PowerMate P150/P166 Service And Reference Manual

PowerMate P150/P166 Service And Reference Manual
NEC
PowerMate P
Service and Reference Manual
Printed in U.S.A 4/96
819-181410-000 Rev. 00
PROPRIETARY NOTICE AND LIABILITY DISCLAIMER
The information disclosed in this document, including all designs and related materials, is
the valuable property of NEC Corporation (NEC) and/or its licensors. NEC and/or its licensors, as appropriate, reserve all patent, copyright and other proprietary rights to this document, including all design, manufacturing, reproduction, use, and sales rights thereto, except
to the extent said rights are expressly granted to others.
The NEC product(s) discussed in this document are warranted in accordance with the terms
of the Warranty Statement accompanying each product. However, actual performance of
each such product is dependent upon factors such as system configuration, customer data,
and operator control. Since implementation by customers of each product may vary, the
suitability of specific product configurations and applications must be determined by the
customer and is not warranted by NEC.
To allow for design and specification improvements, the information in this document is
subject to change at any time, without notice. Reproduction of this document or portions
thereof without prior written approval of NEC is prohibited.
MultiSync and PowerMate are U.S. registered trademarks of NEC Technologies, Inc.
FastFacts is a U.S. trademark of NEC Technologies, Inc.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation
All other product, brand, or trade names used in this publication are the trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective trademark owners.
First Printing — March 1996
Copyright 1996
NEC Technologies, Inc.
1414 Massachusetts Avenue
Boxborough, MA 01719
All Rights Reserved
Copyright 1996
NEC Corporation
7-1 Shiba 5-Chome, Minato-Ku
Tokyo 108-01, Japan
All Rights Reserved
iii
Contents
Section 1 Technical Information
Minitower System Chassis ........................................................................................... 1-1
System Board .............................................................................................................. 1-2
Processor.............................................................................................................. 1-5
Secondary Cache .................................................................................................. 1-5
System and Video BIOS ....................................................................................... 1-6
Power Management .............................................................................................. 1-7
I/O Addressing ..................................................................................................... 1-7
System Memory.................................................................................................... 1-9
Interrupt Controller .............................................................................................. 1-10
Graphics Subsystem.............................................................................................. 1-11
Motion Video Controller ............................................................................... 1-11
Graphics Accelerator ..................................................................................... 1-12
Video Memory .............................................................................................. 1-12
ISA Bus................................................................................................................ 1-13
PCI Local Bus ...................................................................................................... 1-13
PCI/IDE Ports ...................................................................................................... 1-14
Parallel Interface................................................................................................... 1-14
Serial Interface ..................................................................................................... 1-15
Infrared Interface.................................................................................................. 1-16
Power Supply .............................................................................................................. 1-16
Diskette Drive ............................................................................................................. 1-16
Hard Disk Drive .......................................................................................................... 1-17
Keyboard..................................................................................................................... 1-17
Mouse ......................................................................................................................... 1-18
Multimedia Components.............................................................................................. 1-18
Integrated Audio................................................................................................... 1-18
Six-Speed CD-ROM............................................................................................. 1-18
Speakers............................................................................................................... 1-19
Microphone .......................................................................................................... 1-19
Plug and Play............................................................................................................... 1-19
Power Management..................................................................................................... 1-19
Desktop Management Interface ................................................................................... 1-20
DMI Components................................................................................................. 1-20
iv
Contents
Manageable Products............................................................................................ 1-20
CI Module ............................................................................................................ 1-20
DMI Browser ....................................................................................................... 1-21
Usage ................................................................................................................... 1-22
Specifications .............................................................................................................. 1-23
Section 2 Setup and Operation
Unpacking and Repacking ........................................................................................... 2-1
Setup........................................................................................................................... 2-1
Cd-Rom Reader........................................................................................................... 2-10
System Configuration .................................................................................................. 2-11
Setup Utility ......................................................................................................... 2-11
How to Start Setup............................................................................................... 2-12
How to Use Setup ................................................................................................ 2-13
Menu Bar ...................................................................................................... 2-13
Legend Bar.................................................................................................... 2-14
Field Help Window........................................................................................ 2-15
General Help Window.................................................................................... 2-15
Main Menu Options ....................................................................................... 2-15
IDE Adapters ................................................................................................ 2-16
Memory Cache .............................................................................................. 2-19
Memory Shadow ........................................................................................... 2-19
Boot Options ................................................................................................. 2-19
Numlock........................................................................................................ 2-20
Advanced Menu.................................................................................................... 2-21
Integrated Peripherals Menu .......................................................................... 2-21
Security Menu ...................................................................................................... 2-23
Power Menu......................................................................................................... 2-24
Boot Menu ........................................................................................................... 2-25
Exit Menu............................................................................................................. 2-26
Save Changes & Exit ..................................................................................... 2-26
Discard Changes & Exit................................................................................. 2-26
Get Default Values ........................................................................................ 2-27
Load Previous Values .................................................................................... 2-27
Save Changes ................................................................................................ 2-27
BIOS Update Utility .................................................................................................... 2-27
NEC Bulletin Board Service ................................................................................. 2-28
Contents
v
Using the BIOS Update Utility.............................................................................. 2-29
Section 3 Option Installation
General Rules For Installing Options............................................................................ 3-1
Precautions.................................................................................................................. 3-1
Removing the System Unit Cover ................................................................................ 3-2
Expansion Boards........................................................................................................ 3-5
Expansion Slot Locations ..................................................................................... 3-5
Expansion Board Installation ................................................................................ 3-6
Expansion Board Removal............................................................................. 3-8
Simm Upgrade............................................................................................................. 3-9
Checking System Memory .................................................................................... 3-9
SIMM Removal.................................................................................................... 3-12
SIMM Installation................................................................................................. 3-13
Video Upgrade ............................................................................................................ 3-14
Processor Upgrade ...................................................................................................... 3-15
Processor Removal ............................................................................................... 3-15
Processor Installation............................................................................................ 3-16
Data Storage Devices .................................................................................................. 3-17
Device Slots ......................................................................................................... 3-17
Device Preparation ............................................................................................... 3-18
Device Cables....................................................................................................... 3-18
Diskette Drive Signal Cable ........................................................................... 3-20
IDE Signal Cables.......................................................................................... 3-21
System Power Cables..................................................................................... 3-22
Device Cabling ..................................................................................................... 3-23
Cabling an IDE Device .................................................................................. 3-23
Cabling a Diskette Drive ................................................................................ 3-24
Storage Device Installation ................................................................................... 3-25
Installing the 3 1/2-Inch Drive into the Internal Front Slot.............................. 3-25
Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Drive into a Rear Slot.................................................. 3-26
Removing the Front Panel.............................................................................. 3-28
Installing the 5 1/4-Inch Device...................................................................... 3-31
Replacing the Front Panel .............................................................................. 3-34
Adding External Options ............................................................................................. 3-35
Parallel Printer ...................................................................................................... 3-35
RS-232C Device Connection ................................................................................ 3-36
vi
Contents
Section 4 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Maintenance ................................................................................................................ 4-1
System Cleaning ................................................................................................... 4-2
Keyboard Cleaning ............................................................................................... 4-2
Mouse Cleaning.................................................................................................... 4-3
Troubleshooting .......................................................................................................... 4-4
Error Messages..................................................................................................... 4-4
Diagnosing and Solving Problems ......................................................................... 4-6
Beep Codes .......................................................................................................... 4-10
Section 5 Repair
Disassembly and Reassembly ....................................................................................... 5-1
System Unit Cover Removal ................................................................................. 5-2
Expansion Board Removal.................................................................................... 5-4
SIMM Removal.................................................................................................... 5-4
Front Panel Assembly Removal............................................................................. 5-6
Blank Panel and Metal Cover Plate Removal......................................................... 5-7
3 1/2-Inch Drive Bracket Removal........................................................................ 5-9
Card Guide/Fan Bracket Removal......................................................................... 5-9
Speaker Assembly Removal .................................................................................. 5-10
3 1/2-inch Diskette Drive Removal ....................................................................... 5-11
5 1/4-Inch Device Removal................................................................................... 5-12
Rear Internal 3 1/2-Inch Drive Removal................................................................ 5-14
Power Supply Removal......................................................................................... 5-16
PCI/ISA Backboard Removal ............................................................................... 5-17
System Board Removal......................................................................................... 5-17
Illustrated Parts Breakdown.................................................................................. 5-18
Appendix A Connector Pin Assignments
Serial Interface Connectors.......................................................................................... A-3
Parallel Interface Connector......................................................................................... A-4
VGA Interface Connector Pin Assignments.................................................................. A-6
Speaker Connector Pin Assignments............................................................................ A-7
Power Supply Connector ............................................................................................. A-7
Keyboard and Mouse Connectors ................................................................................ A-8
IRDA Connector ......................................................................................................... A-8
Contents
vii
Suspend Button Connector .......................................................................................... A-8
Fan Connector............................................................................................................. A-9
Diskette Drive Interface Pin Assignments..................................................................... A-9
IDE Interface Connectors ............................................................................................ A-10
SIMM Sockets ............................................................................................................ A-11
ISA/PCI-Bus Backboard Connector Pin Assignments .................................................. A-12
ISA Expansion Bus Connector Pin Assignments .......................................................... A-14
CD Audio In Connector Pin Assignments .................................................................... A-16
Appendix B System Board Jumpers
Jumper Locations ........................................................................................................ B-1
Changing Processor Jumper Settings............................................................................ B-2
Changing the Password................................................................................................ B-3
Clearing CMOS........................................................................................................... B-4
Appendix C Hard Disk Drive Specifications and Jumper Settings
Hard Disk Drive Specifications .................................................................................... C-1
1.6-GB Hard Disk Drive Jumper Settings .................................................................... C-2
2.0-GB Hard Disk Drive Jumper Settings .................................................................... C-3
J5 Master/Slave Select.......................................................................................... C-3
J6 Dual Drive Emulation Block............................................................................. C-3
J8 Remote LED Option Block .............................................................................. C-3
Appendix D CD-ROM Reader Specifications and Jumper Settings
CD-ROM Reader Specifications .................................................................................. D-1
CD-ROM Reader Connectors and Jumper Settings ...................................................... D-2
Figure
1-1
System Controls and Storage Device Slots......................................................... 1-2
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
Voltage Selector Switch .................................................................................... 2-2
Peripheral Connections ...................................................................................... 2-2
Speaker Cables.................................................................................................. 2-3
Connecting the left speaker cable....................................................................... 2-4
Connecting the Y-cable ..................................................................................... 2-5
viii
Contents
2-6
2-7
2-8
Connecting the AC adapter................................................................................ 2-5
Inserting the Microphone Holder into the Stand................................................. 2-6
Inserting the Microphone into the Holder .......................................................... 2-7
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-13
3-14
3-15
3-16
3-17
3-18
3-19
3-20
3-21
3-22
3-23
3-24
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-29
Removing Cover Screws ................................................................................... 3-3
Releasing the Cover........................................................................................... 3-4
Locating Expansion Slots .................................................................................. 3-5
Removing a Slot Cover...................................................................................... 3-6
Inserting the Board............................................................................................ 3-7
Removing the Screw.......................................................................................... 3-8
System Board Upgrade SIMM Sockets ............................................................. 3-10
Removing a SIMM............................................................................................ 3-12
Inserting the SIMM ........................................................................................... 3-13
Aligning the Video WRAM Module with the Video Board Sockets ................... 3-14
Locating Device Slots in the Minitower ............................................................. 3-18
System Board Cable Connectors........................................................................ 3-19
Optional Diskette Drive Signal Cable................................................................. 3-20
Optional IDE Cable Connectors......................................................................... 3-21
Power Cable Connectors ................................................................................... 3-22
Connecting IDE Device Cables.......................................................................... 3-23
Connecting 1.2-MB Diskette Drive Cables ........................................................ 3-24
Left Side Drive Screws...................................................................................... 3-25
Securing the Drive to the Bracket...................................................................... 3-26
Removing the Drive Bracket Screws.................................................................. 3-27
Removing the Front Panel ................................................................................. 3-28
Locating the Blank Panel Tabs........................................................................... 3-29
Locating the Slot Cover..................................................................................... 3-30
Attaching the Device Rails................................................................................. 3-32
Front and Left Side Device Screws.................................................................... 3-33
Right Side Device Screws.................................................................................. 3-33
Aligning the Front Panel .................................................................................... 3-34
Connecting a Printer Cable to the Minitower ..................................................... 3-35
Connecting an RS-232C Cable to the Minitower................................................ 3-36
4-1
Removing the Mouse Ball Cover ....................................................................... 4-3
5-1
5-2
Removing Cover Screws ................................................................................... 5-3
Releasing the Cover........................................................................................... 5-3
Contents
ix
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-19
5-20
5-21
5-22
Removing the Screw.......................................................................................... 5-4
System Board Upgrade SIMM Sockets ............................................................. 5-5
Removing a SIMM............................................................................................ 5-5
Removing the Front Panel ................................................................................. 5-6
Locating the Blank Panel Tabs........................................................................... 5-7
Locating and Removing the Slot Covers ............................................................ 5-8
Left Side Front Internal Drive Bracket Screws................................................... 5-9
Removing the Card Guide/Fan Bracket Assembly .............................................. 5-10
Speaker ............................................................................................................. 5-11
3 1/2-Inch Diskette Drive Cables ....................................................................... 5-11
Diskette Drive Bracket Screws .......................................................................... 5-12
Front and Left Side Device Screws.................................................................... 5-13
Right Side Device Screws.................................................................................. 5-13
Removing the Device Rails ................................................................................ 5-14
Removing the Drive Bracket Screws.................................................................. 5-15
Securing the Drive to the Bracket...................................................................... 5-15
Power Supply Screws........................................................................................ 5-16
PCI/ISA Backboard........................................................................................... 5-17
System Board Removal ..................................................................................... 5-18
Powermate P Series Illustrated Parts Breakdown............................................... 5-20
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
System Board Layout ........................................................................................ A-1
System Board Connectors, Lower Right............................................................ A-2
Serial Interface .................................................................................................. A-3
Parallel Interface Connector............................................................................... A-4
VGA Interface Connector.................................................................................. A-6
Power Supply Connector Pin Assignments......................................................... A-7
Tables
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
System Board Chips .......................................................................................... 1-4
System Memory Map ........................................................................................ 1-6
I/O Address Map............................................................................................... 1-8
SIMM Memory Upgrade Path ........................................................................... 1-10
Interrupt Level Assignments .............................................................................. 1-11
Parallel Port Addressing and Interrupts.............................................................. 1-15
Serial Port Addressing and Interrupts ................................................................ 1-15
x
Contents
1-8
Specifications .................................................................................................... 1-23
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
Setup Key Functions.......................................................................................... 2-14
Main Menu Parameters...................................................................................... 2-16
IDE Hard Disk Parameters ................................................................................ 2-18
Memory Cache Parameters ................................................................................ 2-19
Boot Parameters................................................................................................ 2-20
Numlock Parameters ......................................................................................... 2-20
Advanced Menu Parameters .............................................................................. 2-21
Integrated Peripherals Parameters...................................................................... 2-22
System Security Options.................................................................................... 2-23
Power Management Parameters......................................................................... 2-25
3-1
Recommended Memory Upgrade Path............................................................... 3-11
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
NEC Service and Information Telephone Numbers ............................................ 4-1
PowerMate P System Error Messages ............................................................... 4-4
ISA NMI Error Messages.................................................................................. 4-6
Problems and Solutions ..................................................................................... 4-6
Diagnostic Beep Codes...................................................................................... 4-10
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
PowerMate P Series System Unit Disassembly Sequence ................................... 5-1
PowerMate P Series Field-Replaceable Parts List .............................................. 5-18
PowerMate P Series Video Upgrade Options..................................................... 5-21
PowerMate P Series Documentation and Packaging .......................................... 5-21
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-8
A-9
A-10
A-11
System Board Connectors ................................................................................. A-2
RS-232C Serial Port Connector Pin Assignments............................................... A-4
Parallel Printer Port Connector Pin Assignments................................................ A-5
VGA Interface Connector Pin Assignments ....................................................... A-6
Speaker Connector Pin Assignments.................................................................. A-7
Keyboard and Mouse Connector Pin Assignments ............................................. A-8
IRDA Connector Pin Assignments..................................................................... A-8
Suspend Connector Pin Assignments ................................................................. A-8
Fan Connector Pin Assignments......................................................................... A-9
Diskette Drive Connector Pin Assignments........................................................ A-9
IDE/PCI Connector Pin Assignments................................................................. A-10
Contents
xi
A-12
A-13
A-14
A-15
SIMM Socket Pin Assignments ......................................................................... A-11
ISA/PCI-Bus Backboard Connector Pin Assignments ........................................ A-12
ISA Expansion Slot Pin Assignments................................................................. A-14
CD Audio In Connector .................................................................................... A-16
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-4
Hard Disk Drive Specifications.......................................................................... C-1
1.6-GB Hard Disk Jumper Settings.................................................................... C-2
2-GB Hard Disk Master/Slave Select Jumper Settings ....................................... C-3
2-GB Dual Drive Emulation Jumper Settings ..................................................... C-3
D-1
Specifications for Six-Speed CD-ROM Reader .................................................. D-1
xiii
Preface
This service and reference manual for the NEC PowerMate P series of minitower computer
systems contains hardware and interface information for users who need an overview of
system design. The manual also includes system setup information, procedures for installing
options, and illustrated parts lists. The manual is written for NEC-trained customer
engineers, system analysts, service center personnel, and dealers.
The manual is organized as follows:
Section 1 — Technical Information, provides an overview of the system features,
hardware design, interface ports, and internal devices. System specifications are listed
including dimensions, weight, environment, safety compliance, power consumption, and
memory.
Section 2 — Setup and Operation, includes unpacking, setup, and operation information.
Also included are procedures for configuring the system through the Setup utility program,
setting passwords and power management features, and using the BIOS Update utility.
Section 3 — Option Installation, provides installation procedures for adding optional
expansion boards, diskette and hard disk storage devices, system and video memory, and
processor updates.
Section 4 — Maintenance and Troubleshooting, includes recommended maintenance
information and lists possible problems and solutions that apply to computer operation.
Also included are NEC telephone numbers for obtaining service, access to the NEC Bulletin
Board System, and access to the FastFacts™ service.
Section 5 — Disassembly and Reassembly, provides removal and replacement procedures
for the field-replaceable parts in the system unit chassis. Also included is a parts lists and
illustrated parts breakdown (IPB) for the field-replaceable parts.
Appendix A — Connector Pin Assignments, provides a list of the system boards' internal
connector pin assignments and a list of external pin assignments for the keyboard, mouse,
serial ports, parallel port, and video port.
Appendix B — System Board Jumpers, includes information on setting jumpers for
processor upgrades, clearing a password, and clearing CMOS.
Appendix C — Hard Disk Drive Specifications and Jumper Settings, includes
specifications and jumper settings for the system unit’s 1.6-GB and 2-GB hard disks.
Appendix D — CD-ROM Reader Specifications and Jumper Settings, includes
specifications and jumper settings for the system unit’s six-speed CD-ROM reader.
xv
Abbreviations
A
AC
AT
BBS
BCD
BCU
BIOS
bit
BUU
bpi
bps
C
C
Cache
CAM
CAS
CD/ROM
CG
CH
clk
cm
CMOS
COM
CONT
CPGA
CPU
DAC
DACK
DC
DIP
DLAB
DMA
DMAC
DOS
DRAM
ECC
ampere
alternating current
advanced technology (IBM PC)
Bulletin Board System
binary-coded decimal
BIOS Customized Utility
basic input/output system
binary digit
BIOS Upgrade Utility
bits per inch
bits per second
capacitance
centigrade
high-speed buffer storage
constantly addressable memory
column address strobe
compact disk-ROM
character generator
channel
clock
centimeter
complementary metal oxide
semiconductor
communication
contrast
ceramic pin grid array
central processing unit
digital-to-analog converter
DMA acknowledge
direct current
dual in-line package
Divisor Latch Address bit
direct memory access
DMA controller
disk operating system
dynamic RAM
error checking and correction
EGA
EPROM
F
FAX
FCC
FG
FM
FRU
GB
GND
HEX
Hz
IC
ID
IDE
IDTR
in.
INTA
IPB
IRR
ISA
ISR
I/O
IPC
ips
IRQ
K
k
KB
kg
kHz
lb
LED
LSB
M
Enhanced Graphics Adapter
erasable and programmable
ROM
Fahrenheit
facsimile transmission
Federal Communications
Commission
frame ground
frequency modulation
field-replaceable unit
gigabyte
ground
hexadecimal
hertz
integrated circuit
identification
intelligent device electronics
interrupt descriptor table register
inch
interrupt acknowledge
illustrated parts breakdown
Interrupt Request register
Industry Standard Architecture
In Service register
input/output
integrated peripheral controller
inches per second
interrupt request
kilo (1024)
kilo (1000)
kilobyte
kilogram
kilohertz
pound
light-emitting diode
least-significant bit
mega
xvi
Abbreviations
mA
max
MB
MFM
MHz
mm
ms
MSB
NASC
NC
NMI
ns
NSRC
PAL
PC
PCB
PCI
PFP
PIO
pixel
PLCC
PLL
p-p
PPI
PROM
QFP
RAM
RAMDAC
RAS
RGB
RGBI
ROM
rpm
R
RTC
R/W
milliamps
maximum
megabyte
modified frequency modulation
megahertz
millimeter
millisecond
most-significant bit
National Authorized Service
Center
not connected
Non-maskable Interrupt
nanosecond
National Service Response
Center
programmable array logic
personal computer
printed circuit board
Peripheral Component
Interconnect
plastic flat package
parallel input/output
picture element
plastic leaded chip carrier
phase lock loop
peak-to-peak
programmable peripheral
interface
programmable ROM
quad flat pack
random-access memory
RAM digital-to-analog converter
row address strobe
red green blue
red green blue intensity
read-only memory
revolutions per minute
read
real-time clock
read/write
S
SCSI
SG
SIMM
SVGA
SW
TSC
TTL
tpi
V
Vac
Vdc
VESA
VGA
VRAM
W
W
slave
Small Computer System
Interface
signal ground
single inline memory module
Super Video Graphics Array
switch
Technical Support Center
transistor/transistor logic
tracks per inch
volt
volts, alernating current
volts, direct current
video electronics standards
association
Video Graphics Array
video RAM
watt
write
Section 1
Technical Information
The PowerMate P Series Pentium system includes the following configurations:
n PowerMate P150 and P166 hard disk systems (diskette drive, hard disk)
n PowerMate P150 and P166 multimedia systems (diskette drive, hard disk,
six-speed CD-ROM reader, multimedia components).
All systems come standard with an Intel Pentium™ processor (150 MHz or 166 MHz), a 3
1/2-inch diskette drive, 256 kilobyte (KB) synchronous secondary cache, 16-megabytes
(MB) of random access memory (RAM), and 2 MB of video window random access
memory (WRAM). Each system incorporates power management features and has factory
installed software including Microsoft Windows for Workgroups™ or Microsoft® Windows
95™.
The following paragraphs provide an overview of the system.
MINITOWER SYSTEM CHASSIS
The minitower chassis provides an enclosure for the system board, power supply, five
useable expansion slots, a six-connector PCI/ISA backboard, and five storage device slots.
The expansion slots include three 8-/16-bit ISA slots, one shared PCI/ISA slot, and one 32bit PCI slot.
A video board (the Matrox Millennium™ board described in "Graphics Subsystem")
occupies one of the expansion slots to provide graphics and/or video functionality.
The five storage device slots accommodate up to four accessible devices and one internal
hard disk drive device. The accessible devices include the standard one-inch high 3 1/2-inch
1.44-MB diskette drive and up to three 1.6-inch high 5 1/4-inch storage devices. The
internal device slot supports the standard 1-inch by 3 1/2-inch hard disk.
