Installation Guide AS5610-52X 48-Port 10G Top-of

Installation Guide AS5610-52X 48-Port 10G Top-of
AS5610-52X
48-Port 10G
Top-of-Rack Switch
Installation Guide
www.edge-core.com
Installation Guide
AS5610-52X 48-Port 10G Top-of-Rack Switch
with 48 10GBASE SFP+ Ports,
4 40GBASE QSFP+ Ports,
1 1000BASE-T (RJ-45) Management Port,
2 Power Supply Units (F2B and B2F Airflow),
and 1 Fan Tray Module (F2B and B2F Airflow)
E122013-CS-R01
How to Use This Guide
This guide includes detailed information on the switch hardware, including
network ports, power, cabling requirements, as well as plug-in modules and
transceivers. This guide also provides general installation guidelines and
recommended procedures. To deploy this switch effectively and ensure troublefree operation, you should first read the relevant sections in this guide so that you
are familiar with all its hardware components.
Who Should Read This This guide is for network administrators and support personnel that install, operate,
Guide? and maintain network equipment. The guide assumes a basic working knowledge
of LANs (Local Area Networks) and can be read by those that are new to network
equipment, or those with more experience.
How This Guide is The organization of this guide is based on the switch’s main hardware components.
Organized Each chapter includes information about a specific component with relevant
specifications and installation procedures. A switch overview section is also
provided.
For Users New to Switches — If you are new to network switches, it is
recommended that you first read all chapters in this guide before installing the
switch.
For Experienced Users — If you are already familiar with installing and operating
network switches, the Switch Description and Installation Overview chapters
provide you with enough information to install the switch. Other chapters can be
left for reference, when needed.
The guide includes these chapters:
◆
Chapter 1 - Switch Description — Includes a switch overview, key component
identification, key technical specifications, and switch deployment information.
◆
Chapter 2 - Installation Overview — Includes details of the package contents
and an outline of switch installation tasks.
◆
Chapter 3 - Switch Chassis — Includes switch chassis rack installaion, and
system cooling requirements.
◆
Chapter 4 - Power and Grounding — Includes installation of AC power
modules, switch grounding, and powering on the switch.
– 3 –
How to Use This Guide
◆
Chapter 5 - Port Connections — Includes information on network interfaces,
installing optional transceivers, and cabling specifications.
◆
Chapter 6 - Switch Management — Connecting to the switch for management,
and information on the system status LEDs.
◆
Appendix A - Troubleshooting — Information for troubleshooting switch
installation and operation.
Related This guide focuses on switch hardware and installation, it does not cover software
Documentation configuration of the switch. For specific information on how to operate and use the
management functions of the switch, see the following guides:
CLI Command Reference
Administrator’s Guide
For all safety information and regulatory statements, see the following document:
Quick Start Guide
Safety and Regulatory Information
Conventions The following conventions are used throughout this guide to show information:
Note: Emphasizes important information or calls your attention to related features
or instructions.
Caution: Alerts you to a potential hazard that could cause loss of data, or damage
the system or equipment.
Warning: Alerts you to a potential hazard that could cause personal injury.
Revision History This section summarizes the changes in each revision of this guide.
December 2013 Revision
This is the first revision of this guide.
– 4 –
Contents
How to Use This Guide
3
Contents
5
Figures
7
Tables
9
1 Switch Description
10
Overview
10
Key Hardware Components
11
Key Technical Specifications
13
Data Center Deployment
14
Rack Cooling
15
2 Installation Overview
18
Package Contents
18
Switch Installation Tasks
19
3 Switch Chassis
25
General Installation Guidelines
25
How to Install the Switch in a Rack
26
Rack-Mounting Items
26
Rack-Mount Procedure
26
Switch Cooling Requirements
28
Rack Cooling
29
Fan Tray Module
29
How to Replace a Fan Tray
30
4 Power and Grounding
31
Power Supply Modules
31
Grounding the Chassis
33
How to Connect to AC Power
34
– 5 –
Contents
5 Port Connections
37
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
38
Understanding the Port Status LEDs
39
How to Install an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver
40
How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports
41
Copper Cabling Guidelines
42
10/100BASE-TX Pin Assignments
42
1000BASE-T Pin Assignments
43
Connection Procedure
43
How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
Connection Procedure
How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
Connection Procedure
DAC Connections
44
44
46
46
48
Making DAC Connections
6 Switch Management
48
51
Understanding the System Status LEDs
52
How to Connect to the Management Port
53
How to Connect to the Console Port
54
How to Connect to the USB Port
56
How to Reset the Switch
57
A Troubleshooting
58
Diagnosing LED Indicators
58
System Self-Diagnostic Test Failure
58
Power and Cooling Problems
59
Installation
59
In-Band Access
59
Index
60
– 6 –
Figures
Figure 1: Front Panel
11
Figure 2: Rear Panel
12
Figure 3: Cloud Data Center Deployment
14
Figure 4: Converged Ethernet Data Center Deployment
15
Figure 5: F2B Airflow Cooling
15
Figure 6: B2F Airflow Cooling
16
Figure 7: Installing the Switch in a Rack
19
Figure 8: Grounding the Switch
20
Figure 9: Connecting AC Power
21
Figure 10: System LEDs
21
Figure 11: Console Port
22
Figure 12: Making a Connection to a QSFP+ Transceiver
23
Figure 13: Attaching the Brackets
27
Figure 14: Installing the Switch in a Rack
27
Figure 15: Switch Cooling
28
Figure 16: Fan Tray
30
Figure 17: AC Power Supply Module
32
Figure 18: Power Supply Module LED
32
Figure 19: Grounding Terminal
33
Figure 20: AC PSU and Power Socket
34
Figure 21: Port Status LEDs
39
Figure 22: Port Status LEDs
39
Figure 23: Inserting an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver into a Slot
41
Figure 24: RJ-45 Connector
42
Figure 25: Making Connections to an SFP+ Transceiver
45
Figure 26: Connecting to a QSFP+ Transceiver
47
Figure 27: Making DAC Connections
49
Figure 28: System LEDs
52
Figure 29: Management Port
53
– 7 –
Figures
Figure 30: Console Port
54
Figure 31: Console Port Connection
55
Figure 32: USB Port
56
Figure 33: Reset Button
57
– 8 –
Tables
Table 1: Key Technical Specifications
13
Table 2: Fan Tray Specifications
30
Table 3: AC Power Supply Module Specifications
32
Table 4: Maximum Twisted-Pair Copper Cable Lengths
41
Table 5: 10/100BASE-TX MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
42
Table 6: 1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
43
Table 7: Maximum 10 Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
44
Table 8: Maximum Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
44
Table 9: Maximum 40 Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
46
Table 10: Maximum 10GBASE-CR 10 Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
48
Table 11: Maximum 40GBASE-CR4 40 Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
48
Table 12: System Status LEDs
52
Table 13: RJ-45 Management Port Status LEDs
53
Table 14: Console Cable Wiring
55
Table 15: Troubleshooting Chart
58
– 9 –
1
Switch Description
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“Overview” on page 10
◆
“Key Technical Specifications” on page 13
◆
“Data Center Deployment” on page 14
Overview
Thank you for choosing the AS5610-52X switch system. This switch is built with
leading-edge technology to deliver reliable high-performance connectivity for
your data network.
