the message “Sent exit request
to the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has
been sent a request to stop.
If for some reason the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program, you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command. Avoid
using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean up
what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in the following topics).
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Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Running IA-64 Linux Performance Endpoints
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k” (described above). If that
does not stop the endpoint, kill the endpoint using the Linux kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /usr/local/Ixia/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If an IA64 Linux Endpoint Is
Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if an IA-64 Linux endpoint is
active. At a command prompt, enter:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
Disabling Automatic
Startup
Use the following command to disable the automatic startup:
Increasing the
Number of
Concurrent
Connections
You need to rebuild the Linux kernel to change the number of concurrent endpoint connections. Consult your IA-64 Linux documentation for information
about increasing the maximum open files allowed per process (this probably
involves redefining NR_FILES and other macros). Alternatively, search Linux
newsgroups on the Internet for something like “max open files per process.”
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/sbin/chkconfig --del endpoint
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux 64-Bit (Itanium)
Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in
the following file:
/var/log/endpoint.log
The log file is not created until an error occurs. To view an error log, use the program named FMTLOG. FMTLOG reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
/usr/local/Ixia/fmtlog /var/log/endpoint.log
>output_filename
The endpoint code performs a good deal of internal checking. Our software captures details related to the problem in an ASCII text file:
/var/local/assert.err.
Save a copy of the file and send it to us via email for problem determination.
Message CHR0181
You may receive message CHR0181 while running a test. If the error was
detected at the Linux computer, it says that the endpoint program on Linux has
run out of system semaphores. Each instance of Endpoint 1 requires a system
semaphore. The maximum number of semaphores cannot be configured on
Linux, which is hard-coded to a large value (128). To avoid this problem, stop
other programs that use semaphores or decrease the number of tests that use the
computer as Endpoint 1.
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Logging and Messages
9-12
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
10
Chapter 10:
Linux on ARM
Processors
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Performance Endpoint software for 32-bit Linux running on an ARM platform.
ARM Linux is a port of the Linux Kernel to ARM processor based machines.
The ARM Linux kernel has been ported to a wide range of systems, including
network devices, hand held devices, and embedded devices. This chapter
includes the following topics:
•
Linux on ARM Performance Endpoints on page 10-1
•
Installing the Linux 32-bit on ARM Endpoint on page 10-2
•
Configuring the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint on page 10-3
•
Running the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint on page 10-5
Other chapters in this manual describe additional Linux endpoints.
Linux on ARM Performance
Endpoints
Ixia provides four distinct Performance Endpoints for Linux running on ARM
processors:
•
Linux / ARM (Little Endian) – Performance Endpoint for Linux running on
little endian ARM platforms.
•
Linux / ARM (Big Endian) – Performance Endpoint for Linux running on
big endian ARM platforms.
•
Linux / ARM (Statically-Linked Little Endian) – Performance Endpoint
for Linux running on little endian ARM platforms. This Performance Endpoint includes a statically-linked link library.
•
Linux / ARM (uClibc) – Performance Endpoint for Linux running on little
endian ARM platforms. This Performance Endpoint is compiled with uClibc,
a small C standard library designed for embedded Linux systems.
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Linux on ARM Processors
Installing the Linux 32-bit on ARM Endpoint
About Endianness
Ixia provides big endian and little endian Performance Endpoints for 32-bit
Linux systems running on the ARM platform.
Endianness refers to the byte order used by a computer when it stores a value in
memory. Big endian architectures store the most significant byte in a memory
location with the lowest address, while little endian architectures store the most
significant byte in a memory location with the highest address. Big endian architectures include Motorola 68000, SPARC, and System/370. Little endian architectures include the MOS Technology 6502 and Intel x86.
Some architectures can be configured either way. These include ARM, PowerPC
(excluding the PPC970/G5), MIPS, among others. The endpoint that you will use
is based on the endianness of the ARM-based device that you are using.
Installing the Linux 32-bit on
ARM Endpoint
Requirements
Here is what you need to run the Linux 32-bit on ARM endpoint program:
•
A device with an ARM-compatible CPU.
•
800 KB of free RAM. (This RAM requirement is for a minimal test only. As
more pairs are added to a test, more memory is required.)
•
2.2 MB of permanent storage.
•
A Linux operating system (Linux kernel 2.4.20), such as Monta Vista Linux.
•
Glibc 2.3.3 or newer (except for the Linux / ARM uClibc Performance Endpoint).
We have tested with packages that implement Linux kernel 2.4.20 and 2.6.9. We
have not tested this version of the Performance Endpoint with any earlier versions of the Linux kernel.
No Log Files are
Created
In order to conserve RAM, the Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on ARM
does not generate the endpoint.log and assert.err files. All error messages are sent
to the standard output device.
TAR-Based
Installation for Linux
32-Bit on ARM
Endpoints
All commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the text. You can install
from the IxChariot CD-ROM or download the Performance Endpoint from the
Ixia web site. The commands that follow assume you obtained the file from the
Ixia web site.
This manual uses Mm to represent the product release number in Performance
Endpoint file names; for example, pelinux_arm_Mn.tar. The M specifies the
major release while the m specifies the minor release. For example, the little
endian Performance Endpoint for Release 6.50 is named
pelinux_arm_650.tar.
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Linux on ARM Processors
Configuring the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint
To decompress the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. cd to the directory where you will extract the archive contents.
3. Extract the archive contents. For example:
tar -xvf pelinux_arm_Mm.tar
The procedure for installing these files on an ARM-based device is device-specific. When you have completed the installation, your endpoint should be ready
to be used in testing and monitoring.
What We Do During
Installation
Uninstalling
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed in a
customer-chosen directory. The following contents are placed in that directory:
•
the Performance Endpoint executable.
•
the README file.
•
the Ixia EULA (End-User License Agreement).
•
the directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND
commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression
performance of your network hardware and software.
•
the endpoint.ini file. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
•
a file that holds the text messages that will be displayed by the Performance
Endpoint and by the IxChariot Console.
To uninstall the endpoint, it is sufficient to delete the endpoint directory and all
of its contents.
Configuring the Linux 32-Bit on
ARM Endpoint
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not need to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. Take the
following steps to verify that your network is ready for testing and/or monitoring:
•
Determine the network addresses of the devices for use in tests.
•
Verify the network connections.
The following topics explain how to accomplish these tasks for TCP/IP.
Supported
Protocols
The Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on ARM supports IPv4 over TCP,
UDP, and RTP. It does not support IPv6, IPX, SPX, or APPC.
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Linux on ARM Processors
Configuring the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IPv4 address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation
as a set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 192.168.46.202. The
alternative—domain names—are in a format that is easier to recognize and
remember, such as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a
Domain Name Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on
each device.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local device you are using, enter the following
at a command prompt:
ifconfig
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program included in all TCP/IP implementations. To verify the connection from one device to another, enter the following:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx -c 1
Replace xx.xx.xx.xx with the IP address of the target device. You will know
that you can reach the target host if Ping returns this message:
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
If Ping fails to reach the target host, it returns this message:
1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet
loss
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console to each device serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
10-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux on ARM Processors
Running the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint
Running the Linux 32-Bit on
ARM Endpoint
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program.
Starting the Linux
32-Bit on ARM
Endpoint
Use the following steps to manually start the endpoint program at a command
prompt:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. To start the endpoint, change to the directory in which you installed the endpoint, then enter the following command:
./endpoint &
The optional “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should
run in the background. When running in the foreground, the screen output from
the endpoint program is interleaved with other Linux commands. Just press
RETURN to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. For example:
./endpoint > endpoint.console
You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the endpoint program was started
or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running (see How to Tell if the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint is Active on
page 10-6). If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183, but it appears that the
endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for the
hidden file /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a command. This file
should be manually removed.
Stopping the Linux
32-Bit on ARM
Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same device and enter
the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
./endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process
running on that device. You should see the message “Sent exit request to
the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has been
sent a request to stop.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
10-5
10
Linux on ARM Processors
Running the Linux 32-Bit on ARM Endpoint
If for some reason the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program, you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command. Avoid
using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean up
what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in the following topics).
Clean-up After
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k” (described above). If that
does not stop the endpoint, kill the endpoint using the Linux kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell if the
Linux 32-Bit on
ARM Endpoint is
Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if a Linux endpoint is active. For
example:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
The sample output listed above indicates that the endpoint was installed in
/usr/local/Ixia. However, given that the endpoint does not provide an
installer, you install the endpoint in a directory of your own choosing.
10-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
11
Chapter 11:
Linux on Lexra
The following topics explain the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Performance Endpoint software for 32-bit Linux running on a Lexra platform.
(Ixia customers have successfully used this Performance Endpoint on MIPS platforms (big endian) as well as the Lexra platform.)
•
Installing the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint on page 11-1
•
Configuring the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint on page 11-2
•
Running the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint on page 11-4
Other chapters in this manual describe additional Linux endpoints.
Installing the Linux 32-bit on
Lexra Endpoint
Requirements
Here is what you need to run the Linux 32-bit on Lexra endpoint program:
•
A device with a Lexra-compatible CPU. We tested with Lexra LX5280.
•
1.7 MBytes of flash memory available.
•
4 MBytes of free RAM.
•
Linux kernel 2.4.18.
We have tested with packages that implement Linux kernel 2.4.18. We have
not tested this version of the Performance Endpoint with any earlier versions
of the Linux kernel.
No log files are
created
In order to conserve RAM, the Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on Lexra
does not generate the endpoint.log and assert.err files. All error messages are sent
to the standard output device.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
11-1
11
Linux on Lexra
Configuring the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint
TAR-Based
Installation for Linux
32-bit on Lexra
Endpoints
All commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the text. You can install
from the IxChariot CD-ROM or download the Performance Endpoint from the
Ixia web site.
The following commands assume you obtained the file from the Ixia web site.
The Performance Endpoint file is named pelex_Mm.tar.gz, where “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version. For example, the
Performance Endpoint for Release 6.10 is pelex_610.tar.gz.
To decompress the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. cd to the directory where you will extract the archive contents.
3. Extract the archive contents:
gzip -d pelex_Mm.tar.gz
tar -xvf pelex_Mm.tar
The procedure for installing these files on the Lexra-based device is device-specific. When you have completed the installation, your endpoint should be ready
to be used in testing and monitoring.
What We Do During
Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed in a
customer-chosen directory. The following contents are placed in that directory:
•
the Performance Endpoint executable.
•
the README file.
•
the Ixia End-User License Agreement.
•
the directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND
commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression
performance of your network hardware and software.
•
the file endpoint.ini. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
•
a file that holds the text messages that will be displayed by the Performance
Endpoint and by the IxChariot Console.
Configuring the Linux 32-bit on
Lexra Endpoint
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. Take the
following steps to verify that your network is ready for testing and/or monitoring:
11-2
•
Determine the network addresses of the computers for use in tests.
•
Verify the network connections.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux on Lexra
Configuring the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint
The following topics explain how to accomplish these tasks for TCP/IP.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IPv4 address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation
as a set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202. The
alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember, such as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain
Name Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Note: The Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on Lexra supports TCP and
UDP only. It does not support IPv6, IPX, SPX, or other network protocols.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local computer you are using, enter the following at a command prompt:
ifconfig
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To try
out the connection from one computer to another, enter the following:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx -c 1
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
the Ping worked. Otherwise, there will be a delay, and you’ll see
1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet
loss
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
11-3
11
Linux on Lexra
Running the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint
This means that the Ping failed, and you cannot reach the target computer.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Running the Linux 32-bit on
Lexra Endpoint
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program.
Starting the Linux
32-bit on Lexra
Endpoint
Use the following steps to manually start the endpoint program at a command
prompt:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. To start the endpoint, change to the directory in which you installed the endpoint, then enter the following command:
./endpoint &
The “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should run in
the background. The screen output from the endpoint program is interleaved with
other Linux commands. Just press RETURN to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the
endpoint program was started or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running. If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183, but it appears that the
endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for the
hidden file /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a command. This file
should be manually removed.
Stopping the Linux
32-bit on Lexra
Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same computer and
enter the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
./endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process
running on that computer. You should see the message “Sent exit request
to the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has
been sent a request to stop.
11-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux on Lexra
Running the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint
If for some reason the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program, you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command. Avoid
using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean up
what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in the following topics).
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k” (described above). If that
does not stop the endpoint, kill the endpoint using the Linux kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If the
Linux 32-bit on
Lexra Endpoint Is
Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if a Linux endpoint is active. For
example:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
The sample output listed above indicates that the endpoint was installed in
/usr/local/Ixia. However, given that the endpoint does not provide an
installer, you install the endpoint in a directory of your own choosing.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
11-5
11
Linux on Lexra
Running the Linux 32-bit on Lexra Endpoint
11-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
12
Chapter 12:
Linux on OpenWrt
(MIPS Platforms)
This chapter explains the installation and operation of the Performance Endpoint
software for Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt running on a MIPS platform.
OpenWrt is a 32-bit Linux distribution for embedded devices. It provides a fully
writable file system with package management.
This chapter includes the following topics:
•
Performance Endpoint Overview on page 12-1
•
Installing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint on page 12-2
•
Removing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint on page 12-3
•
TCP/IP Sockets Interface Support on page 12-3
•
Running the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint on page 12-4
Other chapters in this manual describe additional Linux endpoints.
Performance Endpoint Overview
File Names
Ixia provides two versions of the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Performance Endpoint:
•
pelinux_mipsle_Mm.ipk – IPKG distribution
•
pelinux_mipsle_Mm.tar – tar distribution
where “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version.
For example, pelinux_mipsle_640.ipk is version 6.40 of the IPKG distribution
Performance Endpoint.
Linux kernel 2.4.30
Ixia has tested the Performance Endpoint on a Linksys WRT54GL device running the WhiteRussian RC5 version of OpenWrt, which is based on Linux kernel
2.4.30.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
12-1
12
Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Installing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint
Little Endian
This is a Little Endian performance endpoint. (Big endian architectures store the
most significant byte in a memory location with the lowest address, while little
endian architectures store the most significant byte in a memory location with the
highest address.)
Installing the Linux 32-bit on
OpenWrt Endpoint
Requirements
Here is what you need to install and run the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Performance Endpoint:
•
A device running OpenWrt with a MIPS Little Endian architecture.
•
2 MB of flash memory available.
•
4 MB of free RAM.
No Log Files are
Created
In order to conserve RAM, the Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt does not generate the endpoint.log and assert.err files. All errors are sent to
the standard output device.
Linux 32-Bit on
OpenWrt Endpoints
Installation
Instructions
All commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive. Use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown in the text. You can install
from the IxChariot CD-ROM or download the Performance Endpoint from the
Ixia web site. The following commands assume you obtained the file from the
Ixia web site.
TAR-Based Installation
To decompress the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. Extract the archive contents:
tar -xvf pelinux_mipsle_Mm.tar
IPKG-Based Installation
To install the IPKG-based Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. Execute the following command:
ipkg install pelinux_mipsle_Mm.ipk
What We Do During
Installation
12-2
When you execute the tar or the ipkg command, the following Performance Endpoint files are placed in the temp directory:
•
the Performance Endpoint executable.
•
the README file.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Removing the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint
•
the Ixia EULA (End-User License Agreement).
•
the directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND
commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression
performance of your network hardware and software.
•
the endpoint.ini file. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
•
a file that holds the text messages that will be displayed by the Performance
Endpoint and by the IxChariot Console.
Removing the Linux 32-bit on
OpenWrt Endpoint
The procedures for uninstalling the Performance Endpoint are specific to the type
of installation you performed: tar-based or ipkg-based.
Removing TARBased Installations
To remove the tar-based Performance Endpoint (pelinux_mipsle_Mm.tar):
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. Delete all the files that were installed in the temp directory.
Removing IPKGBased Installations
To remove the IPKG-based Performance Endpoint
(pelinux_mipsle_Mm.ipk):
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. Execute the following command:
ipkg remove endpoint
TCP/IP Sockets Interface
Support
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not need to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. For example, to use domain names, you need either a Domain Name Server (DNS) set up
in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each device.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local device you are using, enter the following
at a command prompt:
ifconfig
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
12-3
12
Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Running the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint
Supported
Protocols
The Performance Endpoint for Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt uses the Sockets interface to the TCP/IP support shipped with Linux. It supports the following protocols:
•
IPv4 over TCP
•
UDP
•
RTP
Neither APPC, IPX, SPX, nor any other network protocols are supported in this
version.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Running the Linux 32-bit on
OpenWrt Endpoint
The following topics describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program.
Starting the Linux
32-bit on OpenWrt
Endpoint
Use the following steps to manually start the endpoint program at a command
prompt:
1. Ensure that you are logged in as root.
2. To start the endpoint, change to the directory in which the Performance Endpoint executable resides, then enter the following command:
./endpoint &
The optional “&” parameter indicates to Linux that the endpoint program should
run in the background. When running in the foreground, the screen output from
the endpoint program is interleaved with other Linux commands. Just press
RETURN to enter more commands.