The non-multimedia hard disk systems ship with an accessible 3 1/2-inch diskette drive and
an internal 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive, leaving three accessible 5 1/4-inch storage device
slots available for optional devices. The multimedia systems ship with an accessible 3 1/2inch diskette drive, an internal 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive, and an accessible 5 1/4-inch CDROM reader, leaving two accessible 5 1/4-inch storage device slots.
Figure 1-1 shows the front panel features and the locations of the accessible storage devices
in the system. Multimedia systems come with a six-speed CD-ROM reader installed in the
top accessible device slot.
1-2
Technical Information
Figure 1-1
System Controls and Storage Device Slots
SYSTEM BOARD
Key features of the system board include the following:
n Intel Pentium 150-or 166-MHz Pentium processor, depending on system
configuration
n 16-KB internal dual write-back cache integrated on the processor
n 15 nanosecond (ns), 256-KB synchronous, pipeline burst, write-back, secondary
cache memory
n Intel 82430FX PCI/ISA (Triton) chipset
n system Setup program built into the BIOS
n flash ROM for fast economical BIOS upgrades
n integrated input/output (I/O) controller with keyboard, diskette drive, and hard
disk drive controllers. Supports two serial ports, a parallel port, and an IR port.
n PCI local bus for fast data transfer
n support for Intel processor upgrades
n 16 MB RAM (two 2MB x 32 SIMMs) in multimedia configurations and hard disk
configurations
 supports 32-bit, non-parity, 60-or 70-ns, EDO single-inline memory modules
(SIMMs)
 RAM expandable up to 128 MB
Technical Information
1-3
n graphics subsystem
 standard 2-MB video WRAM on video board, expandable using optional
upgrade modules
 Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Matrox MGA Millennium™
graphical user interface (GUI) accelerator and motion video playback
controller
 standard 2-MB video WRAM supports resolutions of 640 x 480 with up to
256/65K/16.7 million colors, 1024 x 768 with up to 256/65K colors, 1280 x
1024 with up to 256 colors, and 1152 by 882 with up to 256/65K colors
n integrated sound (multimedia configurations only)
 OPTi Sound Blaster compatible chip on system board
 Yamaha OPL3 FM synthesis chip on system board
 built-in 16-bit stereo CODEC
 Wavetable sound upgradeable
 3D sound effects
n two intelligent drive electronics (IDE) interface channels
 one fast IDE/PCI channel (primary connector) used by the hard disk drive to
transfer data at the hard disk's optimum rate
 one standard IDE channel (secondary connector) for the CD-ROM reader
 supports up to four IDE devices, two to each channel
n power management for placing system in power save mode when idle for a
specified amount of time
n 3 1/2-inch, 1.44-MB diskette drive standard in all configurations
n PCI/ISA backboard supporting five expansion slots for I/O devices
 three ISA slots
 one PCI slot
 one shared (ISA/PCI) slot
1-4
Technical Information
n I/O panel contains external connectors for connecting the following external
devices:
 VGA-compatible monitor (standard, super, high-resolution VGA)
 personal system/2 (PS/2®)-style mouse
 Windows 95, 104-key keyboard
 bidirectional Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) and enhanced capabilities port
(ECP) are supported for a parallel printer
 serial devices through two buffered 16C550 UART serial ports, each
supporting up to 19.2 KB per second
 multimedia speakers, microphone, and headphone connectors (multimedia
configurations only)
Table 1-1 lists the major chips on the system board. See Appendix A, Connector Pin
Assignments, for a list of the system board connectors. See Appendix B, System Board
Jumpers, for a description of board jumpers.
Table 1-1
System Board Chips
Chip
Description
P54C (CPGA)
150-MHz Intel Pentium processor
166-MHz Intel Pentium processor
Intel Triton 82430FX PCI/ISA Chip Set
System controller
82437FX
Data path unit
82438FX
PCI ISA/IDE accelerator bridge chip
824371FB
SMC FDC37C665IR
Integrated Plug and Play Ultra I/O controller
28F001
128k x 8 Flash ROM
Dallas DS12887 compatible battery
Real-time clock/battery
OPTi 82C930 Sound Chip (multimedia Onboard PC sound system
systems only)
Yamaha OPL3-L Synthesizer Chip
(multimedia systems only)
Frequency modulated synthesizer
NOTE: The PCI GUI graphics controller is on the video board (see "Graphics Subsystem".
Technical Information
1-5
Processor
The PowerMate P series of computers use the following Pentium processors:
n PowerMate P150 — 150-MHz processor with an internal speed of 150 MHz and
an external speed of 60 MHz.
n PowerMate P166 — 166-MHz processor with an internal speed of 160 MHz and
an external speed of 66 MHz
Each processor has 16 KB of write-back primary cache and a math coprocessor. The 16 KB
primary cache provides 8 KB for instructions and 8 KB for data.
The processor is an advanced pipelined 32-bit addressing, 64-bit data processor designed to
optimize multitasking operating systems. The 64-bit registers and data paths support 64-bit
addresses and data types.
To use the Pentium processor’s power, the system features an optimized 64-bit memory
interface and complementary synchronous pipelined 256-KB secondary cache.
The processor is compatible with 8-, 16-, and 32-bit software written for the Intel386™,
Intel486™, and Pentium processors.
To accommodate future technologies and work requirements, the Pentium processor comes
in a 320-pin zero insertion force (ZIF) socket. The socket provides an upgrade path to the
next generation processor.
Secondary Cache
The system board contains 256 KB of secondary cache, external to the processor. The
cache uses 15-ns SRAM that allows data to be sent or received from the cache with one
wait state burst. Cache memory improves read performance by holding copies of code and
data that are frequently requested from the system memory by the processor. Cache
memory is not considered part of the expansion memory.
The cache is connected directly to the processor address bus and uses physical addresses. A
bus feature known as burst enables fast cache fills. Memory areas (pages) can be designated
as cacheable or non-cacheable by software. The cache can also be enabled and disabled by
software.
The write strategy of the cache (primary and secondary) is write-back. If the write is a
cache hit, an external bus cycle is not generated and information is written to the cache. The
system caches the following regions:
n all system memory, including 0 to 640 KB and all memory present above 1 MB
(see the following subsection for a system memory map).
n system and integrated video controller in BIOS
1-6
Technical Information
Non-cacheable portions of memory are defined by software (see the following subsection
for a system memory map). The system does not cache the following regions:
n video text memory block from A0000 to BFFFF
n PCI memory space on top of main memory to 4 GB
n any access to the PCI or AT bus
The cache can be cleared by software instructions.
System and Video BIOS
The system and video BIOS are stored in a 1 MB (128 KB by 8) flash memory device
(Flash ROM). The system BIOS uses 64 KB, the video BIOS uses 32 KB, and 32 KB is
reserved. The system BIOS is capable of being shadowed and cached through the system's
Setup utility (see Section 2 for Setup information). System BIOS is write protected and
automatically enabled.
The BIOS programs execute the Power-On Self-Test, initialize processor controllers, and
interact with the display, diskette drives, hard disks, communication devices, and
peripherals. The system BIOS also contains the Setup utility. The hardware setup default
copies the ROM BIOS into RAM (shadowing) for maximum performance.
The Flash ROM allows the system and video BIOS to be upgraded with the BIOS Update
utility, without removing the ROM (see Section 2 for further information on the BIOS
Update utility). The Flash ROM supports the reprogramming of the system BIOS and the
video BIOS.
The system memory map in shown in Table 1-2.
Table 1-2
System Memory Map
Memory Space
Size
To
Function
FFF80000-FFFFFFFF
512 KB
4 GB
04000000-07FFFFFF
64 KB
128 MB
01000000-03FFFFFF
48 KB
64 MB
Always cacheable
00F00000-00FFFFFF
1 MB
16 MB
Optional memory space gap
00100000-00EFFFFF
14 MB
15 MB
Cacheable
000F0000-000FFFFF
64 MB
1KB
000C8000-000EFFFF
160 KB
960 KB
Expansion region (shadowed in DRAM)
000C0000-000C7FFF
32 KB
800 KB
Video BIOS (shadowed in DRAM
000A0000-000BFFFF
128 KB
768 KB
Video buffer (SMM space non-cacheable)
BIOS ROM
Second level cache (non-cacheable)
First level cache (cacheable)
System BIOS (shadowed in DRAM)
Technical Information
Table 1-2
Memory Space
Size
1-7
System Memory Map
To
Function
00080000-0009FFFF
128 KB
640 KB
Optional memory space gap (DOS
applications)
00000000-0007FFFF
512 KB
512 KB
DOS applications (no read/write protect;
always cacheable)
Power Management
Each system incorporates power management features that lower power consumption when
there is no activity detected from the keyboard, mouse, diskette drive, CD-ROM reader, or
hard disk drive after a pre-defined period of time. As soon as activity is detected the system
resumes where it left off.
With Power Management enabled (shipped enabled), the system automatically activates the
power-saving features and enters a suspend mode whenever inactivity is sensed. The
system's power-saving functions are as follows.
n Reduces CPU clock speed
The CPU, cache, and video clock speeds are reduced, putting the system in the
suspend mode.
n Blanks out the monitor
Puts the video controller into suspend mode. The vertical sync clock and blank
signals to the monitor are disabled.
n Forces the IDE devices into stand-by mode
A suspend command is sent to the IDE devices which put the devices into a
stand-by mode.
I/O Addressing
The processor communicates with I/O devices by I/O mapping. The hexadecimal (hex)
addresses of I/O devices are listed in Table 1-3.
1-8
Technical Information
Table 1-3
Address (Hex)
I/O Address Map
I/O Device Name
0000-000F
DMA controller 1 (channel 0-3)
0020-0021
Interrupt controller 1
0040-0043
Timer 1
0048-004B
Timer 2
0060
Keyboard controller data byte
0061
NMI status and speaker control
0064
Keyboard controller command/status byte
0070-007F
Real-time clock, NMI mask
0080-008F
DMA page registers
00A0-00A1
Interrupt controller 2
00C-00DE
DMA controller 2
00E0-00EF
Reserved
00F0
Clear math coprocessor error
00F1
Reset math coprocessor
0F8-0FF
Math coprocessor
170-177
Hard disk controller (secondary IDE channel)
1F0-1F7
Hard disk controller (primary IDE channel)
200, 202, 207
Game I/O
220-22F
Sound port
238-23F
Serial port 4 (used for remapping)
278-27F
Parallel port 2
2B0-2DF
Alternate EGA adapter
2F8-2FF
Serial port 2
338-33F
Serial port 3 (used for remapping)
370-375
Diskette drive controller (secondary address)
376
Secondary IDE channel command port
377
Secondary IDE channel status port
378-37F
Parallel port 1
3B0-3BF
Mono display and printer adapter
3C0-3CF
EGA adapter
3D0-3DF
CGA adapter
3F0-3F5, 3F7
Diskette controller (primary channel)
Technical Information
Table 1-3
Address (Hex)
1-9
I/O Address Map
I/O Device Name
0000-000F
DMA controller 1 (channel 0-3)
0020-0021
Interrupt controller 1
0040-0043
Timer 1
0048-004B
Timer 2
3F8-3FF
Serial port 1
CF8-CFF
PCI configuration space
System Memory
All systems come standard with 16 MB of EDO memory: 640 KB of base memory and 15
MB of extended memory. System memory can be expanded up to 128 MB, using optional
single in-line memory modules (SIMMs) installed in SIMM sockets on the system board.
Four SIMM sockets are integrated on the system board. The multimedia and 1.2-/2.0-GB
hard disk configurations ship with two 2 MB x 32 SIMMs) (16 MB total) installed in two
sockets.
The SIMM memory sockets accept 32-bit (non-parity) 4-, 8-, 16-, or 32-MB 60 ns or 70 ns
SIMMs. The SIMMs are 1 MB x 32 bit (4 MB), 2 MB x 32 bit (8 MB), 4 MB x 32 bit (16
MB), and 8 MB x 32 bit (32 MB). When the standard SIMMs are removed, four 32-MB
SIMMs may be installed for a total of 128 MB.
CAUTION: SIMMs must match the tin metal
plating used on the system board SIMM sockets.
When adding SIMMs, use tin-plated SIMMs.
SIMMs install directly in the four sockets on the system board. The four sockets are
assigned as SIMM 1 through SIMM 4. The two standard 8 MB SIMMs are installed in
SIMM 1 and SIMM 2. SIMMs must be installed in pairs of the same memory type. Jumpers
are not required to set memory size or type as the system BIOS automatically detects the
SIMMs. SIMM banks 1 and 2 must always be filled for the system to operate. Table 1-4
shows the SIMM memory upgrade path.
1-10
Technical Information
Table 1-4
Total Memory
SIMM Memory Upgrade Path
SIMM 1
SIMM 2
SIMM 3
SIMM 4
8 MB
4 MB
4 MB
Empty
Empty
16 MB
4 MB
4 MB
4 MB
4 MB
16 MB
8 MB
8 MB
Empty
Empty
24 MB
4 MB
4 MB
8 MB
8 MB
24 MB
8 MB
8 MB
4 MB
4 MB
32 MB
8 MB
8 MB
8 MB
8 MB
32 MB
16 MB
16 MB
Empty
Empty
40 MB
4 MB
4 MB
16 MB
16 MB
40 MB
16 MB
16 MB
4 MB
4 MB
48 MB
8 MB
8 MB
16 MB
16 MB
48 MB
16 MB
16 MB
8 MB
8 MB
64 MB
16 MB
16 MB
16 MB
16 MB
64 MB
32 MB
32 MB
Empty
Empty
72 MB
4 MB
4 MB
32 MB
32 MB
72 MB
32 MB
32 MB
4 MB
4 MB
80 MB
8 MB
8 MB
32 MB
32 MB
80 MB
32 MB
32 MB
8 MB
8 MB
96 MB
16 MB
16 MB
32 MB
32 MB
96 MB
32 MB
32 MB
16 MB
16 MB
128 MB
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
Interrupt Controller
The interrupt controller operates as an interrupt manager for the entire AT system
environment. The controller accepts requests from peripherals, issues interrupt requests to
the processor, resolves interrupt priorities, and provides vectors for the processor to
determine which interrupt routine to execute. The interrupt controller has priority
assignment modes that can be reconfigured at any time during system operations.
The interrupt levels are described in Table 1-5. Interrupt-level assignments 0 through 15 are
in order of decreasing priority. See Section 2, Setup and Operation, for information on
changing the interrupts using Setup.
Technical Information
Table 1-5
Interrupt Priority
1-11
Interrupt Level Assignments
Interrupt Device
IRQ00
Counter/Timer
IRQ01
Keyboard
IRQ02
Cascade (INT output from slave)
IRQ03
COM2 and COM4
IRQ04
COM1 and COM3
IRQ05
Parallel Port 2/Audio (if present)
IRQ06
Diskette Drive Controller
IRQ07
Parallel Port 1
IRQ08
Real-time clock
IRQ09
Audio (if present)
IRQ10
Available
IRQ11
Matrox Video Controller
IRQ12
PS/2 mouse
IRQ13
Coprocessor
IRQ14
Primary IDE
IRQ15
Secondary IDE
Graphics Subsystem
The system unit has a Matrox MGA Millennium motion video controller and graphics
accelerator integrated on the video board. The video board plugs into the PCI backplane.
State of the art techniques are used for optimizing performance in computer graphic
intensive applications and graphical user interfaces (GUI).
The integrated graphics controller integrates a motion video controller, a high-performance
GUI accelerator, 24-bit high frequency DAC and clock generator, VESA®-compliant
feature connector, and 2 MB of fast 64-bit WRAM (expandable using optional upgrade
modules).
Motion Video Controller
The motion video controller integrates a powerful Windows® GUI engine and unique
motion video playback hardware for superior performance. The graphics engine includes an
on-chip color space converter to accelerate decompression and a hardware scaler to scale
continuously from native size up to full screen at full speed. The graphics engine delivers a
full screen, smooth display of motion video data up to 30 frames per second (fps). Support
includes MPEG-1 and Video for Windows®.
1-12
Technical Information
MPEG is a compression/decompression standard developed by the Motion Picture Experts
Group. MPEG produces full-screen 30 fps, broadcast-quality digital video. The video
controller architecture maximizes the motion video performance and removes bandwidth
bottlenecks to display multimedia data at its full speed.
Graphics Accelerator
The graphics accelerator is specifically designed for graphics-intensive operations, text and
color pixel amplification, and scrolling. The graphics accelerator provides 64-bit, ultra-high
performance for demanding True Color, High Color, and pseudocolor GUI and CAD
applications.
The accelerator minimizes bus traffic by off-loading the tasks normally performed by the
processor. The dedicated bit-block transfers (BitBLT) engine maximizes performance by
speeding the movement of large blocks of image data in video memory.
Video Memory
The system comes with 2 MB of on-board video WRAM, upgradeable to 8 MB. The
standard 2 MB WRAM consists of two devices soldered to the system board. The optional
2 MB or 6 MB of WRAM is mounted on a daughter card that installs in two sockets on the
video board. You can install one or the other type card (2-MB or 6-MB).
With the standard 2 MB of video WRAM, the video hardware supports the following
resolutions, colors, and refresh rates:
n 1600 by 1200 pixels, 256 colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-78 Hz and a horizontal
refresh rate of 76-96 Kz
n 1280 by 1024 pixels, 256 colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-110 Hz and a
horizontal refresh rate of 63-107 Kz
n 1152 by 882 pixels, 256/16.5K colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-120 Hz and a
horizontal refresh rate of 54-110 Kz
n 1024 by 768 pixels, 256/65K colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-120 Hz and a
horizontal refresh rate of 48-104 Kz
n 640 by 480 pixels, 256/65K/16.7 million colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-200 Hz
and a horizontal refresh rate of 32-100 Kz.
Technical Information
1-13
With 4 MB or 8 MB of video WRAM, the system supports the following additional
resolutions, colors, and refresh rates:
n 1600 by 1200 pixels, 256/16.5K colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-78 Hz and a
horizontal refresh rate of 76-96 Kz
n 1280 by 1024 pixels, 256/65K/16.7 million colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-110
Hz and a horizontal refresh rate of 63-107 Kz
n 1152 by 882 pixels, 256/16.5K/16.7 million colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-120
Hz and a horizontal refresh rate of 54-110 Kz
n 1024 by 768 pixels, 256/65K/16.7 million colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-120
Hz and a horizontal refresh rate of 48-104 Kz
n 640 by 480 pixels, 256/65K/16.7 million colors, vertical refresh rate of 60-200 Hz
and a horizontal refresh rate of 32-100 Kz.
ISA Bus
The system board uses the ISA bus for transferring data between the processor and I/O
peripherals and expansion boards. The ISA bus supports 16-bit data transfers and typically
operates at 8 MHz. ISA expansion slot connector pin assignments are provided in Appendix
A.
PCI Local Bus
The 32-bit PCI-bus is the primary I/O bus for the system. The PCI-bus is a highly-integrated
I/O interface that offers the highest performance local bus available for the Pentium
processor. The bus supports burst modes that send large chunks of data across the bus,
allowing fast displays of high-resolution images.
The PCI-bus operates at half the Pentium's processor speed, and supports memory transfer
rates of up to 105 MB per second for reads and up to 120 MB per second for writes,
depending on processor configuration.
The high-bandwidth PCI-bus eliminates the data bottleneck found in traditional systems,
maintains maximum performance at high clock speeds, and provides a clear upgrade path to
future technologies.
The PCI bus contains two embedded PCI devices, the PCI local bus IDE interface and the
PCI video/graphics controller.
PCI expansion slot connector pin assignments are provided in Appendix A.
1-14
Technical Information
PCI/IDE Ports
The system board provides two high-performance PCI/IDE ports: a primary channel and a
secondary channel. Each port supports up to two devices for a total of four IDE devices.
The primary PCI/IDE port has an enhanced IDE interface which supports 11.1 MB per
second 32-bit wide data transfers on the high-performance PCI local bus. The installed hard
disk drive is connected to the primary PCI/IDE port. The installed CD-ROM reader
(multimedia systems only) is connected to the secondary PCI/IDE port. Both devices are
configured as “masters” off the IDE controller.
Parallel Interface
The system has a 25-pin parallel bidirectional enhanced parallel port on the system board.
Port specifications conform to the IBM-PC standards. The port supports Enhanced
Capabilities Port (ECP) and Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) modes for devices that require
ECP or EPP protocols. The protocols allow high-speed bidirectional transfer over a parallel
port and increase parallel port functionality by supporting more devices.
The BIOS has automatic ISA printer port sensing. If the BIOS detects an ISA printer port
mapped to the same address, the built-in printer port is disabled. The BIOS also sets the
first parallel interface port it finds as LPT1 and the second port it finds as LPT2. The
interrupt is selected to either IRQ5 or IRQ7 via Setup. Software selectable base addresses
are 3BCh, 378h, and 278h.
I/O addresses and interrupts for the parallel port are given in Table 1-6.
NOTE: Any interrupts used for the built-in
parallel port are not available for ISA parallel
ports.
Technical Information
Table 1-6
1-15
Parallel Port Addressing and Interrupts
Starting I/O Address
Interrupt Level
Port
378
IRQ05
LPT1
278
IRQ05
LPT1 or LPT2
3BC
IRQ05
LPT1 or LPT2
378
IRQ07
LPT1
278
IRQ07
LPT1 or LPT2
3BC
IRQ07
LPT1 or LPT2
Parallel interface signals are output through the system board's 25-pin, D-subconnector. The
connector is located at the rear of the system unit. Pin locations for the parallel interface
connector are given in Appendix A.
Serial Interface
The system has two 16C550 UART compatible serial ports (COM1 and COM2) integrated
on the I/O controller. The serial ports support the standard RS-232C interface and the IR
interface (see Table 1-7). The buffered high-speed serial ports supports transfer rates up to
19.2 KB. These ports allow the installation of high-speed serial devices for faster data
transfer rates.
I/O addresses and interrupt levels for the two channels are given Table 1-7. The interrupt
level is selectable via Setup to either IRQ3 or IRQ4. Software selectable base addresses are
3F8h, 2F8h, 3E8h, and 2E8h.
NOTE: Any interrupts used for the built-in
serial ports are not available for ISA parallel
ports.
Table 1-7
Serial Port Addressing and Interrupts
Starting I/O Address
Interrupt Level
Port
3F8h
IRQ04
COM1*
2F8h
IRQ03
COM2**
3E8h
IRQ04
COM3
2E8h
IRQ03
COM4
* Disabled if fax/modem installed
** Used for IrDA data transfer
1-16
Technical Information
Note that the COM2 port is factory set for IrDA data transfer and must be reset to
"Standard" for serial port transfers. See Section 2, Setup and Operation, for information on
resetting the port through Setup.
Serial interface specifications include:
n Baud rate up to 19.2 KB per second
n Word length - 5, 6, 7, or 8 bits
n Stop bit - 1, 1.5, or 2 bits
n Start bit - 1 bit
n Parity bit - 1 bit (odd parity or even parity).
Serial interface signals are output through the system board's 9-pin, D-subconnector. The
connectors are located at the rear of the system unit. Pin locations for the serial interface
connector are shown in Appendix A.
Infrared Interface
The I/O controller incorporates an infrared interface that provides two-way wireless
communication through the IR window (port) on the front of the system. The interface uses
infrared as the transmission medium instead of a traditional serial cable.
The IR port permits transfer of files to or from portable devices such as laptops and
personal digital assistant (PDA) products using the pre-installed Puma TranXit applications
software or other software supporting IrDA data transfer. The port supports data transfers
at 115 Kbps from a distance of 1 meter (3 feet 3 inches).
The IR port uses the system's COM2 serial port to transfer data. The port shares registers
and function logic with COM2.
POWER SUPPLY
The power supply is mounted inside the system unit. It supplies power to the system board,
option boards, diskette drives, hard disks, keyboard, and mouse. A fan inside the power
supply provides system ventilation. The power supply provides 200 watts. Connector
locations are in Appendix A.
