safety - Maritime Heritage Alliance

safety - Maritime Heritage Alliance
Schooner MADELINE
CREW TRAINING MANUAL
SECTION C
SAFETY
C1
SAFETY RULES & GUIDELINES
The safety and health of all crew members are of up most importance to MHA, its Captains and
Mates. Fires, accidents, and personal injury are potentially devastating to the
organization. They may result in destruction of property, reduced assets, disrupted operations
and negative public relations.
Safety rules do not take the place of training and education. They establish standards for acceptable
work behavior and increase safety awareness. The following rules and guidelines are made in
keeping with our overriding priority: the safety of the crew and boat. They are intended to reduce
unsafe acts and unsafe conditions. Each crew member is required to follow the safety rules and work
in a safe manner.
Safety Rules
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
PFD’s shall be worn during heavy weather, on deck after dark, and in the tug/rescue boat.
No smoking on board, except midships, downwind side of the boat with the Captain's Permission.
Going forward on t he jibboom requires permission of the Captain or First Mate. A PFD shall
be worn.
No horseplay.
Ear protectors shall be worn in the engine room while the engine is running.
Do not wear dangling clothing while checking the running engine.
Face the steps when descending ladders.
Do not put any part of your body between the boat and dock or piling.
Do not lean over the rail unless wearing a safety harness of being held by another crew
member.
Always keep one hand for yourself when working outboard, aloft or and in heavy weather.
Hold on to grab rails or life lines when on deck in heavy weather.
Going aloft requires permission of the Captain or First Mate
When going aloft, hang on to the shrouds, not the rat boards.
Personal Safety Guidelines
1)
Wear deck-gripping non-skid shoes while the boat is underway.
2)
Wear gloves when handling lines
3)
Protective clothing, sunscreen and use of hats is recommended
4)
Do not wear rings or dangling jewelry.
DC/96
C2
FIRE SAFETY
Fire on a boat is an extremely serious business. Most fires are preventable and careful
management of MADELINE and its contents are the best way to prevent such an occurrence. If you
are aware of a potential fire hazard aboard report it to the Captain or a Mate. If you notice a fire
or smoke on board notify the Mate and/or Captain immediately!
About Fire:
Fires require four elements to burn:
FUEL
OXYGEN
HEAT
CHEMICAL CHAIN REACTIONS.
If you eliminate one of these ingredients, the fire will go out. Fires can be fought by smothering
them, cooling them below the temperature of combustion, or by stopping the chain reaction.
There are three classes of fires:
Class A
Fire in ordinary combustible materials: wood, paper, cloth. They can be
quenched with water or water solutions and cooled to below combustible
temperatures.
Class B
Fires in flammable materials such as petroleum products, greases,
other flammable liquids. Smothering these with oxygen-excluding
substances is most effective.
Class C
Fires involving electrical equipment. The electrical conductivity of the
extinguishing materials is of first consideration (i.e. DO NOT USE
WATER! IT WILL CONDUCT ELECTRICAL CURRENT!)
Fire extinguishers are classified as Type A, B, or C. Extinguishers on MADELINE are Type B.
There is one located in all 5 compartments of the boat. Be sure you know where the
firefighting equipment is located.
See SAFETY EQUIPMENT - LOCATION BELOW DECK diagram on next page.
C3
S A F E T Y E Q U I P M E N T – L O C AT I O N B E L O W D E C K
FIRE EXTINGUISHER EQUIPMENT BELOW DECK
Fire Extinguisher #7 is in the
Wheelhouse, see the Deck Diagram
on next page
Fire Extinguisher #6
Fire Extinguisher #5
Fire Blanket
Fire Extinguisher #4
Fire Extinguisher #3
Fire Extinguisher #2
Fire Extinguisher #1
C4
SAFETY EQUIPMENT – ON DECK
K
Fire Extinguisher #7
in Wheelhouse
A
B
C
Safety Equipment
A - Man Overboard light
B - Life ring
C - EPIRB
D - Man Overboard Pole
E - Life raft
F - Valve for fire hose
G - Fire hose & nozzle
H - Jacob’s ladder (out board side in port)
I - Valve for seawater intake
J - Lever for fire hose
K- Throw Bag
L - Fire Extinguisher #7
E
E
H
D
H
F
G
B
I
J
B
C5
RADIO OPERATION POLICIES
Domestic Law and international treaty require all licensed vessels to be equipped with VHF/FM
radiotelephones for local communications between ship to ship and ship to shore. Although the MHA
ships are not required by law or treaty to be so equipped, common sense and safety dictate that we
should be equipped with this equipment.
The radiotelephone aboard the Madeline is located overhead at the navigation station in the main
cabin. A remote station (microphone) located on the port side exterior of the wheel house. The radiotelephone can be monitored or put into use at either location. On the Welcome, it will be similarly
placed.
MONITORING CHANNEL 16 UNDERWAY
MHA policies require that, while under way, the Captain, Mates and crew are to monitor Channel 16,
the distress and emergency broadcast channel. Since we have and monitor a radio we are required
by law to meet certain requirements.
We must keep a radiotelephone log and we are required to log any emergency traffic
received and all calls received requesting emergency assistance received from other stations, even
though we are not a licensed vessel. These notations are kept in our regular log book.