12-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Running the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. For example:
./endpoint > endpoint.console
You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the endpoint program was started
or stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running (see How to Tell if the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint is Active on
page 12-6). If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183, but it appears that the
endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup. Check for the
hidden file /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID by using the ls -a command. This file
should be manually removed.
Stopping the Linux
32-bit on OpenWrt
Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you’d like to
kill an endpoint program, go to a command prompt on the same device and enter
the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
./endpoint -k
The -k command line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint process running on that device. You should see the message “Sent exit request to
the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has been
sent a request to stop.
If for some reason the request to stop is not handled correctly by the running endpoint program, you may need to use the Linux “kill -TERM” command. Avoid
using “kill -9” to stop the running endpoint program—it doesn’t clean up
what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in the following topics).
Clean-up After
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k” (described above). If that
does not stop the endpoint, kill the endpoint using the Linux kill command.
Then enter the following command:
rm /var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
12-5
12
Linux on OpenWrt (MIPS Platforms)
Running the Linux 32-bit on OpenWrt Endpoint
How to Tell if the
Linux 32-bit on
OpenWrt Endpoint
is Active
Use traditional Linux commands to determine if a Linux endpoint is active. For
example:
ps axf | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
11118 pts/1 S 0:00 \_ grep endpoint
7652 pts/0 S 0:00 /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7653 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7654 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7655 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
7656 pts/0 S 0:00 \_ /usr/local/Ixia/endpoint
12-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
13
Chapter 13:
Mac OS X
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for the Mac OS X operating system.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Platforms Supported on page 13-1
•
Installing the Mac OS Performance Endpoint on page 13-1
•
Configuring Mac OS X Endpoints on page 13-3
•
Running Mac OS X Endpoints on page 13-4
•
Logging and Messages on page 13-5
•
Updates for Mac OS X on page 13-6
Platforms Supported
The Mac OS X Performance Endpoint is a 32-bit universal binary endpoint. It
runs natively, and at full performance, on both PowerPC and Intel based
machines. It supports Mac OS 10.3.0 and higher.
Installing the Mac OS
Performance Endpoint
Here is what you need to run the endpoint program with Mac OS X:
•
An Apple computer capable of running Mac OS X 10.3.0 or higher.
•
128 MBytes of random access memory (RAM).
•
The total RAM requirement depends on RAM usage of the underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent connection pairs. For very large tests
involving hundreds of connections through a single endpoint, additional
memory may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 10 MBytes of space available.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
13-1
13
Mac OS X
Installing the Mac OS Performance Endpoint
Once the Performance Endpoint is installed, Mac OS will decide automatically
which version of the endpoint (PowerPC or Intel) to run.
Installation
Procedure
First, ensure that you are logged in as a user with administrative privileges.
Next, find the Mac OS X endpoint from our web site’s endpoint library at: http://
www.ixiacom.com/support/endpoint_library/ and double-click on the endpoint
file (for example pemac_710.dmg). The endpoint will be downloaded and the
installation started. You should follow the instructions to complete the installation. During the installation, you will be offered the opportunity to view the
README file, which contains the latest information about the endpoint program.
The endpoint is installed in your Applications folder as a MAC application. To
start the endpoint, browse the application folder and double click on the endpoint
icon. The README file contains instructions on how to install the endpoint as a
service.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Mac OS X Endpoints
on page 13-3 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used in testing and monitoring.
Removing the
Endpoint (Uninstall)
Using Finder, delete the Endpoint bundle.
What Happens
During Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed into
the Applications folder. A directory is created with the following contents:
•
The executable programs
•
The README file
•
Various install and uninstall programs
•
The directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
•
The file endpoint.ini
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring
this file for individual endpoints.
If an earlier version of the endpoint is installed, you will be asked if you wish to
upgrade. If you agree, the installation program stops any copy of the endpoint
program currently running and starts a copy of the newly installed endpoint. You
can run tests immediately, without restarting your computer.
Downgrading to an
older version of the
Endpoint
13-2
To downgrade to an older version of the endpoint:
1. Follow the steps to uninstall the Endpoint (refer to Removing the Endpoint
(Uninstall) on page 13-2).
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Mac OS X
Configuring Mac OS X Endpoints
2. Manually delete this directory: /Library/Receipts/pemac.pkg.
3. Then follow the installation instructions for the older Endpoint.
Configuring Mac OS X
Endpoints
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. Take the
following steps to verify that your network is ready for testing and/or monitoring:
1. Determine the network addresses of the computers for use in tests.
2. Verify the network connections.
Let’s look at TCP/IP to see how to accomplish these tasks.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The TCP and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications.
TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain names.
An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a
set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 192.168.46.202. The alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember,
such as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain
Name Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine the IP address of the local computer you are using, enter the following in a Terminal window:
/sbin/ifconfig
Testing the TCP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To try
out the connection from one computer to another, enter the following:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx -c 1
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
then the Ping worked. Otherwise, there will be a delay, and you’ll see
1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet loss
This means that the Ping failed, and you cannot reach the target computer.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints
involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
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Mac OS X
Running Mac OS X Endpoints
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Running Mac OS X Endpoints
The following sections describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program, and how to examine error log files if a problem occurs.
The endpoint icon, located in the Applications folder, may be used to manually
start the Mac OS X endpoint. Alternatively, you may set up the endpoint to automatically start with your computer by dragging and dropping the icon into the
/library/StartupItems folder using Finder.
If you want to see any error messages generated by the endpoint, use the fmtlog
command to view the Endpoint.log file located in /private/var/log.
The detailed information about the start and stop of each individual connection
pair is written to file endpoint.aud. The contents of this file vary depending on
how you’ve set the SECURITY_AUDITING keyword in your endpoint.ini
file.
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for more information about
endpoint.aud and SECURITY_AUDIT settings.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one copy is allowed
at a time.”
Use the ps command to check all running processes and make sure the endpoint
is running (see the section, How to Tell If a Mac OS X Endpoint Is Active on page
13-5 for more information). If you repeatedly get error message CHR0183 but it
appears that the endpoint is not running, you may need to do some extra cleanup.
Check for the file /private/var/log/.ENDPOINT.PID by using Finder. This
file should be manually removed.
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Mac OS X
Logging and Messages
Stopping a Mac OS
X Endpoint
If the endpoint was started manually, it may be terminated by selecting Quit
from the desktop icon.
If the endpoint was started automatically, then it may be terminated by using the
SystemStarter command:
sudo SystemStarter Stop Endpoint
A password may be required.
If the endpoint does not stop, then you will need to use
kill -9 <pid>
to stop the running endpoint program. See How to Tell If a Mac OS X Endpoint Is
Active below for instructions on using the ps command and determining the process id (pid) of the endpoint. With the “-9” argument, the endpoint doesn’t clean
up what’s been created (so you’ll need to do the steps outlined in Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors on page 13-5).
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. Enter the following command:
rm -f /usr/local/ixia/IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If a Mac
OS X Endpoint Is
Active
Use traditional UNIX commands to determine if a Mac OS X endpoint is active.
At a command prompt, enter:
ps ax | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, you will see output similar to this:
855 ?? S 3:19:90 ./endpoint
2846 std R+ 0:00:00 grep endpoint
Determining CPU
Type
To make it easier to determine which endpoint version is running (PowerPC or
Intel), the IxChariot Endpoint Configuration dialog includes a CPU Architecture
field (for the Mac OS X endpoint only).
Disabling Automatic
Startup
If you wish to disable the Mac OS X from running as a service, then stop it as
described above and remove the endpoint folder from the /Library/
StartupItems folder.
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in
the following file:
•
/private/var/log/endpoint.log
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Mac OS X
Updates for Mac OS X
To view an error log, use the IxChariot Console’s Tool menu, View Error Log
choice.
The endpoint code does a lot of internal checking on itself. Our software captures
details related to the problem in an ASCII text file:
•
/private/var/log/assert.err
Save a copy of the file and send it to us via email for problem determination.
Updates for Mac OS X
We’ve found that communications software is often fragile. Its developers are
constantly working to make it more robust, as the software gets used in an everwider set of situations.
We therefore recommend working with the very latest software for the underlying operating system and communications software.
Use the Software Update program that is included with Mac OS to keep your
Mac software up to date.
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Chapter 14:
Microsoft Windows
32-Bit
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for 32-bit Windows operating systems.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Windows Operating Systems Supported on page 14-1
•
Installation Requirements for the 32-bit Windows Endpoint on page 14-2
•
Installing the Endpoint on page 14-3
•
Uninstalling the Endpoint on page 14-9
•
Configuring Windows Endpoints on page 14-10
•
Running Windows Endpoints on page 14-13
•
Logging and Messages on page 14-16
•
Getting the Latest Fixes and Service Updates on page 14-16
Windows Operating Systems
Supported
The Performance Endpoint software for 32-bit Windows runs on the following
Microsoft Windows operating systems:
•
Windows NT
•
Windows 2000
•
Windows XP, and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
•
Windows Server 2003
•
Windows Server 2008
•
Windows Vista (32-Bit)
•
Windows 7 (32-Bit)
Note that separate endpoint executables are provided for Windows CE, 64-bit
Windows operating systems, and the Web-based endpoint. For detailed informa-
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installation Requirements for the 32-bit Windows Endpoint
tion about these endpoints, refer to the following chapters in this manual:
Chapter 17, Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0; Chapter 18, Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0; Chapter 15, Microsoft Windows
64-Bit; Chapter 20, Web-Based Performance Endpoint.
The following Microsoft Windows endpoints have been archived:
•
Windows 3.1
•
Windows 95 and Windows 95 with WinSock 2
•
Windows 98
•
Windows CE 4.x
•
Windows ME
•
Windows NT 4 for Alpha
•
Windows XP 64-bit Edition (IA-64)
The archived endpoints will not support new features in recent releases of Ixia
products. However, they are still available from the Ixia Web site at www.ixiacom.com/support/ixchariot.
Installation Requirements for the
32-bit Windows Endpoint
Here is what you need to run the endpoint program with any of these 32-bit Windows operating systems: Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, or Windows 7:
•
A computer fully capable of running the selected Windows operating system.
The minimum hardware requirements vary for each of the 32-bit Windows
operating systems. Refer to your Windows documentation or to the Microsoft
web site to determine the requirements for the specific operating system that
you are using.
Note that the total memory requirements depends on the RAM usage of the
underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent connection pairs. For
large tests involving hundreds of connections through a single endpoint, additional memory may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 8 MBytes of space available.
•
A 32-bit version of Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, or Windows 7.
Both the Workstation and Server of these operating systems are supported.
• for IP QoS: Windows 2000 requires the QoS Packet Scheduler.
• for IPv6 Multicast: Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista,
or Windows 7 is required.
•
14-2
The latest service packs for Windows NT. On Windows NT with Service
Pack 3, Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.0 and higher is required. Service Pack 6 is not supported (use Service Pack 6a instead).
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
See the README file for this endpoint to see the latest Microsoft service packs
with which we’ve tested.
You also need compatible network protocol software:
•
For IPX and SPX
IPX and SPX software is provided as part of the network support in the
Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
Microsoft improved their IPX/SPX support for Windows NT, Windows 2000,
and Windows XP, using “SPX II.” SPX II is also present on Novell NetWare
4.x (or later). SPX II allows a window size greater than 1, and buffer sizes up
to the size the underlying transport supports.
IxChariot does not support connections between Windows NT and OS/2,
using IPX or SPX.
•
for RTP, TCP, and UDP
TCP/IP software is provided as part of the network support with
Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and Windows 7.
Quality of Service (QoS) support for TCP/IP is part of Microsoft
Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista.,
Windows 7, and Windows CE 6.0. On Windows NT, ToS is available for
UDP and RTP only. See the User Guide for IxChariot for more information.
Microsoft’s Service Pack 3 for Windows NT 4.0 fixes several TCP/IP bugs;
Service Pack 3 (or later) is strongly recommended for users of Windows NT
4.0. Service Pack 3 (or later) is required for IP Multicast testing.
•
for APPC
The APPC protocol is no longer supported by the Ixia Performance Endpoints
for Windows on any 32-bit or 64-bit operating system.
We recommend that you keep up-to-date with the latest Windows operating system service levels. Getting the Latest Fixes and Service Updates on page 14-16
discusses where to get the latest software upgrades.
Installing the Endpoint
You can install the Performance Endpoint using the Windows Control Panel, or
using unattended (silent) mode:
•
For Control Panel installation, refer to Installing from CD-ROM on page 14-5
or Installing from a Downloaded Executable on page 14-6.
•
For unattended installation, refer to Silent Mode Installation on page 14-9.
We recommend configuring your networking software—and ensuring that it is
working correctly—before installing our software. See the Help for your networking software, and see Configuring Windows Endpoints on page 14-10 for
more assistance.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
Note: Before installing the endpoint on Windows 2000, plan to close any other
network applications. During the endpoint installation, Windows 2000 recycles
the protocol stack, causing some client applications to lose connectivity to their
servers. Some of these applications don’t retry their connectivity before exiting
and must be restarted.
Performance
Endpoint Filenames
There are two 32-bit Windows Performance Endpoint files:
•
pewindows32_Mn.exe
Use this file for the following 32-bit Windows operating systems:
Windows NT
Windows 2000
Windows XP, and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
Windows Server 2003
•
pevista32_Mn.exe
Use this file for the following 32-bit Windows operating systems:
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Windows 7
The Performance Endpoint file names identify the product release: “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version. For example, the
32-bit Windows Performance Endpoint for Release 7.0 is named
pewindows32_70.exe.
User and System
Permission
Requirements
The endpoint for 32-bit Windows is installed and runs as a service. Only a user
ID with Administrator authority is permitted to install services. To successfully
install the endpoint, you must be logged in with Administrator authority. The
permissions of the directory where the endpoint is installed must also be set to
allow the SYSTEM (the operating system) full control access. Be sure to give the
System “Full Control” permission on all files in the C:\Program
Files\Ixia\Endpoint directory or the directory where you’ve installed the
endpoint, plus any relevant subdirectories, if any.
The security implementation in Windows Server 2003 differs noticeably from
that in earlier versions of Windows. Before you install the endpoint on Windows
Server 2003, make sure your user account is running in Install mode and not in
Execute mode. To change the mode so that you have the necessary installation
privileges, run the following at a command prompt:
change user /install
The installation on Windows Server 2003 will fail with the message “The
InstallShield-generated file that allows uninstallation is missing” if you try to
install from the wrong mode.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
Before Installing an
Older Endpoint
Should you have reason to install an older endpoint, you should delete any
safestore files, taking the following steps:
1. Stop the endpoint.
2. Delete the safestore files from the endpoint directory (or from the directory
specified by the SAFESTORE_DIRECTORY keyword in endpoint.ini). Safestore files have an extension of .q*; you may delete them using the command delete *.q*.
3. Uninstall the current endpoint.
4. Install the desired endpoint.
Installing from CDROM
To install the endpoint from a CD-ROM, do the following:
1. Shut down any programs that are running.
2. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
3. If the installer does not start automatically, display the files on the CD-ROM
drive and double-click the installer executable (pewindows_Mm.exe).
The installer displays a splash screen and the first installation dialog:
4. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ixia Software End User License Agreement.
5. To proceed with the installation, Click Yes to accept the license agreement.
The installer checks for an existing endpoint installation. If there is an endpoint installed that is of an earlier version, it gives you the option to either
delete it or quit the installation. If there is an endpoint of the same version, it
provides options for repairing, modifying, or removing the endpoint.
6. If the installer displays the Previous Version Detected dialog, select “Remove
the Performance Endpoint”, then click Next to proceed with the installation.
The installer removes the prior endpoint (if necessary), and then displays the
Custom Setup dialog.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
7. If you want to install the endpoint in a folder other than the default folder
(C:\Program Files\Ixia\Endpoint), click Change, then specify the
path.
We recommend installing it on a local hard disk of the computer you’re using.
If you install on a LAN drive, the additional network traffic may influence
your performance results.
8. Select the desired options from the Performance Endpoint Installation
Options.
There are two options, both of which are selected by default:
• Performance Endpoint for Windows: You cannot de-select this option.
• Pre-built Data Files: This option allows you to set various data types (in
addition to ZEROS and NOCOMPRESS) during testing. We recommend
you leave this option selected. You can save a small amount of disk space
by not installing the files used for compression testing; however, the
defaults in many application scripts specify these files. If these CMP files
are not installed, many application scripts cannot be used in tests until they
are modified.
9. Click Install when the Ready to Install dialog appears.
The installer now copies the files and installs the Performance Endpoint.
10. Click Finish when the Setup Complete dialog appears.
The installation is now complete; you can remove the CD-ROM from its drive.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Windows Endpoints on
page 14-10 to make sure your endpoint is ready for testing and monitoring.