DISKETTE DRIVE
Up to two diskette drives are supported in the system. The installed 3 1/2-inch diskette
drive is connected by a single ribbon cable with two drive connectors. The diskette drive
cable plugs directly into the system board. Connector locations are given in Appendix A.
Technical Information
1-17
HARD DISK DRIVE
Up to four IDE hard drives are supported in the system. The system board has two
IDE/PCI interface connectors (primary and secondary) for connecting various storage
devices such as hard disk drives. Each connector supports up to two IDE devices.
Hard disk systems ship with one internal 3 1/2-inch hard disk (1-inch high, thin-height)
installed behind the front panel, at the bottom of the chassis. The three-connector drive
cable plugs into the primary (fast) connector on the system board. An optional second hard
drive can be connected to the cable.
KEYBOARD
A Windows 95 104 key keyboard is standard equipment for the system. The keyboard
provides a numeric keypad, separate cursor control keys, and 12 function keys, capable of
up to 48 functions. Status lamps on the keyboard indicate: Num (Numeric) Lock, Caps
(Capital) Lock, and Scroll Lock key status. The keyboard's six-pin connector plugs into the
rear of the system. The keyboard connector pin assignments are given in Appendix A.
1-18
Technical Information
MOUSE
A PS/2-compatible mouse is standard equipment for the system. The mouse has a selfcleaning mechanism that prevents a buildup of dust or lint around the mouse ball and
tracking mechanism. The mouse's six-pin connector plugs into the rear of the system. The
mouse connector pin assignments are given in Appendix A.
MULTIMEDIA COMPONENTS
Systems configured for multimedia come with audio integrated on the system board, a sixspeed CD-ROM reader, a 20-watt speaker set, and a microphone. The following briefly
describes each. Information on setting up and operating the speakers, microphone, and
CD-ROM reader is in Section 2, Setup and Operation.
Integrated Audio
Multimedia systems come with audio components integrated on the system board. Nonmultimedia systems do not have the audio components on the system board. The audio
components include an OPTi 82C930 Sound Blaster-compatible chip, a Yamaha OPL3 FM
synthesizer chip, and an SRS Labs Sound Retrieval System®. The system's integrated audio
features the following:
n built-in 16-bit 128x oversampling Sigma-Delta Stereo Codec with 85dB S/N ratio
n built-in five-channel 16/32 step MPC compatible stereo mixer with master volume
and sample rates up to 48 Hz stereo
n dual DMA channel and built-in FIFOs for full duplex simultaneous playback and
record in 16-bit stereo
n WaveBlaster upgradeable for Wavetable synthesis
n 3D sound effects
n 20 voice FM synthesis.
The integrated components are compatible with the Sound Blaster™ board and the
Microsoft® Windows Sound System™ board. The components work with the pre-installed
Voyetra Multimedia Sound software.
Six-Speed CD-ROM
The IDE six-speed CD-ROM reader is pre-installed as drive E on multimedia
configurations. The reader can be used to load programs from a CD or it can be used to
play audio CDs. The reader operates at different speeds depending on whether the CD
contains music or data. The reader is fully compatible with Kodak Multisession Photo
CDs™ and standard CDs. The reader is connected to the secondary IDE/PCI port.
Technical Information
1-19
Speakers
The multimedia systems come with 20 watt, high-quality stereo speaker set, an AC adapter,
and connecting wires. The speaker set features a volume control, base and treble controls,
power on/off switch, power lamp, and a headphone jack. Volume is controlled from the
speaker or from the preinstalled sound system software provided with the Voyetra
application program. The speaker set connects to the speaker line out jack on the back of
the system.
Microphone
The microphone that comes with the multimedia systems allows recording of voice and
sound into computer data files. The microphone connects to the MIC jack located on the
back of the system. The microphone works in conjunction with the Voyetra application
program.
PLUG AND PLAY
The system comes with a Plug and Play BIOS which supports Plug and Play technology.
Plug and Play eliminates complicated setup procedures for installing Plug and Play
expansion boards. With Plug and Play, adding a Plug and Play expansion board is done by
turning off the system, installing the board, and turning on the system. There are no jumpers
to set and no system resource conflicts to resolve. Plug and Play automatically configures
the board.
POWER MANAGEMENT
Each system comes with the power-saving features enabled. If the keyboard, mouse, or
drives are not used after 15 minutes, the screen goes blank and the system goes into a
partial power shutdown. A blinking power lamp indicates that the system is in the powersaving mode. As soon as activity is detected, the system resumes where it left off.
The system can be manually put into a Suspend power-saving mode by pressing the suspend
button. The Suspend mode provides the greatest power savings by putting the system in
maximum power shutdown. When the system goes into Suspend mode, it saves data and
system status and then shuts off power to all possible components. A blinking power lamp
indicates that the system is in the power-saving mode. As soon as activity is detected, the
system resumes where it left off.
The amount of inactive time is adjustable. Power management can also be disabled. Both
can be set through Setup.
1-20
Technical Information
DESKTOP MANAGEMENT INTERFACE
The Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is the new standard for managing computer
systems. DMI is an interface between management applications and managed components
such as systems, network boards, and printers.
With DMI, a management application (such as Hewlett Packard’s Openview), provides a
simplified method to collect information from different vendors computers operating on the
network.
DMI is not a protocol but an interface that complements network protocols like the Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
DMI Components
The NEC DMI consists of two major functional components:
n the Component Interface (CI) module
n Windows Management Information Format (MIF) Browser.
The CI module provides the instrumentation and interface between the BIOS and the DMI
Service Layer (SL). The DMI Browser displays and manages existing attributes in the
Management Information Format (MIF) database. The Desktop Management Task Force
(DMTF) provides the DOS Service Layer, Windows Service Layer, and MIF database
structure.
Manageable Products
Manageable components are hardware, software, and peripherals installed or attached to a
desktop computer or network server. These include hard disks, word processors, CDROMs, printers, operating systems, graphics boards, modems, etc. Manageable components
can come with the system or be added later. Each component supplies information to the
MIF database that contains the component's pertinent management information.
Each component may or may not include an instrumentation module in order to provide
real-time support.
CI Module
The Component Interface Module is a Windows program that provides access to your
system and its components. It runs minimized in Windows and should only be canceled if
you are uninstalling DMI.
CI module is comprised of programs written by the component manufacturer to provide
real-time attribute values to the network Service Layer as requested.
Technical Information
1-21
DMI Browser
The NEC DMI Browser is a Windows application provided by NEC Technologies, Inc. The
Browser uses the Management Interface (MI) to provide access to MIF attributes and their
respective values. The Browser has the ability to set attributes and manage DMI
components.
The NEC Browser can only access the local MIF database. The Browser lets you access
MIF attributes according to the structure defined by the DMTF. It is not intended to be a
general PC management application. If a more comprehensive management application is
desired, use a product such as Intel's LANDesk Manager™.
The NEC DMI Browser has two sections: an Overview and a Detailed View. The Overview
displays pertinent information on the system. In addition, you can click on each of eight
buttons provided to obtain more information on each subject. The organization of the data
in the Overview presents a comprehensive view of the system.
To display the Detailed View, select either the Detail tab or the Detail option on the View
menu. This initiates a hierarchical view of the MIF database and allows the user to make
some changes. For example, if a system is transferred to another department or user, the
primary user name, telephone number and system location can be updated.
In the Browser, components and groups are expanded or collapsed by selecting the desired
object and double clicking. You can also use the toolbar to access information in the MIF
file.
The Browser provides seven buttons (Windows for Workgroups, only) in the toolbar which
are defined as follows:
n Expand  to expand a component.
n Collapse  to collapse a component.
n View Component Detail  to review the selected component's details.
n View Group Detail  to review the selected group’s details.
n View Attribute Detail  to review the selected attribute’s details.
n DMI Browser Information  to display program information, version number,
and copyright.
n Help  to display help information for clicked toolbar, buttons, and menus.
The Browser provides five buttons (Windows 95) in the toolbar which are defined as
follows:
n Overview  to switch to Overview screen.
n Detailed View  to switch to Detailed View screen.
1-22
Technical Information
n Print  to print.
n DMI Browser Information  to display program information, version number,
and copyright.
n Help  to display help information for clicked toolbar, buttons, and menus.
Upon exiting the Browser, the program saves the current viewing configuration. The next
time you use the Browser, it restores all the viewing screens to the last known position.
Usage
To start the NEC DMI Viewer, simply double click on the NEC DMI icon in the NEC
Tools group in Windows.
The initial display contains the system serial number, model number, asset tag number,
processor information, serial and parallel ports and their status, video information, HDD
information, and memory information. Click on any of the buttons to display even more
information on the eight topics.
The service topic option invokes the Windows utility SYSEDIT. This utility displays all of
the important system files.
CAUTION: Using the SYSEDIT utility can put
either the system or Windows into a state where
it cannot operate. If you are not familiar with the
use of these files and their maintenance, do not
make any changes.
If trouble is experienced in using the NEC DMI Browser, here are a few suggestions on
how to clear up the problem.
Reboot the system after installation, otherwise you may have problems running the NEC
DMI Browser.
If the product name, serial number, system boot time, or other attribute returns a N/A,
check the following:
n Look at the AUTOEXEC.BAT file to see if the line
DMIDIR%\WIN16\BIN\NECDMI.EXE is present.
n Make sure the file NECDMI.DAT is located in the DMIDIR%\WIN16\BIN
subdirectory.
n Check that NECCI.EXE is running.
Technical Information
1-23
SPECIFICATIONS
System specifications are included in Table 1-8.
Table 1-8
Item
Dimensions and
Weight
Specifications
Specification
Width: 8 inches (20.32 cm)
Depth: 16 inches (40.64 cm)
Height: 14 inches (35.56 cm)
Weight: 26 lb (11.78 kg) (dependent upon options)
Keyboard Dimensions and
Weight:
Width: 19.0 inches (48.3 cm)
Depth: 8.4 inches (21.3 cm)
Height: 1.6 inches (4.1 cm)
Weight: 3.5 to 4.0 lb. (1.6 to 1.8 kg)
Device Slots
Three 1.6 inch x 5 1/4-inch, front accessible slots
One 1 inch x 3 1/2-inch front access slot
One 1 inch x 3 1/2-inch internal slot
Two 1.6 inch x 3 1/2-inch internal slots
Expansion Slots
Five slots
three 16-bit ISA slots
one ISA/PCI shared slot
one PCI slot
Peripheral Interface
PS/2-style keyboard connector, rear panel
PS/2-style mouse connector, rear panel
Two RS-232C serial ports, rear panel
Parallel printer port, rear panel
Audio connector, rear panel (audio systems only)
VGA connector on video board (mounted in expansion slot)
Front Panel
Power button
Power indicator lamp
Hard disk drive busy indicator lamp
Suspend button
Reset button
Processor
Intel Pentium 150- or 166-MHz (dependent on system)
Cache Memory
16 KB of primary cache (8 KB data, 8 KB instruction) integrated in
the processor, 256 KB secondary cache
Flash ROM
128 KB (28F001) Flash ROM
Chip Set
Intel Triton 82430FX PCI/ISA Chip set
System Memory
16-MB standard, expandable to 128 MB using SIMM sockets
Optional SIMMs
4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-MB; 32-bit, non-parity, 70-ns SIMMs
1-24
Technical Information
Table 1-8
Item
Specifications
Specification
Integrated Graphics
Matrox MGA Millennium PCI GUI Accelerator and Motion Video
Playback Controller
PCI-Bus Video
2-MB video WRAM standard, expandable to 4 or 8 MB
Maximum resolution 1600 x 1200 pixels
Battery
Real-time clock/battery module
Power Supply
200 Watt, 115 V/230V switch selectable (minitower)
CD-ROM Reader
Standard in multimedia systems
Six speed
Disc format: ISO 9660, High Sierra Group, Multisession Kodak
Photo CD, CD-ROM XA, Mode 1 and 2, CD-i FMV*, Video CD
Ready, CD-DA, CD-Plus, MPC III
Data transfer rate: 900 KB/sec
Average access time: 160 ms
Burst transfer: 11.11 MB/sec (PIO Mode 3), 13.3 MB/sec DMA
Mode 1)
Cache buffer memory 256 KB
System compatibility: MS-DOS, Windows 95/3.1/NT 3.5
Disk loading method: Motorized tray loading/unloading
Tray control: Software, Panel button, or Emergency Manual Eject
Error rate: 10E-9 (ECC off), 10E-12 (ECC on)
Reliability MTBF: 125,000 POH
Size (without front bezel): Standard 5.25 Inch Half Height
5.7” (W) x 7.44” (D) x 1.63” (H) (146mm x 189mm x 41mm
Power requirements: DC +12V, +5%, DC +5V +5%
Integrated Sound
Standard in multimedia systems
OPTi 82C930 Sound Blaster compatible
Yamaha OPL3 FM Synthesis
SRS Labs 3D sound solution
16-bit 128x oversampling sigma-delta stereo CODEC with 85 dB
S/N ratio
Built-in 5-channel 16/32 step multimedia PC (MPC) compatible
stereo mixer with master volume and sample rates up to 48 KHz
stereo
Stereo jacks for microphone: line in and line out
Wave Blaster upgradeable for wavetable synthesis
Built-in MPU-401 MIDI and game port interface
Technical Information
Table 1-8
Item
Speakers (Mli™ 691H Hi-Fi
Sound Monitor)
Administrative Compliance
1-25
Specifications
Specification
Standard in multimedia systems
Magnetically shielded
20-watt RMS power output
Power on indicator, volume control, treble and base tone control
Headphone jack
AC adapter (120V to +15V, -15V)
Built-in stereo amplifier
2-way speaker system
2-in. tweeter
4-in. woofer
Subwoofer output jack
External DC jack
Dimensions:
Depth:
5 in (12.7 cm)
Width:
4.5 in. (11.5 cm)
Height:
11 in. (28 cm)
UL 1950 - safety
CSA C22.2 No. 950-m89
TUV EN60950: 1988
FCC part 15, Subpart J, Class B - emissions
FCC part 68
C.R.C., c.1374
IEC 950 - safety
VDE 0871/6.78, Class B - emissions
Section 2
Setup and Operation
This section provides information on hardware setup and operation for the PowerMate P
series systems. Setup includes unpacking, setting up, and powering on the system. It also
includes information for configuring the system with the setup program, using the NEC
bulletin board service, and running the BIOS update utility. Setting system board jumpers is
described in Appendix B, System Board Jumpers.
UNPACKING AND REPACKING
Find an area away from devices that generate magnetic fields (electric motors, transformers,
etc.). Place the carton on a sturdy surface, and carefully unpack the system. The carton
contents for non-multimedia configurations include the system unit, keyboard, mouse,
power cord, user documentation, and system recovery diskette. The carton contents for
multimedia configurations include the system unit with a six-speed CD-ROM player,
keyboard, mouse, speakers, power cord, user documentation, and system recovery diskette.
Repack the system using the original shipping carton and packing material. Part numbers for
replacement shipping cartons and packing material are included in Section 4, Illustrated
Parts Breakdown.
SETUP
Set up the PowerMate system by making the following connections.
1. Set the voltage selector switch to 115V (U.S. and Canada) or 230V and plug the
power cord into the power socket (see Figure Section 2-1).
NOTE: The correct AC input voltage must be
properly set. Select the appropriate voltage with
the voltage selector switch located at the rear of
the system.
2-2
Setup and Operation
Figure Section 2-1
Voltage Selector Switch
2. Connect the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and printer cables to the back of the
system (see Figure Section 2-2).
Figure Section 2-2
Peripheral Connections
Setup and Operation
2-3
3. If installing a multimedia system, connect the speakers as follows.
n
Locate the speaker with the control knobs. This is the right speaker.
n
Identify the cables that came with your speakers (see Figure Section 2-3). The
left speaker cable has a black connector on each end. The other cable is a Ycable. The Y-cable has a red and white connector at one end and a black
connector with two rings on the other end.
Figure Section 2-3
n
Speaker Cables
Attach the left speaker cable (with the black connectors at each end) to the
speaker as follows (see Figure Section 2-4).
 Insert one end of the speaker cable into the jack marked "LEFT SPEAKER
INPUT" on the back of the left speaker.
 Insert the other end of the speaker cable into the jack marked "L
SPEAKER OUTPUT" on the back of the right speaker.
2-4
Setup and Operation
Figure Section 2-4
n
Connecting the left speaker cable
Attach the Y-cable as follows (see Figure Section 2-5).
 Insert the red connector into the red jack marked "RIGHT LINE IN" on
the back of the right speaker.
 Insert the white connector into the white jack marked "LEFT LINE IN" on
the back of the right speaker.
 Insert the other end of the cable into the Line Out jack on the rear of the
system unit.
Setup and Operation
Figure Section 2-5
n
Connecting the Y-cable
Locate the AC adapter (see Figure Section 2-6).
 Plug the AC adapter into the jack marked "+15 DC" on the back of the
right speaker.
 Plug the other end of the cable into a properly grounded wall outlet.
Figure Section 2-6
Connecting the AC adapter
2-5
2-6
Setup and Operation
n
To operate your speakers, turn on your system.
 Push the power button on the front of the right speaker.
 Turn on your audio source.
 Adjust the volume by turning the volume control on the front of the right
speaker.
 Adjust the bass and treble controls on the front of the right speaker to the
desired levels.
NOTE: Headphones can be connected to the
jack in the front of the right speakers.
4. Assemble and connect the microphone (multimedia systems only) as follows.
n
Insert the microphone holder into the slot in the microphone stand (see Figure
Section 2-7). Push the holder all the way into the slot.
Figure Section 2-7
n
Inserting the microphone holder into the stand
Insert the microphone into the holder as follows (see Figure Section 2-8):
 Place the microphone cable into the slot in the microphone holder.
 Slide the microphone into the holder.
Setup and Operation
Figure Section 2-8
n
Inserting the microphone into the holder
Adjust your microphone by pivoting it up and down and side to side (see
Figure Section 2-9).
Figure Section 2-9
Assembling the Microphone Holder
n Plug the microphone into the microphone in jack at the rear of the system (see
Figure Section 2-10).
2-7
2-8
Setup and Operation
Figure Section 2-10
Connecting the Microphone
Setup and Operation
2-9
5. Press the power button (see Figure Section 2-11) to power-on the system. The
power lamp lights green, indicating that the system is in Full-Power mode.
The system automatically goes into its Power-On-Self-Test (POST), and checks
system components. One beep indicates that the system has successfully
completed its power-on test.
If a problem occurs, a series of beeps may sound. If this happens repeatedly after
powering on, power off the system and Troubleshoot.
If a problem occurs and is not indicated by beeps, power off the system and
Troubleshoot.
NOTE: If the system displays a message
indicating that system settings have changed, run
Setup (see “System Configuration” later in this
section).
Figure Section 2-11
Power Button, Lamps, and Suspend Button
2-10
Setup and Operation
6. Press the suspend button (see Figure Section 2-11) to place the unit in the power
management mode.
The power lamp lights amber, indicating that the system is in the power-saving
Suspend mode. Pressing the Suspend button places the system back in the FullPower mode.
If the system is left alone for a preset time, it goes into the automatic Standby
mode. The screen goes blank and the system goes into the power-saving mode of
operation. Moving the mouse or pressing a key on the keyboard activates the
Standby mode.
CD-ROM READER
A six-speed CD-ROM reader (see Figure Section 2-12) comes pre-installed as drive E in
the multimedia configurations. The reader is set as a master device, and is connected to the
secondary IDE/PCI port on the system board.
Use the CD-ROM reader to load and start programs from a CD or to play audio CDs. The
CD-ROM reader has the following controls and indicators:
n jack for connecting headphones with a stereo mini-jack plug
n volume control for adjusting the headphone volume
n busy lamp that lights during read operations
n open/close/stop button for opening or closing the CD tray when the power is on
n CD tray that opens and closes when the open/close/stop button is pressed
n emergency eject hole in the front panel for manually opening the CD tray if power
is lost. Insert a jewelers screwdriver into the hole. Turn the screw
counterclockwise to open the tray and clockwise to close the tray.
Figure Section 2-12
Typical CD-ROM Reader Controls and Indicators
Setup and Operation
2-11
To load a disc in the six-speed CD-ROM reader, follow these steps.
1. Press the open/close/stop button. The CD tray opens.
2. Put the CD, printed side up, into the tray.
3. Press the open/close/stop button. The tray closes.
4. To remove the disc, press the open/close/stop button. The tray opens, allowing
removal of the disc.
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
This section describes the Setup utility program that allows the system configuration
information to be viewed and changed.
NOTE: The system ships from the factory with
the correct system parameters for the
configuration. Unless setting the time and date,
setting security features, customizing the system,
or adding optional hardware, Setup does not
need to be run.
System configuration information is stored in nonvolatile memory. Nonvolatile memory in
the system is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip backed by a realtime clock/battery chip on the system board. The battery supplies continuous power to the
CMOS memory and maintains configuration information when system power is off.
Setup Utility
The Setup utility is used to view and set system parameters. Use the Setup utility to:
n set the time and date.
n update or check system parameters when adding or removing expansion options.
n change or set power management features.
n correct a hardware discrepancy when the Power-On-Self-Test (POST) displays an
error message and a prompt appears to run Setup.
n check the installation of optional memory by comparing the amount of memory
installed with the amount of memory displayed by Setup.
n change certain system operating parameters, such as boot device sequence or
keyboard parameters.
2-12
Setup and Operation
n configure system connections for peripherals such as the diskette drive, hard
drives, and devices connected to the printer and serial ports.
n customize the system with security features such as passwords, diskette drive
restriction, virus check reminder, and system backup reminder.
n set system parameters if the real-time clock/battery chip is replaced.
How to Start Setup
To start the Setup utility, follow these steps:
1. Turn on or reboot the system. Setup displays the following message:
Press <F2> to enter SETUP
2. Press F2. Setup’s Main Menu window appears similar to the following screen.
NOTE: The screen shown is typical of the
system. The actual items on the Main Menu
depend upon the hardware installed in the
system.
Setup and Operation
2-13
How to Use Setup
The Setup utility has a Main Menu window and six top-level menus with submenus. The
Main Menu window contains the following areas:
n A title line  the top line of the Main Menu. This line displays the Setup utility
name and copyright message.
n The menu bar  the line under the Setup title line. The menu bar contains six top-
level menus (Main, Advanced, Security, Power, Boot, Exit) for setting system
parameters.
n A Main Menu summary window  the center area on the left side of the screen.
This area provides a summary of Main Menu Setup parameters. Main Menu
parameters can be set directly from this window or from the Main menu option in
the legend bar.
n The Field Help window or Item Specific Help  the area on the right side of the
screen. This help area provides help information for the Setup option currently
selected.
n The legend bar  the area at the bottom of the screen. The legend bar provides a
summary of command keys for using Setup.
n The General Help window  a window that appears any time during Setup after
pressing F1 or Alt H . This help window provides two pages of general
information about using Setup.
The following subsections describe how to use the Main Menu window to set system
parameters.
Menu Bar
The menu bar at the top of the Main Menu window lists these menus:
n Main  Use this menu for basic system configuration. For example, select Main
to set the system time, system date, diskette drives, and video parameters. Use
this menu to check memory parameters, numlock, and boot options.
n Advanced  Use this menu to set serial port and printer port addresses and
interrupts, to enable/disable the system’s diskette drive controller and dual-IDE
controllers, and to enable a Plug and Play operating system such as Windows 95.
The Advanced menu also provides, for example, menu items for setting
parameters for large disks (using large disks with Windows NT™), enable/disable
onboard sound and surround sound, and enable/disable the mouse port.
Some of the Advanced features are accessible only with a Supervisor password.
2-14
Setup and Operation
n Security  Use this menu to set User and Supervisor Passwords, diskette access,
fixed disk boot sector, and the Backup and Virus-check reminders.
n Power  Use this menu to configure Power Management features.
n Boot  Use this menu to select the boot device (diskette drive, CD-ROM reader,
or hard drive)
n Exit  Exits the Setup utility with options to save or discard changes, load
defaults, or load previous values.