The AS5610-52X switch is a high-performance top-of-rack switch, designed for data
center operating environments. The switch provides 48 10G Ethernet Small Form
Factor Pluggable Plus (SFP+) transceiver slots, four 40G Quad-SFP+ (QSFP+) ports,
and two 1G RJ-45 ports. The switch also includes replaceable dual power supply
units and a fan tray module.
The switch supports a full set of Layer 2 switching, data center bridging, and Layer 3
routing features. The switch can be deployed as a top-of-rack (TOR) or distributed
spine switch to form a network fabric that can reduce infrastructure expenses and
power consumption in the data center. This network fabric can be used to
interconnect tens of thousands of servers delivering cloud computing services.
The switch also offers an option of front-to-back (F2B) or back-to-front (B2F) airflow
cooling for rack deployment with either blade servers or other switches, allowing
cool aisles to be maintained without creating “hot loops.”
– 10 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Overview
Key Hardware The AS5610-52X switch consists of several key hardware components. This manual
Components describes each specific component, or related components, together with their
installation requirements and procedures in each chapter. To understand each
component in detail, refer to the relevant section.
Figure 1: Front Panel
1
7
8
2
3
1
Port LEDs
5
RJ-45 Management Port
2
10G SFP+ Slots
6
USB Port
3
40G QSFP+ Slots
7
System LEDs
4
Reset Button
8
RJ-45 Console Port
4
5
6
10G SFP+ Slots
The switch contains 48 Small Form Factor Pluggable Plus (SFP+) transceiver slots
that support 10G Ethernet SFP+ transceivers, or 1G Ethernet SFP transceivers. For
more information, see “How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports” on page 44.
40G QSFP+ Slots
The switch contains four Quad Small Form Factor Pluggable Plus (QSFP+)
transceiver slots that operate up to 40 Gbps full duplex. For more information, see
“How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports” on page 46.
Management Port
The RJ-45 port labeled “Management” provides a dedicated 1000BASE-T
management interface. For more information, see “How to Connect to the
Management Port” on page 53.
Console Port
The RJ-45 port labeled “Console” provides an out-of-band serial connection to a
terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software. The port can be used for
performing switch monitoring and configuration. For more information, see “How
to Connect to the Console Port” on page 54.
– 11 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Overview
USB Port
A USB port is provided on the switch front panel. This port is for transferring
configuration files from a USB storage device to the switch’s flash memory. For
more information, see “How to Connect to the USB Port” on page 56.
Reset Button
Pressing the reset button on the front panel causes the switch to perform a hard
reset. For more information, see “How to Reset the Switch” on page 57.
System LEDs
For information on system status LED indicators, see “Understanding the System
Status LEDs” on page 52.
Port LEDs
For information on port status LED indicators, see “Understanding the Port Status
LEDs” on page 39.
Figure 2: Rear Panel
1
2
3
1
Ground Point
3
Power Supply Module Slot
2
Fan Tray Module
4
Power Supply Module
4
Grounding Terminal
The grounding terminal must be connected to a ground source that provides local
earth potential. For more information, see “Grounding the Chassis” on page 33.
Power Supply Modules
The switch supports dual hot-swappable AC power supply units (PSUs). You can
install up to two PSUs with matching airflow direction in the switch. For more
information on the switch power supplies, how to install them, and how to poweron the switch, see “Power Supply Modules” on page 31.
Fan Tray Module
The fan tray module provides air cooling for the switch system. For more
information, see “Switch Cooling Requirements” on page 28.
– 12 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Key Technical Specifications
Key Technical Specifications
The following table contains key system specifications for the switch.
Table 1: Key Technical Specifications
Item
Specification
Ports
48 10 Gbps SFP+ transceiver slots
4 40 Gbps QSFP+ transceiver slots
1 10/100/1000 Mbps RJ-45 Management port
Network Interface
Ports 1~48: SFP+
10 Gbps SFP+ transceivers: 10GBASE-CR, 10GBASE-SR
◆
1 Gbps SFP transceivers: 1000BASE-SX, 1000BASE-LX
Ports 49~52: QSFP+
◆
40 Gbps QSFP+ transceivers: 40GBASE-CR4, 40GBASE-SR4
Management Port
◆
10/100/1000BASE-T, RJ-45 connector
◆
Buffer Architecture
32 Mbit packet buffer
Aggregate Bandwidth
1280 Gbps
Switching Database
128K MAC address entries
LEDs
System: PS1, PS2, Diag (Diagnostic), Fan, Loc (Locator)
Ports 1~52: Status (link and activity)
Power Supply Module
100-240 VAC, 50-60 Hz, auto-sensing; hot pluggable
400 Watts@ 240V/100V per module
Power Consumption
165 Watts maximum
Weight
8.395 kg (18.51 lb), with two installed power supply modules
Size
W x D x H: 438.4 x 473 x 43.4 mm ( 17.26 x 18.62 x 1.71 inches)
Temperature
Operating: 0 °C to 40 °C (32 °F to 104 °F)
Storage: -40 °C to 70 °C (-40 °F to 158 °F)
Humidity
Operating: 5% to 95% (non-condensing)
Out-of-Band Management
RS-232 RJ-45 console port
In-Band Management
SSH, Telnet, SNMP, or HTTP
Software Loading
HTTP, FTP/TFTP in-band
Forwarding Mode
Store-and-forward
Throughput
Wire speed
Flow Control
Full Duplex: IEEE 802.3x
Half Duplex: Back pressure
– 13 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Data Center Deployment
Data Center Deployment
The switch is designed for high-availability data center environments with a high
port density. The switch includes redundant, hot-swappable, load-sharing AC PSUs,
a hot-swappable fan tray, and port-to-power and power-to-port airflow direction
options. Meeting the network scaling requirements of enterprise and cloud data
centers, the switch can be deployed as a top-of-rack switch or as part of a
distributed spine network, providing full line-rate switching at Layer 2 or Layer 3
across all ports.
Figure 3: Cloud Data Center Deployment
Non-Blocking Distributed Spine Network
...
…
...
Spine Cluster 1
Spine Cluster x
OSFP/BGP
ECMP
TOR or Leaf Switch
L2
vSwitch
Server Rack 1
Server Rack n
…
vSwitch
…
…
…
…
1GbE or 10GbE
Servers or
Storage Nodes
Core Router Racks
In many data center configurations, Ethernet connections link servers and data
networks, and Fibre Channel connections link servers to storage networks. This
switch enables the creation of a converged network, which employs lossless
Ethernet connections between FCOE storage, servers, and other data network
switches.