Installing from a
Downloaded
Executable
14-6
To install an endpoint you’ve downloaded from the World Wide Web:
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
1. Shut down any programs that are running.
2. Download and save the pewindows_Mm.exe file to a local directory.
3. Use the Windows Explorer to navigate to the file and double-click to start the
installation.
The installer displays a splash screen and the first installation dialog:
4. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ixia Software End User License Agreement.
5. To proceed with the installation, Click Yes to accept the license agreement.
The installer checks for an existing endpoint installation. If there is an endpoint installed that is of an earlier version, it gives you the option to either
delete it or quit the installation. If there is an endpoint of the same version, it
provides options for repairing, modifying, or removing the endpoint.
6. If the installer displays the Previous Version Detected dialog, select “Remove
the Performance Endpoint”, then click Next to proceed with the installation.
The installer removes the prior endpoint (if necessary), and then displays the
Custom Setup dialog.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Installing the Endpoint
7. If you want to install the endpoint in a folder other than the default folder
(C:\Program Files\Ixia\Endpoint), click Change, then specify the
path.
We recommend installing it on a local hard disk of the computer you’re using.
If you install on a LAN drive, the additional network traffic may influence
your performance results.
8. Select the desired options from the Performance Endpoint Installation
Options.
There are two options, both of which are selected by default:
• Performance Endpoint for Windows: You cannot de-select this option.
• Pre-built Data Files: This option allows you to set various data types (in
addition to ZEROS and NOCOMPRESS) during testing. We recommend
you leave this option selected. You can save a small amount of disk space
by not installing the files used for compression testing; however, the
defaults in many application scripts specify these files. If these CMP files
are not installed, many application scripts cannot be used in tests until they
are modified.
9. Click Install when the Ready to Install dialog appears.
The installer now copies the files and installs the Performance Endpoint.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Windows Endpoints on
page 14-10 to make sure your endpoint is ready for testing and monitoring.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Uninstalling the Endpoint
Silent Mode
Installation
To install the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following command from the command line:
C:\>filename /s /v/qb!
where filename is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For example,
for the release 7.0 Windows Vista Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pevista32_70.exe /s /v/qb!
Installing the
Windows Endpoint
with SMS
You can automatically install and uninstall Performance Endpoints, using
Microsoft’s Systems Management Server (SMS). Refer to your SMS documentation for instructions.
What Happens
During Installation
Here is what happens during the installation steps. Let’s say you install the endpoint into the directory C:\Program Files\Ixia\Endpoint. A directory is
created with the following contents:
•
The executable programs
•
The README file
•
The directory Cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .CMP file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
•
The file endpoint.ini
•
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring
this file for individual endpoints.
The endpoint is installed as a service, which means there’s nothing visible while
it’s running. During installation, the endpoint is configured to automatically start
when the system reboots. A service can be controlled from the Services dialog
box inside the Control Panel; this process is described in Running Windows Endpoints on page 14-13.
Uninstalling the Endpoint
You can uninstall the Performance Endpoint using the Windows Control Panel,
or using unattended (silent) mode.
Removing the
Endpoint Package
(Uninstall)
To remove the Performance Endpoint package using the Windows GUI:
1. On the Start menu, click Settings and then Control Panel.
2. Click on Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs Properties
dialog box is shown.
3. Highlight Ixia Endpoint for Windows and press Add/Remove. The uninstallation program begins. After the program is completed, the endpoint
should be uninstalled.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Configuring Windows Endpoints
Silent Mode
Uninstall
To uninstall the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following
command from the command line:
C:\>filename /s /x /v/qb!
where filename is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For example,
for the release 7.0 Windows Vista Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pevista32_70.exe /s /x /v/qb!
Removing the
Endpoint Manually
If the uninstallation program is unable to uninstall the endpoint, you will need to
manually uninstall it. For detailed instructions on manually removing the endpoints, see the Performance Endpoints FAQ page in the Knowledge Base on our
Web site at www.ixiacom.com/support/chariot/knowledge_base.php.
Configuring Windows Endpoints
The endpoint program uses the network application programming interfaces,
such as Winsock, for all of its communications. The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to update the configuration files for
your communications software. However, your communications software must
be configured and running correctly. The following steps guide you through this
verification process.
1. Determine the network addresses of the computers to be used in tests.
2. Select a service quality.
3. Verify the network connections.
The following sections describe how to accomplish these steps for 32-bit Windows:
• Sockets Port Number on page 14-10
• Windows Configuration for IPX and SPX on page 14-11
• Windows Configuration for TCP/IP on page 14-12
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Configuring Windows Endpoints
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number speci-
fied in the script.
Windows
Configuration for
IPX and SPX
To use the IPX or SPX protocol in tests, IPX addresses must be supplied as the
network address when adding a connection pair. IPX addresses consist of a 4byte network number (8 hexadecimal digits) followed by a 6-byte node ID (12
hex digits). A colon separates the network number and node ID. The 6-byte node
ID (also known as the device number) is usually the same as the MAC address of
the LAN adapter you’re using.
In IxChariot, it’s tedious to enter IPX addresses when adding new connection
pairs. When using the IPX or SPX protocol in your tests, our software can maintain an easy-to-remember alias in the Edit Pair dialog. You can set up the mapping once, and use the alias names ever after. The underlying file, named
spxdir.dat, is like the HOSTS file used in TCP/IP.
For Win32 operating systems, endpoints make WinSock version 1.1 Socketscompatible calls when using the IPX or SPX network protocol.
Determining Your IPX Network Address
To determine a Windows computer’s local IPX address, enter the following at a
command prompt:
IPXROUTE CONFIG
If your IPX software support is configured correctly, your output will look similar to the following:
NWLink IPX Routing and Source Routing Control Program v2.00
net 1: network number 00000002, frame type 802.2, device AMDPCN1
(0207011a3082)
The 8-digit network number is shown first; here, it’s 00000002. The 12-digit
node ID is shown in parentheses at the end; here it’s 0207011a3082, which is
our Ethernet MAC address. Thus, the IPX address to be used in tests is
00000002:0207011a3082.
Another method: if you already know the IP address of a computer -- and thus
can Ping to that computer -- it’s easy find its MAC address. First, Ping to the target computer from a computer on the same network segment, using its IP
address. Then, enter the following command:
arp -a
A list of recently cached IP addresses is shown, along with their MAC addresses
if they are LAN-attached. The arp command only reports the physical address of
computers it can reach without crossing a router. It also won't give you the physical address of the local computer.
An IxChariot Console user may observe that stopping can take between 20 and
50 seconds when running connections using SPX on Windows NT, doing loop-
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Configuring Windows Endpoints
back (that is, both endpoints have the same address). If the endpoint is on a
Receive call, the protocol stack can pause for almost a minute before returning.
Windows
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The RTP, TCP, and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications. TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain
names. An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202.
IPv6 addresses are represented by up to 8 colon separated hex digit pairs, such as
0::FF. An alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize
and remember, such as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need
either a Domain Name Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts
file on each computer.
Determining Your IP Network Address
To determine a Windows computer’s local IP address, enter the following command:
IPCONFIG
If your TCP/IP stack is configured correctly, your output will look similar to the
following:
Windows 2000 IP Configuration
Ethernet adapter Local
Connection-specific
IP Address. . . . .
Subnet Mask . . . .
Default Gateway . .
Area Connection:
DNS Suffix . : ixiacom.com
. . . . . . . : 10.200.24.12
. . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
. . . . . . . : 10.200.24.1
Its local IP address is shown in the first row; here it’s 10.200.24.12.
You can also find your IP address using the graphical user interface. Select the
Control Panel folder, and double-click on the Network icon. The installed network components are shown. Double-click TCP/IP Protocol in the list to get to
the TCP/IP Configuration. Your IP address and subnet mask are shown.
To determine a Windows computer’s local hostname, enter the following command:
HOSTNAME
The current hostname is shown in the first row.
From the graphical user interface, return to the TCP/IP Protocol configuration.
Select DNS (Domain Name System) to see or change your domain name. If the
DNS Configuration is empty, avoid using domain names as network addresses;
use numeric IP addresses instead.
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Microsoft Windows 32-Bit
Running Windows Endpoints
Testing the TCP/IP Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To
check the connection from one computer to another, enter the following at an
MS-DOS command prompt:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says “Reply from xx.xx.xx.xx ...,” the Ping worked. If it says
“Request timed out,” the Ping failed, and you have a configuration problem.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints
involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Running Windows Endpoints
The following topics describe starting and stopping an endpoint on a 32-bit Windows operating systems, as well as some of the messages and information that
become available during testing with this endpoint. The endpoint is controlled
from the Services dialog box. For Windows 2000, click Settings, then Control
Panel on the Start menu, double-click Administrative Tools, and then doubleclick Services. The Services dialog box lets you start or stop the endpoint, listed
as “Ixia Endpoint.”
Only a user ID with Administrator authority is permitted to start or stop
Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows
Vista, or Windows 7 services.
Starting the
Endpoint
By default, the endpoint program is configured to start automatically, which
means that you will not see a window for the program when it is running.
Because the endpoint runs as a service, you do not have to be logged into your
workstation for the endpoint to run.
If you stop the endpoint service, you can restart it without restarting the operating
system. There are two ways to restart the endpoint service:
1. At a command prompt, enter:
net start IxiaEndpoint
2. In the Services dialog box, select Ixia Endpoint and click Start (or Play).
The status changes to “started” when the endpoint is successfully started.
A single running copy of the endpoint service handles one or multiple concurrent
tests.
Stopping a
Windows Endpoint
There are two ways to stop the endpoint service:
•
At a command prompt, enter the following:
net stop IxiaEndpoint
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•
In the Services dialog box, click Ixia Endpoint and click Stop. The status is
blank when the endpoint program has stopped.
Disable Your
Screen Saver
Screen savers in Windows can significantly lower the throughput that is measured by an endpoint. We recommend disabling your screen saver at endpoint
computers while running tests.
The SetAddr Utility
Endpoints for Windows operating systems now ship with a utility that helps you
quickly create virtual IP addresses on 32-bit Windows endpoint computers. Virtual addresses are chiefly useful when you’re testing hundreds or even thousands
of endpoint pairs using only a few computers as endpoints. To all intents and purposes, the traffic on the network is identical, whether you're using “real” or virtual addresses.
For more information about creating virtual addresses, consult “Configuring Virtual Addresses on Endpoint Computers” in the User Guide for IxChariot.
When you install a Windows endpoint, Setaddr.exe for 32-bit Windows is
automatically installed in the same directory. For 64-bit Windows, a 64-bit version of Setaddr.exe is installed. The two versions of SetAddr cannot be used
across operating systems with different architectures.
The usage is as follows:
setaddr [-dr] -a N -f Addr -t Addr -i Addr -s Addr
| -l[a]
| -da
| -ds -f Addr -s Addr
(where “N” indicates the adapter number of the NIC card you’re assigning virtual
addresses to, and “Addr” indicates the virtual addresses or subnet mask you’re
assigning to it).
SetAddr Options:
-l
List all network adapters
-la
List all network adapters and their IP addresses
-a
Adapter to modify (number given by -l options)
-dr
Delete a range of addresses
-da
Delete all addresses
-ds
Delete a single address
-f
From address
-t
To address
-i
Increment by
-s
Subnet Mask
The -d flags cannot be used to delete a computer’s primary IP address.
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The -i flag lets you determine how the range of addresses will be created. This is
an optional field; by default, SetAddr increments the range by one in the final
byte only. This “increment by” value is represented as “0.0.0.1”. Enter a
value (0-255) for each byte of the 4-byte IP address. A value of 1 specifies that
the address values in that byte will be incremented by one when SetAddr creates
the range. For example, enter
setaddr -f 10.40.1.1 -t 10.40.4.250 -i 0.0.1.1 -s
255.255.0.0
SetAddr creates 1000 virtual addresses.
SetAddr Known Limitations:
• IPv4 only.
• SetAddr only works on computers with fixed IP addresses. DHCP-enabled
adapters can’t be used.
• You must restart the computer to whose NIC you’ve assigned virtual IP
addresses before you begin testing with that computer. SetAddr modifies
some Windows Registry keys, and restarting is required for the changes to
take effect.
• The number of virtual addresses you can assign to a single adapter depends
on the protocol stack and the size of the Windows Registry. We benchmarked measurements using computers running up to 2500 virtual
addresses, which is a recommended limit.
• No checking is done to ensure that thousands of addresses are not being
created. Be careful! More TCP/IP stack resources are required to manage
virtual addresses.
• You may only add Class A, B, and C virtual IP addresses. Loopback
addresses and Class D and E IP addresses are invalid. Valid address ranges,
then, are 1.x.x.x to 233.x.x.x, excluding 127.x.x.x.
• When more than 2250 virtual address are defined on Windows 2000 computers, all the LAN adaptor icons disappear from the Network and Dial-up
Connections dialog box in My Network Places. You can still see the adaptors by invoking ipconfig or setaddr from the command line, and the
addresses are still reachable. Removing some virtual addresses so that
fewer than 2250 were specified and restarting the computer solved the
problem.
Disabling Automatic
Startup
To disable the automatic starting of the endpoint, take the following steps in
Windows 2000:
1. On the Start menu, click Settings, then Control Panel, then Administrative
Tools, then Services. The Services dialog box appears.
2. Double-click Ixia Endpoint.
3. On the Startup type menu, click Manual.
4. Click OK to save the new setting and exit the dialog box. The endpoint will
no longer start automatically when you restart the computer. However, you
can manually start the endpoint.
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Logging and Messages
To disable the automatic starting of the endpoint, take the following steps in
Windows NT:
1. On the Start menu, click Settings, then Control Panel.
The Control Panel opens.
2. Double-click the Services icon.
3. Double-click Ixia Endpoint and click Startup.
4. Click Manual.
5. Click OK and then Close. The endpoint will no longer start automatically
when you restart the computer. However, you can manually start the endpoint.
How to Tell If a
Windows Endpoint
Is Active
The status field in the Services dialog box shows whether the Ixia Endpoint service has started.
Similarly, the Windows Performance Monitor program can be used to look at
various aspects of the endpoint. Start Performance Monitor by double-clicking its
icon in the Administrative tools group. Click Add to Chart on the Edit menu.
Select the Process object and the Endpoint instance. Then add the counters you
are interested in, such as thread count or % of processor time. In the Steady state
(that is, no tests are active), Thread Count will show about 6 threads active for
the endpoint; the answer depends on the number of protocols in use.
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in a
file named ENDPOINT.LOG, in the directory where you installed the endpoint. To
view an error log, use the command-line program named FMTLOG.EXE. The program FMTLOG.EXE reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to
stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
FMTLOG log_filename > output_file
This endpoint performs extensive internal cross-checking to catch unexpected
conditions early. If an assertion failure occurs, the file assert.err is written to
the directory where you installed the endpoint.
Getting the Latest Fixes and
Service Updates
We’ve found that communications software is often fragile. Its developers are
constantly working to make it more robust, as the software gets used in an everwider set of situations.
We therefore recommend working with the very latest software for the underlying operating system and communications software. To keep your 32-bit Windows operating system up-to-date, you should use the Windows Update function
available from your Start Menu.
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Chapter 15:
Microsoft Windows
64-Bit
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for 64-bit Microsoft Windows operating systems.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Operating Systems and Processors Supported on page 15-2
•
Installation Requirements for the Windows 64-Bit Endpoint on page 15-2
•
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoint Installation on page 15-3
•
Uninstalling the Endpoint on page 15-6
•
Configuring Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoints on page 15-7
•
Running Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoints on page 15-9
•
Logging and Messages on page 15-12
•
Getting the Latest Fixes and Service Updates on page 15-12
•
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE on page 15-12
Separate Performance Endpoint executables are provided for 32-bit Windows
systems, the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system running on
Itanium-based systems, Windows CE, and the Web-based endpoint. For information about these endpoints, refer to the appropriate chapters in this manual.
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Operating Systems and Processors Supported
Operating Systems and
Processors Supported
This section identifies the operating systems and processors that support the Performance Endpoint software for 64-bit Microsoft Windows.
Supported
Operating Systems
Supported
Processors
The Performance Endpoint software for 64-bit Microsoft Windows runs on the
following operating systems:
•
Windows 2000 64-bit
•
Windows Server 2003 64-bit Edition
•
Windows Server 2008 64-bit Edition
•
Windows XP x64 Edition (Workstation and Server versions)
•
Windows Vista (64-bit)
•
Windows 7 (64-bit)
These Performance Endpoints supports the 64-bit Windows operating systems
running on the following processor families:
•
AMD64 processors (such as the AMD Opteron/ Athlon FX/Athlon 64 CPU).
•
Intel Extended Memory 64 Technology (Intel EM64T) processors, including
the Xeon processor.
Note that these Performance Endpoints do not support the Intel Itanium processors. A separate Performance Endpoint is provided for the Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 R2 operating system running on Itanium-based systems. Refer to
Chapter 16, Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System, for
detailed information.