To select an option from the menu bar, use the left and right arrow keys.
See “Exiting Setup” in this section for a description on exiting the Main Menu.
Legend Bar
Use the keys listed in the legend bar on the bottom of the Setup menu to make the
selections or exit the current menu. Table Section 2-1 describes the legend keys and their
alternates.
Table Section 2-1
Setup Key Functions
Key
Function
F1 or Alt-H
Displays General Help window (described later in this section).
Esc
Exits the menu.
← or → arrow keys
Selects a different menu.
↑ or ↓ arrow keys
Moves cursor up and down.
Tab or Shift-Tab
Cycles cursor up and down.
Home or End
Moves cursor to top or bottom of window.
Page Up or Page Down
Moves cursor to next or previous page.
- (minus)
Selects the Previous Value for the field.
+ (plus)
Selects the Next Value for the field.
F9
Loads the Default Configuration values for this menu.
F10
Loads the Previous Configuration values for this menu.
Enter
Executes a command or selects submenu.
Alt-R
Refreshes screen.
Setup and Operation
2-15
n Selecting a Menu Item
To select a menu item, use the up or down arrow keys to move the cursor to the
desired field.
Use the tab key to cycle the cursor through the options.
Then use the value keys (F5, - , F6, +, or space bar) to cycle through the value for
that field. The Save Values command in the Exit Menu saves the values currently
displayed in all the menus.
n Displaying a Submenu
To display a submenu, use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the desired
submenu. Press Enter. A pointer (a right-pointing triangle) marks all selectable
submenus.
Field Help Window
The Field Help window or Item Specific Help window on the right side of each menu
displays the help text for the currently selected Setup option. It updates as the cursor is
moved to each new field.
General Help Window
Pressing F1 or Alt H on any menu brings up the General Help window that describes the
legend keys and their alternates.
The scroll bar on the right of any window indicates that there is more than one page of
information in the window. Use Page Up and Page Down to display all the pages.
Pressing Home and End displays the first and last page.
Press Esc to exit the current window.
Main Menu Options
Table Section 2-2 lists and describes the available parameters when the Main Menu is
selected in the menu bar. Other Main Menu parameters are available by selecting submenus.
Parameters available directly from the Main Menu summary window have a right-pointing
triangle next to the parameter. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to a parameter and
press Enter to select a submenu.
See the sections following the table for a description of Main Menu parameters from the
summary window.
2-16
Setup and Operation
Table Section 2-2
Main Menu Parameters
Parameter
Options
Description
System Time
HH:MM:SS
Sets the system time.
System Date
MM/DD/YYYY
Sets the system date.
Diskette A:
Diskette B:
360KB, 5 1/4”
1.2MB, 5 1/4”
720KB, 3 1/2”
1.44MB, 3 1/2”
2.88MB, 3 1/2”
Not Installed
Selects the type of diskette drive in the system.
Video System
EGA/VGA (default)
CGA 80x25
Monochrome
Selects the default video device.
System Memory
Automatically detected Displays the amount of conventional memory
by the system
detected at power-on.
Extended Memory
Automatically detected Displays the amount of extended memory
by the system
detected at power-on.
IDE Adapters
IDE adapters control the IDE devices, such as IDE hard disk drives and IDE CD-ROM
readers, in the system. The system uses two IDE controllers integrated on the system board.
Setup supports up to four IDE devices, with an IDE adapter for each of the following
configurations:
1 Master
1 Master, 1 Slave
2 Masters
2 Masters, 1 Slave
2 Masters, 2 Slaves
The factory installed master/slave combination for configurations with an IDE hard disk
connected to the primary IDE/PCI port is “1 Master.” If a second hard disk is added to the
primary IDE/PCI port, the combination becomes “1 Master, 1 Slave.”
The factory installed master/slave combination for multimedia configurations with an IDE
hard disk and a CD-ROM reader is “2 Masters.” The hard disk is connected to the primary
IDE/PCI port and the CD-ROM reader is connected to the secondary IDE/PCI port as a
master. If an IDE hard disk is added to the primary IDE/PCI port, the combination becomes
“2 Masters, 1 Slave.”
Setup and Operation
2-17
Jumper settings on the IDE device set the device to master or slave (see the documentation
that comes with the device).
Select the IDE Adapter option configuration directly from the Main Menu summary
window. Available options include:
n IDE Adapter 0 Master
n IDE Adapter 0 Slave
n IDE Adapter 1 Master
n IDE Adapter 1 Slave.
IDE Adapter 0 configures the primary IDE/PCI port (primary channel), IDE Adapter 1
configures the secondary IDE port.
Each IDE Adapter parameter has a right-pointing arrow to the left of it. Selecting the
option displays an IDE adapters advanced features menu with IDE hard disk parameters.
Select an IDE Adapter option and set parameters for each hard disk separately.
Use Table Section 2-3 to configure the hard disk. If the IDE hard disk features auto IDE
type detection, select the Autotype Fixed Disk parameter. The system then automatically
detects the hard disk type and sets the remaining parameters.
CAUTION: Incorrect settings can cause the
system to malfunction and to not read the drive.
2-18
Setup and Operation
Table Section 2-3
IDE Hard Disk Parameters
Parameter
Options
Description
Autotype Fixed Disk
Automatically detected Pressing Enter causes the system to attempt to
by the system
detect the hard disk type. If successful, Setup fills
in the remaining fields on this menu.
Type
1 to 39
User
Auto
Selecting 1 to 39 fills in all remaining fields with
values for predefined disk type. “User” prompts
user to fill in remaining fields. When "Auto" is
selected, the BIOS automatically sets drive type.
Cylinders
1 to 16,384
Specifies number of cylinders.
Heads
1 to 16
Specifies number of read/write heads.
Sectors/Track
1 to 63
Specifies number of sectors per track.
Write Precomp*
1 to 2048
None
Specifies number of the cylinder at which to
change the write timing.
Multi-Sector Transfers Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables multi-Sector transfers. Disabled
is default if drive is none.
LBA Mode Control
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables Logical Block Access. Disabled
is default if drive is none.
32-Bit I/O
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables 32 bit communications between
the CPU and IDE controller.
Transfer Mode
Standard (default)
Fast PIO1
Fast PIO2
Fast PIO3
Fast PIO4
Specifies the transfer mode for moving data to
and from the hard drive. Standard is the slowest
mode but the most compatible. Fast PIO
(programmed input/output) is the slowest of the
three enhanced modes. Fast PIO3 is the fastest
of the enhanced modes.
*IDE drives do not require setting Landing Zone and Write Precomp.
Setup and Operation
2-19
Memory Cache
For memory caching parameters, select "Memory Cache" directly from the Main Menu
summary window. See Table Section 2-4 for a description of memory cache parameters.
CAUTION: Incorrect settings can cause the
system to malfunction.
Table Section 2-4
Memory Cache Parameters
Parameter
Options
Description
External cache
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Sets the state of external cache.
Cache Video BIOS
Area
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Controls caching of the video BIOS area.
Caching Memory
Regions
Enabled
Disabled (default)
Default is disabled. Cache shadows optional
ROM located in specified segments of memory
and can improve performance. CAUTION: Some
add-in boards, particularly with on-board
firmware, do not work properly when shadowed.
Memory Shadow
Memory Shadow is always enabled. This parameter is not user-selectable.
Boot Options
The system might require a Supervisor password to set Boot parameters. Select “Boot
Options” directly from the Main Menu summary window to display the “Boot Options”
menu.
Use the legend keys to make the selections and exit to the Main Menu. Use Table Section
2-5 to select the boot options.
2-20
Setup and Operation
Table Section 2-5
Boot Parameters
Parameters
Options
Description
Summary Screen
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Displays system configuration at the end of bootup.
Floppy Check
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Verifies diskette type during boot-up. Disabling
speeds up boot time.
Last Boot Fail
3 (default)
Sets the number of times for user to boot system.
User-selectable settings If system fails to boot on number of tries, the
Disabled
"Previous Boot Incomplete" message appears
and the system boots with default settings.
The default setting, 3, give the user three tries to
boot the system before the "Previous Boot
Incomplete" message" appears.
Numlock
Select “Numlock” directly from the Main Menu summary window to display the Keyboard
Features menu.
Use the legend keys to make the selections and exit to the Main Menu. Use Table Section
2-6 to configure the keyboard parameters.
Table Section 2-6
Numlock Parameters
Parameters
Options
Description
Numlock
Auto (default)
On
Off
On or Off turns NumLock on or off at bootup.
Auto turns NumLock on if it finds a numeric key
pad.
Keyboard AutoRepeat rate
Fast (default)
Medium
Slow
Selects key repeat rate.
Keyboard AutoRepeat delay
1/4 sec
1/2 sec (default)
3/4 sec
1 sec
Sets the delay time after the key is held down
before it begins to repeat the keystroke.
Key Click
Enabled
Disabled (default)
Turns audible key click on or off.
Setup and Operation
2-21
Advanced Menu
Accessing the Advanced menu might require a Supervisor password. See Table Section 2-7
for Advanced Menu parameters.
CAUTION: Setting items in the Advanced menu
to incorrect values can cause the system to
malfunction.
Table Section 2-7
Parameter
Options
Advanced Menu Parameters
Description
Integrated Peripherals See Table Section 2-8 See Table Section 2-8 for descriptions of the
for options.
options.
Plug and Play OS
No
Yes (default)
Select "Yes" if using a Plug and Play capable
operating system such as Windows 95.
Otherwise, set to "No."
Reset Configuration
Data
No (default)
Yes
If Windows 95 or the ICU has difficulty
configuring the system, try setting this parameter
to "Yes" to clear all of the configuration data. This
parameter resets automatically to "No" to reboot.
ISA Graphics Device
Installed
No (default)
Yes
Set to "Yes" if other system devices need to know
if an ISA graphics device is installed.
Big Memory Mode
Normal (default)
Alternate
Selects the method the BIOS uses to report
memory sizes over 64 MB to the operating
system. Select "Normal" for MS-DOS and
Windows. Select "Alternate" for OS/2® and
Windows NT™.
Large Disk Access
Mode
DOS (default)
Other
Select DOS if the system has DOS. Select
"Other" if another operating system like UNIX is
installed. A large disk is one that has more than
1024 cylinders, more than 16 heads, or more than
63 tracks per sector.
Integrated Peripherals Menu
Select Integrated Peripherals menu on the Advanced Menu to configure the connections
between the system processor and the I/O ports (serial ports 1 and 2, printer port), diskette
drives, hard disk controllers, and integrated audio in multimedia and fax/modem systems.
NOTE: A Supervisor password might be
required to select parameters from the Integrated
Peripherals menu.
2-22
Setup and Operation
Use the legend keys to make the selections and exit to the Main Menu. Use Table Section
2-8 to configure the peripherals.
Table Section 2-8
Integrated Peripherals Parameters
Feature
Options
Description
COM A Port
COM B Port
Disabled
Selects a unique address and interrupt request
User-selectable settings for the listed COM ports. Auto selects the next
Auto
available combination.
Factory settings:
COM A port default: 3F8, IRQ 4
COM B port default: 2F8, IRQ 3
COM B Mode
Serial Port
IrDA (default)
LPT Port
Selects a unique address and interrupt request
Disabled
for the LPT port. Auto selects the next available
378, IRQ 7 (default)
User-selectable settings combination.
Auto
LPT Mode
Output only (default)
Bi-directional
ECP
Enables parallel port to function normally
(Output only), bidirectional, or in an enhanced
capabilities port (ECP) mode. Check the printer
documentation to set the correct LPT mode for
your printer.
ECP Channel
DMA 0
DMA 1
DMA 3
Available when ECP is selected for the LPT
mode.
Diskette Controller
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables the on-board diskette drive controller.
Local Bus IDE
Controller
Both (default)
Primary
Disabled
Enables the on-board IDE controllers. "Both"
enables the primary (fast) and secondary
(standard) channels. The "Primary" option
enables only the primary (fast) channel
PS/2 Mouse
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables the PS/2-style mouse.
On-board Stereo
Sound
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables integrated audio in multimedia
systems.
On-board Surround
Sound
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Enables/disables surround sound in multimedia
systems.
"Serial Port" enables COM B port as a serial
port. "IrDA" enables COM B port for IrDA
transfers.
Setup and Operation
2-23
Security Menu
Selecting “Security” from the Main Menu displays a menu with system security options.
NOTE: The Setup program can be entered with
either a User or Supervisor password. However,
more Setup choices are available with the
Supervisor password.
CAUTION: The features set in the Security
menu affect the features that appear on the
Security menu as well as on other Setup menus.
Enabling “Supervisor Password” requires a password for entering Setup. Passwords are not
case sensitive.
Pressing Enter at either Set Supervisor Password or Set User Password on the menu
displays a Set Password dialog box with the following prompts:
Enter new password:
Re-enter new password:
[
[
]
]
To set a password, type the password and press Enter. Reenter the password and press
Enter.
See Table Section 2-9 for a description of the security features. Use the legend keys to
make the selections and exit to the Main Menu.
Table Section 2-9
Feature
Options
System Security Options
Description
Supervisor Password Disabled (default)
Enabled
Must set to "Enabled" to set a Supervisor
password.
User Password
Disabled (default)
Enabled
Must set to "Enabled" to set a User password.
Set Supervisor
Password
Up to seven
alphanumeric
characters
Pressing Enter displays dialog box for entering
the supervisor password. This password gives
FULL access to Setup menus.
Set User Password
Up to seven
alphanumeric
characters
Pressing Enter displays the dialog box for
entering the user password. This password gives
RESTRICTED access to Setup menus. Requires
prior setting of Supervisor password.
2-24
Setup and Operation
Table Section 2-9
Feature
Password on boot
Options
Disabled (default)
Enabled
System Security Options
Description
Enabled requires a password on boot (cold boot
only, no password required for warm boot).
Requires the prior setting of the Supervisor
and/or User password.
If disabled, password(s) are required for entering
Setup but are not required for booting.
If Supervisor password is set and this option is
disabled, the BIOS boots without asking for a
password.
Diskette Access
User (default)
Supervisor
Fixed Disk Boot Sector Normal (default)
Write Protected
System Backup
Reminder and Virus
Check Reminder
Disabled (default)
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Supervisor setting restricts use of diskette drives
to supervisor. Requires setting the Supervisor
password.
Write protected helps prevent viruses. When
write protected, operating systems (and viruses
and application programs) which attempt to
modify the boot sector will not be able to do so.
When a schedule is specified, displays a
message during bootup asking (Y/N) if the system
has been backed up or scanned for viruses.
Message returns on each boot until “Y” is
responded.
Daily displays the message on the first boot of the
day, weekly on the first boot after Sunday, and
monthly on the first boot of the month.
Power Menu
Selecting “Power” from the menu bar displays a screen with the power management
parameters. Use the Power menu to specify the settings for Power Management. The
parameters are described in Table Section 2-10.
A power-management system reduces the amount of energy used after specified periods of
inactivity. The Power menu supports a Full On state, a Standby state with partial power
reduction, and a Suspend state with full power reduction.
Use the legend keys to make the selections and exit to the Main Menu.
Setup and Operation
Table Section 2-10
2-25
Power Management Parameters
Feature
Options
Description
APM
Enabled (default)
Advanced power management (APM) allows
APM-aware software to better manage power
savings.
Keyboard Wakeup
Enabled (default)|
Disabled
Allows keyboard activity to wake up system.
Mouse Wakeup
Enabled (default)
Allows mouse activity to wake up system.
Power Savings Mode Customize (default)
Disabled
Maximum
Medium
Minimum
Maximum, Medium, and Minimum set powermanagement options with predefined values.
Select Customize to make customize selections.
Disabled turns off all power management.
Sleep Timeout
15 min (default)
Disabled
User Selectable
Inactivity period required before partial power
shutdown (Standby mode).
Deep Sleep Timeout
15 minute (default)
Disabled
User Selectable
Inactivity period required before Sleep timeout to
maximum power shutdown (Suspend mode).
Video in Sleep Mode
Off (default)
On
Off turns monitor off in Sleep mode.
Boot Menu
Selecting "Boot" from the Main menu displays the following list of boot devices.
1. Diskette Drive
2. Hard Drive
3. CD-ROM Drive
The BIOS loads the operating system from the devices in the sequence selected.
2-26
Setup and Operation
Exit Menu
Selecting “Exit” from the menu bar displays the following exit options.
n Save Changes & Exit
n Discard Changes & Exit
n Get Default Values
n Load Previous Values
n Save Changes.
The following subsections describe each of the options on the Exit Menu. Note that Esc
does not exit this menu. Select one of the items from the menu or menu bar to exit.
Save Changes & Exit
After making the selections on the Setup menus, always select Save Changes to NonVolatile RAM (NVRAM) to make them operative.
Unlike standard RAM memory, NVRAM is sustained by an onboard battery and stays on
when the system is turned off.
After saving the selections, the program displays this message:
NOTICE
Changes have been saved
[continue]
If an attempt is made to exit without saving, Setup asks if the changes should be saved
before exiting.
During bootup, Setup attempts to load the values saved in NVRAM. If the values saved in
NVRAM cause the system boot to fail, reboot and press F2 to enter Setup. In Setup, the
ROM default values (as described below) can be loaded or the values can be changed that
caused the boot to fail.
Discard Changes & Exit
Use this option to exit Setup without recording any changes.
Setup and Operation
2-27
Get Default Values
To load all the default Setup values in the Setup menus, select Load ROM Default Values
from the Main Menu. The program displays this message:
NOTICE
Default values have been loaded!
[continue]
If, during bootup, the BIOS program detects a problem in the integrity of values stored in
NVRAM, it displays these messages:
System CMOS checksum bad - run SETUP
Press <F1> to resume, <F2> to Setup
The CMOS values have been corrupted or modified incorrectly, perhaps by an application
program that changes data stored in CMOS.
Press F1 to resume the boot or F2 to run Setup with the ROM default values already loaded
into the menus. Other changes can be made before saving the values to NVRAM.
Load Previous Values
During a Setup session, if a mistake has been made and has not yet been saved to NVRAM,
the previously saved NVRAM values can be restored.
Selecting Load Previous Values on the Exit menu updates all the selections and displays this
message:
NOTICE
Previous values have been loaded!
[continue]
Save Changes
Save Changes saves all the selections without exiting Setup. Other menus selections can be
reviewed or changed.
BIOS UPDATE UTILITY
The system BIOS resides on a flash ROM in the system. The flash ROM can be updated,
should it ever become necessary. This feature allows the ROM BIOS chip to be flashed with
a new BIOS code through software, rather than replacing the chip.
Performing an update is done with a BIOS flash diskette. The diskette, which contains the
latest version of the BIOS code, can be obtained from NEC Technologies or, if a modem is
available, the latest BIOS can be downloaded from NEC's Bulletin Board Service (BBS).
2-28
Setup and Operation
If a modem is available, use the following procedure to access the BBS for the latest
version of the BIOS Update utility. How to flash the BIOS with a flash diskette is described
following the BBS access procedure.
NEC Bulletin Board Service
Log onto the BBS as follows.
NOTE: First time users must answer a new user
questionnaire.
1. From the Windows for Workgroups Program Manager, select Accessories and
double click on Terminal.
2. From the Settings menu, click on Communications, check that the settings match
the following BBS parameters, and click OK when done.
n
Baud rate: select a baud rate that matches the modem
n
Parity: none
n
Data bits: 8
n
Stop bits: 1
n
Flow control: Xon/Xoff (select Hardware if using 14.4 bps or higher)
3. From the Phone menu, click on Dial, enter the BBS phone
number (508 635-4706), and click OK. Your business phone or location might
require a 9 1 or 1 prefix.
4. Press Enter twice.
5. Enter your first name, last name, and password. Press Enter after each.
6. Follow the screen prompts until the NECTECH Main Menu is displayed.
7. At the Main Menu, press J to join a conference. Select Conference 1 for the
desktop conference.
8. From the Main Menu, select F and Enter for the File menu.
9. At the File menu, select F for a list of downloadable files. Follow the prompts to
select a file for downloading.
Setup and Operation
After completing downloading of the file, log off the BBS as follows.
1. Press Enter (to continue).
2. Press G (command for Goodbye/Hangup).
3. Press Enter.
Using the BIOS Update Utility
Update the BIOS from the BIOS flash diskette as follows.
1. Write down the Setup parameters currently set on the system.
2. Turn off the system.
3. Insert the flash diskette in drive A, and turn on the system.
4. The update procedes automatically and shows a BIOS Update successfully
completed message when done.
5. Press any key to reboot the system.
6. Remove the flash diskette.
2-29
Section 3
Option Installation
This section provides instructions for installing the following options:
n expansion boards
n SIMM memory upgrade
n video memory upgrade
n processor upgrade
n data storage devices
n external options.
All options require that the system cover be removed. Procedures for removing the
minitower covers are included in this section.
GENERAL RULES FOR INSTALLING OPTIONS
Follow these general rules when installing system options.
n Turn off system power and unplug the power cable.
n Turn off and disconnect all peripherals.
n When handling boards or chips, touch the system unit frame to discharge static.
n Do not disassemble parts other than those specified in the procedure.
n All screws are Phillips-head, unless otherwise specified.
n Label any removed connectors. Note where the connector goes and in what
position it was installed.
PRECAUTIONS
Take care when working inside the system and when handling computer components. Avoid
electric shock or personal injury by observing the following warning.
WARNING: Before removing the system unit
cover, turn off the power and unplug the system
power cable. Power is removed only when the
power cable is unplugged.
3-2
Option Installation
Static electricity and improper installation procedures can damage computer components.
Protect computer components by following these safety instructions.
CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage
computer components. Discharge static
electricity by touching a metal object before
removing the system unit cover.
n Avoid carpets in cool, dry areas. Leave an option, such as a board or chip, in its
anti-static packaging until ready to install it.
n Dissipate static electricity before handling any system components (boards, chips,
and so on) by touching a grounded metal object, such as the system's unpainted
metal chassis.
If possible, use anti-static devices, such as wrist straps and floor mats.
n Always hold a chip or board by its edges. Avoid touching the components on the
chip or board.
n Take care when connecting or disconnecting cables. A damaged cable can cause a
short in the electrical circuit. Misaligned connector pins can cause damage to
system components at power-on.
When installing a cable, route the cable so it is not pinched by other components
and is out of the path of the system unit cover. Prevent damage to the connectors
by aligning connector pins before you connect the cable.
n When disconnecting a cable, always pull on the cable connector or strain-relief
loop, not on the cable.
REMOVING THE SYSTEM UNIT COVER
The following subsections describe how to remove the system unit cover.
WARNING: Before removing the system unit
cover, turn off the power and unplug the system
power cable. Power is removed only when the
power cable is unplugged.
1. Turn off and unplug the system unit.
2. Disconnect the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and any other device (such as a
printer) connected from the rear of the system.
Option Installation
CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage
computer components. Discharge static
electricity by touching a metal object before you
remove the system unit cover.
3. Remove the four cover screws from the rear of the system unit (see Figure
Section 3-1).
Figure Section 3-1
Removing Cover Screws
4. From the rear of the system, grasp the sides and slide the cover about an inch
away from the front panel (see Figure Section 3-2).
NOTE: The cover fits tightly. Press the front
edge of the cover to release it from the front
panel. Also try pressing against the rear panel to
slide the cover one inch away from the front
panel.
3-3
3-4
Option Installation
Figure Section 3-2
Releasing the Cover
5. Lift the cover up and away from the system unit.
6. Reinstall the cover by reversing steps 1 through 5, above.
Be sure that the cover tabs on the sides of the cover align inside the frame of the
unit when replacing the cover.
Option Installation
3-5
EXPANSION BOARDS
The computer supports ISA Plug and Play expansion boards. Plug and Play expansion
boards allow installing a board in an expansion slot without changing the hardware settings.