– 14 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Data Center Deployment
Figure 4: Converged Ethernet Data Center Deployment
Core Switch
Core Switch
FCoE Storage
A
A
A
Link
A
Link
Link
Link
Link
Link
Link
Link
1X
1X
1X
1X
1X
1X
2X
2X
2X
2X
2X
2X
3X
3X
3X
3X
3X
3X
4X
4X
4X
4X
4X
4X
5X
5X
5X
5X
5X
5X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
7X
7X
7X
7X
7X
7X
8X
8X
8X
8X
8X
8X
8X
5X
8X
5X
7X
5X
6X
4X
5X
5X
4X
5X
4X
4X
5X
5X
3X
4X
5X
4X
3X
4X
5X
3X
3X
4X
5X
M ode
2X
2X
3X
4X
5X
1X
2X
3X
4X
M ode
7X
2X
3X
4X
M ode
7X
2X
3X
4X
M ode
6X
2X
3X
M ode
M ode
6X
2X
3X
M ode
M ode
5X
2X
3X
M ode
M ode
5X
2X
Act
M ode Fdx
Select
100
4X
2X
Clear
4X
2X
Console
Switch Engine Fail
SelfTest
3X
1X
M ode
3X
1X
M ode
3X
1X
M ode
2X
1X
M ode
2X
1X
M ode
2X
1X
M ode
1X
1X
M ode
1X
1X
M ode
1X
1X
M ode
Act
Status
Status
M odules
7X
8X
8X
8X
8X
8X
7X
7X
8X
8X
7X
7X
8X
8X
8X
8X
8X
7X
7X
7X
7X
7X
7X
Power
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
1
2
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
6X
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
1
2
6X
Power
Link
Reset
M ode
M ode Fdx
Select
100
M odules
Link
A
Link
A
Link
A
Link
A
Link
A
Link
1X
Clear
A
A
Link
A
A
Link
A
A
Link
A
A
Link
A
A
A
Link
Reset
Console
Switch Engine Fail
SelfTest
Fan
Fan
ToR Switch
ToR Switch
Servers
Servers
Rack Cooling The top-of-rack switch is a high-performance, high-density unit that generates a
substantial amount of heat. When mounted in a rack with other equipment, it is
important that the switch has the same airflow direction to avoid “hot loops” in the
data center aisles. Hot loops increase cooling requirements since warm air is drawn
into rack devices instead of cool air.
Most rack-mounted blade servers draw cool air from the front and expel hot air at
the rear. The top-of-rack switch includes power supply units and a fan tray module
that have a front-to-back (F2B) airflow direction that maintains cool aisles in the
data center.
Figure 5: F2B Airflow Cooling
Hot Aisle
Cool Aisle
ToR Switch
Servers
Front of Rack
Rear of Rack
– 15 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Data Center Deployment
When mounted in a rack with other network equipment that may have a back-tofront (B2F) airflow direction, the top-of-rack switch includes power supply and fan
tray modules that reverse the airflow direction through the switch. This enables
various deployment options for the switch in the data center.
Figure 6: B2F Airflow Cooling
Hot Aisle
Cool Aisle
ToR Switch
Servers
Front of Rack
Rear of Rack
– 16 –
Chapter 1 | Switch Description
Data Center Deployment
– 17 –
2
Installation Overview
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“Package Contents” on page 18
◆
“Switch Installation Tasks” on page 19
Package Contents
After unpacking the switch, check the contents to be sure you have received all the
components.
◆
AS5610-52X 10G Top-of-Rack Switch
◆
Rack Mounting Kit containing two brackets and eight screws for attaching the
brackets to the switch
◆
Grounding wire
◆
Power cord—either Japan, US, Continental Europe or UK
◆
Console cable (RJ-45 to DB-9)
◆
Quick Start Guide
◆
Safety and Regulatory Information
– 18 –
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
Switch Installation Tasks
Follow these tasks to install the switch in your network. For full details on each task,
go to the relevant chapter or section by clicking on the link.
Caution: Before installing your switch, first review all the safety statements and
guidelines in the Safety and Regulatory Information document.
Task 1
Unpack package and check contents
Unpack your switch and check the package contents to be sure you have received
all the items. See “Package Contents” on page 18.
Task 2
Install the Chassis
The switch is designed to be installed in a standard 19-inch equipment rack. Plan
your rack installation and install the switch chassis in the rack. Be sure to take into
account switch cooling requirements.
Go to the chapter “Switch Chassis”
Figure 7: Installing the Switch in a Rack
1
2
1
Attach the brackets to the switch,
– 19 –
2
Use the rack mounting screws supplied
with the rack to secure the switch in the
rack.
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
Task 3
Ground the Switch
Before powering on the switch, ground the switch to earth.
Ensure the rack on which the switch is to be mounted is properly grounded and in
compliance with ETSI ETS 300 253. Verify that there is a good electrical connection
to the grounding point on the rack (no paint or isolating surface treatment.).
Caution: The earth connection must not be removed unless all supply
connections have been disconnected.
Figure 8: Grounding the Switch
1
1
Task 4
Attach the included grounding wire to
the grounding terminal on the switch
rear panel, then to rack ground.
Install Power Modules and Power On
Install power modules, then power on. The switch supports up to two PSUs that
have a matching airflow direction as the installed fan tray.
Caution: The switch includes plug-in power supply and fan tray modules that are
installed into its chassis. All installed modules must have a matching airflow
direction. That is, all modules must have a front-to-back (F2B) airflow direction, or
all modules must have a back-to-front (B2F) airflow direction. The airflow direction
of PSUs and fan trays is indicated by labels on the modules.
Go to the chapter “Power and Grounding”
– 20 –
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
Figure 9: Connecting AC Power
1
2
1
Task 5
Install one or two universal AC power
modules in the switch.
2
Connect an external AC power source
to the modules.
Verify Switch Operation
Verify basic switch operation by checking the system LEDs.
When operating normally, the PSU1/PSU2, Diag, and Fan LEDs should all be on
green. If any of the LEDs are on amber, see “Diagnosing LED Indicators” on page 58
Go to the section “Understanding the System Status LEDs”
Figure 10: System LEDs
1
1
System Status LEDs.
– 21 –
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
Task 6
Make Initial Configuration Changes
At this point you may need to make a few basic switch configuration changes
before connecting to the network. It is suggested to connect to the switch console
port to perform this task.
The serial port’s configuration requirements are as follows: 115200 bps, 8
characters, no parity, one stop bit, 8 data bits, and no flow control.
You can log in to the command-line interface (CLI) using default settings: User
“admin” with no password.
Go to “How to Connect to the Console Port”
Figure 11: Console Port
1
1
Console Port
For information on initial switch configuration:
Refer to the Administrator’s Guide.
Task 7
Install Transceivers and Connect Cables
Install SFP+ or QSFP+ transceivers and connect network cables to port interfaces:
◆
Connect DAC cables to the SFP+/QSFP+ slots. Or first install SFP+/QSFP+
transceivers and then connect fiber optic cabling to the transceiver ports.
◆
For the RJ-45 Management port, use 100-ohm Category 5, 5e or better cable for
1000BASE-T connections.
As connections are made, check the port status LEDs to be sure the links are valid.
– 22 –
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
Go to the chapter “Port Connections”
Figure 12: Making a Connection to a QSFP+ Transceiver
1
1
2
Install QSFP+ transceivers.
– 23 –
2
Connect fiber optic cabling to the ports.
Chapter 2 | Installation Overview
Switch Installation Tasks
– 24 –
3
Switch Chassis
The switch is designed to be installed in a standard 19-inch equipment rack.
Before continuing with switch installation, first review the general guidelines and
switch cooling requirements in this chapter.
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“General Installation Guidelines” on page 25
◆
“How to Install the Switch in a Rack” on page 26
◆
“Switch Cooling Requirements” on page 28
General Installation Guidelines
Be sure to follow the guidelines below when choosing a location.
◆
The installation location should:
■
be able to maintain its temperature within 0 to 40 °C (32 to 104 °F) and its
humidity within 5% to 95%, non-condensing.
■
provide adequate space (approximately five centimeters or two inches) on
all sides for proper air flow.
■
be accessible for installing, cabling and maintaining the device.
■
allow the status LEDs to be clearly visible.
◆
Make sure twisted-pair cable is always routed away from power lines,
fluorescent lighting fixtures and other sources of electrical interference, such as
radios and transmitters.
◆
Make sure the unit is connected to a separate grounded power outlet that is
powered from an independent circuit breaker. As with any equipment, using a
filter or surge suppressor is recommended. Verify that the external power
requirements for the switch can be met as listed under “Power Supply
Modules” on page 31.
– 25 –
Chapter 3 | Switch Chassis
How to Install the Switch in a Rack
How to Install the Switch in a Rack
When rack mounting the switch, pay particular attention to the following factors:
◆
Rack Types: You can use any standard EIA 19-inch equipment rack with either
two or four posts. The bracket hole pattern should be spaced 1U (1.75 in. or
4.45 cm) apart.
◆
Rack Stability: Whenever possible, secure the rack to the building ceiling or
floor, particularly if you are located in a region where earthquakes are common.
◆
Rack Planning: When installing equipment in a rack, first plan how units can
be best arranged. Try to always mount the heaviest equipment at the bottom
of the rack.
◆
Temperature: Since the temperature within a rack assembly may be higher
than the ambient room temperature, check that the rack-environment
temperature is within the specified operating temperature range. See “Switch
Cooling Requirements” on page 28.
◆
Mechanical Loading: Do not place any equipment on top of a rack-mounted
unit.
◆
Circuit Overloading: Be sure that the supply circuit to the rack assembly is not
overloaded.
◆
Grounding: Rack-mounted equipment should be properly grounded.
Rack-Mounting Items Before you start to rack-mount the switch, be sure to have the following items
available:
◆
Four mounting screws for each device you plan to install in a rack—these are
not included. Be sure to use the rack mounting screws that are supplied with
the rack.
◆
A screwdriver (Phillips or flathead, depending on the type of screws used).
Rack-Mount To rack mount the switch, follow these steps:
Procedure
Caution: Installing the switch in a rack requires two people: One should position
the switch in the rack, while the other secures it using the mounting screws.
– 26 –
Chapter 3 | Switch Chassis
How to Install the Switch in a Rack
1. Attach the brackets to the device using the screws provided in the Rack
Mounting Kit.
Figure 13: Attaching the Brackets
1
1
Use the screws provided in the Rack
Mounting Kit.
2. Following your rack plan, mark the holes in the rack where the switch will be
installed.
3. One person should lift the switch into the rack so that it is aligned with the
marked holes.
4. The second person should secure the switch in the rack, using four rackmounting screws (not provided).
Figure 14: Installing the Switch in a Rack
1
1
Use the rack mounting screws supplied
with the rack.
– 27 –
Chapter 3 | Switch Chassis
Switch Cooling Requirements
5. If installing a single switch only, go to “Power and Grounding” on page 31.
6. If installing multiple switches, repeat steps 1 to 4 to mount the switches
following your rack plan.
Switch Cooling Requirements
Wherever the switch is located, be sure to pay close attention to switch cooling
requirements. The location should be well ventilated and provide unrestricted air
flow at the front, back, and sides of the switch. If the air flow is insufficient, it may
cause the switch to overheat and possibly fail.
The switch includes a removable fan tray module located in the rear of the switch.
The module options may have either a front-to-back (F2B) airflow direction or a
back-to-front (B2F) airflow direction. The switch’s plug-in power supply modules
also include a fan, which can be either F2B or B2F airflow direction. For proper
switch cooling, all installed modules must have a matching airflow direction.
The following figure shows the airflow through the switch.
Figure 15: Switch Cooling
1
2
1
2
B2F Airflow
– 28 –
F2B Airflow
Chapter 3 | Switch Chassis
Switch Cooling Requirements
Rack Cooling When mounting the switch in an enclosed rack or cabinet, be sure to check the
following guidelines to prevent overheating:
◆
Make sure that enough cool air can flow into the enclosure for the equipment it
contains.
◆
Check that the rack or cabinet allows the hot air to exit the enclosure (normally
from the top) without circulating back into equipment.
◆
If the enclosure has sides or doors with ventilation holes, make sure they are
not blocked by cables or other obstructions.
◆
Route cables within the rack or cabinet to maximize the airflow.
◆
When possible, do not completely fill the rack or cabinet with equipment, allow
some unused space within the enclosure for better airflow.
Fan Tray Module The fan tray module is an important part of the switch air cooling system. A fan tray
module must be installed in the switch at all times. If a fan should fail, the whole fan
tray module must be replaced as soon as possible.
You must install the fan tray module in the switch that matches the airflow
direction of the installed power supply units. The available fan tray modules are
listed below:
◆
AS5610S-FANTRAY (front-to-back airflow)
◆
AS5610SR-FANTRAY (back-to-front airflow)
Caution: The switch includes plug-in power supply and fan tray modules that are
installed into its chassis. All installed modules must have a matching airflow
direction. That is, all modules must have a front-to-back (F2B) airflow direction, or
all modules must have a back-to-front (B2F) airflow direction. The airflow direction
of PSUs and fan trays is indicated by labels on the modules.
The removable fan tray, located in the rear of the switch, includes four fixed fans
and supports fan speed control. The fan speed is dynamically controlled as a
function of temperature: the higher the internal temperature, the faster the speed
of the fans. The fan tray module does not include LED indicators.
– 29 –
Chapter 3 | Switch Chassis
Switch Cooling Requirements
The following figure shows the fan tray removed from the switch.
Figure 16: Fan Tray
1
1
Label indicates airflow direction
Table 2: Fan Tray Specifications
Item
Description
Power Consumption
12 VDC @ 2.8 A, 37 Watts maximum
Airflow
76.4 CFM minimum
90.4 CFM maximum
Dimensions
W x D x H: 207 x 94.25 x 40.4 mm (8.15 x 3.71 x 1.59 inches)
How to Replace a Fan The switch system is shipped with a fan tray module installed. If a fan failure is
Tray detected (see “Understanding the System Status LEDs” on page 52), the module
should be replaced immediately.
Follow this procedure to replace a fan tray:
1. Loosen the two retaining screws on the front panel of the fan tray.
2. Pull firmly on the screws until the fan tray is free.
3. Slide the fan tray out of the switch.
4. Insert the replacement fan tray into the slot and slide it slowly into the chassis.
5. Push firmly until the fan tray clicks into place. The fans should immediately start
to operate.
6. Tighten the retaining screws to secure the fan tray in the chassis.
– 30 –
4
Power and Grounding
This chapter focuses on the switch power supplies, how to install them, and how to
power-on the switch. Connecting the switch to ground is also covered.
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“Power Supply Modules” on page 31
◆
“Grounding the Chassis” on page 33
◆
“How to Connect to AC Power” on page 34
Power Supply Modules
The switch supports hot-swappable power supply units (PSUs). You can install up
to two PSUs with matching airflow direction in the switch. The PSUs operate in a
load-sharing mode and provide 1+1 redundancy.
Note: 1+1 redundancy is a system where a switch power supply is backed up by
another switch power supply in a load-sharing mode. If one power supply fails, the
other power supply takes over the full load of the switch.
The switch provides two AC power supply module options, which are listed below:
◆
AS5610S-ACPWR (front-to-back airflow)
◆
AS5610SR-ACPWR (back-to-front airflow)
Caution: The switch includes plug-in power supply and fan tray modules that are
installed into its chassis. All installed modules must have a matching airflow
direction. That is, all modules must have a front-to-back (F2B) airflow direction, or
all modules must have a back-to-front (B2F) airflow direction. The airflow direction
of PSUs and fan trays is indicated by labels on the modules.
The AC Power Supply Modules require power from an external AC power supply
that can provide 100 to 240 VAC, 50-60 Hz. A standard AC power socket is located
on the rear panel of the PSU. The power socket is for the AC power cord.
– 31 –
Chapter 4 | Power and Grounding
Power Supply Modules
Figure 17: AC Power Supply Module
4
1
2
3
1
AC Power Socket
3
Release Lever
2
Power Supply Module LED
4
Label indicates airflow direction of PSU
Table 3: AC Power Supply Module Specifications
Item
Description
AC Input
100-240 VAC, 50-60 Hz, 4-2 A
DC Output
5 VDC @ 3 A
12 VDC @ 33 A
Power Supply
100-240 VAC, 50-60 Hz, auto-sensing; hot pluggable
400 Watts@ 220V/110V per module
Power Consumption
165 Watts maximum
Maximum Current
4 A @ 100 VAC
2 A @ 240 VAC
Size
W x D x H: 54.5 x 220 x 40.25 mm (2.15 x 8.66 x 1.58 inches)
The PSU also includes an AC power status LED. This LED is described in the
following table.
Figure 18: Power Supply Module LED
LED
Condition
Status
AC
Green
External AC power is connected to the module.
Off
External power is not connected or has failed.
– 32 –
Chapter 4 | Power and Grounding
Grounding the Chassis
Grounding the Chassis
The switch chassis must be connected to ground to ensure proper operation and to
meet electromagnetic interference (EMI) and safety requirements.
The rear panel of the switch chassis includes a single-screw grounding terminal.
The surface area around this terminal is not painted in order to provide for a good
connection It must be connected to ground to ensure proper operation and to
meet electromagnetic interference (EMI) and safety requirements.
Figure 19: Grounding Terminal
1
1
Grounding Terminal.
Before powering on the switch, ground the switch to earth as described below.
1. Ensure that the rack on which the switch is to be mounted is properly
grounded and in compliance with ETSI ETS 300 253.
2. Ensure that there is a good electrical connection to the grounding point on the
rack (no paint or isolating surface treatment).
3. Disconnect all power cables to the switch.
4. Attach a 6 AWG stranded copper wire to the grounding terminal on the switch.
5. Then attach the grounding wire to the ground point on the rack.
Caution: The earth connection must not be removed unless all supply
connections have been disconnected.
– 33 –
Chapter 4 | Power and Grounding
How to Connect to AC Power
How to Connect to AC Power
To supply AC power to the switch, first verify that the external AC power supply can
provide 100 to 240 VAC, 50-60 Hz, 3 A minimum.
Note: For electrical safety purposes, please pay attention to the following warning
notices, printed on the switch unit.
100 - 240VAC, 50 - 60Hz, 4 - 2A Per PS
To connect the switch to a power source:
1. Install one or two AC PSU modules. Slide them into the PSU slots at the rear of
the switch until they click into place. (Push the red release lever to remove a
module from the switch.)
Figure 20: AC PSU and Power Socket
2
1
1
2
AC Power Cord
AC PSU
2. Plug the power cord into a grounded, 3-pin, AC power source.
Note: For international use, you may need to change the AC power cord. You must
use a cord set that has been approved for the socket type in your country.
– 34 –
Chapter 4 | Power and Grounding
How to Connect to AC Power
3. Insert the plug on the other end of the power cord directly into the socket on
the AC PSU.
4. Check the LED indicators on the PSU and switch front panel as the unit is
powered on to verify that power is being received. If not, recheck the PSU and
power cord connections at the AC supply source and PSU.
5. If you have installed a second PSU, repeat steps 2 to 4.
– 35 –
Chapter 4 | Power and Grounding
How to Connect to AC Power
– 36 –
5
Port Connections
This chapter focuses on making connections to switch network interfaces,
including how to install optional transceivers, and details on network cable
specifications.
The switch features 48 SFP+ transceiver slots and four 40 Gigabit QSFP+ transceiver
slots. The sections that follow describe these interfaces.
Note: The switch also has one 10/100/1000BASE-T port for dedicated management
access. This port is described in “How to Connect to the Management Port” on
page 53.
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“Cable Labeling and Connection Records” on page 38
◆
“Understanding the Port Status LEDs” on page 39
◆
“How to Install an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver” on page 40
◆
“How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports” on page 41
◆
“How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports” on page 44
◆
“How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports” on page 46
◆
“DAC Connections” on page 48
– 37 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
When planning a network installation, it is essential to label the opposing ends of
cables and to record where each cable is connected. Doing so will enable you to
easily locate inter-connected devices, isolate faults and change your topology
without need for unnecessary time consumption.
To best manage the physical implementations of your network, follow these
guidelines:
◆
Clearly label the opposing ends of each cable.
◆
Using your building’s floor plans, draw a map of the location of all networkconnected equipment. For each piece of equipment, identify the devices to
which it is connected.
◆
Note the length of each cable and the maximum cable length supported by the
switch ports.
◆
For ease of understanding, use a location-based key when assigning prefixes to
your cable labeling.
◆
Use sequential numbers for cables that originate from the same equipment.
◆
Differentiate between racks by naming accordingly.
◆
Label each separate piece of equipment.
◆
Display a copy of your equipment map, including keys to all abbreviations at
each equipment rack.
– 38 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
Understanding the Port Status LEDs
Understanding the Port Status LEDs
The switch includes LED indicators for each port to indicate link status and network
activity. The port LEDs are shown below and described in the following table.
Figure 21: Port Status LEDs
2
1
1
Port 1-48 Link/Activity LEDs
2
Port 49-52 Link/Activity LEDs
Figure 22: Port Status LEDs
LED
Condition
Status
On/Flashing Green
Port has a valid 10G link. Flashing indicates
activity on the port.
On/Flashing Amber
Port has a valid 1G link. Flashing indicates activity
on the port.
Off
The link is down.
10G SFP+ Ports (1-48)
Link/Activity
40G QSFP+ Ports (49-52)
Link/Activity
On Green
Port has a valid 40G link.
Flashing Green
Flashing indicates activity on the port.
Off
The link is down.
– 39 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Install an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver
How to Install an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver
The switch provides slots for optional SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers. The
supported transceiver types are listed below:
◆
◆
◆
40 Gbps Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
■
40GBASE-CR4
■
40GBASE-SR4
10 Gbps Ethernet SFP+ transceivers
■
10GBASE-CR
■
10GBASE-SR
1000 Mbps Ethernet SFP transceivers
■
1000BASE-SX
■
1000BASE-LX
Note: SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ transceivers are hot-swappable. The switch does not need
to be powered off before installing or removing a transceiver.
Note: SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ transceivers are not provided in the switch package.
To install an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ transceiver, do the following:
1. Consider network and cabling requirements to select an appropriate
transceiver type that is also compatible with the switch transceiver support.
2. If the SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ slot is covered with a rubber protective cap, remove the
cap and keep it for later replacement.
3. Insert the transceiver with the optical connector facing outward and the slot
connector facing down. Note that SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ transceivers are keyed so
they can only be installed in the correct orientation.
4. Slide the transceiver into the slot until it clicks into place. If you do not
immediately connect a cable to the port, use a rubber protective cap to keep
the transceiver optics clean.
– 40 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports
Figure 23: Inserting an SFP/SFP+/QSFP+ Transceiver into a Slot
1
1
QSFP+ Transceiver
Note: To uninstall a transceiver: First disconnect the network cable, then release
and pull the wire bail to remove the transceiver from the slot.
How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports
The RJ-45 management port on the switch supports automatic MDI/MDI-X pinout
configuration, so you can use standard straight-through twisted-pair cables to
connect to any other network device (PCs, servers, switches, routers, or hubs).
The connection requires an unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable with RJ-45
connectors at both ends. Use Category 5, 5e or 6 cable for 1000BASE-T connections,
Category 5 or better for 100BASE-TX connections, and Category 3 or better for
10BASE-T connections.
Table 4: Maximum Twisted-Pair Copper Cable Lengths
Cable Type
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
100 m (328 ft)
RJ-45
100 m (328 ft)
RJ-45
100 m (328 ft)
RJ-45
1000BASE-T
Category 5, 5e, or 6 100-ohm UTP or STP
100BASE-TX
Category 5 or better 100-ohm UTP or STP
10BASE-T
Category 3 or better 100-ohm UTP
– 41 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports
Copper Cabling To ensure proper operation when installing the switch into a network, make sure
Guidelines that the current cables are suitable for 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX or 1000BASE-T
operation. Check the following criteria against the current installation of your
network:
◆
Cable type: Unshielded twisted pair (UTP) or shielded twisted pair (STP) cables
with RJ-45 connectors; Category 3 or better for 10BASE-T, Category 5 or better
for 100BASE-TX, and Category 5, 5e or 6 for 1000BASE-T.
◆
Protection from radio frequency interference emissions
◆
Electrical surge suppression
◆
Separation of electrical wires (switch related or other) and electromagnetic
fields from data based network wiring
◆
Safe connections with no damaged cables, connectors or shields
10/100BASE-TX Pin All 100BASE-TX RJ-45 ports support automatic MDI/MDI-X operation, so you can
Assignments use straight-through or crossover cables for all network connections to PCs,
switches, or hubs. In straight-through cable, pins 1, 2, 3, and 6, at one end of the
cable, are connected straight through to pins 1, 2, 3, and 6 at the other end of the
cable.
Figure 24: RJ-45 Connector
RJ-45 Pin Numbers
Table 5: 10/100BASE-TX MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
Pin
MDI Signal Namea
MDI-X Signal Name
1
Transmit Data plus (TD+)
Receive Data plus (RD+)
2
Transmit Data minus (TD-)
Receive Data minus (RD-)
3
Receive Data plus (RD+)
Transmit Data plus (TD+)
6
Receive Data minus (RD-)
Transmit Data minus (TD-)
4,5,7,8
Not used
Not used
a.
The “+” and “-” signs represent the polarity of the wires that make up each wire pair.
– 42 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to Twisted-Pair Copper Ports
1000BASE-T Pin All 1000BASE-T ports support automatic MDI/MDI-X operation, so you can use
Assignments straight-through cables for all network connections to PCs, servers, or switches.
The table below shows the 1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X port pinouts. These ports
require that all four pairs of wires be connected. Note that for 1000BASE-T
operation, all four pairs of wires are used for both transmit and receive.
Table 6: 1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
Pin
MDI Signal Name
MDI-X Signal Name
1
Bi-directional Pair A Plus (BI_DA+)
Bi-directional Pair B Plus (BI_DB+)
2
Bi-directional Pair A Minus (BI_DA-)
Bi-directional Pair B Minus (BI_DB-)
3
Bi-directional Pair B Plus (BI_DB+)
Bi-directional Pair A Plus (BI_DA+)
4
Bi-directional Pair C Plus (BI_DC+)
Bi-directional Pair D Plus (BI_DD+)
5
Bi-directional Pair C Minus (BI_DC-)
Bi-directional Pair D Minus (BI_DD-)
6
Bi-directional Pair B Minus (BI_DB-)
Bi-directional Pair A Minus (BI_DA-)
7
Bi-directional Pair D Plus (BI_DD+)
Bi-directional Pair C Plus (BI_DC+)
8
Bi-directional Pair D Minus (BI_DD-)
Bi-directional Pair C Minus (BI_DC-)
1000BASE-T Cable Requirements
All Category 5 UTP cables that are used for 100BASE-TX connections should also
work for 1000BASE-T, providing that all four wire pairs are connected. However, it is
recommended that for all critical connections, or any new cable installations,
Category 5e (enhanced Category 5) or Category 6 cable should be used. The
Category 5e and 6 specifications include test parameters that are only
recommendations for Category 5. Therefore, the first step in preparing existing
Category 5 cabling for running 1000BASE-T is a simple test of the cable installation
to be sure that it complies with the IEEE 802.3-2008 standards.
Connection Procedure The switch has one 10/100/1000BASE-T port for dedicated management access.
Making a connection to this port is described in “How to Connect to the
Management Port” on page 53.
– 43 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
The switch provides 48 slots for SFP/SFP+ fiber-optic transceivers. Note that all 10G
SFP+ fiber optic ports operate at 10 Gbps full duplex. All 1000 Mbps SFP fiber optic
ports operate at 1 Gbps full duplex.
Table 7: Maximum 10 Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
Fiber Size
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
62.5/125 micron multimode
160 MHz/km
2-26 m (7-85 ft.)
LC
62.5/125 micron multimode
200 MHz/km
2-33 m (7-108 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
400 MHz/km
2-66 m (7-216 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
500 MHz/km
2-82 m (7-269 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
2000 MHz/km
2-300 m (7-984 ft.)
LC
10GBASE-SR
Table 8: Maximum Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
Cable Type
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
160 MHz/km
2-220 m (7-722 ft)
LC
200 MHz/km
2-275 m (7-902 ft)
LC
400 MHz/km
2-500 m (7-1641 ft)
LC
500 MHz/km
2-550 m (7-1805 ft)
LC
N/A
2 m - 10 km
(7 ft - 6.2 miles)
LC
1000BASE-SX
62.5/125 micron multimode
50/125 micron multimode
1000BASE-LX
9/125 micron single-mode
Note: The length of fiber optic cable for a single switched link should not exceed
the relevant standards specified in this section. However, power budget constraints
should also be considered when calculating the maximum fiber optic cable length
for a particular link.
Connection Procedure Follow these steps to connect cables to SFP/SFP+ transceiver ports.
Warning: This switch uses lasers to transmit signals over fiber optic cable. The
lasers are compliant with the requirements of a Class 1 Laser Product and are
inherently eye safe in normal operation. However, you should never look directly at
a transmit port when it is powered on.
– 44 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to SFP/SFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
Warning: When selecting a fiber SFP/SFP+ device, considering safety, please make
sure that it can function at a temperature that is not less than the recommended
maximum operational temperature of the product. You must also use an approved
Laser Class 1 SFP/SFP+ transceiver.
1. Remove and keep the fiber port’s rubber cover. When not connected to a fiber
cable, the rubber cover should be replaced to protect the optics.
2. Check that the fiber terminators are clean. You can clean the cable plugs by
wiping them gently with a clean tissue or cotton ball moistened with a little
ethanol. Dirty fiber terminators on fiber cables will impair the quality of the
light transmitted through the cable and lead to degraded performance on the
port.
3. Connect one end of the cable to the LC connector on one of the switch’s SFP
transceivers and the other end to the LC port on the other device. Since both LC
connectors are keyed, the cable can only be attached in the correct orientation.
Figure 25: Making Connections to an SFP+ Transceiver
1
2
1
2
SFP+ Transceiver
Fiber Optic Cable
4. As a connection is made, check the Link LED on the switch corresponding to
the port to be sure that the connection is valid.
Note: Be sure to secure cables properly and route them away from the switch
without exceeding the minimum bending radius for fiber cables (typically a few
inches). Use cable ties to bunder cables together and secure coiled loops of excess
cable. Do not let cables hang free supporting their own weight or pull in any way
that puts stress on the connectors.
– 45 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
The switch includes four slots for 40 Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ fiber-optic
transceivers. Note that 40G fiber optic ports can provide either one 40 Gbps fullduplex link, four independent 10G fiber optic links. Connecting a 40G QSFP+ port
to four 10G SFP+ ports requires the use of a breakout cable.
Table 9: Maximum 40 Gigabit Ethernet Fiber Cable Lengths
Fiber Size
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
62.5/125 micron multimode
160 MHz/km
2-26 m (7-85 ft.)
LC
62.5/125 micron multimode
200 MHz/km
2-33 m (7-108 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
400 MHz/km
2-66 m (7-216 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
500 MHz/km
2-82 m (7-269 ft.)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
2000 MHz/km
2-300 m (7-984 ft.)
LC
40GBASE-SR4
Note: The length of fiber optic cable for a single switched link should not exceed
the relevant standards specified in this section. However, power budget constraints
should also be considered when calculating the maximum fiber optic cable length
for a particular link.
Connection Procedure Follow these steps to connect cables to QSFP+ transceiver ports.
Warning: This switch uses lasers to transmit signals over fiber optic cable. The
lasers are compliant with the requirements of a Class 1 Laser Product and are
inherently eye safe in normal operation. However, you should never look directly at
a transmit port when it is powered on.
Warning: When selecting a fiber QSFP+ device, considering safety, please make
sure that it can function at a temperature that is not less than the recommended
maximum operational temperature of the product. You must also use an approved
Laser Class 1 QSFP+ transceiver.
1. Remove and keep the port’s protective cover. When not connected to a fiber
cable, the cover should be replaced to protect the optics.
2. Check that the fiber terminators are clean. You can clean the cable plugs by
wiping them gently with a clean tissue or cotton ball moistened with a little
ethanol. Dirty fiber terminators on fiber cables will impair the quality of the
light transmitted through the cable and lead to degraded performance on the
port.
– 46 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
How to Connect to QSFP+ Fiber Optic Ports
3. Connect one end of the cable to the QSFP+ port on the switch and the other
end to the QSFP+ port on the other device. Since QSFP+ connectors are keyed,
the cable can only be attached in the correct orientation.
Figure 26: Connecting to a QSFP+ Transceiver
2
1
1
QSFP+ Transceiver Port
2
QSFP+ Fiber Optic Cable
4. As a connection is made, check the Link LED on the switch to be sure that the
connection is valid.
Note: Be sure to secure cables properly and route them away from the switch
without exceeding the minimum bending radius for fiber cables (typically a few
inches). Use cable ties to bundle cables together and secure coiled loops of excess
cable. Do not let cables hang free supporting their own weight or pull in any way
that puts stress on the connectors.
– 47 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
DAC Connections
DAC Connections
Direct Attach Cable (DAC) is a method of connecting two SFP+/QSFP+ interfaces
without using optics and fiber cable. A fixed length of twinax copper cable is
terminated at each end with physically-compliant SFP+/QSFP+ transceivers that do
not include all their normal electronic and optical components. The result is a low
cost, low-latency, 10G/40G Ethernet solution for short distances, ideal for
connections within the data center.
A 10G DAC connection is also known as twinax copper or 10GBASE-CR. DAC copper
cables are available in pre-terminated lengths up to 7 m (22.9 ft).
For 40G DAC, or 40GBASE-CR4, copper cables are also available in pre-terminated
lengths up to 7 m (22.9 ft).
Table 10: Maximum 10GBASE-CR 10 Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
Cable Type
Cable Lengths
Connector
Pre-terminated Direct Attach Cable
(DAC) — (twinax copper cable)
1 m (3.28 ft)
2 m (6.56 ft)
3 m (9.8 ft)
5 m (16.4 ft)
7 m (22.9 ft)
SFP+
Table 11: Maximum 40GBASE-CR4 40 Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
Cable Type
Cable Lengths
Connector
Pre-terminated Direct Attach Cable
(DAC) — (twinax copper cable)
1 m (3.28 ft)
2 m (6.56 ft)
3 m (9.8 ft)
5 m (16.4 ft)
7 m (22.9 ft)
QSFP+
Making DAC 1. Plug the SFP+/QSFP+ transceiver connector on one end of a twinax copper
cable segment into an SFP+/QSFP+ slot on the link device.
Connections
– 48 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
DAC Connections
Figure 27: Making DAC Connections
1
1
10G SFP+ DAC Cable
2. Plug the other end of the twinax cable into an SFP+/QSFP+ slot on the switch.
3. Check that the Link LED on the switch turns on green to indicate that the
connection is valid.
Note: Connecting a 40G QSFP+ port to four 10G SFP+ ports requires the use of a
breakout DAC cable.
– 49 –
Chapter 5 | Port Connections
DAC Connections
– 50 –
6
Switch Management
The switch includes a management agent that allows you to configure or monitor
the switch using its embedded management software. To manage the switch, you
can make a direct connection to the console port (out-of-band), or you can manage
it through a network connection (in-band) using Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH), a web
browser, or SNMP-based network management software.
The switch’s Management port (RJ-45) provides a dedicated management channel
that operates outside of the data transport network. This makes it possible to reconfigure or troubleshoot the switch over either a local or remote connection to
the Management port when access through the data channel is not possible or
deemed insecure.
For a detailed description of the switch’s software features, refer to the
Administrator’s Guide.
This chapter includes these sections:
◆
“Understanding the System Status LEDs” on page 52
◆
“How to Connect to the Management Port” on page 53
◆
“How to Connect to the Console Port” on page 54
◆
“How to Connect to the USB Port” on page 56
◆
“How to Reset the Switch” on page 57
– 51 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
Understanding the System Status LEDs
Understanding the System Status LEDs
The switch includes a display panel of key system LED indicators. The LEDs, which
are located on the front panel, are shown below and described in the following
table.
Figure 28: System LEDs
1
1
System Status LEDs.
Table 12: System Status LEDs
LED
Condition
Status
PSU1/PSU2
On Green
Power supply 1/2 is installed and operating normally.
On Amber
The power supply has detected a fault.
Off
The power supply unit is not installed.
On Green
The system diagnostic test has completed successfully.
On Amber
The system self-diagnostic test has detected a fault.
On Green
Fans are operating normally.
On Amber
A fan failure has been detected.
Flashing Amber
Activated through remote software to assist identification
of the switch unit within a rack.
Diag
Fan
Loc
– 52 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
How to Connect to the Management Port
How to Connect to the Management Port
The 10/100/1000BASE-T port labeled “Mgmt” provides a dedicated management
interface which is segregated from the data traffic crossing the other ports.
This port supports auto-negotiation, so the optimum transmission mode (half or
full duplex) and data rate (10, 100, or 1000 Mbps) can be selected automatically, if
this feature is also supported by the attached device.
Figure 29: Management Port
3
2
1
1
Link/Activity LED
2
Speed LED
3
RJ-45 Management Port
Table 13: RJ-45 Management Port Status LEDs
LED
Condition
Status
Link/Activity
On/Flashing Green
Port has established a valid network connection.