Installation Requirements for the
Windows 64-Bit Endpoint
The installation requirements for Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoint are:
•
A computer equipped with one of the processor types identified in Supported
Processors on page 15-2.
•
One of the Microsoft Windows 64-bit operating systems identified in
Supported Operating Systems on page 15-2.
•
512 MByte of random access memory (RAM).
The Microsoft recommended hardware requirements vary for each of the
64-bit Windows operating systems. Refer to your Windows documentation or
to the Microsoft web site to determine the requirements for the specific operating system that you are using.
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Note that the total RAM requirement depends on the RAM usage of the
underlying protocol stack and the number of concurrent connection pairs. For
very large tests involving hundreds of connections through a single endpoint,
additional memory may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 10 MBytes of space available.
•
Microsoft Windows qWAVE (on Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008).
The qWAVE (Quality Windows Audio Video Experience) component is not
installed by default in Windows Server 2008. Therefore, you need to install it
prior to running the Performance Endpoint. Check your Windows
Server 2008 documentation for installation instructions, or refer to Installing
Microsoft Windows qWAVE on page 15-12 for a summary of the installation
procedure.
Supported
Protocols
The Performance Endpoint for Microsoft Windows XP 64-bit Edition supports
the following protocols:
•
IPv4 and IPv6
•
TCP, UDP, and RTP
The Microsoft Windows 64-bit operating systems do not support IPX and SPX.
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Performance Endpoint
Installation
You can install the Performance Endpoint using the Windows GUI, or using
unattended (silent) mode:
•
For interactive installation, refer to Interactive Installation on page 15-4.
•
For unattended installation, refer to Silent Mode Installation on page 15-5.
We recommend configuring your networking software—and ensuring that it is
working correctly—before installing Ixia Endpoint software. See the Help for
your networking software, and see Configuring Windows 64-bit Performance
Endpoints on page 15-7 for more information.
Performance
Endpoint Filenames
There are two 64-bit Windows Performance Endpoint files:
•
pewindow64_Mn.exe
Use this file for the following 64-bit Windows operating systems:
Windows 2000
Windows Server 2003 64-bit Edition
Windows XP x64 Edition (Workstation and Server versions)
•
pevista64_Mn.exe
Use this file for the following 64-bit Windows operating systems:
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Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoint Installation
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008 64-bit Edition
The Performance Endpoint file names identify the product release: “M” represents the major version and “m” represents the minor version. For example, the
64-bit Windows Vista Performance Endpoint for Release 7.0 is named
pevista64_70.exe.
User and System
Permission
Requirements
The endpoint for Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint is installed and runs as
a service. Only a user with Administrator authority is permitted to install services. To successfully install the endpoint, you must be logged in with Administrator authority. If you are installing the endpoint in an NTFS directory, the
permissions of the directory must also be set to allow the SYSTEM (the operating system) full control access. Be sure to give the System “Full Control” permission on all files in the Ixia\Endpoint directory or the directory where you’ve
installed the endpoint, plus any relevant subdirectories, if any.
Interactive
Installation
To install the Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoint interactively:
1. Log onto the target machine with a user ID that has Administrative privileges.
2. Either download the endpoint executable (pewindows_64bit_Mn.exe or
pevista64_Mn.exe) from the Ixia web site, or access it from the product CD.
3. Double-click the file to start the installation.
The installer displays a splash screen and the Welcome dialog.
4. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ixia Software End User License Agreement.
5. To proceed with the installation, Click Yes to accept the license agreement.
6. If you have a Performance Endpoint already installed on your machine, the
installer detects this and displays the Installation Options dialog.
To uninstall the older version, follow these steps:
a: Ensure that the “Remove existing version of the product” is selected.
b: Select Next to continue.
The installer removes the older version of the Performance Endpoint from
your machine.
c: Select OK to continue.
The installer displays the Custom Setup dialog.
7. Select Next to use the standard setup selections and continue with the
installation.
We recommend that you install the pre-built data files (this is the default
behavior). You can save a small amount of disk space by not installing the
files used for compression testing; however, the defaults in many application
scripts specify these files. If these CMP files are not installed, many
application scripts cannot be used in tests until they are modified.
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8. If you want to install the endpoint in a folder other than the default folder
(C:\Program Files\Ixia\Endpoint), click Browse, then select the path.
We recommend installing the endpoint on a local hard disk of the computer
you’re using. If you install on a LAN drive, the additional network traffic
may influence your performance results.
9. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Start Copying Files dialog.
10. Click Next to continue.
The installer now copies the files and installs the Performance Endpoint.
Once the installation is complete, the installer displays the Setup Complete
dialog.
11. Click Finish to complete the installation.
Windows services are controlled from the Services dialog box, accessible by
selecting Programs>Administrative Tools>Services from the Start menu. If
you want to restart a service without restarting Windows, use the Services dialog
box. Go to the Services dialog, select Ixia Endpoint, and select a Startup type
from the pull-down. Press Start to start the endpoint.
You can also manually start the endpoint after installation. See Starting a
Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint on page 15-9 for instructions.
To prevent the endpoint from running automatically on startup, see Disabling
Automatic Startup on page 15-10.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Windows 64-bit
Performance Endpoints on page 15-7 to make sure your endpoint is ready for
testing and monitoring.
Silent Mode
Installation
To install the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following command from the command line:
C:\>filename /s /v/qb!
where filename is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For example,
for the release 7.0 Windows Vista Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pevista64_70.exe /s /v/qb!
What We Do During
Installation
Here’s what happens during the installation steps. Let’s say you install the endpoint into the directory \Program Files\Ixia\Endpoint. A directory is created with the following contents:
•
the executable programs;
•
the README file;
•
the directory Cmpfiles.
This directory contains files with the .CMP file extension. These are files
containing data of different types, such as typical text or binary data. These
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Uninstalling the Endpoint
files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data
types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network
hardware and software.
•
the file endpoint.ini
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring the
.ini file for individual endpoints.
The endpoint is installed as a service, which means there’s nothing visible while
it’s running. During installation, the endpoint is configured to automatically start
when the system reboots. Controlling the endpoint from the Services dialog box
is described in Running Microsoft Windows 64-Bit Performance Endpoints on
page 15-9.
Uninstalling the Endpoint
You can uninstall the Performance Endpoint using the Windows Control Panel,
or using unattended (silent) mode.
Removing the
Endpoint Package
(Uninstall)
To remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, follow these steps:
1. Click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2. Click Add or Remove Programs. The Add or Remove Programs Properties
dialog box is shown.
3. Highlight Ixia Endpoint and press Change/Remove.
The un-installation program begins. After the program is completed, the endpoint
should be uninstalled.
Silent Mode
Uninstall
To uninstall the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following
command from the command line:
C:\>filename /s /x /v/qb!
where filename is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For example,
for the release 7.0 Windows Vista Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pevista64_70.exe /s /x /v/qb!
Removing the
Endpoint Manually
15-6
If the uninstallation program is unable to uninstall the endpoint, you will need to
manually uninstall it. For detailed instructions on manually removing the endpoints, see the Performance Endpoints FAQ page in the Knowledge Base on our
Web site at www.ixiacom.com/support/chariot/knowledge_base.php.
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Configuring Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoints
Configuring Windows 64-bit
Performance Endpoints
The endpoint program uses network application programming interfaces such as
WinSock for all of its communications. The endpoint dynamically configures its
own programs, so you do not have to update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your communications software must be configured and running correctly. The following steps guide you through this
verification process.
1. Determine the network addresses of the computers to be used in tests.
2. Select a service quality.
3. Verify the network connections.
The following topics describe how to accomplish these steps for the Windows
64-bit Performance Endpoint.
64-bit Windows
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The RTP, TCP, and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications. TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain
names. An IP address is a 32-bit (IPv4) or 128-bit (IPv6) numeric address. IPv4
addresses are represented in dotted notation as a set of four numbers separated by
periods, such as 199.72.46.202. IPv6 addresses are represented by up to 8 colon
separated hex digit pairs, such as 0::FF. An alternative—domain names—are in a
format that is easier to recognize and remember, such as www.ixiacom.com. To
use domain names, you need either a Domain Name Server (DNS) set up in your
network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
To determine an 64-bit Windows computer’s local IP address, enter the following at a command prompt:
IPCONFIG
If your TCP/IP stack is configured correctly, your output will look like the following:
Windows IP Configuration
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.41.2.19
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 10.41.1.254
The local IP address is shown in the first row; here it is 10.41.2.19.
For IP addresses not configured by DHCP, you can also find your IP address
using the graphical user interface. Select Start - Settings - Control Panel, then
double-click on the Network Connections icon. Select Local Area Connection
and click Properties. In the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box, dou-
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Configuring Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoints
ble-click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in the list. Your IP address and subnet
mask are shown.
To determine a 64-bit Windows computer’s local hostname, enter the following
at a command prompt:
HOSTNAME
The current hostname is shown in the first row.
From the graphical user interface, return to Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) configuration. Press Advanced and then select the DNS tab to see or change your DNS
servers. If the DNS tab is empty, avoid using domain names as network
addresses; use numeric IP addresses instead.
The default location for the /etc/hosts file is the following:
c:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\ETC\HOSTS
Trying Out the TCP/
IP Connection
Ping and ping6 are simple utility programs, included in all TCP/IP implementations. They are used to check the connection from one computer to another using
either IPv4 or IPv6 addresses. For ping, enter the following at a command
prompt:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says “Reply from xx.xx.xx.xx ...,” the Ping worked. If it says “Request
timed out,” the Ping failed, and you have a configuration problem.
For ping6 enter an address in standard IPv6 format.
Make sure that you can run ping/ping6 successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia
Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair
of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP. When
using alternate networks, the alternate networks need to be tested as well.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
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CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number speci-
fied in the script.
Running Microsoft Windows
64-Bit Performance Endpoints
The following topics describe starting and stopping an endpoint running on a
Microsoft Windows 64-bit operating system, as well as some of the messages
and information that become available during testing with this endpoint. The
Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint is controlled from the Services dialog
box, which you access by selecting Start - Settings - Administrative Tools Services from the Start menu. The Services dialog box lets you start or stop the
endpoint, listed as Ixia Endpoint.
Only a user with Administrator authority is permitted to start or stop 64-bit Windows services.
Starting a Windows
64-bit Performance
Endpoint
By default, the endpoint program is configured to start automatically, which
means that you will not see a window for the program when it is running.
Because the endpoint runs as a service, you do not have to be logged into your
workstation for the endpoint to run.
If you stop the endpoint service, you can restart it without restarting the operating
system. There are two ways to restart the endpoint service:
1. At a command prompt, enter:
net start IxiaEndpoint
2. In the Services dialog box, double-click Ixia Endpoint and press Start. The
status changes to “started” when the endpoint is successfully started.
A single running copy of the endpoint service handles one or multiple concurrent
tests.
Stopping a
Windows 64-bit
Performance
Endpoint
There are two ways to stop the endpoint service:
If You Receive an
Error 1920 Message
If qWAVE is not installed on your Windows Server 2008 system, the
Performance Endpoint will fail to start and will display an Error 1920 message.
1. At a command prompt, enter the following:
net stop IxiaEndpoint
2. In the Services dialog box, double-click Ixia Endpoint and click Stop. The
status is blank when the endpoint program has stopped.
To resolve the problem, install qWAVE. Refer to Installing Microsoft Windows
qWAVE on page 15-12 for more information.
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Disable Your
Screen Saver
Screen savers can significantly lower the throughput that’s measured by an endpoint. We recommend disabling your screen saver at endpoint computers while
running tests.
Disable NIC Power
Save Mode
If your NIC is configured to power down after some period of non-traffic, this
might cause your test to fail.
Disabling Automatic
Startup
To disable the automatic starting of the Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint,
take the following steps:
1. From the Windows Start menu, select Programs\Administrative Tools\Services. The Services dialog is shown.
2. Double-click Ixia Endpoint.
3. From the Startup type menu, select Manual.
4. Press OK to save the new setting and exit the dialog. The endpoint will no
longer start automatically when you restart the computer. However, you can
manually start the endpoint.
How to Tell If a
Windows 64-bit
Performance
Endpoint Is Active
The status field in the Services dialog box shows whether the Ixia Endpoint service has started.
The SetAddr Utility
for 64-bit Windows
Endpoints for Windows operating systems now ship with a utility that helps you
quickly create virtual IP addresses on 64-bit Windows endpoint computers. Virtual addresses are chiefly useful when you’re testing hundreds or even thousands
of endpoint pairs using only a few computers as endpoints. To all intents and purposes, the traffic on the network is identical, whether you’re using “real” or virtual addresses.
For more information about creating virtual addresses, consult “Configuring Virtual Addresses on Endpoint Computers” in the User Guide for IxChariot.
When you install a Windows endpoint, Setaddr.exe for 64-bit Windows is automatically installed in the same directory. The usage is as follows:
setaddr [-dr] -a N -f Addr -t Addr -i Addr -s Addr
| -l[a]
| -da
| -ds -f Addr -s Addr
(where “N” indicates the adapter number of the NIC card you’re assigning virtual
addresses to, and “Addr” indicates the virtual addresses or subnet mask you're
assigning to it).
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SetAddr Options
-l List all network adapters
-la List all network adapters and their IP addresses
-a Adapter to modify (number given by -l options)
-dr Delete a range of addresses
-da Delete all addresses
-ds Delete a single address
-f From address
-t To address
-i Increment by
-s Subnet Mask
The -d flags cannot be used to delete a computer’s primary IP address.
The -i flag lets you determine how the range of addresses will be created. This is
an optional field; by default, SetAddr increments the range by one in the final
byte only. This “increment by” value is represented as “0.0.0.1”. Enter a value
(0-255) for each byte of the 4-byte IP address. A value of 1 specifies that the
address values in that byte will be incremented by one when SetAddr creates the
range. For example, enter
setaddr -f 10.40.1.1 -t 10.40.4.250 -i 0.0.1.1 -s
255.255.0.0
SetAddr creates 1,000 virtual addresses.
SetAddr Known Limitations
•
A version of SetAddr is also available for Windows NT, Windows 2000, and
Windows XP/2003 32-bit computers. This 64-bit Windows version of SetAddr does not work on 32-bit systems.
•
SetAddr only works on computers with fixed IP addresses. DHCP-enabled
adapters can’t be used.
•
You must restart the computer to whose NIC you've assigned virtual IP
addresses before you begin testing with that computer. SetAddr modifies
some Windows Registry keys, and restarting is required for the changes to
take effect.
•
The number of virtual addresses you can assign to a single adapter depends
on the protocol stack and the size of the Windows Registry. We have benchmarked measurements using computers running up to 2500 virtual addresses,
which is a recommended limit.
•
No checking is done to ensure that thousands of addresses are not being created. Be careful! More TCP/IP stack resources are required to manage virtual
addresses.
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Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
While most endpoint error messages are returned to the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in a file named ENDPOINT.LOG, in the directory where you installed the endpoint. To view an error
log, use the command-line program named FMTLOG.EXE. Program FMTLOG.EXE reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout.
Use the following FMTLOG command:
FMTLOG log_filename > output_file
This endpoint has extensive internal cross-checking to catch unexpected conditions early. If an assertion failure occurs, the file assert.err is written to the directory where you installed the endpoint.
Getting the Latest Fixes and
Service Updates
We’ve found that communications software is often fragile. Its developers are
constantly working to make it more robust, as the software gets used in an everwider set of situations.
We therefore recommend working with the very latest software for the underlying operating system and communications software. To keep your 64-bit Windows operating system up-to-date, you should use the Windows Update function
available from your Start Menu.
Installing Microsoft Windows
qWAVE
The qWAVE (Quality Windows Audio Video Experience) component is not
installed by default in Windows Server 2008. Therefore, you need to install it
prior to running the Performance Endpoint.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE
If you try to run the Performance Endpoint on a Windows Server 2008 system
that does not have qWAVE installed, you will encounter Error 1920:
The resolution of the error is to install qWAVE on the system. Check your
Windows Server 2008 documentation for installation instructions, or use the
following summary installation procedure:
1. Open the Control Panel and select Programs and Features.
2. Select the Turn Windows features on or off task on the left side of the
window. For example:
3. Click Add Features.
4. Find Quality Windows Audio Video Experience in the feature list, and select it
using the checkbox.
5. Click Install.
Windows Server 2008 installs the feature.
6. Select Close and then Yes to restart the server and complete the installation.
After the machine restarts, Windows Server 2008 displays the Installation
Results window, verifying a successful installation of the feature.