There are no system resource conflicts to resolve. Plug and Play automatically configures
the board for the system.
Industry-standard 8- 16-bit, ISA and 32-bit PCI expansion boards are supported in the
system unit. ISA expansion boards can either be Plug and Play or non-Plug and Play boards.
Expansion Slot Locations
The minitower system has five useable expansion slots (see Figure Section 3-3) broken
down as follows:
n three ISA slots
n one PCI slot
n one shared PCI/ISA slot
ISA expansion slots support industry-standard 8-bit or 16-bit expansion boards. The
PCI/ISA slot also supports PCI expansion boards.
PCI expansion boards run at the system's processor speed. The PCI bus handles 32 bits of
data at a time, being wider as well as faster than the standard ISA bus. PCI boards can send
and receive data much faster which boosts system performance.
Figure Section 3-3
Locating Expansion Slots
3-6
Option Installation
Expansion Board Installation
Install expansion boards in the system as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Follow any preinstallation instructions that came with the expansion board (such
as setting switches or jumpers on the board).
3. Remove the screw securing an expansion slot cover and remove the cover (see
Figure Section 3-4).
Save the screw for installing the expansion board. Save the slot cover for future
use.
CAUTION: A slot cover can damage the system
board or any option board if it falls into the
system. Take care to keep the slot cover from
falling when removing the screw.
If the slot cover does fall into the unit, remove it
before replacing the cover.
Figure Section 3-4
Removing a Slot Cover
4. Hold the board by its edges and insert it into the expansion slot (see Figure
Section 3-5). Align full-size expansion boards with the guide rail at the front of
the system unit.
Option Installation
3-7
Press the board firmly into the expansion slot connector. Gently rock the board
from side-to-side to seat it into the connector.
5. Insert the screw removed earlier to secure the expansion board to the support
bracket.
Figure Section 3-5
Inserting the Board
6. Attach any signal cables required by the expansion board.
7. Replace the system unit cover.
3-8
Option Installation
Expansion Board Removal
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Label and remove any cables connected to the board.
NOTE: To remove a board from an inside slot
in the desktop, see Inside Slot Expansion Board
Removal.
3. Remove the screw that secures the board to the support bracket (see Figure
Section 3-6
Figure Section 3-6
Removing the Screw
4. Pull the board out of the connector. Gently rock the board from side-to-side to
release it from its connector.
5. Replace the system unit cover.
Option Installation
3-9
SIMM UPGRADE
SIMM sticks are installed into SIMM sockets on the system board. The system board
provides four SIMM sockets and supports up to 128 MB of high-speed memory. The
system ships with two 8-MB EDO SIMMs already installed. The following 32-bit (nonparity) 60 ns or 70 ns SIMMs are supported:
n 1-MB by 32-bit (4-MB stick)
n 2-MB by 32-bit (8-MB stick)
n 4-MB by 32-bit (16-MB stick)
n 8-MB by 32-bit (32-MB stick).
NOTE: 60 ns SIMMs can be installed, but they
will function at 70 ns.
CAUTION: To avoid corrosion between
different metals, only use tin-plated SIMM sticks.
Checking System Memory
Use the following procedure to:
n check the memory installed in the system
n determine the SIMM configuration needed to increase memory
n locate the sockets for SIMM installation.
1. Locate the four SIMM sockets on the system board (see Figure Section 3-7).
If any cables block access to the SIMM sockets, label and disconnect them. If any
boards block access to the sockets, remove them.
2. Use Table Section 3-1 to determine the SIMM configuration needed to upgrade
memory and to identify the sockets for SIMM installation.
3-10
Option Installation
Figure Section 3-7
System Board Upgrade SIMM Sockets
Option Installation
Table Section 3-1
Total
Memory
Recommended Memory Upgrade Path
SIMM
Socket 1
Socket 2
SIMM
Socket 3
Socket 4
16 MB
4 MB
4 MB
4 MB
4 MB
16 MB*
8 MB
8 MB
Empty
Empty
24 MB
4 MB
4 MB
8 MB
8 MB
24 MB
8 MB
8 MB
4 MB
4 MB
32 MB
8 MB
8 MB
8 MB
8 MB
32 MB
16 MB
16 MB
Empty
Empty
40 MB
4 MB
4 MB
16 MB
16 MB
40 MB
16 MB
16 MB
4 MB
4 MB
48 MB
8 MB
8 MB
16 MB
16 MB
48 MB
16 MB
16 MB
8 MB
8 MB
64 MB
16 MB
16 MB
16 MB
16 MB
64 MB
32 MB
32 MB
Empty
Empty
72 MB
4 MB
4 MB
32 MB
32 MB
72 MB
32 MB
32 MB
4 MB
4 MB
80 MB
8 MB
8 MB
32 MB
32 MB
80 MB
32 MB
32 MB
8 MB
8 MB
96 MB
16 MB
16 MB
32 MB
32 MB
96 MB
32 MB
32 MB
16 MB
16 MB
128 MB
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
*Standard configuration for 16-MB systems.
3-11
3-12
Option Installation
SIMM Removal
Remove a SIMM as follows.
CAUTION: Reduce static discharge by touching
the system's metal chassis.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Locate the SIMM sockets (see Figure Section 3-7).
3. Press the metal clips at the outer edges of the socket away from the SIMM.
4. Push the SIMM away from the locking tabs and remove it from the socket (see
Figure Section 3-8).
Figure Section 3-8
Removing a SIMM
5. Install a SIMM per the following procedure.
Option Installation
3-13
SIMM Installation
Install a SIMM as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Locate the SIMM sockets (see Figure Section 3-9).
Remove any currently installed SIMMs that are not needed.
CAUTION: Before installing a SIMM, reduce
static discharge by touching the system's metal
chassis.
3. Align the notched end of the SIMM with the socket end closest to the front of the
system.
4. Insert the SIMM at an angle into the socket.
5. Tilt the SIMM towards the locking tabs using equal pressure at the ends of the
SIMM until it locks into the socket (see Figure Section 3-9).
Figure Section 3-9
Inserting the SIMM
6. Replace any cables or boards that may have been removed.
7. Replace the system unit cover.
3-14
Option Installation
VIDEO UPGRADE
Upgrade the video memory by adding the 2- or 6-MB video WRAM upgrade module to the
video board as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Locate the video WRAM sockets (see Figure Section 3-10).
If any expansion boards are obstructing your view of the sockets, remove the
boards (see Expansion Board Removal).
CAUTION: Reduce static discharge by
touching the system's metal chassis.
3. Align the notched ends of the module and the video board sockets (see
Figure Section 3-10). Using equal pressure, gently press the module into the
sockets.
Figure Section 3-10
Aligning the Video WRAM Module with the Video Board
Sockets
4. Replace any boards that were removed.
5. Replace the system unit cover.
Option Installation
3-15
PROCESSOR UPGRADE
The zero-insertion force (ZIF) socket accepts pin-grid-array (PGA) processors, such as the
primary processor or an upgrade processor.
CAUTION: Incorrect installation of the
processor can damage the processor, system
board, or both. Follow the installation
instructions carefully.
The system requires a heatsink on the upgrade
processor. Verify that you have the correct
heatsink for the processor.
When upgrading the processor, first remove the processor currently installed in the system,
then install the upgrade processor.
Processor Removal
Remove the installed processor on the system board as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Locate the processor socket (see Figure Section 3-7).
If any expansion boards are obstructing the socket, remove the boards.
3. Release the heatsink clip from the tabs on the socket.
4. Release the processor by pulling the lever on the socket away from the socket and
as far back as it goes without forcing.
CAUTION: Before picking up the processor,
reduce static discharge by touching the metal
frame of the system unit.
5. Lift the processor out of the socket.
3-16
Option Installation
Processor Installation
1. Remove the processor currently in the system (see above).
CAUTION: Before picking up the processor,
reduce static discharge by touching the metal
frame of the system unit.
2. Align the notched corner of the processor with the alignment corner in the socket
and insert the processor.
3. Swing the lever down to lock the processor into the socket.
CAUTION: Remember to either reattach the
heatsink used with the old processor or install the
new heatsink supplied with the upgrade
processor.
4. Check to see if the newly installed processor requires a system board jumper
change (see Appendix B, "System Board Jumpers").
5. Replace any boards removed during this procedure.
6. Replace the system unit cover.
Option Installation
3-17
DATA STORAGE DEVICES
The system board in the computer supports the following storage devices:
n up to two diskette drives, including the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive
n up to four IDE devices such as IDE hard disks and an IDE CD-ROM reader.
Other storage devices might require the installation of a compatible controller board.
Device Slots
The PowerMate has seven device slots:
n a 3 1/2-inch accessible device slot which contains the standard 1.44-MB diskette
drive
n one front internal hard disk drive slot (1-inch high, thin-height)
This slot is occupied by an IDE hard disk in both hard disk and multimedia
configurations.
n three 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots (1.6-inch high, half-height)
In multimedia models, one accessible device slot contains the standard CD-ROM
reader.
Other accessible devices (diskette drive, tape drive, CD-ROM reader) can be
installed in the 5 1/4-inch slots.
A hard disk with a 5 1/4-inch form factor can be installed in the 5 1/4-inch slots.
n one rear internal hard disk basket containing two slots (1-inch high, thin-height)
for installing optional 3 1/2-inch IDE hard disks
Figure Section 3-11 shows the device slot locations.
3-18
Option Installation
Figure Section 3-11
Locating Device Slots in the Minitower
Device Preparation
Before installing a storage device in the system, follow any preinstallation instructions that
come with the device. For example, check the following:
n Diskette drive  remove any termination on the optional diskette drive. See the
documentation that comes with the drive.
n IDE device  check the jumper settings on the device before installing it. See the
documentation that comes with the device for jumper setting information.
An IDE device, such as an IDE hard disk or IDE CD-ROM reader, must be set
correctly as the first (master) or second (slave) device on the IDE channel.
The standard IDE hard disk (in hard disk models) is set as the master device on
the primary IDE connector. The CD-ROM reader in multimedia models is the
master device on the secondary IDE connector.
Device Cables
The cables used for installation of optional storage devices include:
n diskette drive signal cable
n IDE signal cables
n system power cables.
Option Installation
3-19
The diskette drive and IDE cables shipped with the system each support two devices. Cable
connector locations on the system board are shown in Figure Section 3-12.
Figure Section 3-12
System Board Cable Connectors
3-20
Option Installation
Diskette Drive Signal Cable
A three-connector diskette drive signal cable comes attached to the system board and to the
standard 1.44-MB diskette drive.
The installation of a second diskette drive in your system does not require the replacement
of the existing diskette drive signal cable. Connect an optional diskette drive to the middle
connector on the standard diskette drive signal cable.
The colored edge of the cable goes to pin 1 on the cable connector. Align the red edge of
the cable with pin 1 (the notched end) on the drive connector.
Figure Section 3-13 shows a three-connector diskette drive signal cable.
Figure Section 3-13
Optional Diskette Drive Signal Cable
Option Installation
3-21
IDE Signal Cables
Hard disk systems come with a three-connector IDE interface cable attached to the primary
IDE connector. Multimedia systems come with a second IDE cable connected to the CDROM reader and to the secondary IDE connector.
Each IDE connector on the system board supports two IDE devices. The addition of an
IDE device to an IDE connector does not require the replacement of the existing IDE signal
cable.
If installing an optional IDE CD-ROM reader, connect it to the secondary IDE connector.
The primary (fast) IDE port should be reserved for hard disks.
Figure Section 3-14 shows a typical three-connector IDE cable. If the IDE cable is not
keyed with a connector tab, align the colored edge of the cable with the pin 1 side of the
drive connector.
Figure Section 3-14
Optional IDE Cable Connectors
3-22
Option Installation
System Power Cables
Power cables come from the power supply and are attached to the standard storage devices.
System power cables vary in length and provide connector sizes to accommodate a variety
of supported storage configurations. Power cable connectors are keyed to fit only in the
correct position. Figure Section 3-15 shows the power cable connectors.
Figure Section 3-15
Power Cable Connectors
Option Installation
3-23
Device Cabling
All storage devices require a power and signal cable connection. Devices shipped with the
system are already connected. Cable optional devices as follows.
Cabling an IDE Device
1. Connect the IDE signal cable connector to the connector on the IDE device.
Take care to prevent bending drive connector pins. Align the IDE cable connector
as shown in Figure Section 3-16.
2. Locate an available power connector coming from the power supply.
3. Connect the appropriate power cable to the power connector on the IDE device.
Figure Section 3-16
Connecting IDE Device Cables
4. If installing an IDE CD-ROM reader, also connect the audio cable (see the
instructions that come with the reader).
3-24
Option Installation
Cabling a Diskette Drive
1. Connect the diskette drive signal cable connector to the signal connector on the
diskette drive (see Figure Section 3-17).
2. Locate an available power connector.
3. Connect the power cable to the power connector on the device.
Figure Section 3-17
Connecting 1.2-MB Diskette Drive Cables
Option Installation
3-25
Storage Device Installation
The following subsections describe how to install 3 1/2-inch and 5 1/4-inch drives. The
installation procedures include:
n installing a 3 1/2-inch drive in the internal front slot
n installing a 3 1/2-inch drive in the internal rear slot
n removing the front panel
n installing a 5 1/4-inch device
n replacing the front panel.
Installing the 3 1/2-Inch Drive into the Internal Front Slot
Install a 3 1/2-inch hard disk in the front slot of a diskless system as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the hard disk drive.
3. From inside the chassis, insert the drive into the bottom 3 1/2-inch hard drive slot
and connect the drive cables.
4. Align the holes in the drive with the holes in the device cage, and secure the cage
with four screws, two to a side (see Figure Section 3-18).
5. Replace the system unit cover.
6. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration.
Figure Section 3-18
Left Side Drive Screws
3-26
Option Installation
Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Drive into a Rear Slot
Install a second 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive into the system as follows.
NOTE: Adding a second hard disk to hard disk
configurations requires the removal of the
standard hard disk.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the hard disk drive, such as
setting jumpers and switches.
3. Remove the hard disk drive installed in the front slot as follows:
n
Unplug the power and signal cables.
n
Remove the four drive screws (two on each side).
n
Remove the drive from the slot.
4. Insert the first drive into the lower slot of the 3 1/2-inch drive bracket. Insert the
drive so that the drive connectors face toward the front storage device slots in the
system unit.
5. Align the holes in the drive with the holes in the bracket.
6. Secure the drive to the bracket with the four screws, two to a side, that come with
the drive (see Figure Section 3-19).
Figure Section 3-19
Securing the Drive to the Bracket
Option Installation
3-27
7. Insert the second drive into the upper slot of the 3 1/2-inch drive bracket; repeat
steps 6 and 7.
8. Hook the bracket (with drive) on the two tabs on the inside rear of the system
unit and secure the bracket with the two screws removed earlier (see
Figure Section 3-20).
Figure Section 3-20
Removing the Drive Bracket Screws
9. Connect the drive cables.
10. Replace the system unit cover.
11. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration.
3-28
Option Installation
Removing the Front Panel
Remove the front panel only if installing a 5 1/4-inch device. The front panel does not need
to be removed if installing a 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive.
If installing a 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive, see Installing the 3 1/2-Inch Drive into the Front
Slot or Installing the 3 1/2-Inch Drive into a Rear Slot.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. The front panel is secured with six metal clips (see Figure Section 3-21). Remove
the front panel by evenly and carefully pulling the panel off the chassis.
Use care to prevent pulling on the LED and IR cables attached to the panel.
3. Label and disconnect the LED and IR cables from the system board.
Figure Section 3-21
Removing the Front Panel
Option Installation
3-29
4. Identify the slot for the device being installed.
5. Remove the blank panel from the selected slot by pressing the panel tabs from
inside the front panel and pushing the blank panel out (see Figure Section 3-22).
Figure Section 3-22
Locating the Blank Panel Tabs
3-30
Option Installation
6. Remove the slot cover from the selected slot by removing the two slot cover
screws on the front of the system (see Figure Section 3-23).
Figure Section 3-23
Locating the Slot Cover
7. Install the 5 1/4-inch device (see Installing the 5 1/4-Inch Device).
Option Installation
3-31
Installing the 5 1/4-Inch Device
Install an accessible device into the device cage as follows.
1. Remove the front panel as previously described.
2. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the device, such as setting
jumpers and switches.
NOTE: If the 5 1/4-inch device comes with
drive rails, do not attach them. Remove any rails
already attached. See the documentation that
comes with the device.
If installing the device into the top 5 1/4-inch
slot, do not attach the device rails that came with
the system.
The rails must be used when installing a device in
the middle and bottom 5 1/4-inch device slots.
3. If installing the device into the top 5 1/4-inch slot, go to Step 4. Otherwise, locate
the device rails that ship with the system. Attach the rails to the sides of the device
with the four screws that come with the device (see Figure Section 3-24).
If installing an accessible device (diskette drive, tape drive, CD-ROM reader),
attach the rails to the device so that the front of the device extends beyond the
chassis and is even with the blank panels on the front of the system.
3-32
Option Installation
Figure Section 3-24
Attaching the Device Rails
4. Insert the device into the device slot from the front of the system unit, connector
end first.
5. Secure the device as follows:
n
If installing the device into the top 5 1/4-inch slot, align the holes in the device
with the holes in the device cage.
Secure the device with the four screws that come with the device, two to a
side (see Figure Section 3-25 and Figure Section 3-26).
n
If installing a device with rails in the middle or bottom 5 1/4-inch slot, secure
the device with the two screws that were removed during slot cover removal
(see Removing the Front Panel and Figure Section 3-25).
Option Installation
Figure Section 3-25
Front and Left Side Device Screws
Figure Section 3-26
Right Side Device Screws
6. Connect the device cables.
7. Replace the system unit front panel (see Replacing the Front Panel).
3-33
3-34
Option Installation
8. Replace the system unit cover.
NOTE: If a 1.2-MB diskette drive was
installed, remove the protective cardboard insert
from the drive.
9. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration.
Replacing the Front Panel
Replace the front panel only after it has been removed in a 5 1/4-inch device installation.
1. Route the LED and IR cables on the front panel through the chassis to the system
board, and connect the cables to the board.
2. Align the six front panel metal clips with the holes in the front of the system unit
(see Figure Section 3-27).
3. Evenly press the front panel into position until the clips lock the panel in place.
Figure Section 3-27
Aligning the Front Panel
4. Go to Step 8, Installing the 5 1/4-Inch Device, to complete the installation.
Option Installation
3-35
ADDING EXTERNAL OPTIONS
This subsection includes installation procedures for the following external options:.
n parallel printer
n serial devices.
Procedures for connecting the microphone and speakers are included in Section 2, Setup
and Operation.
Parallel Printer
NOTE: Before connecting a printer to the
system, be sure the printer is set up correctly.
Follow the setup instructions that come with the
printer.
Connect a parallel printer to the system as follows.
1. Turn off power to the system and printer.
2. Connect the printer cable to the printer port on the rear of the system unit (see
Figure Section 3-28).
3. Secure the cable with the screws provided.
4. Connect the other end to the printer.
Figure Section 3-28
Connecting a Printer Cable to the Minitower
3-36
Option Installation
RS-232C Device Connection
NOTE: Before connecting a serial device to the
system, be sure the serial device is set up
correctly. Follow the setup instructions that
come with the option.
1. Turn off power to the system and to the serial device.
2. Connect one end of the serial cable to one of the two serial ports on the rear of
the computer (see Figure Section 3-29).
3. Secure the cable with the screws provided.
4. Connect the other end to the serial device.
Figure Section 3-29
Connecting an RS-232C Cable to the Minitower
Section 4
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
This section provides information on maintaining and troubleshooting the PowerMate P computers. Also included in this section are NEC service telephone numbers (see Table Section 4-1).
Table Section 4-1 NEC Service and Information Telephone Numbers
Service
Call
To order NEC spare parts
In the U.S.,
Dealers: call 1(800) 632-4525
End users: call 1(800) 233-6321
To order options in the U.S.
1-800-NEC-INFO
To access the NEC Electronic Bulletin Board
System (BBS) for down loading software drivers
and the latest BIOS for ROM flashing
1(508) 635-4706 (see BIOS Update Utility in Section
2)
To open a Service Call or obtain Technical
Support
In the U.S., call 1(800) 632-4565
To obtain other services:
1(800) 632-4525
Listen to the automated attendant and select the appropriate menu to
reach one of the following departments.
Information Center - literature, dealer locations, sales leads, response to ads
NASC (National Authorized Service Centers)
Administration - new dealer service authorization/warranty claims
NSRC (National Service Response Center) - questions other than products, spare parts or
technical support
Service Contracts
FastFacts™, an automated service for
In the U.S., call 1(800) 366-0476.
sending the latest Technical Information Bulletins
and other information about NEC products to your Outside the U.S., call 1(708) 860-9500,
fax machine 24 hours a day.
Ext. 2621.
Canadian Inquires
1(416) 795-3554
4-2
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
MAINTENANCE
This subsection contains general information for cleaning and checking the system, keyboard,
and monitor.
The system, keyboard, and monitor require cleaning and checking at least once a year, and more
often if operating in a dusty environment. No other scheduled maintenance or
lubrication is required.
WARNING: Unplug all power cords before performing any maintenance. Voltage is present inside
the system and monitor even after the power button
is off. All voltage is removed only when the power
cord is unplugged.
System Cleaning
Use the following procedure for cleaning the system.
1. Power off the system and unplug all power cables.
2. Periodically wipe the outside of the system, keyboard, mouse, and monitor with a soft,
clean cloth. Remove stains with a mild detergent. Do not use solvents or strong, abrasive cleaners on any part of the system.
3. Clean the monitor screen with a commercial monitor screen cleaning kit. Or use a
glass cleaner, then wipe with a clean lint-free cloth.
4. Local distributors and dealers may sell diskette drive head cleaning kits. These kits
contain special diskettes and cleaning solution. Do not use the abrasive head cleaning
kits (kits without cleaning solution). Insert the diskette immediately after powering on
the system, before the disk boot-up. Allow the diskette drive heads to clean for about
30 seconds.
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4-3
Keyboard Cleaning
When necessary, inspect and clean the inside of the keyboard as follows:
1. Remove the six screws holding the keyboard enclosure together.
NOTE: The keyboard and cable together are considered a whole-unit, field-replaceable
assembly. Therefore, disassembly of the keyboard
is necessary only when cleaning the inside.
2. Separate the two halves of the enclosure. Clean the enclosure and keys with a damp
cloth. A small, soft-bristle brush may be used to clean between the keys. Do not wet
or dampen the keyboard's printed circuit board (PCB). If the PCB
accidentally gets wet, thoroughly dry it before reattaching the keyboard to the system
unit.
Mouse Cleaning
Under normal conditions, the mouse has a self-cleaning mechanism that prevents a buildup of
dust or lint around the mouse ball and tracking mechanism. Periodically, however, the mouse
ball must be cleaned. Use the following procedure to clean the mouse.
1. Unplug the mouse from the system.
2. Turn the mouse upside down and locate the mouse ball cover (see Figure Section 41).
3. Turn the ball cover counterclockwise and remove the cover.
Figure Section 4-1 Removing the Mouse Ball Cover
4-4
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4. Turn the mouse over and remove the ball.
5. Clean the mouse as follows:
n
Clean the mouse ball with tap water and a mild detergent, then dry it with a lintfree cloth.
n
Remove any dust and lint from the mouse socket.
6. Replace the mouse ball in its socket.
7. Replace the ball cover and turn it clockwise until it locks in place.
TROUBLESHOOTING
This subsection provides information that helps isolate and repair system malfunctions at the
field level. Step-by-step instructions for diagnosing and solving system hardware problems are
provided.
If disassembly is required, see Section 5. Connector pin assignments are given in
Appendix A. Jumper settings are given in Appendix B.
Error Messages
Messages may appear when running NEC utilities. Table Section 4-2 describes possible system
error and warning messages. Table Section 4-4 describes possible ISA NMI error messages.