At the discretion of the Captain other channels may be monitor such as channel 13 or 79A in areas of
high congestion or other areas he deems it necessary to do so.
The radiotelephone may also be placed on scan. In the scan mode the radiotelephone will
automatically switch to channel 16 upon a broadcast on that channel. (See the attached channel
references and uses.)
RADIO TRANSMISSIONS
The Captain or First Mate will be in charge and direct use of the of ANY (regular or emergency) radio
transmissions. No other Mate or crew member shall use the radio unless otherwise directed by the
Captain or First Mate.
EMERGENCY RADIO TRANSMISSIONS
MAYDAY CALLS
A MAYDAY call is transmitted only when GRAVE and IMMINENT danger threatens the life or property
and immediate help is required.
Constant monitoring:
The Captain or Mate transmitting the call will be responsible to stay and monitor the radiotelephone
on channel 16 (or other channel) directed to by the USCG. Do not switch channels to talk to
someone else.
Leaving the Vessel in an emergency:
If the crew is ordered to leave the vessel because of the emergency, the Captain or Mate (designated
in the Station Bill) shall take the portable radio telephone. Attempt to reestablish contact with some
one on Channel 16 even though if you have only one watt of power. Someone in the area who is able
to hear you on their radio can re-transmit your information at full power to the USCG.
JR 2007
C6
RADIO OPERATION POLICIES
TRANSMITTING A DSC AND VOICE MAYDAY DISTRESS CALL
A MAYDAY call on a marine radio is the most
effective way to summon aid when faced with
grave and imminent danger. Regardless of your
location, use your VHF/DSC radio to send a
DSC MAYDAY call (if linked to a GPS receiver,
it will automatically alert every DSC-equipped
vessel and coast station in radio range, instantly
informing them of your precise position). Follow
up with a voice MAYDAY call on channel 16 to
alert stations in range that may not have DSC
receiving capability. If offshore, follow up with
voice distress calls on 2182 and the HF calling
channels.
To make a DSC distress call:
1 Be sure the radio and GPS are ON.
2 Locate the red DISTRESS button.
3 Lift the cover and press the button until the
radio "beeps."
4 After the radio beeps, pick up the microphone
and make a voice MAYDAY call on channel 16,
clearly saying, "MAYDAY, MAYDAY,MAYDAY."
5 State your latitude and longitude or describe
your location relative to a landmark or aid to
navigation.
6 State the nature of your distress: medical,
flooding, sinking, fire, etc.
7 Listen for a response from the Coast Guard on
channel 16 and follow their instructions.
8 If you called on an MF or HF frequency (see
Chapman Piloting & Seamanship 66th edition,
page 682), state the frequency you used.
VHF: See next page for channels used; normal maximum range is 20 miles for typical antenna height. Visual distance to horizon in
nautical miles is 1.17 H, where H is eye height above water in feet.
DSC: Digital Selective Signaling.
TRANSMITTING A PAN-PAN
URGENCY CALL & MESSAGE
Send the Pan- Pan urgency signal to indicate
that you have a "very urgent" message
regarding the safety of your vessel or the
safety of a person.
1 Send DSC PAN-PAN, then say
"PAN-PAN" "PAN-PAN" "PAN-PAN"
(pronounced pahn-pahn)
on channel 16.
2 "ALL STATIONS (or the name of a particular
vessel)."
3 "THIS IS (boat name)... (boat name)
... (boat name)."
4 "WE (nature of your emergency)."
5 "WE REQUIRE (type of assistance required
or other useful information such as your
position, a description of your vessel, and/or
the number of people on board)."
6 "THIS IS (boat name). OVER."
CANCELING A PAN-PAN
If you transmit a Distress or Pan-Pan call, then
find that you no longer require assistance, you
must cancel the message on channel 16.
1 Say (as appropriate) "DISTRESS" or
"PAN-PAN"
three times.
2 "HELLO ALL STATIONS" three times.
3 "THIS IS (boat name)."
4 "TIME (use 24-hour clock)."
5 "CANCEL"
(as appropriate) "DISTRESS"
or "PAN-PAN."
6 To cancel a DSC distress call that has not yet
been answered by the Coast Guard; turn the
radio off, then turn it back on, select channel
16 and make a voice broadcast per steps 1-5
above. Continue to monitor channel 16.
Tables from “Chapman Piloting and Seamanship,” 2009 66th Edition
C7
RADIO OPERATIONS - MARINE CHANNELS
SELECTED VHF MARINE CHANNELS & THEIR USES
“Chapman Piloting and Seamanship,” 2009 66th Edition
C8
MARINE BAND RADIO
MADELINE’s Call Sign:
Whiskey Alpha Popa
2920
The VHF radio is kept tuned to Channel 16 while underway. It is to be used only
for ship to ship communications or for current weather information by the Captain,
Mates or with approval of the same.
Emergency Procedures
MAYDAY: In case of Immediate Danger to Life and/or Property- Captain or mate only
1)
Select Channel 16
2)
Repeat MAYDAY 3 times
MAYDAY! MAYDAY! MAY DAY!
3)
Give vessel name and call sign
This is the Schooner MADELINE (Whiskey Alpha Popa
2920 (WAP2920)
4)
Give position
5)
Describe emergency
6)
If no answer, repeat on another channel.
C9
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