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Microsoft Windows 64-Bit
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
16
Chapter 16:
Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 R2
Itanium-Based System
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the
Performance Endpoint software for the 64-bit Microsoft Windows Server 2008
R2 operating system running on Itanium-based systems.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Operating Systems and Processors Supported on page 16-1
•
Protocols Supported on page 16-2
•
Hardware and Software Requirements on page 16-2
•
Installation Instructions on page 16-2
•
After Installation Is Complete on page 16-4
•
Running the Performance Endpoint on page 16-4
•
Logging and Messages on page 16-6
•
Uninstalling the Performance Endpoint on page 16-6
•
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE on page 16-7
Separate Performance Endpoint executables are provided for 32-bit Windows
systems, Windows CE, the Web-based endpoint, and the non-Itanium 64-bit
Microsoft Windows operating systems. For the latter, refer to Chapter 15,
Microsoft Windows 64-Bit.
Operating Systems and
Processors Supported
This Performance Endpoint requires the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
Itanium-Based System operating system running on a machine that uses an Intel
Itanium 2 processor.
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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Protocols Supported
Protocols Supported
The Performance Endpoint for Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 ItaniumBased Systems supports the following protocols:
•
IPv4 and IPv6
•
TCP, UDP, and RTP
The IPX and SPX protocols are not supported.
To deactivate support for protocols you are not using, edit the
ENABLE_PROTOCOL keyword in the ENDPOINT.INI file at each endpoint.
Hardware and Software
Requirements
Following is a list of the installation requirements for the Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based Systems Performance Endpoint:
•
A minimum of 32 MBytes of random access memory (RAM).
Total RAM requirement depends on RAM usage of protocol stack and number of concurrent connections or pairs. For very large tests, additional memory may be required.
•
At least 8 MBytes of disk space.
•
Microsoft Windows qWAVE (Quality Windows Audio Video Experience).
The qWAVE component is not installed by default in Windows Server 2008
R2. Therefore, you need to install it prior to installing the Performance Endpoint. Check your Windows Server 2008 documentation for installation
instructions, or refer to Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE on page 16-7
for a summary of the installation procedure.
Installation Instructions
This section describes the requirements and procedures for installing the
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based Systems Performance
Endpoint.
Performance
Endpoint Filename
The Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based Systems Performance
Endpoint file is named pewinia64_Mm.exe, where M represents the major release
number and m represents the minor release number. For example,
pewinia64_710.exe is the Performance Endpoint executable for IxChariot release
7.10.
User and System
Permission
Requirements
This Performance Endpoint is installed as and runs as a service. Therefore, to
successfully install the endpoint, you must be logged in with Administrator
authority. If you are installing the endpoint in an NTFS directory, the
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Installation Instructions
permissions of the directory must also be set to allow the SYSTEM (the
operating system) full control access. Be sure to give the System “Full Control”
permission on all files in the Ixia\Endpoint directory or the directory where you
have installed the endpoint, plus any relevant subdirectories, if any.
Interactive
Installation
To install the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based Systems
Performance Endpoint interactively:
1. Log onto the target machine with a user ID that has Administrative privileges.
2. Either download the endpoint executable (pewinia64_Mm.exe) from the Ixia
web site, or access it from the product CD.
3. Double-click the file to start the installation.
The installer displays a splash screen and the Welcome dialog.
4. Follow the instructions presented to complete the installation.
Note: In the Custom Setup dialog, we recommend that you install the prebuilt data files (this is the default behavior). You can save a small amount of
disk space by not installing the files used for compression testing; however,
the defaults in many application scripts specify these files. If these CMP files
are not installed, many application scripts cannot be used in tests until they
are modified.
Silent Mode
Installation
To install the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following
command from the command line:
C:\>pewinia64_Mm.exe /s /v/qb!
where pewinia64_Mm.exe is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For
example, for the release 7.10 Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pewinia64_710.exe /s /v/qb!
What We Do During
Installation
The Performance Endpoint installer creates a directory (the default is \Program
Files\Ixia\Endpoint) with the following contents:
•
the executable programs;
•
the README file;
•
the directory Cmpfiles.
This directory contains files with the .CMP file extension. These are files
containing data of different types, such as typical text or binary data. These
files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data
types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network
hardware and software.
•
the file endpoint.ini
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for information about tailoring the
endpoint.ini file for individual endpoints.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to After Installation Is Complete on
page 16-4 to make sure your endpoint is ready for testing and monitoring.
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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
After Installation Is Complete
The Performance Endpoint is installed as a service, and is configured to
automatically start when the system reboots. Controlling the Performance
Endpoint from the Services dialog box is described in Running the Performance
Endpoint on page 16-4.
After Installation Is Complete
The Performance Endpoint program should be running at the completion of the
installation. It runs in the background as a service, waiting for incoming test
requests.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Once the installation is complete, we recommend that you use Ping to verify
connectivity to your endpoint computers. Before starting a test, make sure that
you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck Console to each
computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in
the test.
TCP Port Numbers
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management
traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
Either TCP port 10115 (the default),
•
or a user-selected TCP port. (Refer to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10
for more information about selecting a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are
dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing
the CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number
specified in the script. For more information on this, consult the IxChariot User
Guide.
When runnings tests, ensure that the UDP and TCP ports used during the test are
not blocked.
Running the Performance
Endpoint
The following topics describe starting and stopping the Performance Endpoint
for Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based Systems, and also
describe some of the messages and information that become available during
testing. The Performance Endpoint for Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
Itanium-Based Systems is controlled from the Services dialog box, which you
access by selecting Start - Settings - Administrative Tools - Services from the
Start menu. The Services dialog box lets you start or stop the endpoint, listed as
Ixia Endpoint.
Only a user with Administrator authority is permitted to start or stop 64-bit
Windows services.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Running the Performance Endpoint
Starting the
Performance
Endpoint
By default, the endpoint program is configured to start automatically. Because
the endpoint runs as a service, you do not have to be logged into your workstation
for the endpoint to run.
If you stop the endpoint service, you can restart it without restarting the operating
system. There are two ways to restart the endpoint service:
•
At a command prompt, enter:
net start IxiaEndpoint
•
Or, in the Services dialog box, double-click Ixia Endpoint and press Start.
The status changes to “started” when the endpoint is successfully started.
A single running copy of the endpoint service handles one or multiple concurrent
tests.
Stopping the
Performance
Endpoint
There are two ways to stop the endpoint service:
1. At a command prompt, enter the following:
net stop IxiaEndpoint
2. In the Services dialog box, double-click Ixia Endpoint and click Stop. The
status is blank when the endpoint program has stopped.
If You Receive an
Error 1920 Message
If qWAVE is not installed on your Windows Server 2008 system, the
Performance Endpoint will fail to start and will display an Error 1920 message.
To resolve the problem, install qWAVE. Refer to Installing Microsoft Windows
qWAVE on page 16-7 for more information.
Disable Your
Screen Saver
Screen savers can significantly lower the throughput that’s measured by an endpoint. We recommend disabling your screen saver at endpoint computers while
running tests.
Disable NIC Power
Save Mode
If your NIC is configured to power down after some period of non-traffic, this
might cause your test to fail.
Disabling Automatic
Startup
To disable the automatic starting of the Windows 64-bit Performance Endpoint,
take the following steps:
1. From the Windows Start menu, select Programs\Administrative Tools\Services. The Services dialog opens.
2. Double-click Ixia Endpoint.
3. From the Startup type menu, select Manual.
4. Press OK to save the new setting and exit the dialog. The endpoint will no
longer start automatically when you restart the computer. However, you can
manually start the endpoint.
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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Logging and Messages
How to Tell If a
Windows 64-bit
Performance
Endpoint Is Active
The status field in the Services dialog box shows whether the Ixia Endpoint service has started.
Logging and Messages
While most endpoint error messages are returned to the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in a file named
ENDPOINT.LOG, in the directory where you installed the endpoint. To view an
error log, use the command-line program named FMTLOG.EXE. Program
FMTLOG.EXE reads from a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to
stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
FMTLOG log_filename > output_file
This endpoint has extensive internal cross-checking to catch unexpected
conditions early. If an assertion failure occurs, the file assert.err is written to the
directory where you installed the endpoint.
Uninstalling the Performance
Endpoint
You can uninstall the Performance Endpoint using the Windows Control Panel,
or using unattended (silent) mode.
Control Panel
Uninstall
To use Control Panel to remove the endpoint package from your system, follow
these steps:
1. Click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2. Click Add or Remove Programs. The Add or Remove Programs Properties
dialog box is shown.
3. Highlight Ixia Endpoint and press Change/Remove.
The un-installation program begins. After the program is completed, the endpoint
should be uninstalled.
Silent Mode
Uninstall
To uninstall the Performance Endpoint using silent mode, enter the following
command from the command line:
C:\>pewinia64_Mm.exe /s /x /v/qb!
where pewinia64_Mm.exe is the name of the specific Performance Endpoint. For
example, for the release 7.10 Performance Endpoint, the command is:
C:\>pewinia64_710.exe /s /x /v/qb!
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE
Installing Microsoft Windows
qWAVE
The qWAVE (Quality Windows Audio Video Experience) component is not
installed by default in Windows Server 2008. Therefore, you need to install it
prior to running the Performance Endpoint.
If you try to run the Performance Endpoint on a Windows Server 2008 system
that does not have qWAVE installed, you will encounter Error 1920:
The resolution of the error is to install qWAVE on the system. Check your
Windows Server 2008 documentation for installation instructions, or use the
following summary installation procedure:
1. Open the Control Panel and select Programs and Features.
2. Select the Turn Windows features on or off task on the left side of the
window. For example:
3. Click Add Features.
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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium-Based System
Installing Microsoft Windows qWAVE
4. Find Quality Windows Audio Video Experience in the feature list, and select it
using the checkbox.
5. Click Install.
Windows Server 2008 installs the feature.
6. Select Close and then Yes to restart the server and complete the installation.
After the machine restarts, Windows Server 2008 displays the Installation
Results window, verifying a successful installation of the feature.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
17
Chapter 17:
Microsoft Windows
CE 5.0 and Windows
Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
This chapter describes the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows
Mobile 5.0 and 6.0.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Available Performance Endpoints on page 17-2
•
Network Protocol Stacks on page 17-2
•
Installation Process on page 17-2
•
Installing the Package on page 17-3
•
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page 17-4
•
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall) on page 17-5
•
Windows CE Configuration for TCP/IP on page 17-6
•
Running Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0 Performance Endpoints on
page 17-6
•
Logging and Messages on page 17-7
•
Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint on page 17-8
You can run both streaming and non-streaming tests using the Performance Endpoint software for Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0.
You can also run IP Multicast tests that include these endpoint as part of a multicast group.
Most IxChariot testing parameters are supported, but note the exceptions in Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint on page 17-8.
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Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Available Performance Endpoints
Available Performance
Endpoints
Table 17-1 on page 17-2 list the Performance Endpoints that Ixia provides for
Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0. The table shows the filename for each of the available Performance Endpoints.
Table 17-1.
Performance Endpoints for Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile
5.0 and 6.0
Processor:
ARM
Graphical User Interface
arm-ARMV4I-gui/pewce.exe
Command Line Interface
arm-ARMV4I-nogui/pewce_cl.exe
GUI with file storage
arm-ARMV4I-disk/pewce_disk.exe
Network Protocol Stacks
We recommend that you configure your networking software–and make sure that
it is working correctly–before installing the Performance Endpoint software.
We suggest that you use the built-in network protocol stack. In addition, you may
need to purchase and configure a wireless or wired adapter.
The TCP/IP and UDP/RTP protocols are supported by the Performance Endpoint
for Windows CE. The Windows CE Performance Endpoints run on any IP network, regardless of topology. For example, we have tested it with 802.11a/b/g
wireless links and 10/100/1000 Ethernet links.
Installation Process
Installing a Performance Endpoint for a Windows CE 5.0, Windows Mobile 5.0,
or Windows Mobile 6.0 device is a two-step process:
1. First, install the Performance Endpoint package to a Windows PC, as
described in Installing the Package on page 17-3.
The package includes the Performance Endpoints described in Available Performance Endpoints on page 17-2.
2. Then, install one of the Performance Endpoints to your target device, as
described in Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page 17-4.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Installing the Package
Installing the Package
The Performance Endpoint package contains all of the Performance Endpoint
files needed for IxChariot testing with Windows CE 5.0, Windows Mobile 5.0, or
Windows Mobile 6.0.
Installation
Requirements
Installation of the Performance Endpoint package requires a Windows PC with:
•
1,956 KB available disk space for the ARM Performance Endpoints.
The PC can be running Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003,
Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, or Windows 7.
Administrator
Privilege
Requirements
You must be logged in with Administrator privileges to install the Performance
Endpoint package. If you are installing the package in an NTFS directory, the
permissions of the directory must also be set to allow the SYSTEM (the operating system) full control access. Be sure to give the System “Full Control” permission on all files in the Ixia\Endpoint directory or the directory where you’ve
installed the endpoint, plus any relevant subdirectories, if any.
Installation
Procedure
To install the Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 5.0 or 6.0 Performance Endpoint package to a Windows PC:
1. Log onto the PC to which you will install the package.
2. Access the package from the Ixia web site or from the product CD.
The filename indicate the IxChariot version. For example, for
pewce500armARMV4I_cl_70.exe, the 70 refers to IxChariot release 7.0.
3. Double-click the file to start the installation.
The installer displays a splash screen and the Welcome dialog.
4. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ixia Software End User License Agreement.
5. To proceed with the installation, select “I accept the terms of the license
agreement”, then click Next.
The installer displays the Custom Setup dialog.
6. If you want to install the package in a folder other than the default folder
(C:\Program Files\Ixia\IxChariot\wince), click Change…, then select the
path.
7. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ready to Install the Program dialog.
8. Click Install to continue.
The installer now copies the files and installs the Performance Endpoint package.
Once the installation is complete, the installer displays the Setup Complete
dialog.
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17
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device
9. Click Finish to complete the installation.
The installer creates three folders within the destination folder identified in step 6
above. These folders contain all the files needed for each of the Performance
Endpoints described in Available Performance Endpoints on page 17-2.
Next Step
The next step is to install one of the Performance Endpoints on your target
device, as described in Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page
17-4.
Installing a Performance
Endpoint on a Device
Once you have installed the package to a Windows PC, you can then install one
of the specific Performance Endpoints to your target device.
Installation
Requirements
GUI Performance
Endpoint Installation
Installation of any of Performance Endpoints requires a device that is running
Windows CE 5.0, Windows Mobile 5.0, or Windows Mobile 6.0, configured
with:
•
64 MB of RAM
•
530 KB available disk space
To install the GUI version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows CE or Windows Mobile device is synched to
your desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 17-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the arm_ARMV4I-gui folder.
3. Copy the Performance Endpoint executable (pewce.exe) to the Windows
Clipboard using the Windows Explorer.
4. Paste the file to the following directory:
[Mobile Device]\My Pocket PC\Windows\Start Menu
The endpoint is now ready for use. Refer to Running Windows CE 5.0 / Windows
Mobile 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 17-6 for additional instructions.
CLI Performance
Endpoint
To install the command line version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows CE or Windows Mobile device is synched to
your desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 17-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the arm_ARMV4I-nogui folder.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall)
3. Copy the Performance Endpoint executable (pewce_cl.exe) to your Windows
CE or Windows Mobile device, using the tools available on the device.
Once you have copied the endpoint, it is ready for use. Refer to Running Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 17-6 for
additional instructions.
File-Storage
Performance
Endpoint
To install the file-storage version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows CE or Windows Mobile device is synched to
your desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 17-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the arm_ARMV4I-disk folder.
3. Double-click the pewce_disk_zip.exe file to extract the contents.
You can place these files anywhere on the storage device (whether in the root
directory, or in a user-defined directory). The self-extracting archive includes
all the files you need to run the Performance Endpoint, including:
• the Performance Endpoint executable (pewce_disk.exe)
• the End User License Agreement
• endpoint.ini
• echr.msg
• the cmpfiles directory
4. Modify the endpoint.ini file, as required for your testing.
Refer to Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File, for information about the
endpoint.ini file.
Once you have copied the endpoint, it is ready for use. Refer to Running Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 17-6 for
additional instructions.
Removing the Endpoint Package
(Uninstall)
The following installation instructions assume that the Windows CE or Windows
Mobile device is synched to your desktop computer:
Delete the Performance Endpoint executable from the following directory on
your desktop PC:
[Mobile Device]\My Pocket PC\Windows\Start Menu
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Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Windows CE Configuration for TCP/IP
Windows CE Configuration for
TCP/IP
Determining Your IP
Network Address
On your Windows CE device, tap Start > Settings > Connections and tap the
Network Adapters icon. Select an adapter and then tap Properties.
Look at your adapter configuration. If you are using DHCP, your adapter configuration may not show your address. In that case, contact your network administrator to find out which IP address the DHCP server has assigned to the adapter.
If you are using the command line version of the endpoint, the procedure for
determining your IP address depends on the tools available on the device.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Running Windows CE 5.0 /
Windows Mobile 6.0
Performance Endpoints
The following sections describe how to start, stop, and check the version of a
Performance Endpoint.