Table Section 4-2
PowerMate P System Error Messages
Message
Description
Address Line Short
Error in the address decoding circuitry on the system board.
C: Drive Error
Hard disk drive C not responding. Run Setup (see Section 2, Setup
and Operation) to correct the problem. Also, check C hard disk
drive type in Setup to make sure the hard disk drive type is correct.
C: Drive Failure
Hard disk drive C not responding. Replace the hard disk drive.
Cache Memory Bad, Do Not
Enable Cache
Cache memory is defective.
CH-2 Timer Error
Most AT systems include two timers. There is an error in Timer 2.
CMOS Battery State Low
CMOS RAM is powered by a battery in the RTC/battery backup
chip. The battery power is low. Replace the system board.
CMOS Checksum Failure
After CMOS RAM values are saved, a checksum value is
generated for error checking. The previous value is different from
the current value. Run Setup (see Section 2).
CMOS System Options Not Set
The values stored in CMOS RAM do not match the type detected
by the BIOS. Run Setup (see Section 2).
CMOS Display Type Mismatch
The graphics type in CMOS RAM does not match the type
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-2
4-5
PowerMate P System Error Messages
Message
Description
detected by the BIOS. Run Setup (see Section 2).
CMOS Memory Size
Mismatch
The amount of memory on the system board is different than
the amount in CMOS RAM. Run Setup (see Section 2).
CMOS time and date not set
Run Setup to set the date and time in CMOS RAM.
D: Drive Error
Hard disk drive D does not respond. Run Setup to correct the
problem. Also, check the D hard disk drive type in Setup to make
sure the hard disk drive type is correct.
D: Drive Failure
Hard disk drive D does not respond. Replace the drive.
Diskette Boot Failure
Boot disk in diskette drive A is corrupt and cannot be used to boot.
Use another boot disk and follow screen prompts.
DMA Error
Error in the DMA controller.
DMA #1 Error
Error in the first DMA channel.
DMA #2 Error
Error in the second DMA channel.
FDD Controller Failure
The BIOS cannot communicate with the diskette drive controller.
Power off the system and check all connections.
HDD Controller Failure
The BIOS cannot communicate with the hard disk drive controller.
Power off the system and check all connections.
INTR #1 Error
Interrupt channel 1 failed POST.
INTR #2 Error
Interrupt channel 2 failed POST.
Invalid Boot Diskette
The BIOS can read the disk in diskette drive A, but cannot boot the
system. Use another boot diskette.
Keyboard Is Locked
Keyboard lock on the system is engaged. The system must be
unlocked to continue.
Keyboard Error
There is a timing problem with the keyboard. Set the Keyboard
option in Setup to Not Installed to skip the keyboard POST
routines.
KB/Interface Error
There is a error in the keyboard connector.
No ROM BASIC
Cannot find a bootable sector on either diskette drive A or hard
disk drive C. The BIOS calls INT 18h which generates this
message. Use a bootable disk.
Off Board Parity Error
Parity error in the installed expansion memory. The format is:
OFF BOARD PARITY ERROR ADDR (HEX) = (XXXX)
XXXX is the hex address where the error occurred.
On Board Parity Error
Parity error in system memory. The format is:
OFF BOARD PARITY ERROR ADDR (HEX) = (XXXX)
4-6
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-2
PowerMate P System Error Messages
Message
Description
XXXX is the hex address where the error occurred.
Parity Error ????
Parity error in system memory at an unknown address.
Table Section 4-4
ISA NMI Error Messages
Message
Description
Memory Parity Error at xxxxx
Memory failed. If the memory location can be determined, it is
displayed as xxxxx. If not, the message is Memory Parity
Error ????.
I/O Card Parity Error at xxxxx
An expansion card failed. If the address can be determined, it is
displayed as xxxxx. If not, the message is I/O Card Parity Error
????.
DMA Bus Time-out
A device has driven the signal for more than 7.8 microseconds.
Diagnosing and Solving Problems
One beep indicates that the system has completed its POST test. If intermittent beeping
occurs, power off the system and try again. If the beeping persists, see Table Section 4-6. The table summarizes problems that may develop during system operation and lists (in sequential
order) suggested corrective actions.
Table Section 4-6
Problems and Solutions
Problem
Symptom
Solution
No power
Power lamp on computer status
panel will not light.
1. Check that the power cord is
plugged into the AC connector on
the computer.
Check that the other end of the
cord is plugged into a live
properly grounded AC power
outlet.
2. Check cable connections
between power supply and
system board.
3. Systematically eliminate
possible shorted PCBs by
removing cables and expansion
boards.
4. Check the +5 and +12 power
supply voltages (see Appendix A,
Connector Pin Assignments).
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-6
Problem
Power supply malfunction
Operating system does not boot
4-7
Problems and Solutions
Symptom
Solution
Measure voltages with the
system board installed.
5.
Replace power supply.
6.
Replace system board.
Any one or more of the
following conditions could
occur:
1. Perform steps 1 through 4
listed in this table under No
Power.
Front panel lamps out, diskette
and/or hard drives do not spin,
monitor blank, interface ports not
working, and keyboard lamp out
and/or cannot input from
keyboard.
2. Check power supply
voltages. Voltages should be
measured with a load on them
(system board plugged in). See
Appendix A for connector pin
assignments.
Intermittent beeping at power-on.
Computer beeps more than once
and is unable to complete bootup.
3.
Replace power supply.
1.
Check system configuration.
2. Check all jumper settings
and verify that drives are enabled
(refer to Section 2).
3. Reseat SIMMs and option
boards in their connectors.
Inspect system board for
dropped objects.
4. Remove option boards and
reboot.
5.
“Invalid Configuration” message
displayed.
Replace system board.
1. Press F2 to run Setup and
correct the parameters.
2. Replace the system board if
the date and time must be set
each time the computer is
powered on. (The RTC/battery
backup chip may be defective.)
Computer halts during loading
sequence.
1. Power the computer off.
Check for proper jumper settings
(Appendix B), then power-on the
computer.
2. Check condition of selected
bootload device (diskette or hard
disk) for bad boot track or
incorrect OS files.
4-8
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-6
Problem
Problems and Solutions
Symptom
Solution
3. Try booting OS from diskette
or recopy OS files onto hard disk.
4. Verify correct hard disk is
selected.
Diskette drive does not work
Lamp on drive panel does not
light when diskette is loaded.
1. Check power and signal
cable connections between
diskette drive, system board,
and power supply.
2. Check diskette drive jumpers
(see Section 3).
3. Check power supply and
replace diskette cable.
Hard disk malfunction
4.
Replace diskette drive.
5.
Replace system board.
Hard disk drive lamp does not
light but hard disk drive can be
accessed.
1. Check cable connections
between lamp and system board.
Hard disk controller failure
message displayed.
1. Check that the IDE port and
hard disk drives are enabled in
Setup.
Cannot access hard disk.
1. Check signal/power
connections between hard disk,
PCB, power supply.
2. Check drive jumper settings
(see Section 3).
3.
Check power supply.
4. Check hard disk cable and
hard disk. Replace as necessary.
5. Replace system board (or
hard disk controller PCB if the
system board controller is not
used).
Memory malfunction
Total memory is not recognized.
1.
Reseat SIMMs.
2.
Systematically swap SIMMs.
3. Check to see if the SIMM
configuration is valid (see Section
4).
4.
Replace SIMMs.
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-6
4-9
Problems and Solutions
Problem
Symptom
Solution
5. Replace system board.
Sound/fax/modem
board malfunction
No output from both the 8-bit and
16-bit digitized sounds.
1. Check interrupts. Refer to
Section 1 for interrupt settings.
2. Check DMA channels. Refer
to Section 1 for DMA channel
settings.
Keyboard or mouse
malfunction
Monitor has prompt, but cannot
input data.
1. Check that
keyboard/mouse is plugged in.
2. Check password (see
Section 2).
3. Disable password (see
Section 2).
4. Replace keyboard (or
mouse).
5.
Monitor malfunction
Unable to synchronize display.
Replace system board.
1. Adjust the monitor's
synchronization controls.
2. Check that the monitor's
resolution matches the video
setting or the video driver used
(see Section 1).
3. Check that the utility is not
selecting a refresh rate/resolution
that is not supported by the
monitor.
4. Check that the driver used
matches the capabilities of the
video controller and WRAM on
the video board.
Wavy display.
1. Check that the computer and
monitor are not near motors or
electric fields.
Blank display.
1. Check that built-in VGA or
optional video board, if installed,
is enabled (see Section 2).
2. Check that the monitor
power ON/OFF switch is ON.
3. Check cable connections
between the AC power supply
and monitor.
4. Adjust brightness and
contrast controls on the monitor.
4-10
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Table Section 4-6
Problem
Problems and Solutions
Symptom
Solution
5. Check cable connections
between the monitor connector
and the system board (or
optional video board).
6. Replace system or video
board.
Monitor malfunction (cont’d)
Blank display (cont’d)
7. Replace monitor.
CD-ROM
Malfunction
System power not on.
1. Turn system power on.
Disc tray does not open.
1. System power not on. Turn
system power on.
2. System power failed. Insert
a jewelers screwdriver into the
emergency eject hole and turn
counterclockwise to open the
tray, clockwise to close the tray.
Communication
Error
No or bad data when
communicating.
1. Check cable connections
between system board and
device.
2. Check that the interface port
is selected.
3. Test or replace the device
and interface cable (see the
device documentation for
troubleshooting).
4.
Replace system board.
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4-11
Beep Codes
One beep indicates that the system has completed its power-on self-test. If a long beep or a series of long beeps occur, power off the computer and try again. If the long beeps persists, see
Table Section 4-8 for the diagnostic beep codes.
The beep codes are announced on the speaker only if a fatal failure is detected. For instance,
three long beeps indicates a failure in the first 64 K of RAM.
Table Section 4-8
Diagnostic Beep Codes
Message
Beeps
Description of Failure
Refresh Failure
1
The memory refresh circuit on the system board is
faulty.
Parity Error
2
Parity error in the first 64 KB of memory.
Base 64 KB Memory Failure
3
Memory failure in the first 64 KB.
Timer Not Operational
4
Memory failure in the 64 KB of memory or timer 1 on
the system board is not functioning.
Processor Error
5
The CPU on the system board generated an error.
8042 – Gate A20 Failure
6
The keyboard controller may be bad. The BIOS
cannot switch to protect mode.
Processor Exception Interrupt
Error
7
The CPU generated an exception interrupt.
Display Memory Read/Write
Error
8
The system graphics is either missing or its memory is
faulty. This is not a fatal error.
ROM Checksum Error
9
ROM checksum value does not match the value
encoded in the BIOS.
CMOS Shutdown Register
Read/Write Error
10
The shutdown register for CMOS RAM failed.
Cache Error/External Cache Bad
11
The external cache is faulty.
Section 5
Repair
DISASSEMBLY AND REASSEMBLY
This section contains step-by-step disassembly procedures for the system unit. Reassembly
is the reverse of disassembly. Each procedure is supported by a simplified disassembly
illustration to facilitate removal. An exploded-view, illustrated parts breakdown (IPB) and
parts list for the system are included at the end of this section.
A Phillips-head screwdriver is the only required tool. For complete disassembly of the
system unit, follow the disassembly order listed in Table Section 5-1. To reassemble, follow
the table and procedures in reverse order.
Individual removal procedures do not require the total disassembly of the computer. Each
of the following subsections lists the parts that must be removed before beginning the
removal procedure.
Table Section 5-1
PowerMate P Series System Unit Disassembly Sequence
Sequence
Part
See Page
1
System unit cover
5-2
2
Expansion board(s)
5-4
3
SIMM sticks
5-4
4
Front panel assembly
5-6
5
Blank panel and metal cover plate
5-7
6
3 1/2-inch drive bracket
5-9
7
Card guide/fan bracket
5-9
8
Speaker assembly
5-10
9
3 1/2-inch diskette drive
5-11
10
5 1/4-inch device
5-12
11
Rear 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive bracket
5-14
12
Power supply
5-16
13
PCI/ISA Backboard
5-17
14
System board
5-17
5-2
Repair
When disassembling the system unit, follow these general rules.
n Disconnect all peripherals.
n When handling boards or chips, touch the system unit frame to discharge static.
n Do not disassemble parts other than those specified in the procedure.
n All screws are Phillips-head, unless otherwise specified.
n Label all removed connectors. Note where the connector goes and in what
position it was installed.
On completion of any reassembly, perform a power-on test (see Section 2, “Setup and
Operation”). If a fault occurs, verify that the reassembly was performed correctly.
CAUTION: When handling boards or chips,
ground yourself to release static.
System Unit Cover Removal
The following subsection describes how to remove the system unit cover from the
minitower system.
WARNING: Before removing the system unit
cover, turn off the power and unplug the system
power cable. Power is removed only when the
power cable is unplugged.
1. Turn off and unplug the system unit.
2. Disconnect the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and any other device (such as a
printer) connected from the rear of the system.
CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage
computer components. Discharge static
electricity by touching a metal object before you
remove the system unit cover.
3. Remove the four cover screws from the rear of the system unit (see Figure
Section 5-1).
Repair
Figure Section 5-1
Removing Cover Screws
4. From the rear of the system, grasp the sides and slide the cover about an inch
away from the front panel (see Figure Section 5-2).
NOTE: The cover fits tightly. Press the front
edge of the cover to release it from the front
panel. Also try pressing against the rear panel to
slide the cover one inch away from the front
panel.
Figure Section 5-2
Releasing the Cover
5-3
5-4
Repair
5. Lift the cover up and away from the system unit.
Expansion Board Removal
Remove the any installed expansion board(s) per the following steps.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. Label and remove any cables connected to the board.
3. Remove the screw that secures the board to the support bracket (see Figure
Section 5-3
Figure Section 5-3
Removing the Screw
4. Pull the board out of the connector. Gently rock the board from side-to-side to
release it from its connector.
5. Replace the system unit cover.
SIMM Removal
Remove a SIMM from the system board as follows.
CAUTION: Reduce static discharge by touching
the system's metal chassis.
Repair
5-5
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. Locate the SIMM sockets (see Figure Section 5-4).
Figure Section 5-4
System Board Upgrade SIMM Sockets
3. Press the metal clips at the outer edges of the socket away from the SIMM.
4. Push the SIMM away from the locking tabs (tilt the SIMM forward) and remove
it from the socket (see Figure Section 5-5).
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each SIMM being removed.
5-6
Repair
Figure Section 5-5
Removing a SIMM
NOTE: For information on installing SIMM
sticks, see Section 3, “Options”.
Front Panel Assembly Removal
Remove the front panel from the system unit as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. The front panel is secured with six metal clips (see Figure Section 5-6). Remove
the front panel by evenly and carefully pulling the panel off the chassis.
Use care to prevent pulling on the LED and IR cables attached to the panel.
3. Label and disconnect the LED and IR cables from the system board.
4. Pull the left side out enough to clear the power, reset, and suspend buttons. When
the buttons have been cleared, slide the right side of the front panel out from the
system unit.
Figure Section 5-6
Removing the Front Panel
Repair
5-7
Blank Panel and Metal Cover Plate Removal
Remove the blank panels and the metal cover plates from the chassis as follows.
1. Remove the blank panel from the selected slot by pressing the panel tabs from
inside the front panel and pushing the blank panel out (see Figure Section 5-7).
Store the blank panel for possible later reinstallation.
2. Press in on the tab and remove the metal slot cover from the selected slot on the
front of the system.
Figure Section 5-7
Locating the Blank Panel Tabs
3. Remove the slot cover from the selected slot on the front of the system chassis
(see Figure Section 5-8). On some units, the slot covers may be held in place with
screws; other units may have metal tabs holding the slot covers in place.
5-8
Repair
Store the slot cover in case you choose to use it in the future.
Figure Section 5-8
Locating and Removing the Slot Covers
Repair
5-9
3 1/2-Inch Drive Bracket Removal
Remove the 3 1/2-inch drive bracket as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. Label and disconnect the cables attached to any hard disk drive installed in the
3-1/2-inch bracket.
3. Remove the four screws, two to a side, securing the drive bracket (see
Figure Section 5-9).
Figure Section 5-9
Left Side Front Internal Drive Bracket Screws
4. Slide the bracket out toward the rear of the system.
Card Guide/Fan Bracket Removal
The card guide/fan bracket assembly consists of two parts: the plastic card guide and the
internal fan. These parts are removed as one assembly from the system unit chassis per the
following steps.
5-10
Repair
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. Remove the front panel assembly as previously described (see “Front Panel
Assembly Removal” in this section).
3. Unplug the fan from its connector on the system board.
4. Press in the card guide tabs on the front of the system unit (see Figure Section 5-
10) to release the left side of the card guide from the chassis. From inside the
chassis, pivot the left side of the card guide and remove the card guide/fan bracket
assembly from the chassis (see Figure 5-10).
NOTE: The fan is secured inside the bracket by
four tabs. To remove the fan from the bracket,
gently press out on each tab so that the fan can
be released.
Figure Section 5-10
Removing the Card Guide/Fan Bracket Assembly
Speaker Assembly Removal
Remove the speaker per Figure Section 5-11 and the following steps.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described.
2. Remove the card guide/fan bracket assembly as previously described.
3. Unplug the speaker from its connector on the system board (see Appendix A for
connector assignments).
4. Slide the speaker out from the four speaker tabs.
Repair
Figure Section 5-11
5-11
Speaker
5. Remove the speaker from the system unit.
3 1/2-inch Diskette Drive Removal
Remove the 3 1/2-inch diskette drive as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System unit cover
Removal”).
2. Unplug the diskette drive power cable and signal cable from the diskette drive
(see Figure Section 5-12).
Figure Section 5-12
3 1/2-Inch Diskette Drive Cables
3. Remove the four screws, two on each side, from the 3 1/2-inch diskette drive (see
Figure Section 5-13).
5-12
Repair
Figure Section 5-13
Diskette Drive Bracket Screws
4. Slide the 3 1/2-inch diskette drive out of the slot in the front of the chassis.
5 1/4-Inch Device Removal
Remove a 5 1/4-inch device (CD-ROM reader or other device) from the 5 1/4-inch device
cage as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover and front panel as previously described.
NOTE: The 5 1/4-inch devices are installed with
drive rails.
2. Disconnect the device signal and power cables from the inside of the system unit.
(If removing a CD-ROM reader, also disconnect the audio cable.)
3. Remove the device as follows:
n
If removing the device from the top 5 1/4-inch slot, remove the four screws,
two to a side, that secure the device in the cage (see Figure Section 5-14 and
Figure Section 5-15).
n
If removing a device from the middle or bottom 5 1/4-inch slot, remove the
two screws that secure the device in the cage (see Figure Section 5-14).
n
Slide the device out from the front of the system unit.
Repair
Figure Section 5-14
Front and Left Side Device Screws
Figure Section 5-15
Right Side Device Screws
4. Remove the four screws that secure the rails to the sides of the device(see
Figure Section 5-16).
5-13
5-14
Repair
Figure Section 5-16
Removing the Device Rails
Rear Internal 3 1/2-Inch Drive Removal
Remove a second 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive from the system as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. Unplug the power and signal cables from the 3 1/2-inch internal drive and the
standard hard disk drive installed in the rear internal drive bracket.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the rear internal drive bracket (see
Figure Section 5-17).
Repair
Figure Section 5-17
5-15
Removing the Drive Bracket Screws
4. Lift up the bracket to release it from the metal tabs and remove the bracket
(containing the two hard disks) from the chassis.
5. Remove the four screws, two to a side, securing the second drive in the top slot
of the 3 1/2-inch drive bracket.
NOTE: The following figure shows the standard
hard disk in the lower slot. Removal procedures
are the same for the second drive in the top slot.
Figure Section 5-18
Securing the Drive to the Bracket
5-16
Repair
Power Supply Removal
Remove the power supply as follows.
1. Remove the system unit cover as previously described (see “System Unit Cover
Removal” in this section).
2. If installed, remove the rear internal drive cage as previously described (see “Rear
Internal 3 1/2-Inch Drive Removal” in this section).
3. Unplug the two power cables attached to the system board's connectors. See
Appendix A for connector locations.
4. Unplug the power cables from all installed devices.
5. Cut any tie wraps that may be securing the power cables to the system unit chassis
or drive brackets.
6. Remove the four screws securing the power supply to the system unit chassis (see
Figure Section 5-19).
Figure Section 5-19
Power Supply Screws
7. Free the power supply from the metal tabs on the bottom of the system unit
chassis. Remove the power supply from the system unit.
Repair
5-17
PCI/ISA Backboard Removal
Remove the PCI/ISA backboard per the following steps.
1. Remove the system unit cover and any installed expansion slot boards as
previously described in this section.
2. Remove the two screws that secure the backboard to the support bracket (see
Figure Section 5-20).
3. Pull the backboard out from its connector on the system board and remove it from
the system.
Figure Section 5-20
PCI/ISA Backboard
System Board Removal
Remove the system board per the following steps.
1. Remove the following components as previously described in this section:
n
system unit cover
n
expansion slot boards
n
SIMMs
n
rear 3 1/2-inch internal drive
2. Remove and label all cables connected to the system board. Appendix A provides
the connector identifiers and pin assignments for each connector.
3. Remove the six screws that hold the system board to the system unit chassis.
Remove the system board from the system unit (see Figure Section 5-21).
5-18
Repair
Figure Section 5-21
System Board Removal
Illustrated Parts Breakdown
This subsection contains the illustrated parts breakdown (IPB) and NEC part numbers for
the PowerMate P Series computer. Table Section 5-2 lists the field-replaceable parts for the
computer. Figure Section 5-22 is the illustrated parts breakdown.
NOTE: In the U.S., call 1(800) 632-4565 to
order NEC spare parts. To order options in the
U.S., call the local NEC sales office. See Table
4-1 in Section 4 for NEC telephone numbers.
Table Section 5-2
PowerMate P Series Field-Replaceable Parts List*
Item
Description
Part Number
1
Power Cord
808-857649-101A
2a
1.6 GB 3 1/2-inch IDE hard disk
158-050395-361
2b
2.0 GB 3 1/2-inch IDE hard disk
158-050395-363
3
6X IDE CD-ROM Reader
158-050982-000
4
3 1/2-Inch x 1-Inch, 1.44-MB Diskette Drive
158-050966-000
5
Fan Assembly
158-056328-000
6
3 1/2-Inch Hard Disk Drive IDE Signal Cable
(3 connector)
158-050562-006
7
3 1/2-Inch Diskette Drive Signal Cable
158-050503-001
____________
*This data was prepared March 1996. For an up-to-date listing of spare parts, please call FastFacts (800) 366-0476 and
order document number 42181410.
Repair
Table Section 5-2
Item
PowerMate P Series Field-Replaceable Parts List*
Description
Part Number
8
5 1/4-Inch Blank Panel Cover (plastic)
158-030810-000
9
Front Bezel Assembly (with cables)
158-050896-000
10A
Logo (150 CPU)
158-030872-014
10B
Logo (166 CPU)
158-030872-015
11
Speakers (20 watt)
158-050979-000
12
System Unit Cover
158-056325-000
13
Power Supply (200W)
158-050684-000
14
Speaker Assembly
158-056329-000
15
Audio Cable for 6X CD-ROM
158-050824-000
16
3 1/2-Inch Rear Internal Drive Bracket
158-050932-000
17
CD-ROM IDE Signal Cable
158-050562-007
18A
System Board without CPU, with Audio (multimedia) 158-050866-005C
18B
System Board without CPU, without Audio
(nonmultimedia)
158-050866-006C
19
8 MB EDO SIMM (2 MB x 32 bit, 70 ns)
158-082630-070
20
Video Card with 2 MB video memory
158-050960-002
21
ISA/PCI I/O Backplane
158-026203-000A
22
Heatsink Assembly (with clip)
158-060324-001
23a
150 MHz CPU
158-082502-014
23b
166 MHz CPU
158-082502-017
24
Secondary cache (256K)
158-082624-000
25
Keyboard, 104-Key (WIN95)
158-050939-000
26
Mouse (Logitech)
158-050789-000
27
Microphone
158-050878-000
28
Battery**
158-082595-000
29a
I/O Plate with Audio**
158-030782-005
29b
I/O Plate without Audio**
158-030786-006
30
Rail Kit**
158-050893-000
** = Not shown in Figure 5-22.
5-19
5-20
Repair
Figure Section 5-22
PowerMate P Series Illustrated Parts Breakdown*
____________
* This data was prepared March 1996. For an up-to-date listing of spare parts, please call FastFacts (800) 366-0476
and order document number 42181410.