Flashing indicates activity.
Off
There is no valid link on the port.
On Amber
Valid 1000 Mbps link
On Green
Valid 10/100 Mbps link
Speed
To connect to the management port, use Category 5 or better unshielded twistedpair (UTP) cable with RJ-45 connectors at both ends. Make sure the twisted-pair
cable does not exceed 100 meters (328 ft) in length. This port supports automatic
MDI/MDI-X pinout configuration, so you can use standard straight-through cables
to connect to any other network device.
– 53 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
How to Connect to the Console Port
Follow these steps to connect to the Management port:
1. Attach one end of a twisted-pair cable to an RJ-45 connector on a management
network device (PC or another switch).
2. Attach the other end of the twisted-pair cable to the Management port on the
switch.
3. As the connection is made, the Mgmt port LEDs (on the switch) will turn on to
indicate that the connection is valid.
How to Connect to the Console Port
The RJ-45 Console port on the switch’s front panel is used to connect to the switch
for out-of-band console configuration. The console device can be a PC or
workstation running a VT-100 terminal emulator, or a VT-100 terminal. An RJ-45-toDB-9 cable is supplied with the switch for connecting to a PC’s RS-232 serial DB-9
DTE (COM) port.
Note: To connect to notebooks or other PCs that do not have a DB-9 COM port, use
a USB to male DB-9 adapter cable (not included with the switch).
Figure 30: Console Port
1
1
Console Port
– 54 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
How to Connect to the Console Port
The following table describes the pin assignments used in the RJ-45-to-DB-9
console cable.
Table 14: Console Cable Wiring
Switch’s 8-Pin
Console Port
Null Modem
PC’s 9-Pin
DTE Port
6 RXD (receive data)
<---------------------
3 TXD (transmit data)
3 TXD (transmit data)
--------------------->
2 RXD (receive data)
5 SGND (signal ground)
-----------------------
5 SGND (signal ground)
No other pins are used.
The serial port’s configuration requirements are as follows:
◆
Default Baud rate—115200 bps
◆
Character Size—8 Characters
◆
Parity—None
◆
Stop bit—One
◆
Data bits—8
◆
Flow control—none
Figure 31: Console Port Connection
Follow these steps to connect to the Console port:
1. Attach the DB-9 end of the included RJ-45-to-DB-9 serial cable to a DB-9 COM
port connector on a management PC.
– 55 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
How to Connect to the USB Port
2. Attach the RJ-45 end of the serial cable to the Console port on the switch.
3. Configure the PC’s COM port required settings using VT-100 terminal emulator
software (such as HyperTerminal) running on the management PC.
4. Log in to the command-line interface (CLI) using default settings:
■
User — admin
■
Password — null (there is no default password)
For a detailed description of connecting to the console and using the switch’s
command line interface (CLI), refer to the Administrator’s Guide.
How to Connect to the USB Port
The USB port on the switch front panel is for transferring configuration files from a
USB storage device to the switch’s flash memory.
Figure 32: USB Port
1
1
USB Port
– 56 –
Chapter 6 | Switch Management
How to Reset the Switch
How to Reset the Switch
The Reset button on the switch can be used to restart the device and set the
configuration back to factory default values.
Use a long thin object, such as the end of a paperclip, to press the Reset button.
One push of the button restarts the system software using default values.
Figure 33: Reset Button
1
1
Reset Button
– 57 –
A
Troubleshooting
Diagnosing LED Indicators
Table 15: Troubleshooting Chart
Symptom
Action
PSU1/PSU2 LED is Off
◆
◆
PSU1/PSU2 LED is on
Amber
◆
Diag LED is on Amber
◆
◆
◆
Fan LED is on Amber
◆
◆
Link/Act LED is Off
◆
◆
◆
◆
Check connections between the PSU, the power cord and the wall
outlet.
Contact your dealer for assistance.
Power cycle the PSU to try and clear the condition.
Replace the PSU.
Power cycle the switch to try and clear the condition.
If the condition does not clear, contact your dealer for assistance.
Check fans in the fan tray.
Replace the fan tray as soon as possible.
Verify that the switch and attached device are powered on.
Be sure the cable is plugged into both the switch and
corresponding device.
Verify that the proper cable type is used and its length does not
exceed specified limits.
Check the attached device and cable connections for possible
defects. Replace the defective cable if necessary.
System Self-Diagnostic Test Failure
If the Diag LED indicates a failure of the system power-on-self-test (POST), you can
use a console connection to view the POST results. The POST results may indicate a
failed component or help troubleshoot the problem. For more information on
connecting to the console port and using the CLI, refer to the Administrator’s Guide.
Note a POST failure normally indicates a serious hardware fault that cannot be
rectified or worked around. If you encounter a POST failure, you should contact
your dealer for assistance.
– 58 –
Chapter A | Troubleshooting
Power and Cooling Problems
Power and Cooling Problems
If a power indicator does not turn on when the power cord is plugged in, you may
have a problem with the power outlet, power cord, or PSU. However, if the switch
powers off after running for a while, check for loose power connections, power
losses or surges at the power outlet. If you still cannot isolate the problem, the PSU
may be defective.
Installation
Verify that all system components have been properly installed. If one or more
components appear to be malfunctioning (such as the power cord or network
cabling), test them in an alternate environment where you are sure that all the
other components are functioning properly.
In-Band Access
You can access the management agent in the switch through a connection to any
port using Telnet, a web browser, or other network management software tools.
However, you must first configure the switch with a valid IP address, subnet mask,
and default gateway. If you have trouble establishing a link to the management
agent, check to see if you have a valid network connection. Then verify that you
entered the correct IP address. Also, be sure the switch port has not been disabled.
If it has not been disabled, then check the network cabling that runs between your
remote location and the switch.
– 59 –
Index
Numerics
10/100 PIN assignments 42
1000BASE-SX fiber cable Lengths 44
1000BASE-T PIN assignments 43
10GBASE fiber cable lengths 44, 46
10GBASE-LR fiber cable lengths 48
installation
power requirements 25
site requirements 25
installation troubleshooting 59
introduction 10, 18
L
A
air flow requirements 25
B
brackets, attaching 27
buffer size 13
C
cable
Ethernet cable compatibility 42
labeling and connection records 38
lengths 44, 46
cleaning fiber terminators 45, 46
console port
pin assignments 53, 54
console port, pin assignments 54
contents of package 18
cord sets, international 34
Craft port 51
D
diagnosing LED indicators 58
E
electrical interference, avoiding 25
equipment checklist 18
laser safety 44, 45, 46
LC port connections 44
LED indicators
DIAG 52
port 39
power 32
PWR 52
location requirements 25
M
management
Craft port 51
out-of-band 51
web-based 51
O
out-of-band management 51
P
package contents 18
pin assignments
console port 53, 54
power
indicators 32
modules 31
power and cooling problems 59
R
F
rear panel socket 31
fan tray 29
S
I
in-band access 59
indicators, LED 39, 52
screws for rack mounting 26
SFP
transceiver connections 44
– 60 –
Index
site selelction 25
specifications
environmental 13
status LEDs 39, 52
surge suppressor, using 25
W
web-based management 51
– 61 –
The Declaration of Conformity (DoC) can be obtained from www.edge-core.com -> support -> download -> declarations & certifications.
AS5610-52X
E122013-CS-R01
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