Operations on GUIBased Systems
17-6
Following are the basic operations for the Performance Endpoints running on
graphical user interface (GUI)-based systems.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Logging and Messages
Starting the Performance Endpoint
On Windows CE or Windows Mobile devices that do not support a file system,
tap Start, then tap the name of the Performance Endpoint executable.
On Windows CE or Windows Mobile devices that support a file system,, navigate to the directory where you have installed the Performance Endpoint files,
then tap the name of the Performance Endpoint executable.
Stopping the Performance Endpoint (ARM Processors)
On ARM-based systems, use the following menu path on your Windows CE 5.0
or Windows Mobile 6.0 device to stop the Performance Endpoint:
1. Tap Start > Settings > System > Memory > Running Programs.
2. Select Performance Endpoint and then tap Stop.
Displaying the Performance Endpoint Version
The current version number is displayed on the Performance Endpoint main window.
Operations on CLIBased Systems
Following are the basic operations for the Performance Endpoints running on
command line interface (CLI)-based systems.
Starting the Performance Endpoint
Procedures for starting the command line versions of the Performance Endpoint
depend on the tools available on the device. For example, for some devices you
will enter endpoint at the command line to start the endpoint.
Stopping the Performance Endpoint
Procedures for stopping the command line version of the Performance Endpoint
depend on the tools available on the device. For example, for some devices you
will use CTRL-C to stop the endpoint.
Displaying the Performance Endpoint Version
Procedures for displaying the Performance Endpoint version depend upon the
tools available on the device.
Logging and Messages
All error messages encountered on a Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0
Performance Endpoint are returned to the IxChariot or Qcheck Console.
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Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint
For Performance Endpoints that support a file system, some error messages are
logged to disk. These messages are saved in a file named ENDPOINT.LOG, in the
directory where you installed the endpoint. To view an error log, use the command-line program named FMTLOG.EXE. The program FMTLOG.EXE reads from
a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout. Use the following
FMTLOG command:
FMTLOG log_filename > output_file
In addition, if an assertion failure occurs, the Performance Endpoint writes a file
named assert.err to the directory where you installed the endpoint.
Note that only the pewce500armARMV4I_disk_Mm.exe Performance Endpoint
provides support for disk storage. The other Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile
6.0 Performance Endpoints do not provide disk support.
Limitations of the Windows CE
Endpoint
The Windows CE 5.0 / Windows Mobile 6.0 Performance Endpoints do not support the following IxChariot test facilities:
•
IPTV testing.
•
Disabling the UDP checksum.
•
QoS templates for ToS or GQoS (only DiffServ QoS templates are supported).
•
Traceroute testing.
•
Application scripts with .cmp data files as the datatype.
Scripts that use .cmp files by default, such as the Internet scripts, will run
only on the pewcearm_disk version of this endpoint.
As a work-around on the other versions of the endpoint, edit the scripts to use
NOCOMPRESS as the send_datatype instead of a .cmp file.
Additional Limitations:
•
Support for CPU Utilization on Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 6.0 is
device-dependent. For more information, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/
library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wcemain4/html/cerefGetIdleTime.asp.
•
By default, Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 6.0 will not support an
IxChariot UDP test with a datagram window of more than two datagrams.
The test will time out with error message CHR0216. This problem will only
occur if you adjust the send_buffer_size or Window Size parameter to
include more than two UDP datagrams in a window.
This limitation has been documented in the Microsoft Knowledge Base article Q290206. The article explains that the default internal UDP buffer queue
size on Windows CE is 2. To support applications that deliver more than 2
datagrams in a very short time, the default limit can be raised to a value
between 2 and 10 hex. For example, change the following Registry setting:
17-8
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Comm\Afd]
DgramBuffer=dword:8
The device must be reset for this parameter to take effect.
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Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 and 6.0
Limitations of the Windows CE Endpoint
17-10
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
18
Chapter 18:
Microsoft Windows
Embedded CE 6.0
This chapter describes the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0. Windows
Embedded CE 6.0 is a 32-bit real-time multitasking operating system that provides extensible CPU support.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Available Performance Endpoints on page 18-2
•
Network Protocol Stacks on page 18-2
•
Installation Process on page 18-2
•
Installing the Package on page 18-3
•
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page 18-4
•
Removing the Performance Endpoint Package (Uninstall) on page 18-5
•
Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Configuration for TCP/IP on page 18-6
•
Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 18-6
•
Logging and Messages on page 18-8
•
Limitations of the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint on page
18-8
You can run both streaming and non-streaming tests using the Performance Endpoint software for Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0. You can also run IP
Multicast tests that include these endpoint as part of a multicast group.
Most IxChariot testing parameters are supported, but note the exceptions in Limitations of the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint on page 18-8.
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Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Available Performance Endpoints
Available Performance
Endpoints
Table 18-1 on page 18-2 list the Performance Endpoints that Ixia provides for
Windows Embedded CE 6.0. The table shows the filename for each of the available Performance Endpoints.
Table 18-1.
Performance Endpoints for Windows Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Processor:
ARM (Mainstone III)
Graphical User Interface
pewce600MainstoneIIIARMV4I.exe
Command Line Interface
pewce600MainstoneIIIARMV4I_cl.exe
GUI with file storage
pewce600MainstoneIIIARMV4I_disk.exe
Network Protocol Stacks
We recommend that you configure your networking software–and make sure that
it is working correctly–before installing the Performance Endpoint software.
We suggest that you use the built-in network protocol stack. In addition, you may
need to purchase and configure a wireless or wired adapter.
The TCP/IP and UDP/RTP protocols are supported by the Performance Endpoint
for Windows Embedded CE 6.0. The Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance
Endpoints run on any IP network, regardless of topology. For example, we have
tested it with 802.11a/b/g wireless links and 10/100/1000 Ethernet links.
Installation Process
Installing a Performance Endpoint for a Windows Embedded CE 6.0 device is a
two-step process:
1. First, install the Performance Endpoint package to a Windows PC, as
described in Installing the Package on page 18-3.
The package includes the Performance Endpoints described in Available Performance Endpoints on page 18-2.
2. Then, install one of the Performance Endpoints to your target device, as
described in Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page 18-4.
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IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Installing the Package
Installing the Package
The Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint package contains all of
the Performance Endpoint files needed for IxChariot testing with Windows
Embedded CE 6.0.
Installation
Requirements
Installation of the Performance Endpoint package requires a Windows PC with
1,956 KB available disk space for the ARM Performance Endpoints.
The PC can be running Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows 2003, or Windows Vista.
Administrator
Privilege
Requirements
You must be logged in with Administrator privileges to install the Performance
Endpoint package. If you are installing the package in an NTFS directory, the
permissions of the directory must also be set to allow the SYSTEM (the operating system) full control access. Be sure to give the System “Full Control” permission on all files in the Ixia\Endpoint directory or the directory where you’ve
installed the endpoint, plus any relevant subdirectories, if any.
Installation
Procedure
To install the Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint
package to a Windows PC:
1. Log onto the PC to which you will install the package.
2. Access the package from the Ixia web site or from the product CD.
The filename indicates the IxChariot version. For example, for
pewce600MainstoneIIIARMV4I_cl_70.exe, the 70 refers to IxChariot release
7.0.
3. Double-click the file to start the installation.
The installer displays a splash screen and the Welcome dialog.
4. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ixia Software End User License Agreement.
5. To proceed with the installation, select “I accept the terms of the license
agreement”, then click Next.
The installer displays the Custom Setup dialog.
6. If you want to install the package in a folder other than the default folder
(C:\Program Files\Ixia\IxChariot\wince), click Change…, then select the
path.
7. Click Next to continue.
The installer displays the Ready to Install the Program dialog.
8. Click Install to continue.
The installer copies the files and installs the Performance Endpoint package.
Once the installation is complete, the installer displays the Setup Complete
dialog.
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Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device
9. Click Finish to complete the installation.
The installer creates three folders within the destination folder identified in step 6
above. These folders contain all the files needed for each of the Performance
Endpoints described in Available Performance Endpoints on page 18-2.
Next Step
The next step is to install one of the Performance Endpoints on your target
device, as described in Installing a Performance Endpoint on a Device on page
18-4.
Installing a Performance
Endpoint on a Device
Once you have installed the package to a Windows PC, you can then install one
of the specific Performance Endpoints to your target device.
Installation
Requirements
GUI Performance
Endpoint Installation
Installation of any of Performance Endpoints requires a device that is running
Windows Embedded CE 6.0, configured with:
•
64 MB of RAM
•
530 KB available disk space
To install the GUI version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows Embedded CE 6.0 device is synched to your
desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 18-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the MainstoneIII_ARMV4I-gui folder.
3. Copy the Performance Endpoint executable to the Windows Clipboard using
the Windows Explorer.
4. Paste the file to the following directory:
[Mobile Device]\My Pocket PC\Windows\Start Menu
The endpoint is now ready for use. Refer to Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Performance Endpoints on page 18-6 for additional instructions.
CLI Performance
Endpoint
To install the command line version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows Embedded CE 6.0 device is synched to your
desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 18-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the MainstoneIII_ARMV4I-nogui folder.
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Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Removing the Performance Endpoint Package (Uninstall)
3. Copy the Performance Endpoint executable to your Windows Embedded
CE 6.0 device, using the tools available on the device.
Once you have copied the endpoint, it is ready for use. Refer to Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 18-6 for additional
instructions.
File-Storage
Performance
Endpoint
To install the file-storage version of the Performance Endpoint:
1. Ensure that the target Windows Embedded CE 6.0 device is synched to your
desktop computer (the computer on which you installed the Performance
Endpoint package).
2. Navigate to the folder in which you installed the Performance Endpoint package (in Installing the Package on page 18-3), and within that folder, navigate
to the MainstoneIII_ARMV4I-disk or folder.
3. Double-click the pewce_disk_zip.exe file to extract the contents.
You can place these files anywhere on the storage device (whether in the root
directory, or in a user-defined directory). The self-extracting archive includes
all the files you need to run the Performance Endpoint, including:
• the Performance Endpoint executable
• the End User License Agreement
• endpoint.ini
• echr.msg
• the cmpfiles directory
4. Modify the endpoint.ini file, as required for your testing.
Refer to Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File, for information about the
endpoint.ini file.
Once you have copied the endpoint, it is ready for use. Refer to Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints on page 18-6 for additional
instructions.
Removing the Performance
Endpoint Package (Uninstall)
The following installation instructions assume that the Windows Embedded
CE 6.0 device is synched to your desktop computer:
Delete the Performance Endpoint executable from the following directory on
your desktop PC:
[Mobile Device]\My Pocket PC\Windows\Start Menu
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Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Configuration for TCP/IP
Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Configuration for TCP/IP
Determining Your IP
Network Address
On your Windows CE device, tap Start > Settings > Connections and tap the
Network Adapters icon. Select an adapter and then tap Properties.
Look at your adapter configuration. If you are using DHCP, your adapter configuration may not show your address. In that case, contact your network administrator to find out which IP address the DHCP server has assigned to the adapter.
If you are using the command line version of the endpoint, the procedure for
determining your IP address depends on the tools available on the device.
Testing the TCP
Connection
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Ixia Qcheck
Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
Running Windows Embedded
CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints
The following sections describe how to start, stop, and check the version of a
Performance Endpoint.
Operations on GUIBased Systems
18-6
Following are the basic operations for the Performance Endpoints running on
graphical user interface (GUI)-based systems.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Running Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints
Starting the Performance Endpoint
On Windows CE devices that do not support a file system, tap Start, then tap the
name of the Performance Endpoint executable.
On Windows CE devices that support a file system,, navigate to the directory
where you have installed the Performance Endpoint files, then tap the name of
the Performance Endpoint executable.
Stopping the Performance Endpoint (ARM Processors)
On ARM-based systems, use the following menu path on your Windows Embedded CE 6.0 device to stop the Performance Endpoint:
1. Tap Start > Settings > System > Memory > Running Programs.
2. Select Performance Endpoint and then tap Stop.
Displaying the Performance Endpoint Version
The current version number is displayed on the Performance Endpoint main window.
Operations on CLIBased Systems
Following are the basic operations for the Performance Endpoints running on
command line interface (CLI)-based systems.
Starting the Performance Endpoint
Procedures for starting the command line versions of the Performance Endpoint
depend on the tools available on the device. For example, for some devices you
will enter endpoint at the command line to start the endpoint.
Stopping the Performance Endpoint
Procedures for stopping the command line version of the Performance Endpoint
depend on the tools available on the device. For example, for some devices you
will use CTRL-C to stop the endpoint.
Displaying the Performance Endpoint Version
Procedures for displaying the Performance Endpoint version depend upon the
tools available on the device.
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Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Logging and Messages
Logging and Messages
All error messages encountered on a Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance
Endpoint are returned to the IxChariot or Qcheck Console.
For Performance Endpoints that support a file system, some error messages are
logged to disk. These messages are saved in a file named ENDPOINT.LOG, in the
directory where you installed the endpoint. To view an error log, use the command-line program named FMTLOG.EXE. The program FMTLOG.EXE reads from
a binary log file, and writes its formatted output to stdout. Use the following
FMTLOG command:
FMTLOG log_filename > output_file
In addition, if an assertion failure occurs, the Performance Endpoint writes a file
named assert.err to the directory where you installed the endpoint.
Note that only the pewce600MainstoneIIIARMV4I_disk_Mm.exe Performance
Endpoint provides support for disk storage.
Limitations of the Windows
Embedded CE 6.0 Performance
Endpoint
The Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoints do not support the following IxChariot test facilities:
•
IPTV testing.
•
Disabling the UDP checksum.
•
QoS templates for ToS or GQoS (only DiffServ QoS templates are supported).
•
Traceroute testing.
•
Application scripts with .cmp data files as the datatype.
Scripts that use .cmp files by default, such as the Internet scripts, will run
only on the pewcearm_disk version of this endpoint.
As a work-around on the other versions of the endpoint, edit the scripts to use
NOCOMPRESS as the send_datatype instead of a .cmp file.
Additional Limitations:
18-8
•
Support for CPU Utilization on Windows Embedded CE 6.0 devices is
device-dependent. For more information, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/
library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wcemain4/html/cerefGetIdleTime.asp.
•
By default, Windows Embedded CE 6.0 does not support an IxChariot UDP
test with a datagram window of more than two datagrams. The test will time
out with error message CHR0216. (This problem occurs only if you adjust
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Limitations of the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint
the send_buffer_size or Window Size parameter to include more than
two UDP datagrams in a window.)
This limitation has been documented in the Microsoft Knowledge Base article Q290206. The article explains that the default internal UDP buffer queue
size on Windows CE is 2. To support applications that deliver more than 2
datagrams in a very short time, the default limit can be raised to a value
between 2 and 10 hex. For example, change the following Registry setting:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Comm\Afd]
DgramBuffer=dword:8
The device must be reset for this parameter to take effect.
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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18
Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
Limitations of the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 Performance Endpoint
18-10
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
19
Chapter 19:
Sun Solaris
This chapter explains the installation, configuration, and operation of the Performance Endpoint software for Sun Solaris version 2.4 (or later).
Topics in this chapter:
•
Platforms Supported on page 19-1
•
Installation Requirements for Solaris Endpoints on page 19-1
•
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris on page 19-2
•
Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall) on page 19-7
•
Configuring Solaris Endpoints on page 19-7
•
Running Solaris Endpoints on page 19-9
•
Logging and Messages on page 19-10
•
Updates for Sun Solaris on page 19-11
Platforms Supported
The Performance Endpoint software operates on the “SPARC” and “x86” versions of Solaris.
•
SPARC computers contain CPUs made by Sun Microsystems and others.
•
x86 computers are commonly known as “Intel-compatible PCs”; they contain
CPUs made by Intel, AMD, Cyrix, or others.
Installation Requirements for
Solaris Endpoints
Here’s what you need to run the endpoint program with Sun Solaris:
•
A computer capable of running Sun Solaris well.
For SPARC computers, any system seems to give good performance.
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Sun Solaris
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris
For x86 computers, this implies a CPU such as an Intel 80386, 80486, a member of the Pentium family, or equivalent. A Pentium or better is recommended.
•
At least 32 MBytes of random access memory (RAM).
The total RAM requirement depends on the RAM usage of the underlying
protocol stack and the number of concurrent connection pairs. For large tests
involving hundreds of connections through a single endpoint, additional
memory may be required.
•
A hard disk with at least 4 MBytes of space available.
•
Sun Solaris version 2.4 or later, with TCP/IP networking and corresponding
networking hardware installed and configured. This version also supports IP
Multicast.
•
An Acrobat Reader to view the PDF files.
Acrobat readers are loaded on most computers for viewing other documents,
but if you do not have one, they are available at Adobe’s Web site:
www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.
Endpoint Installation for Sun
Solaris
Performance
Endpoint File Name
The names of the Solaris Performance Endpoint files are:
•
pesun_Mm.tar.Z (Sun Solaris for SPARC)
•
pes86_Mm.tar.Z (Sun Solaris for x86 32-Bit)
In each case, Mm indicates the major and minor IxChariot version number. For
example. 670 for IxChariot release 6.70.