Repair
Table Section 5-3
5-21
PowerMate P Series Video Upgrade Options
Description
Part Number
Video Memory Upgrade Module (2 MB)
158-050994-000
Video Memory Upgrade Module (6 MB)
158-050994-002
Table Section 5-4 lists PowerMate P Series documentation and packaging.
Table Section 5-4
PowerMate P Series Documentation and Packaging*
Description
Part Number
PowerMate P Series User’s Guide
819-181408-000
PowerMate P Series Service and Reference Manual
819-181410-000
Shipping Carton for Multimedia Systems
158-040494-002
Shipping Carton for non-Multimedia Systems
158-040511-000
Shipping Carton Corner Blocks (4)
158-040395-004
____________
* This data was prepared March 1996. For an up-to-date listing of spare parts, please call FastFacts (800) 366-0476
and order document number 42181410.
Appendix A
Connector Pin Assignments
This appendix describes the system board connector pin assignments. Figure Appendix A-1
shows the locations of the system board connectors. shows an exploded view of the smaller
connectors on the lower right side of the system board. Table A-1 identifies the connector
function with the connector number. Descriptions of the connectors are provided in the
following subsections.
Figure Appendix A-1
System Board Layout
A-2
Connector Pin Assignments
Figure Appendix A-2
System Board Connectors, Lower Right
Table Appendix A-1
System Board Connectors
Function
Connector Number
Type
Microphone In
MIC IN
1/8-Inch banana connector
Line In
LINE IN
1/8-Inch banana connector
Line Out
LINE OUT
1/8-Inch banana connector
Parallel Interface
J9 (PRINTER)
25 pin female sub D-shell
Serial Interface COM1/COM2
J4 (COM2. COM1)
9 pin D-shell
Mouse
J2 (MOUSE)
6-pin PS/2 style connector
Keyboard
J2 (KEYBD)
6-pin PS/2 style connector
CD ROM Reader
J10 (CD IN)
1 x 4 pin header
Diskette Drive
J1 (FLOPPY)
2 x 17 pin header
Power Supply
J5
1 x 12 pin locking header
SIMM Memory Sockets
SIMM 1, 2, 3, 4
72 pin single inline connector
PCI/IDE Interface (primary)
J6 (IDE PRI)
2 x 20 pin header
IDE Interface (secondary)
J3 (IDE SEC)
2 x 20 pin header
Secondary Cache Module
J20 (CACHE MODULE)
160-pin single inline connector
Fan
J8 (FAN)
1 x 3 pin header
Connector Pin Assignments
Table Appendix A-1
System Board Connectors
Function
Connector Number
Type
Infrared (IRDA)
IRDA
1 x 4 pin header
Suspend Button
SLEEP
1 x 2 pin header
Hard disk LED
HDLED
1 x 4 pin header
Power LED
POWER LED
1 x 5 pin header
Reset Button
RESET
1 x 4 pin header
Speaker
J22 (SPEAKER)
1 x 4 pin header
ISA/PCI-Bus Backboard
J7
98-pin header
SERIAL INTERFACE CONNECTORS
Serial interface signals are output from the system board through two 9-pin COM port
connectors. The 9-pin, D-subconnectors are located at the rear of the system unit. Pin
locations and pin assignments for the serial interface connectors are shown in Table
Appendix A-2 and Figure Appendix A-3.
Figure Appendix A-3
Serial Interface
A-3
A-4
Connector Pin Assignments
Table Appendix A-2
Pin
RS-232C Serial Port Connector Pin Assignments
Signal
1
Carrier detect
2
Receive data
3
Transmit data
4
Data terminal ready
5
Signal ground
6
Data set ready
7
Request to send
8
Clear to send
9
Ring indicator
PARALLEL INTERFACE CONNECTOR
The system has a 25-pin parallel port on the system board. Parallel interface specifications
for this port conform to the IBM-PC interface. Pin locations and pin assignments for the
parallel interface connector are shown in Table Appendix A-3 and Figure Appendix A-4.
Figure Appendix A-4
Parallel Interface Connector
Connector Pin Assignments
Table Appendix A-3
Parallel Printer Port Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
Strobe
2
Data bit 0
3
Data bit 1
4
Data bit 2
5
Data bit 3
6
Data bit 4
7
Data bit 5
8
Data bit6
9
Data bit 7
10
Acknowledge
11
Busy
12
PE
13
Select
14
Auto feed XT
15
Error
16
Initialize
17
Select in
18
through
25
Ground
A-5
A-6
Connector Pin Assignments
VGA INTERFACE CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Video signals are output from the VGA interface connector, which is a 15-pin, Dsubconnector (VESA VS890803-2) located on the video board (installed in one of the ISA
slots on the PCI/ISA backboard.). Table Appendix A-4 and Figure Appendix A-5 shows the
connector pin locations and pin assignments.
Figure Appendix A-5
VGA Interface Connector
Table Appendix A-4 VGA Interface Connector Pin
Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
Red
2
Green
3
Blue
4
Monitor ID bit 2 (not used)
5
Ground
6
Red return (ground)
7
Green return (ground)
8
Blue return (ground)
9
Key (no pin)
10
Sync return (ground)
11
Monitor ID bit 0 (not used)
12
Monitor ID bit 1 (not used)
13
Horizontal sync
14
Vertical sync
15
Not used
Connector Pin Assignments
SPEAKER CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Speaker connector pin locations and pin assignments are shown in Table Appendix A-5.
Table Appendix A-5
Speaker Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
Speaker data out
2
Key
3
NC
4
+5 Volts
POWER SUPPLY CONNECTOR
Voltages from the power supply are input to the system board through the power supply
connector. Figure Appendix A-6 shows the connector pin locations and pin assignments.
12
7
+5
-5
Figure Appendix A-6
GND
6
1
GND
-12
+12
+5
Power Good
Signal
Power Supply Connector Pin Assignments
A-7
A-8
Connector Pin Assignments
KEYBOARD AND MOUSE CONNECTORS
The keyboard and mouse use standard PS/2 connectors. Pin assignments are given in
Table Appendix A-6.
Table Appendix A-6
Keyboard and Mouse Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Keyboard Connector
Mouse Connector
1
Keyboard Data
Mouse Data
2
N/C
N/C
3
GND
GND
4
+5V, (fused)
+5V, (fused)
5
Keyboard Clk
Mouse Clk
6
N/C
N/C
IRDA CONNECTOR
The IRDA (infrared) connector pin assignments are given in Table Appendix A-7.
Table Appendix A-7
IRDA Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
IR RX (IR receive)
2
Ground
3
IR TX (IR transmit)
4
+5V
SUSPEND BUTTON CONNECTOR
The suspend button connector (SLEEP) pin assignments are given in Table Appendix A-8.
Table Appendix A-8
Pin
Signal
1
+5V
2
Power control
Suspend Connector Pin Assignments
Connector Pin Assignments
A-9
FAN CONNECTOR
Fan connector pin assignments are given in Table Appendix A-9. The connector plugs into
one of the power supply cable connectors.
Table Appendix A-9
Pin
Signal
1
Ground
2
+12V (fused)
3
Ground
Fan Connector Pin Assignments
DISKETTE DRIVE INTERFACE PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Table Appendix A-10 provides the pin assignments for the diskette drive interface.
Table Appendix A-10
Diskette Drive Connector Pin Assignments
Ground Pin
Signal Pin
I/O
Signal Name
1
2
O
FDHDIN
3
4
Not used
5*
6
FDEDIN
7
8
INDEX
9
10
MOTEN1
11
12
O
DS2
13
14
O
DS1
15
16
O
MOTEN2
17
18
O
DIR
19
20
O
STEP
21
22
O
WRT DATA
23
24
O
WRT EN GATE
25
26
I
TRK0
27
28
I
WRT PROT
29
30
I
READ DATA
31
32
O
HS SEL
33
34
I
DSKT CHG
*Pin 5 is reserved for connector polarization.
A-10
Connector Pin Assignments
IDE INTERFACE CONNECTORS
All signal levels in the IDE interface are TTL compatible. A logic 1 is a signal whose
voltage level is between 2.0 and 5.0 V. A logic 0 is a signal measuring between 0.00 V and
0.70 V.
The two system board IDE connectors are physically identical. Electrically the primary
IDE/PCI bus IDE connector is faster and the secondary IDE/PCI connector is slower. Table
Appendix A-11 provides the IDE pin assignments. All signals on the Host interface have the
prefix HOST. All negatively active signals are further prefixed with a “-“ designation. All
positively active signals are prefixed with a “+” designation.
Table Appendix A-11
Pin
IDE/PCI Connector Pin Assignments
Signal
Pin
Signal
01
HOST RESET
02
GND
03
+HOST DATA 7
04
+HOST DATA 8
05
+HOST DATA 6
06
+HOST DATA 9
07
+HOST DATA 5
08
+HOST DATA 10
09
+HOST DATA 4
10
+HOST DATA 11
11
+HOST DATA 3
12
+HOST DATA 12
13
+HOST DATA 2
14
+HOST DATA 13
15
+HOST DATA 1
16
+HOST DATA 14
17
+HOST DATA 0
18
+HOST DATA 15
19
GND
20
KEY
21
DRQ3
22
GND
23
HOST IOW
24
GND
25
HOST IOR
26
GND
27
IOCHRDY
28
+HOST ALE
29
DACK3
30
GND
31*
+HOST IRQ14
32
33
+HOST ADDR 1
34
GND
35
+HOST ADDR 0
36
+HOST ADDR 2
37
HOST CSO
38
39
HOST SLV/ACT
40
*The Primary IDE/PCI connector uses IRQ15
HOST IO16
HOST CS1
GND
Connector Pin Assignments
A-11
SIMM SOCKETS
Table Appendix A-12 provides the SIMM socket pin assignments.
Table Appendix A-12
Pin
SIMM Socket Pin Assignments
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
GND
25
D22
49
D8
2
D0
26
D7
50
D24
3
D16
27
D23
51
D9
4
D1
28
A7
52
D25
5
D17
29
N/C
53
D10
6
D2
30
+5V
54
D26
7
D18
31
A8
55
D11
8
D3
32
A9
56
D27
9
D19
33
N/C
57
D12
10
+5V
34
RAS2
58
D28
11
N/C
35
MP2
59
+5V
12
A0
36
MP0
60
D29
13
A1
37
MP1
61
D13
14
A2
38
MP3
62
D30
15
A3
39
GND
63
D14
16
A4
40
CAS0*
64
D31
17
A5
41
CAS2*
65
D15
18
A6
42
CAS3*
66
N/C
19
N/C
43
CAS1*
67
PD0 (N/C)
20
D4
44
RAS0
68
PD1 (N/C)
21
D20
45
N/C
69
PD2 N/C
22
D5
46
N/C
70
PD3 N/C
23
D21
47
WE
71
N/C
24
D6
48
N/C
72
GND
A-12
Connector Pin Assignments
ISA/PCI-BUS BACKBOARD CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Table Appendix A-13 provides the pin assignments for the ISA/PCI-bus backboard
connector on the system board.
Table Appendix A-13
ISA/PCI-Bus Backboard Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
A1
IOCHCK
B1
GND
E1
GND
F1
GND
A2
SD07
B2
RSET DRV
E2
GND
F2
GND
A3
SD06
B3
+5V
E3
PCIINT1
F3
PCIINT3
A4
SD05
B4
IRO09
E4
PCIINT2
F4
PCIINT4
A5
SD04
B5
5V
E5
+5V
F5
+5V
A6
SD03
B6
DRQ2
E6
Key
F6
Key
A7
SD02
B7
12V
E7
+5V
F7
+5V
A8
SD01
B8
0WS
E8
PCIRST
F8
PCLKF
A9
SD00
B9
+12V
E9
GNTO
F9
GND
A10
IOCHRDY
B10
GND
E10
REQ0
F10
A11
AEN
B11
SMEMWR
E11
GND
F11
A12
SA19
B12
SMEMRD
E12
PCLKE
F12
A13
SA18
B13
IORD
E13
GND
F13
AD31
A14
SA17
B14
IOWR
E14
AD30
F14
AD29
A15
SA16
B15
DACK3
E15
+3.3V
F15
+3.3V
A16
SA15
B16
DRQ3
E16
Key
F16
Key
A17
SA14
B17
DACK1
E17
+3.3V
F17
+3.3V
A18
SA13
B18
DRQ1
E18
AD28
F18
AD27
A19
SA12
B19
REFRESH
E19
AD26
F19
AD25
A20
SA11
B20
BCLK
E20
AD24
F20
A21
SA10
B21
IRQ07
E21
AD22
F21
AD23
A22
SA09
B22
IRQ06
E22
AD20
F22
AD21
A23
SA08
B23
IRQ05
E23
AD18
F23
AD19
A24
SA07
B24
IRQ04
E24
+3.3V
F24
+3.3v
A25
SA06
B25
IRQ03
E25
Key
F25
Key
A26
SA05
B26
DACK2
E26
+3.3V
F26
+3.3V
A27
SA04
B27
T/C
E27
AD16
F27
AD17
GNT1
GND
REQ1
CBE3
Connector Pin Assignments
Table Appendix A-13
A-13
ISA/PCI-Bus Backboard Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
A28
SA03
B28
BALE
E28
A29
SA02
B29
+5V
A30
SA01
B30
A31
SA00
C1
Signal
Pin
Signal
FRAME
F28
IRDY
E29
CBE2
F29
DEVSEL
OSC
E30
TRDY
F30
PLOCK
B31
GND
E31
STOP
F31
PERR
SBHE
D1
MEMCS16
G1
SDONE
H1
SERR
C2
LAB23
D2
I/OCS16
G2
SB0
H2
AD15
C3
LAB22
D3
IRQ10
G3
CBE1
H3
AD14
C4
LAB21
D4
IRQ11
G4
PAR
H4
AD12
C5
LAB20
D5
IRQ12
G5
GND
H5
GND
C6
LAB19
D6
IRQ15
G6
Key
H6
Key
C7
LAB18
D7
IRQ14
G7
GND
H7
GND
C8
LAB17
D8
DACK0
G8
AD13
H8
AD10
C9
MEMRD
D9
DRQ0
G9
AD11
H9
AD8
C10
MEMWR
D10
DACK5
G10
AD9
H10
AD7
C11
SD08
D11
DRQ5
G11
H11
AD5
C12
SD09
D12
DACK6
G12
AD6
H12
AD3
C13
SD10
D13
DRQ6
G13
AD4
H13
AD1
C14
SD11
D14
DACK7
G14
AD2
H14
AD0
C15
SD12
D15
DRQ7
G15
Key
H15
Key
C16
SD13
D16
+5V
G16
+5V
H16
+5V
C17
SD14
D17
MASTER
G17
+5V
H17
+5V
C18
SD15
D18
GND
G18
GND
H18
GND
CBE0
A-14
Connector Pin Assignments
ISA EXPANSION BUS CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The expansion slots signals, voltages, and grounds are supplied through the bus connectors.
There are no active components on the ISA/PCI-bus backboard. Table Appendix A-14
provides the pin assignments for the ISA expansion slots.
Table Appendix A-14
ISA Expansion Slot Pin Assignments
Pin
Direction
Signal
Pin
Direction
Signal
A1
Input
IOCHCK
B1
Ground
GND
A2
Input/Output
SD07
B2
Output
RSET DRV
A3
Input/Output
SD06
B3
Power
+5V
A4
Input/Output
SD05
B4
Input
IRO09
A5
Input/Output
SD04
B5
Power
5V
A6
Input/Output
SD03
B6
Input
DRQ2
A7
Input/Output
SD02
B7
Power
12V
A8
Input/Output
SD01
B8
Input
0WS
A9
Input/Output
SD00
B9
Power
+12V
A10
Input
IOCHRDY
B10
Ground
GND
A11
Output
AEN
B11
Output
SMEMWR
A12
Input/Output
SA19
B12
Output
SMEMRD
A13
Input/Output
SA18
B13
Input/Output
IORD
A14
Input/Output
SA17
B14
Input/Output
IOWR
A15
Input/Output
SA16
B15
Output
DACK3
A16
Input/Output
SA15
B16
Input
DRQ3
A17
Input/Output
SA14
B17
Output
DACK1
A18
Input/Output
SA13
B18
Input
DRQ1
A19
Input/Output
SA12
B19
Input/Output
REFRESH
A20
Input/Output
SA11
B20
Output
BCLK
A21
Input/Output
SA10
B21
Input
IRQ07
A22
Input/Output
SA09
B22
Input
IRQ06
A23
Input/Output
SA08
B23
Input
IRQ05
A24
Input/Output
SA07
B24
Input
IRQ04
A25
Input/Output
SA06
B25
Input
IRQ03
A26
Input/Output
SA05
B26
Output
DACK2
Connector Pin Assignments
Table Appendix A-14
A-15
ISA Expansion Slot Pin Assignments
Pin
Direction
Signal
Pin
Direction
Signal
A27
Input/Output
SA04
B27
Output
T/C
A28
Input/Output
SA03
B28
Output
BALE
A29
Input/Output
SA02
B29
Power
+5V
A30
Input/Output
SA01
B30
Output
OSC
A31
Input/Output
SA00
B31
Ground
GND
C1
Input/Output
SBHE
D1
Input
MEMCS16
C2
Input/Output
LAB23
D2
Input
I/OCS16
C3
Input/Output
LAB22
D3
Input
IRQ10
C4
Input/Output
LAB21
D4
Input
IRQ11
C5
Input/Output
LAB20
D5
Input
IRQ12
C6
Input/Output
LAB19
D6
Input
IRQ15
C7
Input/Output
LAB18
D7
Input
IRQ14
C8
Input/Output
LAB17
D8
Output
DACK0
C9
Input/Output
MEMRD
D9
Input
DRQ0
C10
Input/Output
MEMWR
D10
Output
DACK5
C11
Input/Output
SD08
D11
Input
DRQ5
C12
Input/Output
SD09
D12
Output
DACK6
C13
Input/Output
SD10
D13
Input
DRQ6
C14
Input/Output
SD11
D14
Output
DACK7
C15
Input/Output
SD12
D15
Input
DRQ7
C16
Input/Output
SD13
D16
Power
+5V
C17
Input/Output
SD14
D17
Input
MASTER
C18
Input/Output
SD15
D18
Ground
GND
A-16
Connector Pin Assignments
CD AUDIO IN CONNECTOR PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The pin assignments for the CD audio-in connector are provided in Table Appendix A-15..
Table Appendix A-15
Pin
Signal
1
Speaker Data
2
Key
3
NC
4
+5V
CD Audio In Connector
Appendix B
System Board Jumpers
This appendix provides jumper setting information for configuring the system for a
particular system requirement. Situations that require changing the jumper settings include
the following:
n upgrading the processor
n clearing a password
n clearing CMOS.
CAUTION: Jumpers are set correctly at the
factory for the shipped configuration. If the
system requires a jumper change, change only the
jumper setting for that condition. Otherwise,
keep the jumpers at their factory settings.
JUMPER LOCATIONS
Figure Appendix B-1 shows the location of the system board jumpers.
Figure Appendix B-1
System Board Jumper Locations
B-2
System Board Jumpers
CHANGING PROCESSOR JUMPER SETTINGS
Use the following procedure when replacing the installed processor with a faster speed
processor. Jumpers requiring setting changes include the Processor/Bus Speed and ATCLK
jumpers.
1. Turn off and unplug the system and any connected external options.
WARNING: System power must be off before
removing the cover and changing a jumper
setting.
2. Remove the system unit cover (see Section 3, Option Installation, for cover
removal).
3. Replace the processor (see Section 3 for processor upgrade procedures).
4. Remove any expansion boards blocking access to the jumpers.
5. Locate the Processor/Bus Speed, ATCLK, and Processor Voltage jumper blocks
on the system board (see Figure Appendix B-1).
6. Set the Processor/Bus Speed and ATCLK jumpers per Figure Appendix B-2.
7. Set the Processor Voltage jumper (see Figure Appendix B-2) on the system
board as follows:
n
For the 150-MHz processor (60-MHz clock speed), set the jumper on the VR
block (3.38 volts)
n
For the 166-MHz processor (66-MHz clock speed), set the jumper on the
VRE block (3.52 volts)
CAUTION: Unless updating the processor to a
faster speed, leave the Processor Voltage jumper
and Bus/Core jumper at the factory setting.
Changing the Voltage and Bus/Core jumpers
could damage the processor.
8. Reinstall any removed expansion boards.
9. Reinstall the system cover.
10. Reconnect any disconnected peripherals and turn on the system.
System Board Jumpers
Figure Appendix B-2
B-3
Processor Upgrade Jumpers
CHANGING THE PASSWORD
If a password is forgotten, use the following procedures to clear the current password and
to set a new one.
1. Turn off and unplug the system and any connected external options.
WARNING: System power must be off before
removing the cover and changing a jumper
setting.
B-4
System Board Jumpers
2. Remove the system unit cover (see Section 3, Option Installation, for cover
removal).
3. Locate the Password Clear jumper block on the system board (see Figure
Appendix B-1). Remove any expansion boards blocking access to the jumper.
4. Set a jumper on the Password Clear jumper block pins.
5. Reinstall the system cover.
6. Connect system power cables and external options.
7. Turn on the system. The system boots up and clears the password.
8. Turn off the system and unplug the system and any connected peripherals
9. Remove the system cover.
10. Remove the jumper from the Password Clear jumper block.
11. Reinstall any removed expansion boards.
12. Reinstall the system cover
13. Connect and power up the system and any removed peripherals.
14. Rerun Setup to set a new password (see Section 2, Setup and Operation).
CLEARING CMOS
Use the following procedure to clear CMOS to the factory settings.
CAUTION: Clearing CMOS changes the setup
configuration, including hard disk settings.
1. Turn off and unplug the system and any connected external options.
WARNING: System power must be off before
removing the cover and changing a jumper
setting.
2. Remove the system unit cover (see Section 3, Option Installation, for cover
removal).
3. Locate the BIOS Recovery jumper block on the system board (see Figure
Appendix B-1). Remove any expansion boards blocking access to the jumper.
4. Set a jumper on the BIOS Recovery jumper block pins.
System Board Jumpers
B-5
5. Reinstall the system cover.
6. Connect the system unit and any peripherals.
7. Turn on the system. The system displays a system configuration error message.
8. Turn off the system and unplug the system and any connected peripherals.
9. Remove the system cover and the jumper from the BIOS Recovery jumper block
pins
10. Install any removed expansion boards.
11. Reinstall the system cover and power up the system and peripherals.
12. Run Setup to reconfigure the system (see Section 2).
Appendix C
Hard Disk Drive Specifications and
Jumper Settings
This appendix provides specifications and jumper settings for the Conner 1.6-GB and
Seagate 2-GB hard disk drives used in the PowerMate P series computer configurations.
Table 1-1 and Table 1-2 in Section 1 identifies the which hard disk drives ship in which
configurations. NEC part numbers for the hard drives are provided in Sections 5.
The standard IDE hard drive is set as the master device on the primary IDE connector. The
drive is connected via a three-connector IDE cable to the system board.
The drive is auto-configurable, meaning that once the master/slave jumpers are set, the hard
disk type is automatically detected by the system and the remaining drive parameters are
automatically set by the system. (See Section 2, “Setup and Operation,” for information on
auto setup using the Autotype Fixed Disk parameter.)