Installation
Procedures
First, make sure that you are logged in as a “root” user. Also, remember that all
the commands and parameters discussed here are case-sensitive; use the combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as shown. The following instructions
explain how to install an endpoint from a CD-ROM and from the World Wide
Web.
Note: To install version 4.4 of the Performance Endpoint for Sun Solaris over a
previous version of the endpoint, you need to modify the admin file to contain
“instance=overwrite” and “conflict=nocheck.”
Installation from CD-ROM
To install the endpoint from a CD-ROM, do the following:
1. Put the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive.
2. Next, enter the VOLCHECK command, which tells Solaris that the CD-ROM is
inserted in the drive and is readable. VOLCHECK returns quickly to the command prompt, without a message.
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Sun Solaris
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris
volcheck
3. The CD-ROM contains an archive of the endpoint package. First use the rm
command to ensure a clean temporary install directory. Then use the tar
command to extract the archive contents from the CD-ROM.
For SPARC systems, enter:
cd /tmp
rm -fr endpoint
tar -xvf /cdrom/endpoint/solaris/pesun_Mm.tar
For x86 systems, enter:
cd /tmp
rm -fr endpoint
tar -xvf /cdrom/endpoint/s86/pes86_Mm.tar
4. Next, install the endpoint package using the pkgadd command:
pkgadd -d /tmp endpoint
The pkgadd command is not part of the endpoint installation. It is part of the
standard Solaris installation and can be found in the /usr/bin directory.
5. You will see the license agreement, presented with the pg command. Press the
spacebar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked whether
you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do, enter
“accept_license” and press Return.
6. Next, you are asked the following question:
This package contains scripts which will be executed
with super user permission during the process of
installing this package.
Do you want to continue with the installation of this
package [y,n,?]
Enter a lowercase “y” to complete the installation script. About 20 lines of
text give the status of the installation. When it’s finished, the last line reads:
Installation of <endpoint> was successful.
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating
from $oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the
warnings displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
7. Use the following commands to delete the archive contents from the temporary working directory:
cd /tmp
rm -fr endpoint
8. Remove the CD-ROM by entering eject at a command prompt.
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /opt/
ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program.
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Sun Solaris
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Solaris Endpoints on
page 19-7 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used in testing and monitoring.
Installation from the Web
To install an endpoint you’ve downloaded from the World Wide Web, do the following:
1. First, use the rm command to ensure a clean temporary install directory (we’ll
use tmp in this example).
For SPARC systems:
• Download the pesun_Mm.tar.Z file to the /tmp directory.
• Uncompress the endpoint file by using the uncompress command:
cd /tmp
uncompress pesun_Mm.tar
tar -xvf pesun_Mm.tar
For x86 systems:
• Download the pes86_Mm.tar.Z file to the /tmp directory.
• Uncompress the endpoint file by using the uncompress command:
cd /tmp
uncompress pes86_Mm.tar
tar -xvf pes86_Mm.tar
2. Next, install the endpoint package using the pkgadd command:
pkgadd -d /tmp endpoint
The pkgadd command is not part of the endpoint installation. It is part of the
standard Solaris installation and can be found in the /usr/bin directory.
3. You will see the license agreement, presented with the pg command. Press
the spacebar until the end of the agreement is displayed. You are asked
whether you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do,
enter “accept_license.”
4. You are next asked the following question:
This package contains scripts which will be executed
with super user permission during the process of
installing this package. Do you want to continue with
the installation of this package [y,n,?]
Enter a lowercase “y” to complete the installation script. About 20 lines of
text give the status of the installation. When it’s finished, the last line reads,
“Installation of <endpoint> was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating
from $oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the
warnings displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script
for an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
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Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris
5. Use the following commands to delete the archive contents from the temporary working directory:
cd /tmp
rm -fr endpoint
rm pes86_Mm.tar
This is a good time to read the README file, installed with the endpoint in /opt/
ixia, for the latest information about the endpoint program.
When you’ve completed installation, refer to Configuring Solaris Endpoints on
page 19-7 to make sure your endpoint is ready to be used in testing and monitoring.
Installation Defaults
File for Solaris
The admin file defines default installation actions to be taken when administrative input is required during install, for example, whether to allow a new package
to overwrite an older version, whether an installation can be run with super user
authority, and so on. The admin file is found in /var/sadm/install/admin/
default. The man pages (“man -s 4 admin”) describe its format and content;
please read the man pages if you are unfamiliar with the admin file.
To install version 4.4 of the Endpoint for Sun Solaris over a previous version of
the endpoint, you need to modify the admin file to contain
“instance=overwrite” and “conflict=nocheck.”
If you want non-interactive install capability, modify the admin file to contain
“action=nocheck” so that the endpoint package scripts can be run with super
user authority.
Unattended
Installation for
Solaris
Unattended installation is available for the Sun Solaris endpoint. You install an
endpoint once, manually, while the install facility saves your input in a response
file. You can then install that same endpoint silently on other computers, that is,
without providing input other than the response file.
First, complete the steps described in Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris on
page 19-2, using the tar command. Next create a response file, using the
pkgask command:
pkgask -r /tmp/endpoint.response -d /tmp endpoint
The endpoint license agreement is displayed with the pg command. Press the
spacebar until the end of the agreement is displayed. Next, you are asked whether
you accept the terms and conditions of the agreement. If you do, enter
“accept_license.”
You should see the following displayed:
Response file </tmp/endpoint.response> was created.
Processing of request script was successful.
Use the following command to install other Solaris endpoints in unattended
mode (this single command is split over two lines):
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Sun Solaris
Endpoint Installation for Sun Solaris
pkgadd -n -a /tmp/endpoint/root/opt/ixia/admin
-r /tmp/endpoint.response -d /tmp endpoint
The pkgadd command is not part of the endpoint installation. It is part of the
standard Solaris installation and can be found in the /usr/bin directory.
When pkgadd is finished, the last line reads, “Installation of <endpoint>
was successful.”
You may instead see the following message:
Notice! There were potential problems with migrating from
$oldInstallPath to $installPath. Review the warnings
displayed above for further explanation.
If you see this message, please review the entire output from the install script for
an explanation of the warnings and further instructions.
The response file may be used to install the endpoint on each of your Sun Solaris
computers.
What Happens
During Installation
Here’s what happens during the installation steps. The endpoint is installed into
the directory /opt/ixia. A directory is created with the following contents:
•
The executable programs
•
The README file
•
Various install and uninstall programs
•
The directory cmpfiles. This directory contains files with the .cmp file
extension. These are files containing data of different types, such as typical
text or binary data. These files are used by the endpoint as data on SEND commands. The different data types can be used to vary the data compression performance of your network hardware and software.
•
The file endpoint.ini. See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for
information about tailoring this file for individual endpoints.
The installation program stops any copy of the endpoint program that may currently be running and starts a copy of the newly installed endpoint. You can run
tests immediately, without a reboot.
Our software copies an S81endpoint initialization script to the /etc/rc2.d
directory so the endpoint is started every time your system boots.
No changes are made to the PATH environment variable of the root user.
Should you have reason to install an older endpoint, you should delete any
safestore files using the following steps:
1. Stop the endpoint.
2. Delete the safestore files from the endpoint directory (or from the directory
specified by the SAFESTORE_DIRECTORY keyword in endpoint.ini). Safestore files have an extension of .q*; you may delete them using the command:
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Removing the Endpoint Package (Uninstall)
rm *.q*.
3. Uninstall the current endpoint.
4. Install the desired endpoint.
Removing the Endpoint Package
(Uninstall)
To remove the endpoint package from your hard disk, first stop the endpoint program (if it is running). Enter the following command:
/opt/Ixia/endpoint -k
Use the following command to remove the endpoint package (you must be
logged in as root to run pkgrm):
pkgrm endpoint
Enter a lowercase “y” when you’re asked if you want to remove this package.
About 10 lines of text give the status of the uninstallation. When it’s finished, the
last line reads, “Removal of <endpoint> was successful.”
This removes the files from /opt/ixia, except for any files that were added to
this directory that were not present at installation, such as the endpoint.ini
file, and does not delete the directory. The removal program does not automatically delete files that have been added to the directory that you may need if you
reinstall the product.
Configuring Solaris Endpoints
The endpoint dynamically configures its own programs, so you do not have to
update the configuration files for your communications software. However, your
communications software must be configured and running correctly. The following steps guide you through this verification.
1. Determine the network addresses of the computers to be used in tests.
2. Verify the network connections.
The following sections discuss how to accomplish these tasks.
Configuration for
TCP/IP
The RTP, TCP, and UDP protocols use TCP/IP software for network communications. TCP/IP offers two forms of network addresses: IP addresses and domain
names. An IP address is a 32-bit numeric address. It is represented in dotted notation as a set of four numbers separated by periods, such as 199.72.46.202. The
alternative, domain names are in a format that is easier to recognize and remember, such as www.ixiacom.com. To use domain names, you need either a Domain
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Configuring Solaris Endpoints
Name Server (DNS) set up in your network or an /etc/hosts file on each computer.
Determining Your IP
Network Address
Here are two ways to determine the IP address of the local computer you’re
using:
1. If you’re using Sun’s OpenWindows graphical user interface, right-click on
the outer desktop background. One of the options in this Workspace menu
that pops up is Workstation Info. Click on it to display Workstation Information about your computer, including your local Internet address.
netstat -in
2. As an alternative, enter the following at a command prompt:
Your local IP address is shown in the left-hand column, if there are active connections.
Testing the TCP/IP
Connection
Ping is a simple utility program, included in all TCP/IP implementations. To
check the connection from one computer to another, enter:
ping xx.xx.xx.xx
Replace the x’s with the IP address of the target computer. If Ping returns a message that says “xx.xx.xx.xx is alive,” the Ping worked.
Otherwise, there will be a delay, and then you’ll see “no answer from
xx.xx.xx.xx.” This means that the Ping failed, and you can’t reach the target
computer.
Make sure that you can run Ping successfully from the IxChariot or Qcheck Console to each computer serving as Endpoint 1, and between each pair of endpoints
involved in a test, before starting your testing with TCP/IP.
Sockets Port
Number
IP networks use network addresses to forward traffic across a network to a specific device, and they use port numbers to deliver traffic to a specific application
running on the selected device.
IxChariot uses a designated management port to transport test management traffic between the console and the endpoints. The management port is one of the
following:
•
SPX transport: port 10117
•
TCP transport: either port 10115 (the default) or a user-selected port. (Refer
to MANAGEMENT_PORT on page 3-10 for more information about selecting
a port for management traffic.)
IxChariot uses other ports for test traffic. If an IxChariot script specifies
“port_number=AUTO” on the CONNECT_ACCEPT command, ports are dynamically acquired from the protocol stack. Otherwise, the endpoint issuing the
CONNECT_ACCEPT commands (usually Endpoint 2) uses the port number specified in the script.
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Running Solaris Endpoints
Running Solaris Endpoints
The following sections describe how to manually start and stop the endpoint program, and how to examine error log files if a problem occurs.
Starting a Solaris
Endpoint
The endpoint program is installed so it will start automatically each time Solaris
is rebooted. It sends its screen output to file /var/adm/endpoint.console. If
you want to see any error messages generated at this endpoint, enter the following command:
tail -f /var/adm/endpoint.console
The detailed information about the start and stop of each individual connection
pair is written to file endpoint.aud. The contents of this file vary depending on
how you’ve set the SECURITY_AUDITING keyword in your endpoint.ini file.
See Chapter 3, Endpoint Initialization File for more information about
endpoint.aud and SECURITY_AUDIT settings.
Instead of automatic startup, you can choose to manually start the endpoint program at a command prompt. Ensure that you are logged in as a “root” user. To
start the endpoint, enter:
/opt/ixia/endpoint &
The “&” parameter indicates to Solaris that the endpoint program should run in
the background. The screen output from the endpoint program is interleaved with
other UNIX commands. Just press Return to enter more commands.
If you choose to manually start the endpoint, consider redirecting its output to the
endpoint.console file. You can tell by the time stamp of the file when the
endpoint program was started and stopped.
If the endpoint program is already running, you get the following message,
“CHR0183: The endpoint program is already running. Only one
copy is allowed at a time.”
Stopping a Solaris
Endpoint
The endpoint program has a special command-line option, -k. If you have an
endpoint program you’d like to kill, go to a command prompt on the same computer and enter the following (you must be logged in as root to run this program):
/opt/ixia/endpoint -k
The -k command-line option has the purpose of killing any endpoint program
running on that computer. You should see the message “Sent exit request
to the running endpoint,” which indicates that the endpoint program has
been sent a request to stop.
If for some reason the request to stop is not handled by the running endpoint program correctly, you may need to use the UNIX “kill –TERM” command.
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Logging and Messages
Cleanup after
Unexpected Errors
If the endpoint should fail or be killed abnormally (or encounter assertion conditions), you may also need to do additional cleanup. If the endpoint is still running, try to stop it using the command “endpoint -k”. If that does not stop the
endpoint, kill the endpoint using the UNIX KILL command.
Next, enter the following command:
rm /var/adm/.IXIA.ENDPOINT.PID
How to Tell If a
Solaris Endpoint Is
Active
You can use traditional UNIX commands to determine if the endpoint program is
active. At a command prompt, enter:
ps -ef | grep endpoint
If the endpoint program is running, it shows up with the following string in the
right-most column of the output, “/opt/ixia/endpoint.”
Disabling Automatic
Startup
To disable automatic startup, remove the /etc/rc2.d/S81 endpoint file.
Logging and Messages
While most error messages encountered on an endpoint are returned to the
IxChariot or Qcheck Console, some may be logged to disk. Errors are saved in a
file named endpoint.log, in the /var/adm directory. To view an error log, use
the Ixia program named FMTLOG. FMTLOG reads from a binary log file, and writes
its formatted output to stdout. Use the following FMTLOG command:
/opt/ixia/fmtlog log_filename >output_filename
The endpoint code does a lot of internal checking on itself. Our software captures
details related to the problem in an ASCII text file named assert.err in the /
var/adm directory. Save a copy of the file and send it to us via email for problem
determination.
Known Problems
You might see some operating-system problems during streaming tests. With test
scripts running at a very fast rate or with many pairs using small datagram buffer
sizes, the operating system may lock up.
Specifically, we have seen lock-up problems with Solaris version 2.6 and later
when running certain kinds of streaming tests. We ran a 35-pair IxChariot test in
which each pair used the Voice over IP Send script (Voips.scr). This script
specifies small buffers (40 bytes each) at 64 kbps. Running this test to a Sun
Ultra 5 computer (as the Endpoint 2) caused Solaris to completely lock up; the
computer did not respond to network, keyboard, or mouse input.
We determined that the Endpoint 2 computer was overwhelmed with thousands
of small datagrams, which the TCP/IP network stack could not process quickly
enough. Either the RAM (in our case, the computer had 64 MB of RAM) or CPU
power needs to be increased to handle the load.
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Updates for Sun Solaris
We’ve also seen a recurring problem with Sun Solaris x86, version 2.4. The endpoint may stop, and a core dump may occur during testing. We have traced this
problem to a Solaris software bug, which is solved with the latest OS patch.
Download the patch from one of the following Web sites:
http://access1.sun.com/patch.public/cgi-bin/
readme2html.cgi?patch=101946&type=rec
http://access1.sun.com/patch.public/cgi-bin/show_list.cgi/rec/Solaris_Intel_2.4
Message CHR0181
You may receive message CHR0181 while running a test. If the error was
detected at the Sun Solaris computer, it says that the endpoint program on Sun
Solaris has run out of system semaphores. Each instance of Endpoint 1 requires a
system semaphore. The maximum number of semaphores is not configurable on
Sun Solaris; it is hard-coded to a large value. To avoid this problem, stop other
programs that use semaphores or decrease the number of tests that use the computer as Endpoint 1.
Updates for Sun Solaris
We’ve found that communications software is often fragile. Its developers are
constantly working to make it more robust, as the software gets used in an everwider set of situations.
We therefore recommend working with the very latest software for the underlying operating system and communications software.
Sun posts code and driver updates directly to the following Web sites:
•
www.sun.com/
•
Anonymous FTP to ftp://ftp.sun.com/
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
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Updates for Sun Solaris
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20
Chapter 20:
Web-Based
Performance Endpoint
This chapter describes the operation of the web-based Performance Endpoint.
Topics in this chapter:
•
Web-Based Performance Endpoint Overview on page 20-1
•
Running the Web-Based Endpoint on page 20-2
•
Error Handling on page 20-3
•
Compatibility with Other Endpoints on page 20-3
•
Stopping the Web-Based Endpoint on page 20-4
Web-Based Performance
Endpoint Overview
Ixia Performance Endpoints are lightweight software agents that allow for testing
and monitoring of computers and computer networks. Endpoints are available for
more than 25 operating systems and are continually updated to support new features in IxChariot and Qcheck.
Unlike the endpoints for all of the other supported platforms, the Web-Based Performance Endpoint was not designed to be installed on a computer. Users of the
Web-Based endpoint can either run it from the World Wide Web or save it to a
local hard disk, but as soon as they restart, or log out of, the computer where it is
running, the endpoint stops running.
The Web-Based endpoint runs on the following 32-bit Windows operating systems:
•
Windows NT
•
Windows 2000
•
Windows XP (32-bit version)
•
Windows Server 2003 (32-bit version)
•
Windows Vista (32-bit version)
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Web-Based Performance Endpoint
Running the Web-Based Endpoint
•
Windows 7 (32-bit version).
While endpoints for other operating systems still run as long as the computer
where they’re installed is powered on, the Web-Based endpoint stops running as
soon as the user logs out or restarts. Nothing has been written to the Registry on
the computer where it ran.
The Web-Based endpoint supports most IxChariot and Qcheck functions. A few
features are not supported. The following table summarizes the IxChariot and
Qcheck features that are not supported:
Table 20-1.
Unsupported Features
Function
Comment
APPC protocol
APPC is no longer supported, beginning with
IxChariot 6.10.
SPX, IPX protocols
Not supported.
Endpoint.ini file
Default settings cannot be changed.
Application script datatypes
(other than ZEROES or
NOCOMPRESS)
IxChariot scripts that use a send_datatype
parameter will fail.
Traceroute testing
Not supported.
Running the Web-Based
Endpoint
To run the Web-Based endpoint on your local computer, use the Web browser on
that computer to navigate to http://www.ixiacom.com/support/endpoint_library/.
Click the link labeled Microsoft Windows 2000/XP - web-based.
Depending upon the browser or download utility you are using, you may have the
option of running the software from its present location (the Ixia web site), as
well as saving it to disk:
•
Run from Location:
The “Run from Location” option downloads the Performance Endpoint to
memory, but does not store a copy on your local disk. If the download is successful, you’ll see a message stating that the endpoint has been started. Click
OK to close the message.
There’s nothing else you need to do. The endpoint is ready for testing with
IxChariot or Qcheck.
•
Save to Disk:
If you want to save the Performance Endpoint to disk, save it to the folder
where you save your temporary files, such as Temp.
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Web-Based Performance Endpoint
Error Handling
Starting the
Endpoint
If you selected “Run from Location, the endpoint software starts automatically as
soon as it is downloaded to memory.
If you saved the endpoint to your local disk, you need to manually start it using
this procedure:
1. Navigate to the folder where you’ve saved the endpoint.
2. Double-click the file endpoint.exe to start the endpoint.
You will see a message stating that the endpoint has been started.
3. Click OK to close the message.
Note: If you are running the Performance Endpoint from the command line, you
can use the /nologo switch to suppress the display of the pop-up window.
After you start the endpoint, there’s nothing else you need to do. The endpoint is
ready for testing with IxChariot or Qcheck.
Restarting the
Endpoint
When you save the endpoint to a local hard disk, it makes no difference where
you save it. When you restart the computer, a copy of the executable endpoint.exe will still be on your hard drive, but it will no longer run until you restart
it. Restart the executable by double-clicking it in the Windows Explorer.
Error Handling
Unlike endpoints for other operating systems, the Web-Based endpoint doesn’t
log errors it encounters. However, it does report errors to IxChariot and Qcheck.
In the case of a connection failure or other failure during testing, the endpoint
vanishes silently. The Console will notify you that it can no longer reach the endpoint. You should return to the Web and re-enable the endpoint in the case of
such a failure.
Compatibility with Other
Endpoints
The Web-Based endpoint cannot run on a computer where another endpoint is
already running. For example, you cannot run the Web-Based endpoint on a computer where you have the 32-bit Windows Performance Endpoint installed and
running. When you attempt to download it, you’ll receive an error message.
Correspondingly, if the Web-Based endpoint is running on a computer, you can
install one of the conventional endpoints on that computer, but the conventional
endpoint will not start running automatically once the installation completes. If
the Web-Based endpoint executable is running, you must therefore either stop it
before installing another endpoint, or else restart the computer after you complete
the installation. The new endpoint will then start running automatically (and the
Web-Based endpoint will no longer be present).
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Web-Based Performance Endpoint
Stopping the Web-Based Endpoint
Stopping the Web-Based
Endpoint
The Web-Based endpoint stops automatically as soon as you restart your computer or log out. However, you can also stop the endpoint manually.
To stop the Web-Based endpoint:
1. Click Ctrl+Alt+Delete to access the Windows Task Manager.
2. Click the Processes tab.
3. Highlight the process endpoint.exe. Click End Process to stop the endpoint and remove it from your computer.
20-4
IxChariot Performance Endpoints, Release 7.10
Index
A
ALLOW keyword 3-3
Android endpoint 5-1
configuration 5-4
installingl 5-2
requirements 5-1
starting 5-5
stopping 5-6
uninstalling 5-4
Apple
iPhone 6-1
Mac OS 13-1
archived endpoints 1-2
AUDIT_FILENAME keyword 3-5
B
big endian 10-2
buffer size, socket 3-7, 3-8
C
calculating memory requirements 2-6
capacities of endpoints 2-8
CE, See Windows CE endpoint
cleanup after errors
Linux 32-bit x86 (RPM) endpoint 7-8
Linux-OpenWrt endpoint 12-5
Mac OS X endpoint 13-2
Sun Solaris endpoint 19-10
clock synchronizaton 3-8
CMPFILES directory 14-9
Linux 32-bit x86 7-7
Mac OS X 13-2
Mac OS X endpoint 13-2
Sun Solaris 19-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
Windows 32-bit 14-9
D
DISABLE_DISCOVERY keyword 3-11
Discovery Server 3-11, 3-12
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNECT
S keyword 3-12
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS keyword 3-11
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT keyword 3-11
E
ENABLE_PROTOCOL keyword 3-6
endianness 10-2
endpoint capabilities
IxChariot 2-3, 2-5
endpoint capacities 2-8
endpoint initialization file 3-1
default keywords 3-1
keywords 3-3
endpoint versions 1-2
endpoint.aud 3-5
endpoint.ini 3-1
ALLOW keyword 3-3
AUDIT_FILENAME keyword 3-5
DISABLE_DISCOVERY keyword 3-11
DISCOVERY_INTERVAL_BETWEEN_CONNE
CTS keyword 3-12
DISCOVERY_SERVER_ADDRESS keyword 311
DISCOVERY_SERVER_PORT keyword 3-11
ENABLE_PROTOCOL keyword 3-6
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC keyword 3-8
INITIAL_MANAGEMENT_TOS keyword 3-10
MANAGEMENT_PORT keyword 3-10
Index-1
Index
MAX_PAYLOAD_DISK_USAGE keyword 3-9
MAX_PAYLOAD_MEMORY_USAGE
keyword 3-9
PAYLOAD_MEMORY_LIMIT_USAGE
keyword 3-9
REPORTING_TIMEOUT keyword 3-12
SECURITY_AUDITING keyword 3-4
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE keyword 38
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE keyword 3-7
error messages
Windows CE endpoints 17-7, 18-8
Windows Mobile endpoints 17-7
F
failed assertion
Linux 32-bit x86 endpoint 7-13
Mac OS X endpoint 13-5
Sun Solaris endpoint 19-10
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-16
Windows CE endpoint 17-7, 18-8
Windows Mobile endpoint 17-7
FORCE_CLOCKSYNC keyword 3-8
I
installation requirements 14-2
Android endpoint 5-1
iPhone endpoint 6-1
Linux 32-bit x86 endpoint 7-2
Linux IA-64 endpoint 9-2
Linux on Lexra endpoint 11-1
Linux x86-64 endpoint 8-1
Linux-ARM endpoint 10-2
Linux-OpenWrt endpoint 12-2
Mac OS X endpoint 13-1
Sun Solaris endpoint 19-1
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-2
Windows 64-bit 15-2
Windows Server 2008 R2 IA-64 endpoint 16-2
installation, silent mode 14-9, 15-5, 16-3
installing
Android endpoint 5-2
iPhone endpoint 6-2
Linux 32-bit x86 endpoint 7-5
Linux IA-64-bit endpoint 9-2
Linux on Lexra endpoint 11-1
Linux x86-64 endpoint 8-2
Linux-ARM endpoint 10-2
Linux-OpenWrt endpoint
12-2
Mac OS X endpoint 13-1
Sun Solaris endpoints 19-2
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-3
Windows 64-bit 15-3
Windows CE endpoints 17-4, 17-5, 18-4, 18-5
Index-2
Windows Mobile endpoints 17-4, 17-5
Windows Server 2008 R2 IA-64 endpoint 16-2
iPhone endpoint 6-1
configuration 6-4
installing 6-2
requirements 6-1
starting 6-5
stopping 6-5
uninstalling 6-3
IPKG distribution 12-1, 12-2, 12-3
IPv6 support 2-4, 7-2, 8-2
IPv6 Test Module
support for 2-4
Itanium, Performance Endpoints for 9-1, 16-1
Ixia Discovery Server 3-11, 3-12
Ixia Performance Endpoint
about 4-1
installing 4-1
logging 4-2
messages 4-2
starting and stopping 4-2
updating 4-1
L
Linksys WRT54G 12-1
Linux 32-bit x86 endpoint 7-1
cleanup 7-12
configuring 7-9, 7-10
determining if active 7-12
endpoint.ini 7-7
installing 7-3, 7-5, 7-7
logging 7-13
running 7-11, 7-12, 7-13
starting 7-11
stopping 7-12
supported processors 7-1
uninstall 7-8
uninstalling 7-8
Linux IA-64 endpoint 9-1
autostarting 9-8
cleanup 9-10
configuring 9-7
disabling automatic startup 9-10
increasing number concurrent connections 9-10
installation requirements 9-2
installing 9-2, 9-4, 9-6
logging and messages 9-11
running 9-8
starting 9-8
stopping 9-9
uninstalling 9-6
Linux on Lexra endpoint 11-1
cleanup 11-5
configuring 11-2, 11-3
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
Index
installation requirements 11-1
installing 11-2
running 11-4
stopping 11-4
Linux x86-64 endpoint 8-1
autostarting 8-8
cleanup 8-10
configuring 8-7, 8-8
disabling automatic startup 8-10
increasing number concurrent connections 8-10
installation requirements 8-1
installing 8-2, 8-4, 8-5
logging and messages 8-11
running 8-8
starting 8-9
stopping 8-9
uninstalling 8-6
Linux-ARM endpoint 10-1
configuration 10-3
endianness 10-2
installation 10-2
Linux-OpenWrt endpoint 12-1
installing 12-2
removing 12-3
sockets interface support 12-3
starting 12-4
stopping 12-5
supported protocols 12-4
little endian 5-2, 10-2, 12-2
M
Mac OS X endpoint 13-1
cleanup 13-5
configuring 13-3
determining if active 13-5
determining IP network address 13-3
endpoint.ini 13-2
installing 13-2
logging 13-5
running 13-4
stopping 13-5
support 13-6
supported processors 13-1
uninstall 13-2
messages
Linux 32-bit x86 endpoint 7-13
Mac OS X endpoint 13-5
Sun Solaris endpoint 19-10
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-16
Windows CE endpoint 17-7, 18-8
Windows Mobile endpoint 17-7
Microsoft overlapped I/O 2-6
Microsoft SNA Server
for Windows NT 14-2
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
MIPS 12-1, 12-2
Mobile, See Windows Mobile endpoint
MSS Option 2-4
P
PKGADD command (Solaris) 19-5
port number, management port 3-10, 5-5, 6-4, 7-9, 8-8,
9-8, 10-4, 11-3, 12-4, 13-4, 14-10, 15-8, 17-6, 18-6, 198
Q
QoS for management traffic 3-10
qWAVE 15-12, 16-7
R
Red Hat
autostart commands 7-10
disabling automatic startup 7-12
logging and messages 7-13
reporting timeout 3-12
REPORTING_TIMEOUT keyword 3-12
restricting access to endpoints 3-3
RPM
determining IP network address 7-9
endpoint installation for Linux 32-bit x86 7-5
removing endpoint 7-8
S
SECURITY_AUDITING keyword 3-4
SetAddr utility 14-14
silent mode
install 14-9, 15-5, 16-3
uninstall 14-10, 15-6, 16-6
Slackware
logging and messages 7-13
SNA Server
for Windows NT 14-2
SOCKET_RECEIVE_BUFFER_SIZE keyword 3-8
SOCKET_SEND_BUFFER_SIZE keyword 3-7
software requirements
protocol support 2-2
SPX II
support on Windows NT 14-2
Stack Manager 4-1
Sun Solaris endpoint 19-1, 19-10
cleanup 19-10
configuring 19-7, 19-8
core dump 19-10
determining if active 19-10
installing 19-1, 19-2, 19-5
IP network address 19-8
Index-3
Index
messages 19-10, 19-11
OS lockup 19-10
removing 19-7
running 19-9, 19-10
starting 19-9
stopping 19-9
support for OS
Mac OS X 13-6
Sun Solaris 19-11
T
TAR
determining IP network address 7-9
endpoint installation for Linux 32-bit x86 7-3
unattended Linux 32-bit x86 install 7-5
TcpWindowSize 2-6
throughput 2-6
generating maximum 2-6
timeout, reporting 3-12
U
uninstall
Linux 32-bit x86 (RPM) endpoint 7-8
Linux-OpenWrt endpoint 12-3
Mac OS X endpoint 13-2
Sun Solaris 19-7
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-9
Windows 64-bit endpoint 15-6
Windows CE endpoints 17-5, 18-5
Windows Mobile endpoints 17-5
Windows Server 2008 R2 IA-64 endpoint 16-6
uninstall, silent mode 14-10, 15-6, 16-6
uninstalling
Android endpoint 5-4
iPhone endpoint 6-3
V
version
of endpoint 1-2
virtual addresses in Windows 14-14
VoIP Test Module
support for 2-3, 2-5
W
Web-Based endpoint 20-1
compatibility with other endpoints 20-3
downloading 20-2
error handling 20-3
features not supported 20-2
restarting 20-3
running 20-2
running from location 20-2
saving 20-2
Index-4
supported OSs 20-1
WhiteRussian 12-1
Windows 2000, 32-bit. See Windows 32-bit endpoint
Windows 2000, 64-bit. See Windows 64-bit endpoint
Windows 32-bit endpoint 14-1
configuring 14-10
disabling automatic startup 14-15, 14-16
installing 14-3
IP address 14-12
IPX address 14-11
IPX/SPX 14-11
messages 14-16
running 14-13
SetAddr utility 14-14
starting 14-13
stopping 14-13
support for OS 14-16
TCP/IP 14-12, 14-13
uninstall 14-9, 14-10
Windows 64-bit endpoint
configuring 15-7
disabling automatic startup 15-10
installing 15-3
IP address 15-7
logging 15-12
messages 15-12
SetAddr utility 15-10
starting 15-9
stopping 15-9
TCP/IP 15-7
uninstalling 15-6
Windows 7, 32-bit. See Windows 32-bit endpoint
Windows 7, 64-bit. See Windows 64-bit endpoint
Windows Administrator permissions 14-4
Windows CE endpoint
error messages 17-7, 18-8
installation requirements 17-3, 17-4, 18-3, 18-4
installing 17-2, 17-3, 17-4, 17-5, 18-2, 18-3, 18-4, 185
IP address 17-6, 18-6
limitations 17-8, 18-8
messages 17-7, 18-8
Performance Endpoints, list of 17-2, 18-2
running 17-6, 18-6
starting 17-6, 17-7, 18-6, 18-7
stopping 17-7, 18-7
uninstall 17-5, 18-5
Windows Mobile endpoint
error messages 17-7
installation requirements 17-3, 17-4
installing 17-2, 17-3, 17-4, 17-5
IP address 17-6
limitations 17-8
messages 17-7
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
Index
Performance Endpoints, list of 17-2
running 17-6
starting 17-6, 17-7
stopping 17-7
uninstall 17-5
Windows NT. See Windows 32-bit endpoint
Windows Server 2008 R2 IA-64 endpoint 16-1
disabling automatic startup 16-5
hardware requirements 16-2
installing 16-2
logging 16-6
OS requirements 16-1
processor requirements 16-1
running 16-4
software requirements 16-2
starting 16-5
stopping 16-5
TCP port numbers 16-4
uninstalling 16-6
Windows Server, 32-bit. See Windows 32-bit
endpoint
Windows Server, 64-bit. See Windows 64-bit
endpoint
Windows Vista, 32-bit. See Windows 32-bit endpoint
Windows Vista, 64-bit. See Windows 64-bit endpoint
Windows XP, 32-bit. See Windows 32-bit endpoint
Windows XP, 64-bit. See Windows 64-bit endpoint
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
Index-5
Index
Index-6
IxChariot Performance Endpoints
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