HARD DISK DRIVE SPECIFICATIONS
Specifications for the 3 1/2 inch IDE hard disk drive are given in Table Appendix C-1.
Jumper settings are described in the following subsections.
Table Appendix C-1
Features
Hard Disk Drive Specifications
1.6-GB Hard
Disk (CFS1621A)
2-GB Hard Disk
(ST32140A)
Physical Configuration
Formatted Capacity 1.622 GB
2.113 GB
Actuator Type
Rotary voice-coil
Rotary voice-coil
Number of Disks
3
4
Data Heads
6
8
Servo Type
Embedded
Embedded
Tracks per Inch (tpi) 4,100
4,800
Bytes per Sector
512
512
Maximum Data
Rate from Media
34.8 MB/s
67.7 MB/s
C-2
Hard Disk Drive Specifications and Jumper Settings
Table Appendix C-1
Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Features
1.6-GB Hard
Disk (CFS1621A)
2-GB Hard Disk
(ST32140A)
Dimensions
Height
Length
Width
1.0 in. (25.4 mm)
5.75 in. (146.1 mm)
4.00 in. (101.6 mm)
1.03 in. (25.4 mm)
5.79 in. (146.6 mm)
4.02 in. (102.1 mm)
1.3 lb (590 gm)
1.0 lb (454 gm)
Track-to-track seek
Average seek
Maximum seek
3 ms
14 ms
20 ms
2 ms
10 ms
28 ms
Average Latency
5.58 ms
8.3 ms
Rotation Speed
5376 rpm
3600 rpm
Data Transfer Rate
(buffer to disk)
67.7 MB/s max
34.8 MB/s max
Data Transfer Rate
(buffer to host)
16.6 MB/s, PIO Mode 4 16.6 MB/s, PIO Mode 4
Start/Stop Cycles
20,000 min
40,000 min
Buffer Size
256 KB
64 KB
Interface
IDE
IDE
Weight
Performance
1.6-GB HARD DISK DRIVE JUMPER SETTINGS
The 1.6-GB hard drive uses one user selectable jumper block (J4) to configure the
master/slave and cable select options of the hard drive. Jumper block J4 has two jumper
settings: CS (cable select), and C/D (master/slave select). The factory default is to have pins
1 and 2 jumpered (shorted) to set the drive as the master. See Table Appendix C-2 for
jumper settings.
Table Appendix C-2
1.6-GB Hard Disk Jumper Settings
Pins
Signal
Description
1 and 2
C/D
Open: Drive configured as slave.
Shorted: Drive configured as master
(default)
3 and 4
N/A
Reserved (not used)
5 and 6
CS
Open: Cable Select option disabled (default)
Shorted: Cable select option enabled
7 to 18
N/A
Reserved (not used)
Hard Disk Drive Specifications and Jumper Settings
C-3
2-GB HARD DISK DRIVE JUMPER SETTINGS
The 2-GB hard drive has three jumper blocks used to configure the drive. These are
identified on the drive as J5 (master/slave select), J6 (dual drive emulation), and J8 (remote
LED option). A summary of the configuration settings follows.
J5 Master/Slave Select
Use JP5 to configure the drive as a master or slave as shown in the following table.
Table Appendix C-3
2-GB Hard Disk Master/Slave Select Jumper Settings
Pins 1-2
Pins 3-4
Description
Open
Open
One drive only configured as master
(default). A spare jumper is installed across
pins 1-3.
Short
Open
One drive only configured as slave
Open
Short
Drive is master with slave present Select
option disabled (default)
Shorted: Cable select option enabled
Short
Short
Cable Select. You must also install a
jumper on pins 6-8 of J8.
J6 Dual Drive Emulation Block
The 2-GB hard drive can be addressed as a single drive in systems that employ logical block
addressing (LBA). If the system cannot address the full volume, the drive can be jumpered
to appear to the system as both a Master and Slave (dual-drive emulation).
Table Appendix C-4
2-GB Dual Drive Emulation Jumper Settings
Pins 1-2
Pins 3-4
Description
Open
Open
Normal single drive operation
(default). A spare jumper is
installed across pins 1-3.
Short
Short
Dual-drive emulation.
J8 Remote LED Option Block
J8 consists of 7 pin-pairs. Only one pin-pair (13-14) has functionality. The rest are reserved
and not used outside the factory. The factory default is to have pins 1-2 jumpered as a
spare. Pins 13-14 can be jumpered to drive a remote LED (pin 13 is – and pin 14 is +).
Appendix D
CD-ROM Reader Specifications
and Jumper Settings
This appendix provides specifications and jumper settings for the six-speed GoldStar IDE
CD-ROM reader used in the PowerMate P Series multimedia configurations.
The CD-ROM reader comes pre-installed in the top 5 1/4-inch accessible device slot. The
reader is connected to the secondary PCI/IDE connector on the system board via an I/O
cable. An audio cable connects the reader to the sound system. The reader is assigned as
drive E.
See Section 2 for information on the CD-ROM reader’s controls and indicators. NEC part
numbers are provided in Sections 5.
CD-ROM READER SPECIFICATIONS
Table Appendix D -1 lists the specifications for the six-speed CD-ROM reader.
Table Appendix D -1
Specifications for Six-Speed CD-ROM Reader
Feature
Specification
Performance
Data Transfer Rate
900 KB/sec
Burst Transfer Rate
PIO Mode 3 (11.1 MB/sec) max.
DMA Mode 1
Average Seek Time
130 ms, 150 ms including latency
Average Full Stroke Seek
330 ms, 370 ms including latency
Memory Buffer
256 KB
Supported Formats
Mixed Mode (audio and data combined)
CD-DA,
CD-XA ready,
Mode 1 and Mode 2 form 1 and form 2,
Photo CD (multi-session),
CD-Plus,
CD-I ready
D-2
Quad-Speed CD-ROM Reader Specifications and Jumper Settings
Table Appendix D -1
Specifications for Six-Speed CD-ROM Reader
Feature
Specification
General Specifications
Interface
ATA Packet Interface SFF-8020 Rev.
1.2
Capacity
650 MB (depends on CD format)
Disc Loading
Motorized Front Loading (caddyless)
Logical Format
Data disc: ISO 9660
file format
MTBF (power-on hours)
125, 000 hours (10% duty cycle)
MTTR
30 minutes
Data reliability
1 unrecoverable error per 10E12 bits
read
Height
1.63 in. (41.5 mm)
Width
5.75 in. (146.0 mm)
Depth
7.91 in. (201.0 mm)
Weight
1.8 lb. (900 grams)
Relative Humidity
(operational)
5% to 90% (no condensation)
Operating Temperature
5°C to 45°C
CD-ROM Reader Connectors and Jumper Settings
The back of the CD-ROM readers provides the following connectors and jumpers:
n Audio output connector — connects the reader to the system’s sound system via
an audio cable.
n Configuration jumpers — enables or disables the cable select feature, slave device
configuration, or master device configuration. The CD-ROM reader is set as the
master device on the secondary PCI/IDE channel.
n IDE connector — connects the reader to the secondary PCI/IDE connector on the
system board via an I/O cable.
n Power connector — connects the reader to the power supply via a power supply
cable.
Quad-Speed CD-ROM Reader Specifications and Jumper Settings
D-3
Adjacent to the standard 40-pin IDE connector on the back of the CD-ROM reader is a
jumper block with the following labels as read from left to right: C.S., SL, and MA. The
following is a summary of the jumper settings:
n C.S. (cable select) — enables/disables the cable select feature. Factory set at
disabled (pins not jumpered).
n SL (slave) — enables/disables the slave feature. Factory set at disabled (pins not
jumpered)
n MA (master) — enables/disables the master feature. Factory set at enabled (pins
jumpered)
Glossary
applications programs
Software designed to perform specific functions, like solving business or mathematical
problems.
asynchronous communications
Method of data transmission where characters are preceded by a start bit and followed by a
stop bit, permitting the time between characters to vary.
AUTOEXEC.BAT
A batch program file that the operating system runs to define hardware device
characteristics.
base RAM
Area of system memory between 0 and 640 kilobytes available to the user for operating
system and application programs.
BIOS
Basic Input Output System. A collection of computer routines, usually burnt into ROM,
that controls the real-time clock, keyboard, disk drives, video display, and other peripheral
devices.
bit
Binary digit. The smallest unit of computer data.
bits per second
(bps) A unit of transmission. Also called baud rate.
board
Printed circuit board. Board onto which computer components are soldered and thin wires
are printed to connect the components.
boot
To start up a computer. See cold boot and warm boot.
Glossary-2
bus
An electronic circuit within a computer used for transmitting data or electrical power from
one device to another.
busy lamp
Indicator on the front of the diskette drive that lights when the drive is writing to or reading
from a diskette.
byte
Group of eight contiguous bits.
chip
A small piece of semiconductor material, usually silicon, that contains miniaturized
electronic circuits.
CD-ROM reader
(compact disc, read-only memory) A device that uses laser technology to read data or play
audio stored on a CD.
clock
Electronic timer used to synchronize computer operations.
CMOS
Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. A chip that contains nonvolatile memory.
CMOS is backed up by an internal lithium battery that preserves clock/calendar data and
system configuration parameters stored in CMOS.
cold boot
Process of starting up the computer by turning on the power. If power is already on, the
process means to turn off the computer and turn it on again. A cold boot reinitializes all
devices.
compact disk
(CD) A non-erasable storage disc that is read optically by means of a laser. Holds more than
500 megabytes of data.
Glossary-3
CONFIG.SYS
A text file that tells the computer where in memory to load the operating system, what
device drivers to install, and what memory management features to activate.
conventional RAM
The first megabyte of RAM in the system which contains 640 KB of base memory and 384
KB of reserved memory.
cursor
A movable image on the display screen that indicates where the next entered data appears.
diskette
A thin flexible platter coated with a magnetic material for storing information.
diskette drive
A magnetic drive that writes on and retrieves data from a diskette.
expansion option
Add-on hardware that expands system performance and versatility.
expansion slot
Location inside the system unit for connecting an optional printed circuit board.
extended RAM
The area of RAM above the first megabyte of memory in the system available for enhancing
system performance.
formatting
The process of preparing a disk or diskette to accept data.
function key
The set of keys on the keyboard (usually F1 through F12) that let you get help and error
message information or quickly select frequently used commands.
hard disk
A rigid magnetic storage device that provides fast access to stored data.
Glossary-4
hardware
The electrical and mechanical parts from which a computer is made.
hertz
(Hz) A unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second.
input/output
(I/O) The process of transferring data between the computer and external devices.
IDE
Intelligent Drive Electronics. A hard disk drive type that has controller electronics built into
the drive and delivers high throughput.
interface
A connection that enables two devices to communicate.
interrupt
A special control signal from an I/O device that diverts the attention of the microprocessor
from the program to a special address.
kilobyte
(KB) 1024 bytes.
load
The process of copying a program into the computer's memory from a storage device.
megabyte
(MB) 1,048,576 bytes.
memory
Electronic storage area in a computer that retains information and programs. A computer
has two types of memory - read-only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM).
menu
A video display of programs or options.
Glossary-5
microprocessor
A semiconductor central processing unit that is the principal component of a
microcomputer. Usually contained on a single chip that includes an arithmetic logic unit,
control logic, and control-memory unit.
millisecond
(ms) One-thousandth of one second; 0.001 second.
mode
A method of operation; for example, the system operates in either normal or power-saving
modes.
modem
MOdulator-DEModulator. A device that links computers over a telephone line.
nonvolatile memory
Storage media that retains its data when system power is turned off. Nonvolatile memory in
your system is a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip which is backed
up by an internal battery. The backup battery preserves the clock/calendar data and system
configuration parameters stored in CMOS. See volatile memory.
operating system
Set of programs that manage the overall operation of the computer.
overwrite
Storing information at a location where information is already stored, thus destroying the
original information.
parallel interface
Interface that communicates eight bits at a time.
parallel printer
A printer with a parallel interface.
parameter
A characteristic of a device or system.
Glossary-6
password
A string of characters that the user must enter before the system allows access or system
privileges.
peripheral
Input or output device not under direct computer control. A printer is a peripheral device.
pixels
Picture elements. Tiny dots that make up a screen image.
plug and play
An industry-standard phrase indicating the ability to add or remove external devices such as
a mouse, keyboard, diskette drive, etc. by turning off the system, installing the device, and
turning on the system. Plug and Play automatically configures the device. There are no
jumpers to set or resource conflicts to resolve.
port
Provides the means for an interface between the microprocessor and external devices. A
cable connector is usually plugged into the port to attach the device to the computer.
processor
In a computer, a functional unit that interprets and executes instructions.
prompt
A special symbol indicating the beginning of an input line. Also a message that appears on
the screen indicating that the user must take a certain action.
RAM
Random Access Memory. A storage device into which data is entered and from which data
is retrieved in a nonsequential manner.
read
To extract data from a storage device such as a diskette.
ROM
Read-Only Memory. Memory in which stored data cannot be modified by the user except
under special conditions.
Glossary-7
reset
The process of returning a device to zero or to an initial or arbitrarily selected condition.
resolution
The degree of screen image clarity. Video display resolution is determined by the number of
pixels on the screen. Resolution is usually specified in pixels by scan lines, for example, 640
by 480. See pixels.
RS-232C
Standard interface for serial devices.
serial interface
An interface that communicates information one bit at a time.
serial printer
A printer with a serial interface.
shadowing
To copy the system and video BIOS from chip to RAM for enhanced system performance.
software
Programs that run on a computer, such as operating systems, word processors, and
spreadsheets.
synchronous communication
Method of data transmission where transmission is regulated by a clock.
system board
The main printed circuit board inside the system unit into which other boards and major
chip components, such as the system microprocessor, are connected.
system unit
The system component that contains the computer parts, drives, power supply, and option
boards.
Glossary-8
VGA
Video Graphics Array. Graphics technology that supports many colors and resolutions (for
example, 256 colors and a graphics resolution of 800 by 600 pixels).
volatile memory
Storage media that loses its data when system power is turned off. Standard memory and
memory that you add to your computer are volatile memory. See nonvolatile memory.
wait state
The additional cycle beyond the minimum cycles required by the microprocessor to
complete a memory transaction. When additional cycles are required, the microprocessor
must wait for the additional cycle before the transaction is completed. A “zero wait state”
means that the operation required no additional cycles to complete the memory
transaction.
warm boot
Process of resetting the computer without turning off the power through keyboard input
(pressing Ctrl, Alt, and Del keys simultaneously) or the reset button. The system returns to
an initial or arbitrarily selected condition.
write
To record or store information to a storage device.
write protection
Allows reading from a diskette but prevents writing to a diskette.
Index
B
Baud rate, 1-16
Beep codes, 4-10
BIOS update utility, 2-27
using, 2-29
Boot menu, 2-25
Boot sequence, 2-19
Bulletin board service, 2-28
C
Card guide
removal, 5-9
CD-ROM reader, 1-18, 2-10
controls and indicators, 2-10
operation, 2-11
Configurations, 1-1
minitower chassis, 1-1
setup, 2-11
Connections
minitower, 2-2
Connectors, A-1
CD Audio In, A-16
diskette drive, A-9
fan, A-9
IDE interface, A-10
infrared, A-8
ISA expansion bus, A-14
ISA/PCI bus backboard, A-12
keyboard, A-8
mouse, A-8
parallel interface, A-4
power supply, A-7
serial interface, A-3
SIMM socket, A-11
speaker, A-7
suspend button, A-8
system board, A-1
VGA interface, A-6
Cover removal, 3-2
D
Desktop management interface, 1-20
CI module, 1-20
DMI browser, 1-21
DMI components, 1-20
Manageable products, 1-20
troubleshooting, 1-22
usage, 1-22
Disassembly, 5-1
3 1/2-inch diskette drive, 5-11
5 1/4-inch device, 5-12
blank panel, 5-7
card guide, 5-9
drive bracket, 5-9
expansion boards, 5-4
front panel assembly, 5-6
PCI/ISA backboard, 5-17
power supply, 5-16
rear internal drive, 5-14
SIMMs, 5-4
speaker assembly, 5-10
system board, 5-17
Diagnosing and Solving Problems, 4-6
Diskette drive, 1-16
Drives
bracket removal, 5-9
E
Error messages, 4-4
Expansion board installation, 3-5
Expansion boards
removal, 5-4
External options, 3-35
parallel printer, 3-35
serial devices, 3-36
F
Flash ROM, 1-6
H
Hard disk drive, 1-17
Hard disk drive specifications, C-1
I
I/O addressing, 1-7
Index-2
IDE adapters, 2-16
Illustrated parts breakdown, 5-20
parts list, 5-18
Infrared Interface, 1-16
Integrated Audio, 1-18
Integrated graphics, 1-11
graphics accelerator, 1-12
motion video controller, 1-11
Interrupt controller, 1-10
ISA bus, 1-13
J
Jumper settings
1.2-GB hard disk, C-3
1.6-GB hard disk, C-4
540-MB hard disk, C-2
850-MB hard disk, C-3
CD-ROM reader, D-2
Jumpers, B-1
clearing CMOS, B-4
locations, B-1
password, B-3
processor upgrade, B-2
K
Keyboard, 1-17
Keyboard cleaning, 4-2
M
Maintenance, 4-1
keyboard cleaning, 4-3
mouse cleaning, 4-3
system cleaning, 4-2
Memory, 1-9
video, 1-12
Memory shadow, 2-19
Microphone, 1-19
Minitower chassis, 1-1
Minitower setup
connections, 2-2
multimedia, 2-3
Mouse, 1-18
Mouse cleaning, 4-3
Multimedia components, 1-18
CD-ROM reader, 1-18
microphone, 1-19
speakers, 1-19
N
NEC telephone numbers, 4-1
Numlock, 2-20
O
Operation, 2-1
Option installation, 3-1
cover removal, 3-2
expansion boards, 3-5
external options, 3-35
precautions, 3-1
processor upgrade, 3-15
SIMM memory, 3-9
storage devices, 3-17
Video memory, 3-14
P
Packing, 2-1
Parallel interface, 1-14
addressing and interrupts, 1-15
Password, 2-23
options, 2-23
supervisor, 2-23
user, 2-23
PCI local bus, 1-13
PCI/IDE ports, 1-14
PCI/ISA backboard
removal, 5-17
Plug and Play, 1-19
Power management, 1-7, 1-19
parameters, 2-24
power menu, 2-24
suspend button, 1-19
Power supply, 1-16
Processor, 1-5
Processor upgrade, 3-15
R
Reassembly, 5-1
Repair, 5-1
disassembly, 5-1
reassembly, 5-1
Index-3
S
Secondary cache, 1-5
Security, 2-23
options, 2-23
supervisor password, 2-23
Serial interface, 1-15
specifications, 1-16
Setup, 2-1
main menu parameters, 2-15
minitower, 2-1
Setup and Operation, 2-1
unpacking, 2-1
Setup utility, 2-11
advanced menu, 2-21
boot menu, 2-25
boot options, 2-19
exit menu, 2-26
IDE adapters, 2-16
integrated peripherals menu, 2-21
main menu, 2-13
main menu options, 2-15
memory cache, 2-19
numlock, 2-20
parameters, 2-11
power menu, 2-24
security menu, 2-23
startup, 2-12
using, 2-13
SIMM installation, 3-13
SIMM upgrade, 3-9
SIMMs, 1-9
removal, 5-4
Sound board
audio connector, A-16
Speakers, 1-19
Specifications, 1-23
CD-ROM reader, D-1
hard disk, C-1
storage device installation, 3-17
device cables, 3-18
device preparation, 3-18
device slots, 3-17
minitower device, 3-25
System board, 1-2
chip sets, 1-4
features, 1-2
flash ROM, 1-6
infrared interface, 1-16
integrated audio, 1-18
integrated graphics, 1-11
interrupt controller, 1-10
ISA bus, 1-13
jumper settings, B-1
parallel interface, 1-14
PCI local bus, 1-13
PCI/IDE ports, 1-14
processor, 1-5
removal, 5-17
secondary cache, 1-5
video memory, 1-12
System cleaning, 4-2
System configuration, 2-11
System memory, 1-9
upgrade path, 1-10
T
Troubleshooting, 4-4
beep codes, 4-10
diagnosing and solving problems, 4-6
error messages, 4-4
U
Unpacking, 2-1
V
Video memory, 1-12
Video Resolutions, 1-12
Video upgrade, 3-14
(For United States Use Only)
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE STATEMENT
WARNING: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can
be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct
the interference by one or more of the following measures.
n Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
n Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
n Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from the one to which the
receiver is connected.
Use a shielded and properly grounded I/O cable to ensure compliance of this unit to the
specified limits of the rules.
FCC Modem Connection Requirements
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has established Rules that permit this
device to be directly connected to the telephone network. Standardized jacks are used for
these connections. This equipment should not be used on party lines or coin lines.
If the modem is malfunctioning, it may also be harming the telephone network. Disconnect
the modem until the source of the problem is determined and repairs are made. If this is not
done, the telephone company may temporarily disconnect service.
The telephone company may make changes in its technical operations and procedures. If
such changes affect the compatibility or use of the modem, the telephone company is
required to give adequate notice of the changes. You will be advised of your right to file a
complaint with the FCC.
If the telephone company requires information on what equipment is connected to their
lines, inform them of:
n The telephone number to which this unit is connected
n The ringer equivalence number (see the modem label)
n The USOC jack required.
n The FCC Registration number (see the modem label).
The ringer equivalence (REN) is used to determine how many devices can be connected to
your telephone line. In most areas, the sum of the RENs of all devices on any one line
should not exceed five (5). If too many devices are attached, they may not ring properly.
Modem Service Requirements
If the modem malfunctions, all repairs should be performed by NEC Technologies or an
NEC Authorized Service Center. It is the responsibility of users requiring service to report
the need for service to NEC Technologies or to an NEC Authorized Service Center.
Service can be obtained at:
NEC Technologies, Inc.
1414 Massachusetts Avenue
Boxborough, Massachusetts 01719-9984
Phone: 1-800-632-4525
(For Canadian Use Only)
This equipment is a Class B digital apparatus which complies with the Radio Interference
Regulations, C.R.C., c.1374.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme àu Règlement sur le brouillage
radioélectrique, C.R.C., ch.1374.
Canadian Department of Communications Modem Connection Requirements
NOTE: The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified equipment.
This certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network
protective, operational and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the
equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected
to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be
installed using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside
wiring associated with a single line individual service may be extended by means of a
certified connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The customer should be aware that
compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some
situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance
facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this
equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to
request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the
power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are
connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
WARNING: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should
contact the appropriate inspection authority or electrician.
The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the
total load to be connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device, to prevent
overloading. The termination on a loop may consist of any combination of devices subject
only to the requirement that the total of the Load Numbers of all the devices does not
exceed 100.
BATTERY REPLACEMENT
A lithium battery in your computer maintains system configuration information. In the event
that the battery fails to maintain system configuration information, NEC recommends that
you replace the battery.
WARNING: There is a danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace
only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Discard used
batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
ATTENTION: Il y a danger d’explosion s’il y a replacement incorrect de la batterie.
Remplacer uniquement avec une batterie du même type ou d’un type recommandé par le
constructeur. Mettre au rébut les batteries usagées conformément aux instructions du
fabricant.
BATTERY DISPOSAL
Do not place used batteries in your regular trash.
The nickel-cadmium (NiCD), nickel metal-hydride, or CMOS lithium batteries must be
collected, recycled, or disposed of in an environmentally-approved manner.
The incineration, landfilling, or mixing of batteries with the municipal solid waste stream is
prohibited by law in most areas.
Return batteries to a federal or state approved battery recycler. This may be where
you purchased the battery or a local seller of automotive batteries. In the United States of
America, call 1-800-225-PRBA if further disposal information is required.
Contact your local waste management officials for other information regarding the
environmentally sound collection, recycling, and disposal of the batteries.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising