Oracle StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance

Oracle StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance
StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library
Systems Assurance Guide
E22579-07
April 2014
StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
E22579-07
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................ ix
Documentation Accessibility ....................................................................................................................
ix
1 Product Overview
Bridging...................................................................................................................................................... 1-2
Modules...................................................................................................................................................... 1-2
Robot........................................................................................................................................................... 1-3
Vision.......................................................................................................................................................... 1-3
Class 1 Laser Product Notice .................................................................................................................. 1-4
Tape Drives and Media........................................................................................................................... 1-4
Cartridge Label Options.................................................................................................................... 1-6
Human Interfaces ..................................................................................................................................... 1-6
Partitions .................................................................................................................................................... 1-8
SNMP.......................................................................................................................................................... 1-8
StorageTek Tape Analytics..................................................................................................................... 1-9
Automated Cartridge System Library Software................................................................................. 1-9
Library Specifications........................................................................................................................... 1-10
Environmental Information ................................................................................................................ 1-11
2 Planning
Multiple LUN Support ............................................................................................................................
Tape Device Driver ..................................................................................................................................
SAN Connection.......................................................................................................................................
Zoning..................................................................................................................................................
Persistent Binding ..............................................................................................................................
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)....................................................................................................................
SAS-2 Configuration Issues ..............................................................................................................
Power Over Ethernet (POE)....................................................................................................................
IPv6 Network Address ............................................................................................................................
Equipment Service Clearances ..............................................................................................................
Drives With Two Ports ............................................................................................................................
Tape Drive Cleaning................................................................................................................................
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
3 Ordering
SL150 Modular Tape Library Part Numbers....................................................................................... 3-1
iii
Configuration and Ordering Examples ..........................................................................................
Cable Part Numbers.................................................................................................................................
Ethernet Cables...................................................................................................................................
Multimode Fiber-optic Cables .........................................................................................................
SAS Cables...........................................................................................................................................
Power Cord Part Numbers......................................................................................................................
Information on Ordering Media and Labels .....................................................................................
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-5
A Locations
Library Walls ............................................................................................................................................
Tape Slot Locations.................................................................................................................................
Element Mapping..............................................................................................................................
Library Configuration and Slot Maps ...........................................................................................
Capacity ..............................................................................................................................................
Diagnostic and Cleaning Cartridge Locations .............................................................................
A-1
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-5
A-6
B Partitioning Overview
Partitioning—General ...........................................................................................................................
Partitioning—Feature .............................................................................................................................
Partitioning—Access Control ..........................................................................................................
Partitioning—Shared Mailslot Behavior........................................................................................
Partitioning—Removing the Feature...................................................................................................
B-1
B-1
B-3
B-3
B-5
C Controlling Contaminants
Environmental Contaminants...............................................................................................................
Required Air Quality Levels .................................................................................................................
Contaminant Properties and Sources ..................................................................................................
Operator Activity ..............................................................................................................................
Hardware Movement .......................................................................................................................
Outside Air.........................................................................................................................................
Stored Items .......................................................................................................................................
Outside Influences ............................................................................................................................
Cleaning Activity ..............................................................................................................................
Contaminant Effects ...............................................................................................................................
Physical Interference.........................................................................................................................
Corrosive Failure...............................................................................................................................
Shorts...................................................................................................................................................
Thermal Failure .................................................................................................................................
Room Conditions.....................................................................................................................................
Exposure Points .......................................................................................................................................
Filtration....................................................................................................................................................
Positive Pressurization and Ventilation .............................................................................................
Cleaning Procedures and Equipment..................................................................................................
Daily Tasks .........................................................................................................................................
Weekly Tasks .....................................................................................................................................
Quarterly Tasks .................................................................................................................................
iv
C-1
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-6
C-6
C-7
C-8
C-8
C-8
C-9
Biennial Tasks .................................................................................................................................... C-9
Activity and Processes .......................................................................................................................... C-10
Glossary
Index
v
vi
List of Figures
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
1–5
1–6
A–1
A–2
A–3
B–1
90 Cartridge Library (Front View) ...........................................................................................
Base Module and Expansion Modules - Rear View...............................................................
Robot .............................................................................................................................................
Tape Cartridge.............................................................................................................................
Operator Panel Home Screen ....................................................................................................
Remote Management Interface .................................................................................................
Non-Partitioned One Module Library, Standard Mailslot, and No Reserved Cells .......
Non-Partitioned Two Module Library, Expanded Mailslot, and No Reserved Cells .....
Non-Partitioned Ten Module Library, Standard Mailslot, and Three Reserved Cells ....
Ten Module Library, Two Partitions, and the Standard Mailslot Configuration ............
1-1
1-2
1-4
1-5
1-7
1-7
A-3
A-4
A-5
B-2
vii
List of Tables
A–1
A–2
A–3
B–1
B–2
viii
Starting Element Address and Maximum Number of Elements .......................................
Numbering Key.........................................................................................................................
Storage Slot, Mailslot, and Drive Counts for Different Configurations............................
SCSI Commands Affected by the Shared Mailslot Assignment ........................................
Shared Mailslot Door Locked and Unlocked Conditions ...................................................
A-2
A-2
A-6
B-4
B-5
Preface
This guide is intended for anyone involved with installation planning or the ordering
of Oracle’s StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library.
Documentation Accessibility
For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle
Accessibility Program website at
http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacc.
Access to Oracle Support
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ix
x
1
Product Overview
1
Oracle’s StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library is a rack-mounted, automated tape
library containing up to 300 tape cartridges (tapes) with one to 20 half-height LTO
Ultrium 5 or 6 Fibre Channel (FC) or Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) tape drives (see "Tape
Drives and Media" on page 1-4). The robot control is a SCSI Medium Changer device
that appears as LUN 1 on a bridged tape drive.
The SL150 Library scales from one to ten modules. A module has two tape drive slots.
Each module stores up to 30 tapes in two 15-slot magazines (one on the left side and
the other on the right side). Additionally, a four slot mailslot is available in the base
module for entering tapes into or removing tapes from the library (see Figure 1–1).
Figure 1–1 90 Cartridge Library (Front View)
Illustration Legend:
1 - Base module (Module 1)
2 - Expansion module (Module 2)
3 - Left cartridge magazines
4 - Right cartridge magazines
5 - Front control panel
6 - Mailslot
Product Overview 1-1
Bridging
Bridging
Tape drive bridging provides the external interface for library control. The bridged
drive is LUN 0 and the library is LUN 1.
Data, command, and control signals travel directly to the data interface of the SAS or
FC tape drive. The designated bridged drive handles all control communications for
the library or library partition and passes command and control signals to the library
controller.
A library without partitions must have one bridged drive. A partitioned library must
have a bridged drive for each partition.
Modules
The SL150 Library has two types of modules: the base module (designated Module 1)
and the expansion module (designated as Modules 2 through 10).
Module 1 is the smallest fully functional library, and it contains:
■
Front control panel
■
Two 15-slot tape magazines (left and right)
■
Standard Mailslot with four tape slots (see "Partitions" on page 1-8 for additional
details)
Note: Code version 2.25, and higher, supports a 19 slot Expanded
Mailslot configuration.
■
Robotics with one hand
■
Power supply (with an option to add a second power supply)
■
Tape drive (with an option to add a second drive)
Up to three tape slots in Module 1 can be designated as reserved slots to store
diagnostic or cleaning tapes.
At the rear of Module 1, there is an Ethernet port for remote management and nine
USB Type A ports for connection to expansion modules (see Figure 1–2).
Figure 1–2 Base Module and Expansion Modules - Rear View
Illustration Legend:
1-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Vision
1 - Base module (the Module 1 label is on the rear panel of the module)
2 - Expansion module (a label with the module number is on the rear panel)
3 - Robot lock (Improved Design)
4 - Tape drive tray
5 - Power supply
6 - Module controller (Module 2 and Module 3)
Note: In addition to the components listed previously, Module 1
ships with an accessory kit containing rail components, attachment
hardware, and identification labels.
An expansion module can be added to the bottom of the library to provide additional
tape cartridge capacity and additional performance by adding tape drives (see
Figure 1–2). An expansion module requires 2U of rack space. An expansion module
ships with:
■
Two 15-slot tape magazines (left and right)
■
Module controller
■
Expansion cable that has two USB Type A connectors
■
Mounting hardware to secure the module to the rack
■
Identification labels
The module controller is connected to the base module by an expansion cable that
incorporates USB Type A connectors. The cable provides a communication path
between the base and expansion modules and a power source for the module
controller.
The expansion module has slots for two tape drives and two power supplies. There is
insufficient power from the expansion cable to support a tape drive. Therefore, a power
supply is required when the expansion module has a tape drive.
An SL150 Library can be divided into partitions (see "Partitions" on page 1-8).
Robot
The robotic mechanism resides in the base module. The bull wheel is located in the top
of the base module. The Z platform cables go through pulleys and wind around the
bull wheel (see Figure 1–3). As the bull wheel rotates, the cables lower or raise the Z
platform depending on the direction of bull wheel rotation. A hand assembly moves
along Z-platform rods to provide the track motion. The hand assembly contains a
retractable reach mechanism, and the hand rotates to align with a left magazine slot, a
right magazine slot, a slot in the mailslot, or a tape drive at the rear of the library. The
reach mechanism has spring-loaded grippers to grip and release a tape cartridge.
Vision
The hand assembly uses two vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) devices to
scan barcodes and to target cells. One VCSEL is mounted on each end of the hand.
Moving the VCSEL past a bar code or the edge of a tape cartridge slot generates a data
stream which is decoded on the main processor to generate the bar code or to locate a
target position.
Product Overview 1-3
Class 1 Laser Product Notice
Figure 1–3 Robot
Illustration Legend:
1 - Hand
2 - Pulleys
3 - Suspension cables
4 - Z platform
5 - Bull wheel
6 - Z motor
Class 1 Laser Product Notice
The StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library contains a class-1 laser as defined by IEC
60825-1 Ed. 2 (2007).
Tape Drives and Media
The SL150 Library supports the following Linear Tape Open (LTO) half-height, tape
drives manufactured by HP:
■
Generation 5 Fibre Channel or SAS
■
Generation 6 Fibre Channel or SAS
The library supports simultaneous installation of Generation 5 and 6 tape drives as
bridged tape drives and data drives.
Drive Firmware version required:
■
Fibre Channel:
1-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Tape Drives and Media
■
–
LTO-5: Y5BS, Y65S, or greater
–
LTO-6: 22GS, 239S, or greater
SAS:
–
LTO-5: Z55S, Z65S, or greater
–
LTO-6: 32DS, 339S, or greater
Cartridges supported:
Standard LTO data cartridges are labeled with a unique, customer-assigned, volume
ID, followed by a media ID field.
■
■
■
Generation 6:
–
L6 media ID: read and write in LTO-6 format
–
LW media ID (WORM): read and write in LTO-6 format
Generation 5:
–
L5 media ID: read and write in LTO-5 format
–
LV media ID (WORM): read and write in LTO-5 format
Generation 4:
–
■
L4 media ID or LU media ID (WORM):
*
LTO-6 drive: read only
*
LTO-5 drive: read and write in LTO-4 format
Generation 3:
–
L3 media ID or LT media ID (WORM): read only in an LTO-5 drive
Note: The LTO-6 drive does not support generation 3 media.
■
Universal Cleaning Cartridge
Figure 1–4 Tape Cartridge
Illustration Legend:
1 - Write protect switch
2 - Volume ID label (barcode toward cartridge hub)
Product Overview 1-5
Human Interfaces
3 - Access door
4 - Leader pin
Cartridge Label Options
To accommodate the fullest range of possible labeling schemes, the SL150 Library
supports labels eight to 14 characters long and provides a label windowing feature that
lets you specify how labels should be interpreted when communicating with the host
application.
The library user interface supports the following labeling options:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
No type checking passes all characters in the label without modification and
without checking the media domain and type. Use this option if your labels do not
identify the media; for example, M123456789AB does not contain a media
descriptor (such as L5).
Prepend last two characters passes all the characters after moving the last two
characters in the label to the front: KL10203012L5 is translated to L5KL10203012.
Full label passes the first eight characters in the physical label: KL10203012L5 is
translated to KL102030.
Trim last character passes the first seven characters in the physical label:
KL10203012L5 is translated to KL10203.
Trim last two characters passes the first six characters in the physical label:
KL10203012L5 is translated to KL1020.
Trim first two characters passes the third through eighth characters in the physical
label: KL10203012L5 is translated to 102030.
Trim first character passes the second through eighth characters in the physical
label: KL10203012L5 is translated to L102030.
See the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library User’s Guide for additional information
on tape labels and use of the Configuration section of the SL150 remote GUI.
Human Interfaces
There are three ways to interact with the SL150 Library: the mailslot, operator panel,
and remote interface.
■
The four cartridge mailslot, located above the right magazine in the base module,
is used for entering tapes into and removing tapes from the library without
interfering with robot operations. It can be opened from the front control panel
touch screen or from the remote interface depending on your user role.
Note: Code version 2.25, and higher, supports a 19 slot Expanded
Mailslot configuration.
■
The front control panel contains an LCD touch screen operator panel designed for
use as an information point rather than as a maintenance tool (see Figure 1–5).
Information shown on the panel is primarily in tabular format and is available for:
the library, modules, magazines, the mailslot, partitions (if enabled), drives, tapes,
and settings. The masthead contains a home button to return from an information
section, a button to present the copyright information, an activity icon, the library
health (Operational in this example), and the library state.
1-6 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Human Interfaces
Figure 1–5 Operator Panel Home Screen
■
The remote GUI is the primary management interface for the SL150 Library, and
you access it by entering the library host name or IP address into a web browser.
The interface example (shown in Figure 1–6) is for a library with two partitions,
and provides menus for the library, partitions, drives, tapes, configuration,
firmware, SNMP, users, and service.
Note: Library code versions lower than 2.0 had a Settings menu
instead of the Configuration, Firmware, and SNMP menus in 2.0.
Figure 1–6 Remote Management Interface
Illustration Legend:
1 - Section navigation
2 - Left magazine control
3 - Right magazine control
Product Overview 1-7
Partitions
4 - Slot identification
5 - Tape drive (two-headed arrow indicates a bridged drive)
The library information is presented as a graphical representation of tape slots in
the left and right magazines, mailslots, drives, the robot, and all installed modules
(Module 1 is expanded in Figure 1–6 while Module 2 is collapsed). In addition, the
slot identification information is shown for the right magazine, first row, and first
column. For additional information on slot identification see Appendix A,
"Locations" and Appendix B, "Partitioning Overview".
The Library list (above the label for Module 1) provides the capability to display
library properties, audit the library, unlock magazines, lock and audit magazines,
run a self test, expand all available modules, or collapse all modules.
The partitions, drives, tapes, configuration, firmware, SNMP, and service menus
present information in a tabular format. Some of the menus have tabs to present
information in distinct categories.
An administrator creates individual user accounts for the library and assigns a
distinct user role to each account. The library recognizes four user roles: viewer,
operator, service, and administrator. Each of these roles has limits on what screens
are seen and what actions can be performed.
Refer to the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library User’s Guide or the Help system
of the remote interface for specific information regarding the user interface.
Partitions
The SL150 Library supports a maximum of eight partitions with each partition having
at least one tape drive and one magazine. Each partition behaves as an independent
library, but all partitions share the use of the reserved cells, the single robot, and the
four-cartridge mailslot. Each partition must have a tape drive to provide the host
interface (bridging).
■
■
When ejecting cartridges, the mailslot must be explicitly assigned to a partition
before any cartridge movement takes place.
When entering cartridges through the mailslot, the user must specify the
destination partition.
Note: The administrator enables partitions from the Configuration
button. Refer to the user’s guide or the remote interface online Help
for specific information about setting configuration values.
Additional information on partitions is provided in Appendix B.
SNMP
The library’s SNMP agent can automatically send traps to alert network management
stations of faults and configuration changes. Both version 2c and version 3 of the
SNMP standard are supported.
■
Version 2c is backward compatible with earlier versions of the standard, but it is
not secure because authentication credentials (community strings) and
management data are exchanged in clear text.
1-8 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Automated Cartridge System Library Software
■
Version 3 is not backward compatible, but it supports a more secure authentication
method and can encrypt management data.
The administrator defines SNMP users and recipients in the SNMP section of the
remote management interface. The MIB can be downloaded using the management
interface. Refer to the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library User’s Guide or the remote
interface online Help for specific information.
StorageTek Tape Analytics
StorageTek Tape Analytics (STA) is an intelligent monitoring application, available
exclusively for StorageTek modular tape libraries (including SL150, SL500, SL3000, and
SL8500). It simplifies tape storage management and allows the customer to make
informed decisions about future tape storage investments based on the current health
of the tape storage environment.
Note: STA requires a dedicated server. Oracle recommends that you
place the STA server on the same subnet as the library to improve
SNMP UDP reliability.
To set up communications between the STA server and the libraries, you must perform
some configuration procedures on the libraries and some on the STA server. STA uses
both the v2c and v3 SNMP protocols to communicate with the library.
■
■
The initial communication handshake between a library and the STA server is
done through the v2c protocol.
The traps and get functions are done through the v3 protocol. The authentication,
encryption, and message integrity features in SNMP v3 provide a secure
mechanism for sending library data.
STA allows the customer to monitor globally dispersed libraries from a single,
browser-based user interface. The customer can manage open systems and mainframe,
mixed-media, and mixed-drive environments across multiple library platforms.
STA allows the customer to increase the use and performance of tape investments by
performing detailed performance trending analyses. These analyses are based on a
regularly updated database of library operations. STA captures and retains data from
your tape library environment and uses this data to calculate the health status of your
library resources (drives and media). STA aggregates data according to a variety of
criteria and displays it in tabular and graphical formats, allowing you to quickly assess
environment activity, health, and capacity.
Refer to the STA documentation library on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) for
additional information regarding the STA product and the dedicated STA server. Select
the Tape Storage link at the following URL:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/documentation/index.html#storage
Automated Cartridge System Library Software
Note: ACSLS is supported but not required for operation of the
SL150 Library.
Product Overview 1-9
Library Specifications
StorageTek Automated Cartridge System Library Software (ACSLS) functions as the
central service provider for all library operations, efficiently sharing library resources
with any ACSLS-enabled application on any system, and allowing centralized library
control across multiple StorageTek libraries.
ACSLS version 8.2 or greater is required for interfacing with the SL150 Library.
ACSLS version 8.3 (second patch) is required for library code version 2.25 which
supports new ASC and ASCQ reporting.
Refer to the ACSLS documentation library for additional information regarding
support for the SL150 Library. Use the link listed in the STA section to access the Tape
Storage section of OTN.
Note: ACSLS versions 8.2 and 8.3 do not support the Expanded
Mailslot configuration (19 mailslots) available with library code
version 2.25.
Library Specifications
Physical:
■
Depth: 925 mm (36.4 inches including 2.25 inches of tape drive extension)
■
Height:
–
3U (130.8 mm, 5.15 inches): base module (Module 1)
–
2U (88.9 mm, 3.5 inches): expansion module (Modules 2 through 10)
■
Width: 481 mm (18.9 inches)
■
Weight:
–
21.3 kg (47 pounds [base module, two cartridge magazines, one tape drive,
and one power supply])
–
14.3 kg (31.5 pounds [expansion module, two cartridge magazines, no tape
drive, and no power supply])
Power:
■
AC voltage: 100-240 VAC
■
Line frequency: 50-60 Hz single phase (auto-ranging)
■
Library (operating maximum continuous—not peak) see the power calculator at
the following URL
http://www.oracle.com/us/products/servers-storage/sun-power-calculators/in
dex.html
The smallest SL150 Library consisting of a base module, one tape drive, and one
power supply has a total idle power of 44 W (150 Btu/hr) and a steady state maximum
of 67.5 W (230 Btu/hr).
Rack space requirements:
■
Base module: 3U (131 mm, 5.15 inches)
■
Expansion module: 2U (88.9 mm, 3.5 inches)
■
Depth (minimum): 925 mm (36.4 inches)
1-10 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Environmental Information
Note: The SL150 Library can be installed in a rack with front to rear
rail spacing from 457 mm (18 inches) to 902 mm (35.5 inches).
Environmental Information
Temperature:
■
Operating: +10° to +40°C (+50° to +104°F)
■
Non-operating –40° to +60°C (–40° to +140°F)
Relative Humidity:
■
Operating: 20% to 80% non-condensing
■
Non-operating: 10% to 95% non-condensing
The operating environment must meet the additional requirements listed in
Appendix C, "Controlling Contaminants".
Product Overview 1-11
Environmental Information
1-12 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
2
Planning
2
This chapter provides information for consideration when planning for the installation
of the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library.
Multiple LUN Support
The SL150 Library uses a single SCSI ID and two logical unit numbers (LUN). LUN 0
controls the tape drive and LUN 1 controls the robotics. The designated tape drive
provides the bridging function and must be connected to an HBA supporting multiple
LUNs (also referred to as LUN scanning).
A library without partitions must have one bridged drive. A partitioned library must
have a bridged drive for each partition.
Tape Device Driver
Make sure that the proper device driver is installed, if applicable. Download the driver
from the HP website, if needed.
For example, Oracle has qualified the HP LTO-5 and LTO-6 drives with Windows
driver 3.5.0.0.
SAN Connection
The library can be connected to the host HBA through a storage area network (SAN).
Configure zoning on the Fibre Channel switch so only the backup servers access the
library.
The half-height FC tape drive has an 8 Gb per second data interface.
Zoning
Use zoning to partition a SAN into logical groupings of devices so that each group is
isolated from the other and can only access the devices in its own group. Two types of
zoning exist:
■
■
Hardware zoning: based on physical fabric port number
Software zoning: defined with the World Wide Node Name (WWNN) or World
Wide Port Name (WWPN)
While zoning can be reconfigured without causing an outage, some zoning
configurations can become complicated. The advantage of the library’s WWNN
implementation is that you can avoid the exposure of introducing zoning errors
Planning 2-1
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)
because there is no need to change the zoning configuration when a drive needs
service or replacement.
Note: The dynamic World Wide Name (dWWN) feature assigns
world wide names to the library drive slots rather than the drives
themselves which allows you to swap or replace a drive without
bringing down the entire operating system.
Persistent Binding
When a server is started, it discovers attached devices and assigns SCSI target and
LUN IDs. It is possible for these SCSI assignments to change between restarts. Some
operating systems do not guarantee that devices will always be allocated the same
SCSI target ID after restarting. Also, some software depends on this association, so you
do not want it to change.
The issue of SCSI ID assignment is addressed by persistent binding. Persistent binding
is a host bus adapter (HBA) function that allows a subset of discovered targets to be
bound between a server and device.
Implemented by a WWNN or WWPN, persistent binding causes a tape drive’s WWN
to be bound to a specific SCSI target ID.
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)
SAS uses serial connections, with a direct connection between the host server and each
of the storage devices. SAS signal rates require clean connections and a minimum
number of connections between the HBA and the SL150 Library. Oracle recommends a
maximum SAS cable length of six meters.
The half-height SAS tape drive has a 6 Gb per second data interface.
Oracle SAS HBAs:
■
■
3Gb (SAS-1):
–
SG-XPCI8SAS-E-Z
–
SG-XPCIE8SAS-E-Z
–
SG-XPCIE8SAS-EB-Z
6Gb (SAS-2):
–
SGX-SAS6-EXT-Z
–
SGX-SAS6-EM-Z
SAS-2 Configuration Issues
Caution: The Solaris 10 (Update 8 and later) SAS driver disrupts
communications between Oracle Solaris and common tape backup
applications.
The SAS driver only allows one device driver to attach per device (sg, sgen, st, and so
forth). Users must have every component in the following list to be affected:
■
Oracle Solaris 10 (Update 8 or later) or Solaris 11
2-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Drives With Two Ports
■
Any SAS-2 HBA
■
Tape drives or libraries using a SAS-2 connection
■
A backup application that requires multiple SAS drivers. The most common
backup applications that use multiple device drivers include:
–
CA ARCserve
–
EMC Networker
–
HP Data Protector
–
IBM Tivoli Storage Manager
–
Symantec NetBackup
A SAS tape drive attached through the SAS-2 HBA will work on the Solaris system
using just the Solaris native commands such as dd or tar.
Power Over Ethernet (POE)
Network switches providing power over Ethernet (POE) must be IEEE certified.
Note: A switch that is not IEEE certified might provide too much
current over the cable and overload the Ethernet connection on the
library. Results of an overload appear as the Ethernet port being
unresponsive and the remote management interface not working.
IPv6 Network Address
Code version 2.0, and higher, enables the SL150 Library to support a dual-stack
network configuration that uses both IPv4 and IPv6. In dual-stack mode, the library
continues to recognize the familiar, dot-delimited IPv4 addresses while adding the
capability to use hexadecimal IPv6 addresses.
The library administrator enables dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 from the Configuration
section of the remote management interface. The available selections for IPv6 are
DHCPv6, Stateless (SLAAC), or Static. If Static is selected, the administrator is
prompted to enter the Prefix Length.
Always consult with the network administrator:
■
Before configuring or changing IPv6 addressing
■
To get the length of the network prefix for your location
Equipment Service Clearances
The front and rear service clearance must be at least 965 mm (38 inches).
Drives With Two Ports
When a tape drive has two ports, host applications can treat the second drive port as a
failover port. The library may report a Check Condition to a command received on one
port when the other port is busy with a library command. When a host application
receives either of the following new Check Conditions, it should reissue the command:
■
Not Ready, Logical Unit Offline (02/04/12h)
Planning 2-3
Tape Drive Cleaning
■
Aborted Command, Logical Unit Communication Failure (OBh/08/00)
Notes: The half-height LTO-5 FC tape drive has one port while the
other supported drives have two ports.
Only some host applications support this feature. Be sure to check the
status of this feature with your application.
Tape Drive Cleaning
LTO drives send a cleaning request to both the SL150 Library and the host application
managing the library (or partition). You can handle cleaning in either of two ways:
■
■
Automatically manage cleaning by configuring the host application (for example,
Symantec NetBackup or IBM Tivoli Storage Manager) for Automatic, Tape Alert, or
reactive cleaning depending on the application.
Monitor the library health for a Degraded state and initiate cleaning for the
specific drive. Because this is not an automatic process, you must monitor drives
regularly and respond quickly to cleaning requests.
Refer to the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library User’s Guide for details on
implementing tape drive cleaning.
2-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
3
Ordering
3
This chapter provides the following information:
■
"SL150 Modular Tape Library Part Numbers"
■
"Configuration and Ordering Examples"
■
"Cable Part Numbers"
■
"Power Cord Part Numbers"
■
"Information on Ordering Media and Labels"
SL150 Modular Tape Library Part Numbers
When ordering a new SL150, use the following part numbers:
■
7101750: base module, 30 slots with one HP LTO-5 half-height FC tape drive
■
7101760: base module, 30 slots with one HP LTO-5 half-height SAS tape drive
■
7104475: base module, 30 slots with one HP LTO-6 half-height FC tape drive
■
7104476: base module, 30 slots with one HP LTO-6 half-height SAS tape drive
■
7101763: SL150 expansion module, 30 slots (contains neither a tape drive assembly
nor a power supply)
■
7101761: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height SAS
■
7104474: SL150 drive, HP LTO-6, half-height SAS
■
7101762: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height FC
■
7104473: SL150 drive, HP LTO-6, half-height FC
■
7101769: SL150 power supply
For upgrades and other options to existing systems, use the following part numbers:
■
7101770: SL150 expansion module, 30 slots (contains neither a tape drive assembly
nor a power supply)
■
7101772: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height SAS
■
7104450: SL150 drive, HP LTO-6, half-height SAS
■
7101773: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height FC
■
7104449: SL150 drive, HP LTO-6, half-height FC
■
7101771: SL150 power supply
■
7101774: SL150 magazine set (left and right)
Ordering 3-1
SL150 Modular Tape Library Part Numbers
Configuration and Ordering Examples
A few examples are provided to show the use of both new library part numbers and
upgrade part numbers.
Example 1:
■
30 cartridge library with an FC drive, a second FC drive, and a second power
supply (redundant power):
7101750: SL150 library, 30 slots with HP LTO-5 half-height FC tape drive
7101762: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height FC
7101769: SL150 power supply
Example 2:
■
60 cartridge library with two partitions, a total of four drives (2 SAS and 2 FC),
and four power supplies:
7101760: SL150 library, 30 slots with one HP LTO-5 half-height SAS tape drive
7101763: SL150 expansion module, 30 slots (contains neither a tape drive assembly
nor a power supply)
7101761: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height SAS
7101762: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height FC
7101762: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height FC
7101769: SL150 power supply (x3)
Note: For this example, partition 1 has SAS drives while partition 2
has FC drives. However, the SL150 Library does support mixed drives
without partitioning.
Example 3:
■
90 cartridge library with one FC drive
7101750: SL150 library, 30 slots with one HP LTO-5 half-height FC tape drive
7101763: SL150 expansion module, 30 slots [contains neither a tape drive assembly
nor a power supply] (x2)
Example 4:
■
Upgrade an existing nonpartitioned library from 30 to 120 cartridges with a SAS
drive in each module (power is not redundant):
7101770: SL150 expansion module, 30 slots [contains neither a tape drive assembly
nor a power supply)] (x3)
7101772: SL150 drive, HP LTO-5, half-height SAS (x3)
7101771: SL150 power supply (x3)
Note: Additional modules require a power supply when a tape drive
is installed in the module.
3-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Cable Part Numbers
Cable Part Numbers
This section provides part numbers for:
■
"Ethernet Cables"
■
"Multimode Fiber-optic Cables"
■
"SAS Cables"
Ethernet Cables
The library uses Ethernet cables for network connections. Always use shielded
Ethernet cables to connect to a drive installed in a library.
The following Ethernet cable part numbers can be ordered with the initial order or as
upgrades.
■
CABLE10187033-Z-A: CAT5E, 8 feet, shielded
■
CABLE10187034-Z-A: CAT5E, 35 feet, shielded
■
CABLE10187035-Z-A: CAT5E, 50 inches, shielded
■
CABLE10187037-Z-A: CAT5E, 55 feet, shielded
Multimode Fiber-optic Cables
The following multimode (50-micron) fiber-optic cables connect Fibre Channel
devices. These cables are orange with tan LC connectors. The tape drive only supports
LC connectors.
The following fiber-optic cable part numbers can be ordered with the initial order or as
upgrades.
Riser cable materials are not classified according to flammability.
■
CABLE10800307-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 1 meter
■
CABLE10800308-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 2 meter
■
CABLE10800310-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 10 meter
■
CABLE10800311-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 50 meter
■
CABLE10800312-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 100 meter
■
CABLE10800340-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 3 meter
■
CABLE10800341-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, riser, 5 meter
Plenum cables meet UL standards for flammability.
■
CABLE10800313-Z-A
Ordering 3-3
Power Cord Part Numbers
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, plenum, 10 meter
■
CABLE10800314-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, plenum, 50 meter
■
CABLE10800315-Z-A
LC-LC, 50/125/ duplex, plenum, 100 meter
SAS Cables
The following SAS cable part numbers can be ordered with the initial order or as
upgrades:
■
7100274: 2x1 3M SAS cable
■
7100276: 1x1 3M 4X Mini SAS cable, SHLD
Each SAS tape drive assembly has two SAS ports.
Power Cord Part Numbers
■
PWRCORD10083243-A
Power Cord: Japan, 2.5 meters, METI plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 15 A (for
factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083244-A
Power Cord: Australia, 2.5 meters, SA3112 plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10 A
(for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083245-A
Power Cord: Italy, 2.5 meters, CEI23 plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10 A (for
factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083246-A
Power Cord: Switzerland, 2.5 meters, SEV1011 plug, 10A, IEC60320-1-C13
connector, 10 A (for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083247-A
Power Cord: United Kingdom, 2.5 meters, BS1363A plug, 10A, IEC60320-1-C13
connector, 10 A (for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083248-A
Power Cord: Denmark, 2.5 meters, DEMKO107 plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector,
10 A (for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10083636-A
Power Cord: South Africa, 2.5 meters, BS546 plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 16 A
(for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10187018-A
Power Cord: Europe, 2.5 meters, CEE 7/VII plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10 A
(for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10187019-A
Power Cord: North America and Asia, 2.3 meters, NEMA 5-15 plug,
IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10 A (for factory installation)
3-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Information on Ordering Media and Labels
■
PWRCORD10187061-A
Power Cord: North America and Asia, 3.0 meters, NEMA 5-15 plug,
IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 15 A (for factory installation)
■
PWRCORD10187086-A
Power Cord: Taiwan, 2.5 meters, CNS10917 plug, IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10 A
(for factory installation)
■
333U-10-10-C14
Power cord: Jumper, 1.0 meter, straight IEC60320-2-2 Sheet E (C14) plug, right
angle IEC60320-1-C13 connector, 10A. 250 VAC
Information on Ordering Media and Labels
■
■
Call 1.877.STK.TAPE to order media from your local reseller or to obtain media
pre-sales support.
E-mail: tapemediaorders_ww@oracle.com
See the tape media area on the corporate website for additional information.
http://www.oracle.com/us/products/storage/overview/index.html
Click the Tape Storage tab and the StorageTek LTO Data Cartridges link.
Ordering 3-5
Information on Ordering Media and Labels
3-6 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
A
Locations
A
This appendix describes the SL150 Modular Tape Library walls (sides), tape slots, and
location scheme.
Library Walls
There are two types of walls in the library:
1.
Left side wall, which consists of a 15-cartridge slot magazine array
2.
Right side wall, which consists of 15-cartridge slot array magazine and 4-cartridge
slot Mailslot magazine array
Tapes (cartridges) placed in slots lay flat, hub down, and parallel to the floor. To
prevent slippage, tapes are held within their slots by molded-in internal retainer clips.
Tape Slot Locations
Figure A–1 through Figure A–3 show valid storage slot, mailslot, and drive locations.
Tape locations in previous StorageTek libraries were listed by a LIBRARY Physical
addressing scheme involving Panel, Row, and Column values. SL150 uses the USER
Physical addressing scheme which may change per the component being referenced.
Component
SCSI Element Address
USER Physical addressing
Slot (Data)
Yes
module,side,row,column
Slot (Reserved)
No
module,side,row,column
Drives
Yes
module,top|bottom
Mailslot
Yes
slot number
Expanded Mailslot
Yes
module,side,row,column
Power Supply
No
module,top|bottom
Hand (Robot)
Yes
n/a
Figure A–1 through Figure A–3 illustrate where these terms apply.
Element Mapping
Table A–1 shows the starting element address and the maximum number of each
element type when the SL150 Library is installed with 10 modules.
Locations A-1
Tape Slot Locations
Note: The mailslots allow an operator to insert or remove cartridges
during library operations. The mailslots are also referred to as
Import/Export elements or cartridge access ports (CAPs).
Table A–1
Starting Element Address and Maximum Number of Elements
Maximum Number of
Elements for an SL150
Library with 10 Modules
and the Expanded
Mailslot Configuration
Element Type
First Element
Address
Maximum Number of
Elements for an SL150
Library with 10 Modules
and the Standard
Mailslot Configuration
Hand
0
1
1
Mailslot
10
4
19
Drives
500
20
20
Storage Slots
1000
300
285
Table A–2 shows the element type and the associated numbering key in the SL150
Library.
Table A–2
Numbering Key
Element Type
Numbering Key
Hand
Host Address: SCSI Element Address
Mailslot
Host Address: SCSI Element Address
User Physical: slot number
Expanded Mailslot Host Address: SCSI Element Address
User Physical: module,side,row,column
Drives
Host Address: SCSI Element Address
User Physical: module,Top|Bottom
Storage Slots
Host Address: SCSI Element Address
User Physical: module,side,row,column
Reserved Slots
User Physical: module,side,row,column
Power Supply
User Physical: module,Top|Bottom
Library Configuration and Slot Maps
Figure A–1 shows a library with a base module, no reserved cells, and the standard
mailslot configuration.
Figure A–2 shows a library with two modules, no reserved cells, and the expanded
mailslot configuration.
Figure A–3 shows a library with ten modules, three reserved cells, and the standard
mailslot configuration.
A-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Tape Slot Locations
Figure A–1 Non-Partitioned One Module Library, Standard Mailslot, and No Reserved Cells
Illustration Legend:
1 - Module 1 (Base)
2 - Robot
3 - Power supplies
4 - Standard mailslots
5 - Left magazine front
6 - Right magazine front
7 - Storage slots
8 - Tape drives
Locations A-3
Tape Slot Locations
Figure A–2 Non-Partitioned Two Module Library, Expanded Mailslot, and No Reserved Cells
Illustration Legend:
1 - Module 1 (Base)
2 - Robot
3 - Power supplies
4 - Tape drives
5 - Standard mailslots
6 - Mailslot expansion
7 - Right magazine front
8 - Left magazine front
9 - Storage slots
10 - Module 2 (Expansion)
A-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Tape Slot Locations
Figure A–3 Non-Partitioned Ten Module Library, Standard Mailslot, and Three Reserved Cells
Illustration Legend:
1 - Module 1 (Base)
2 - Robot
3 - Power supplies
4 - Standard mailslots
5 - Left magazine front
6 - Right magazine front
7 - Storage slots
8 - Reserved slots (Configurable)
9 - Tape drives
10 - Module 10 (Expansion)
Capacity
Table A–3 shows the number of Storage, Mailslot, and Tape Drive slots as Expansion
Modules are added to the library configuration.
Locations A-5
Tape Slot Locations
Address numbering changes when a library is partitioned. Partition number is
prefixed to the USER addressing indexes (see Appendix B, "Partitioning Overview").
Table A–3
Storage Slot, Mailslot, and Drive Counts for Different Configurations
Expanded
Mailslot
Configuration
Library Configuration
Standard Mailslot
Configuration
Modules
Total
Total
Total
Storage Total
Storage Mailslot
Slots
Mailslots1 Slots
s
Drive
Slots
Base Module
30
4
15
19
2
Base Module plus one expansion module2
60
4
45
19
4
Base Module plus two expansion modules
90
4
75
19
6
Base Module plus three expansion modules
1200
4
105
19
8
Base Module plus four expansion modules
150
4
135
19
10
Base Module plus five expansion modules
180
4
165
19
12
Base Module plus six expansion modules
210
4
195
19
14
Base Module plus seven expansion modules 240
4
225
19
16
Base Module plus eight expansion modules
270
4
255
19
18
Base Module plus nine expansion modules
300
4
285
19
20
Total
Notes:
1. All Mailslots (Standard Mailslots and Expanded Mailslots) are physically located in the base
module.
2. Each expansion module has 30 Storage Slots and 2 Drive Slots.
Diagnostic and Cleaning Cartridge Locations
A total of up to three slots are allowed to be configured within the front left (Column
1) of the base module. The reserved slots may contain diagnostic and cleaning
cartridges. The customer may not elect to configure any reserved slots, in which case
these are used as normal storage slots.
The user may configure up to three of these reserved slots in the base module
magazine beginning from row 1, column 1 and proceeding to row 3 of Column 1.
Reserved slots in a partitioned library must be configured before you enable
partitioning.
A-6 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
B
Partitioning Overview
B
The SL150 Library can be partitioned into a maximum of eight distinct sections.
Briefly stated, instead of one library—with all its cartridge slots, tape drives, and
mailslots—being a single entity, the library and these components can now be divided
into sections or partitions. A library supports a maximum of eight partitions. Each
partition can be accessed by one host or multiple hosts.
Partitioning—General
Partitioning has terms associated with it that must be understood to effectively use the
feature. In certain cases, these terms redefine some concepts that are familiar to users
of the traditional, nonpartitioned library configuration.
A partition is defined as the process of dividing portions of a library into discrete
sections. The partitioning feature offers great flexibility for users.
Enabling the library to be partitioned requires some important considerations:
■
■
Each partition designates tape drives and magazines solely to its partition, the
other partitions cannot use these tape drives or magazine storage slots.
Partition users must anticipate how much storage area is needed for their resident
tape volumes and the amount of free slots required. Once storage needs are
defined for the partitions within the library, sufficient modules need to be present
within the library to accommodate this need.
Partitioning—Feature
The SL150 Library supports one to eight partitions.
The customer has the choice of a nonpartitioned library or a partitioned library with
one to eight partitions.
When a partitioned library is desired, the administrator enables the Library
Partitioning option and adds the desired number of partitions. The administrator
configures each partition with the following:
■
One or more magazines
■
One or more tape drives
■
A bridged drive
The mailslots are shared among all partitions. If the library is configured with the
Standard Mailslots, then all partitions share the Standard Mailslots. If the library is
Partitioning Overview B-1
Partitioning—Feature
configured with the Expanded Mailslots, then all partitions share the Expanded
Mailslots.
Refer to Figure B–1 as an example of how a customer might divide a library into two
partitions. In this example:
■
Partition one owns the magazines on the left side of the library.
■
Partition two owns the magazines on the right side of the library.
■
Partition one owns the top drive in every module.
■
Partition two owns the bottom drive in every module.
SCSI Element Addresses are assigned from left to right and top to bottom for each
partition. The example in Figure B–1 shows the SCSI Element Address for the elements
in both partitions.
Figure B–1 Ten Module Library, Two Partitions, and the Standard Mailslot Configuration
Illustration Legend:
1 - Module 1 (Base)
B-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Partitioning—Feature
2 - Partition 1
3 - Partition 2
4 - Robot
5 - Power supplies
6 - Tape drives
7 - Standard Mailslots
8 - Left magazine front
9 - Right magazine front
10 - Module 10 (Expansion)
11 - Partition 1 resource
12 - Partition 2 resource
13 - Shared resource
14 - Reserved slots (configurable, shared resource)
When the library is partitioned, all partitions report the mailslots with a starting SCSI
Element Address of 10. The Mailslot Element count depends on the mailslot
configuration:
■
■
The library reports four mailslot elements when the Standard Mailslot is
configured.
The library reports 19 mailslot elements when the Expanded Mailslots are
configured.
Partitioning—Access Control
All hosts that issue commands to a bridged tape drive may also send commands to the
library partition. Commands are processed by the partition in which the bridged drive
resides. The host sends commands to the drive on LUN 0 and to the library on LUN 1.
Partitioning—Shared Mailslot Behavior
When the library is partitioned, the mailslots become a shared resource. When a
partition needs access to the mailslots, the operator must use the ASSIGN action in the
user interface to assign the partition to the mailslots before initiating an import or
export operation. Refer to the StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library User’s Guide for
help.
A Partition-Mailslot assignment gives a partition exclusive ownership of the shared
mailslot. This ensures that cartridges are always entered into the correct partition and
prevents the other partition from taking ownership of a shared mailslot that is already
in use.
If the mailslot is not assigned to the partition, a SCSI host application connected to the
partition will receive a status indication from the library that shows the mailslot is
open. When a SCSI host application receives status that the mailslot is open, the
application will direct the operator to either close the mailslot or ASSIGN the mailslot
to the partition. The SCSI host application cannot tell the difference between an open
mailslot and a shared mailslot that has not been assigned to the partition.
The following SCSI commands will return mailslot open status when the mailslot is
not assigned to the partition or when the mailslot is actually open:
Partitioning Overview B-3
Partitioning—Feature
■
■
A SCSI MOVE command to or from a mailslot element. The command will end in
Check Condition Status. The sense data will indicate Not Ready, Mailslot Open
(Sense Key =2h, ASC =3Ah, ASCQ =02h).
A SCSI READ ELEMENT STATUS command that includes the mailslot elements.
The command will end in GOOD status. The Import/Export Element Descriptor
data for the mailslot element will return an exception condition indicating that the
mailslot is open; the Except Bit will be set to 1, the ASC field will be set to 3Ah,
and the ASCQ field will be set to 02h.
Table B–1 shows how the SCSI Move and SCSI Read Element Status commands are
affected by the shared mailslot assignment. For the purposes of this example, the
library has been configured with two partitions. The library supports up to eight
partitions. The behavior is the same for one or more partitions.
Table B–1
SCSI Commands Affected by the Shared Mailslot Assignment
Mailslot Assignment
Commands from Partition 1
Commands from Partition 2
Unassigned
Commands will be processed as though
the mailslot door is open. The following
commands will report exception status:
Commands will be processed as though
the mailslot door is open. The following
commands will report exception status:
■
■
Assigned to Partition 1
Read Element Status command that
includes the mailslot element(s)
Move command with source or
destination set to a mailslot
Commands will be processed normally.
The SCSI Read Element Status and SCSI
Move commands will only report that the
Mailslot is open if it is physically opened
and the request includes the mailslot.
■
■
Commands will be processed as though
the mailslot door is open. The following
commands will report exception status:
■
■
Read Element Status command that
includes the mailslot element(s)
Move command with source or
destination set to a mailslot
Commands will be processed as though
the mailslot door is open. The following
commands will report exception status.
■
■
Assigned to Partition 2
Read Element Status command that
includes the mailslot element(s)
Read Element Status command that
includes the mailslot element(s)
Move command with source or
destination set to a mailslot
Commands will be processed normally.
The SCSI Read Element Status and SCSI
Move commands will only report that the
Mailslot is open if it is physically opened
and the request includes the mailslot.
Move command with source or
destination set to a mailslot
Note: The operator must use the UNASSIGN action in the user
interface to remove the partition ownership of the mailslots when the
import or export operation is complete.
The operator can open the mailslot only if it is unlocked. The locked or unlocked state
of the mailslot depends on the mailslot assignment and the SCSI Prevent/Allow
Medium Removal state. The library keeps separate Prevent/Allow Medium Removal
data for each partition. Refer to the SCSI Prevent/Allow Medium Removal Command
in the SL150 Modular Tape Library Interface Reference Manual for more details.
Table B–2 shows the conditions under which the shared mailslot is either locked or
unlocked. A value of Ignored indicates that the Prevent/Allow Media Removal state
for the associated partition does not matter. For the purposes of this example, the
library is configured with two partitions. The library supports up to eight partitions.
The behavior is the same for one or more partitions.
B-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Partitioning—Removing the Feature
Table B–2
Shared Mailslot Door Locked and Unlocked Conditions
Mailslot Assignment
Partition 1
Prevent/Allow
Media Removal
State
Partition 2
Prevent/Allow
Media Removal
State
Mailslot
Locked State
Unassigned
Ignored
Ignored
Locked
Assigned to Partition 1
Allowed
Ignored
Unlocked
Assigned to Partition 1
Prevented
Ignored
Locked
Assigned to Partition 2
Ignored
Allowed
Unlocked
Assigned to Partition 2
Ignored
Prevented
Locked
Partitioning—Removing the Feature
The administrator for the SL150 Library can remove all partitions by turning the
library partitioning OFF. The administrator must designate a bridged drive as part of
the new configuration.
Partitioning Overview
B-5
Partitioning—Removing the Feature
B-6 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
C
Controlling Contaminants
C
Control over contaminant levels in a computer room is extremely important because
tape libraries, tape drives, and tape media are subject to damage from airborne
particulates.
Environmental Contaminants
Most particles smaller than ten microns are not visible to the naked eye under most
conditions, but these particles can be the most damaging. As a result, the operating
environment must adhere to the following requirements.
■
■
■
ISO 14644-1 Class 8 Environment.
The total mass of airborne particulates must be less than or equal to 200
micrograms per cubic meter.
Severity level G1 per ANSI/ISA 71.04-1985.
Oracle currently requires the ISO 14644-1 standard approved in 1999, but will require
any updated standards for ISO 14644-1 as they are approved by the ISO governing
body. The ISO 14644-1 standard primarily focuses on the quantity and size of
particulates and the proper measurement methodology, but does not address the
overall mass of the particulates. As a result, the requirement for total mass limitations
is also necessary as a computer room or data center could meet the ISO 14644-1
specification, but still damage equipment because of the specific type of particulates in
the room. In addition, the ANSI/ISA 71.04-1985 specification addresses gaseous
contaminations as some airborne chemicals are more hazardous. All three
requirements are consistent with the requirements set by other major tape storage
vendors.
Required Air Quality Levels
Particles, gasses and other contaminants may impact the sustained operations of
computer hardware. Effects can range from intermittent interference to actual
component failures. The computer room must be designed to achieve a high level of
cleanliness. Airborne dusts, gasses and vapors must be maintained within defined
limits to help minimize their potential impact on the hardware.
Airborne particulate levels must be maintained within the limits of ISO 14644-1 Class 8
Environment. This standard defines air quality classes for clean zones based on
airborne particulate concentrations. This standard has an order of magnitude less
particles than standard air in an office environment. Particles ten microns or smaller
are harmful to most data processing hardware because they tend to exist in large
numbers, and can easily circumvent many sensitive components’ internal air filtration
Controlling Contaminants C-1
Contaminant Properties and Sources
systems. When computer hardware is exposed to these submicron particles in great
numbers they endanger system reliability by posing a threat to moving parts, sensitive
contacts and component corrosion.
Excessive concentrations of certain gasses can also accelerate corrosion and cause
failure in electronic components. Gaseous contaminants are a particular concern in a
computer room both because of the sensitivity of the hardware, and because a proper
computer room environment is almost entirely recirculating. Any contaminant threat
in the room is compounded by the cyclical nature of the airflow patterns. Levels of
exposure that might not be concerning in a well ventilated site repeatedly attack the
hardware in a room with recirculating air. The isolation that prevents exposure of the
computer room environment to outside influences can also multiply any detrimental
influences left unaddressed in the room.
Gasses that are particularly dangerous to electronic components include chlorine
compounds, ammonia and its derivatives, oxides of sulfur and petrol hydrocarbons. In
the absence of appropriate hardware exposure limits, health exposure limits must be
used.
While the following sections will describe some best practices for maintaining an ISO
14644-1 Class 8 Environment in detail, there are some basic precautions that must be
adhered to:
■
■
■
■
Do not allow food or drink into the area.
Cardboard, wood, or packing materials must not be stored in the data center clean
area.
Identify a separate area for unpacking new equipment from crates and boxes.
Do not allow construction or drilling in the data center without first isolating
sensitive equipment and any air targeted specifically for the equipment.
Construction generates a high level of particulates that exceed ISO 14644-1 Class 8
criteria in a localized area. Dry wall and gypsum are especially damaging to
storage equipment.
Contaminant Properties and Sources
Contaminants in the room can take many forms, and can come from numerous
sources. Any mechanical process in the room can produce dangerous contaminants or
agitate settled contaminants. A particle must meet two basic criteria to be considered a
contaminant:
■
■
It must have the physical properties that could potentially cause damage to the
hardware.
It must be able to migrate to areas where it can cause the physical damage.
The only differences between a potential contaminant and an actual contaminant are
time and location. Particulate matter is most likely to migrate to areas where it can do
damage if it is airborne. For this reason, airborne particulate concentration is a useful
measurement in determining the quality of the computer room environment.
Depending on local conditions, particles as big as 1,000 microns can become airborne,
but their active life is very short, and they are arrested by most filtration devices.
Submicron particulates are much more dangerous to sensitive computer hardware,
because they remain airborne for a much longer time, and they are more apt to bypass
filters.
C-2 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Contaminant Properties and Sources
Operator Activity
Human movement within the computer space is probably the single greatest source of
contamination in an otherwise clean computer room. Normal movement can dislodge
tissue fragments, such as dander or hair, or fabric fibers from clothing. The opening
and closing of drawers or hardware panels or any metal-on-metal activity can produce
metal filings. Simply walking across the floor can agitate settled contamination
making it airborne and potentially dangerous.
Hardware Movement
Hardware installation or reconfiguration involves a great deal of subfloor activity, and
settled contaminants can very easily be disturbed, forcing them to become airborne in
the supply air stream to the room's hardware. This is particularly dangerous if the
subfloor deck is unsealed. Unsealed concrete sheds fine dust particles into the
airstream, and is susceptible to efflorescence —mineral salts brought to the surface of
the deck through evaporation or hydrostatic pressure.
Outside Air
Inadequately filtered air from outside the controlled environment can introduce
innumerable contaminants. Post-filtration contamination in duct work can be
dislodged by air flow, and introduced into the hardware environment. This is
particularly important in a downward-flow air conditioning system in which the
sub-floor void is used as a supply air duct. If the structural deck is contaminated, or if
the concrete slab is not sealed, fine particulate matter (such as concrete dust or
efflorescence) can be carried directly to the room's hardware.
Stored Items
Storage and handling of unused hardware or supplies can also be a source of
contamination. Corrugated cardboard boxes or wooden skids shed fibers when moved
or handled. Stored items are not only contamination sources; their handling in the
computer room controlled areas can agitate settled contamination already in the room.
Outside Influences
A negatively pressurized environment can allow contaminants from adjoining office
areas or the exterior of the building to infiltrate the computer room environment
through gaps in the doors or penetrations in the walls. Ammonia and phosphates are
often associated with agricultural processes, and numerous chemical agents can be
produced in manufacturing areas. If such industries are present near the data center
facility, chemical filtration may be necessary. Potential impact from automobile
emissions, dusts from local quarries or masonry fabrication facilities or sea mists
should also be assessed if relevant.
Cleaning Activity
Inappropriate cleaning practices can also degrade the environment. Many chemicals
used in normal or “office” cleaning applications can damage sensitive computer
equipment. Potentially hazardous chemicals outlined in the "Cleaning Procedures and
Equipment" section should be avoided. Out-gassing from these products or direct
contact with hardware components can cause failure. Certain biocide treatments used
in building air handlers are also inappropriate for use in computer rooms either
because they contain chemicals, that can degrade components, or because they are not
Controlling Contaminants C-3
Contaminant Effects
designed to be used in the airstream of a re-circulating air system. The use of push
mops or inadequately filtered vacuums can also stimulate contamination.
It is essential that steps be taken to prevent air contaminants, such as metal particles,
atmospheric dust, solvent vapors, corrosive gasses, soot, airborne fibers or salts from
entering or being generated within the computer room environment. In the absence of
hardware exposure limits, applicable human exposure limits from OSHA, NIOSH or
the ACGIH should be used.
Contaminant Effects
Destructive interactions between airborne particulate and electronic instrumentation
can occur in numerous ways. The means of interference depends on the time and
location of the critical incident, the physical properties of the contaminant and the
environment in which the component is placed.
Physical Interference
Hard particles with a tensile strength at least 10% greater than that of the component
material can remove material from the surface of the component by grinding action or
embedding. Soft particles will not damage the surface of the component, but can
collect in patches that can interfere with proper functioning. If these particles are tacky
they can collect other particulate matter. Even very small particles can have an impact
if they collect on a tacky surface, or agglomerate as the result of electrostatic charge
build-up.
Corrosive Failure
Corrosive failure or contact intermittence due to the intrinsic composition of the
particles or due to absorption of water vapor and gaseous contaminants by the
particles can also cause failures. The chemical composition of the contaminant can be
very important. Salts, for instance, can expand by absorbing water vapor from the air
(nucleating). If a mineral salts deposit exists in a sensitive location and the
environment is sufficiently moist, it can grow to a size where it can physically interfere
with a mechanism or can cause damage by forming salt solutions.
Shorts
Conductive pathways can arise through the accumulation of particles on circuit boards
or other components. Many types of particulate are not inherently conductive, but can
absorb significant quantities of water in high-moisture environments. Problems caused
by electrically conductive particles can range from intermittent malfunctioning to
actual damage to components and operational failures.
Thermal Failure
Premature clogging of filtered devices will cause a restriction in air flow that could
induce internal overheating and head crashes. Heavy layers of accumulated dust on
hardware components can also form an insulative layer that can lead to heat-related
failures.
Room Conditions
All surfaces within the controlled zone of the data center should be maintained at a
high level of cleanliness. All surfaces should be periodically cleaned by trained
C-4 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Room Conditions
professionals on a regular basis, as outlined in the "Cleaning Procedures and
Equipment" section. Particular attention should be paid to the areas beneath the
hardware, and the access floor grid. Contaminants near the air intakes of the hardware
can more easily be transferred to areas where they can do damage. Particulate
accumulations on the access floor grid can be forced airborne when floor tiles are lifted
to gain access to the sub-floor.
The subfloor void in a downward-flow air conditioning system acts as the supply air
plenum. This area is pressurized by the air conditioners, and the conditioned air is
then introduced into the hardware spaces through perforated floor panels. Thus, all air
traveling from the air conditioners to the hardware must first pass through the
subfloor void. Inappropriate conditions in the supply air plenum can have a dramatic
effect on conditions in the hardware areas.
The subfloor void in a data center is often viewed solely as a convenient place to run
cables and pipes. It is important to remember that this is also a duct, and that
conditions below the false floor must be maintained at a high level of cleanliness.
Contaminant sources can include degrading building materials, operator activity or
infiltration from outside the controlled zone. Often particulate deposits are formed
where cables or other subfloor items form air dams that allow particulate to settle and
accumulate. When these items are moved, the particulate is re-introduced into the
supply airstream, where it can be carried directly to hardware.
Damaged or inappropriately protected building materials are often sources of subfloor
contamination. Unprotected concrete, masonry block, plaster or gypsum wall-board
will deteriorate over time, shedding fine particulate into the air. Corrosion on
post-filtration air conditioner surfaces or subfloor items can also be a concern. The
subfloor void must be thoroughly and appropriately decontaminated on a regular
basis to address these contaminants. Only vacuums equipped with High Efficiency
Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration should be used in any decontamination procedure.
Inadequately filtered vacuums will not arrest fine particles, passing them through the
unit at high speeds, and forcing them airborne.
Unsealed concrete, masonry or other similar materials are subject to continued
degradation. The sealants and hardeners normally used during construction are often
designed to protect the deck against heavy traffic, or to prepare the deck for the
application of flooring materials, and are not meant for the interior surfaces of a
supply air plenum. While regular decontaminations will help address loose
particulate, the surfaces will still be subject to deterioration over time, or as subfloor
activity causes wear. Ideally all of the subfloor surfaces will be appropriately sealed at
the time of construction. If this is not the case, special precautions will be necessary to
address the surfaces in an on-line room.
It is extremely important that only appropriate materials and methodology are used in
the encapsulation process. Inappropriate sealants or procedures can actually degrade
the conditions they are meant to improve, impacting hardware operations and
reliability. The following precautions should be taken when encapsulating the supply
air plenum in an on-line room:
■
■
Manually apply the encapsulant. Spray applications are totally inappropriate in an
on-line data center. The spraying process forces the sealant airborne in the supply
airstream, and is more likely to encapsulate cables to the deck.
Use a pigmented encapsulant. The pigmentation makes the encapsulant visible in
application, ensuring thorough coverage, and helps in identifying areas that are
damaged or exposed over time.
Controlling Contaminants C-5
Exposure Points
■
■
It must have a high flexibility and low porosity to effectively cover the irregular
textures of the subject area, and to minimize moisture migration and water
damage.
The encapsulant must not out-gas any harmful contaminants. Many encapsulants
commonly used in industry are highly ammoniated or contain other chemicals
that can be harmful to hardware. It is very unlikely that this out-gassing could
cause immediate, catastrophic failure, but these chemicals will often contribute to
corrosion of contacts, heads or other components.
Effectively encapsulating a subfloor deck in an on-line computer room is a very
sensitive and difficult task, but it can be conducted safely if appropriate procedures
and materials are used. Avoid using the ceiling void as an open supply or return for
the building air system. This area is typically very dirty and difficult to clean. Often
the structural surfaces are coated with fibrous fire-proofing, and the ceiling tiles and
insulation are also subject to shedding. Even before filtration, this is an unnecessary
exposure that can adversely affect environmental conditions in the room. It is also
important that the ceiling void does not become pressurized, as this will force dirty air
into the computer room. Columns or cable chases with penetrations in both the
subfloor and ceiling void can lead to ceiling void pressurization.
Exposure Points
All potential exposure points in the data center should be addressed to minimize
potential influences from outside the controlled zone. Positive pressurization of the
computer rooms will help limit contaminant infiltration, but it is also important to
minimize any breaches in the room perimeter. To ensure the environment is
maintained correctly, the following should be considered:
■
All doors should fit snugly in their frames.
■
Gaskets and sweeps can address any gaps.
■
■
■
Automatic doors should be avoided in areas where they can be accidentally
triggered. An alternate means of control would be to remotely locate a door trigger
so that personnel pushing carts can open the doors easily. In highly sensitive areas,
or where the data center is exposed to undesirable conditions, it may be advisable
to design and install personnel traps. Double sets of doors with a buffer between
can help limit direct exposure to outside conditions.
Seal all penetrations between the data center and adjacent areas.
Avoid sharing a computer room ceiling or subfloor plenum with loosely controlled
adjacent areas.
Filtration
Filtration is an effective means of addressing airborne particulate in a controlled
environment. It is important that all air handlers serving the data center are
adequately filtered to ensure appropriate conditions are maintained within the room.
In-room process cooling is the recommended method of controlling the room
environment. The in-room process coolers re-circulate room air. Air from the hardware
areas is passed through the units where it is filtered and cooled, and then introduced
into the subfloor plenum. The plenum is pressurized, and the conditioned air is forced
into the room, through perforated tiles, which then travels back to the air conditioner
for reconditioning. The airflow patterns and design associated with a typical computer
room air handler have a much higher rate of air change than typical comfort cooling
air conditioners so air is filtered much more often than in an office environment.
C-6 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Positive Pressurization and Ventilation
Proper filtration can capture a great deal of particulates. The filters installed in the
in-room, re-circulating air conditioners should have a minimum efficiency of 40%
(Atmospheric Dust-Spot Efficiency, ASHRAE Standard 52.1). Low-grade pre-filters
should be installed to help prolong the life of the more expensive primary filters.
Any air being introduced into the computer room controlled zone, for ventilation or
positive pressurization, should first pass through high efficiency filtration. Ideally, air
from sources outside the building should be filtered using High Efficiency Particulate
Air (HEPA) filtration rated at 99.97% efficiency (DOP Efficiency MILSTD-282) or
greater. The expensive high efficiency filters should be protected by multiple layers of
pre-filters that are changed on a more frequent basis. Low-grade pre-filters, 20%
ASHRAE atmospheric dust-spot efficiency, should be the primary line of defense. The
next filter bank should consist of pleated or bag type filters with efficiencies between
60% and 80% ASHRAE atmospheric dust-spot efficiency.
ASHRAE 52-76 Dust spot efficiency %
3.0 micron
1.0 micron
0.3 micron
25-30
80
20
<5
60-65
93
50
20
80-85
99
90
50
90
>99
92
60
DOP 95
--
>99
95
Low efficiency filters are almost totally ineffective at removing sub-micron particulates
from the air. It is also important that the filters used are properly sized for the air
handlers. Gaps around the filter panels can allow air to bypass the filter as it passes
through the air conditioner. Any gaps or openings should be filled using appropriate
materials, such as stainless steel panels or custom filter assemblies.
Positive Pressurization and Ventilation
A designed introduction of air from outside the computer room system will be
necessary to accommodate positive pressurization and ventilation requirements. The
data center should be designed to achieve positive pressurization in relation to more
loosely controlled surrounding areas. Positive pressurization of the more sensitive
areas is an effective means of controlling contaminant infiltration through any minor
breaches in the room perimeter. Positive pressure systems are designed to apply
outward air forces to doorways and other access points within the data processing
center to minimize contaminant infiltration of the computer room. Only a minimal
amount of air should be introduced into the controlled environment. In data centers
with multiple rooms, the most sensitive areas should be the most highly pressurized. It
is, however, extremely important that the air being used to positively pressurize the
room does not adversely affect the environmental conditions in the room. It is essential
that any air introduction from outside the computer room is adequately filtered and
conditioned to ensure that it is within acceptable parameters. These parameters can be
looser than the goal conditions for the room since the air introduction should be
minimal. A precise determination of acceptable limits should be based on the amount
of air being introduced and the potential impact on the environment of the data center.
Because a closed-loop, re-circulating air conditioning system is used in most data
centers, it will be necessary to introduce a minimal amount of air to meet the
ventilation requirements of the room occupants. Data center areas normally have a
very low human population density; thus the air required for ventilation will be
minimal. In most cases, the air needed to achieve positive pressurization will likely
Controlling Contaminants C-7
Cleaning Procedures and Equipment
exceed that needed to accommodate the room occupants. Normally, outside air
quantities of less than 5% make-up air should be sufficient (ASHRAE Handbook:
Applications, Chapter 17). A volume of 15 CFM outside air per occupant or
workstation should sufficiently accommodate the ventilation needs of the room.
Cleaning Procedures and Equipment
Even a perfectly designed data center requires continued maintenance. Data centers
containing design flaws or compromises may require extensive efforts to maintain
conditions within desired limits. Hardware performance is an important factor
contributing to the need for a high level of cleanliness in the data center.
Operator awareness is another consideration. Maintaining a fairly high level of
cleanliness will raise the level of occupant awareness about special requirements and
restrictions while in the data center. Occupants or visitors to the data center will hold
the controlled environment in high regard and are more likely to act appropriately.
Any environment that is maintained to a fairly high level of cleanliness and is kept in a
neat and well organized fashion will also command respect from the room’s
inhabitants and visitors. When potential clients visit the room they will interpret the
overall appearance of the room as a reflection of an overall commitment to excellence
and quality. An effective cleaning schedule must consist of specially designed
short-term and long-term actions. These can be summarized as follows:
Frequency
Task
Daily Actions
Rubbish removal
Weekly Actions
Access floor maintenance (vacuum and damp mop)
Quarterly Actions
Hardware decontamination
Room surface decontamination
Biennial Actions
Subfloor void decontamination
Air conditioner decontamination (as necessary)
Daily Tasks
This statement of work focuses on the removal of each day’s discarded trash and
rubbish from the room. In addition, daily floor vacuuming may be required in Print
Rooms or rooms with a considerable amount of operator activity.
Weekly Tasks
This statement of work focuses on the maintenance of the access floor system. During
the week, the access floor becomes soiled with dust accumulations and blemishes. The
entire access floor should be vacuumed and damp mopped. All vacuums used in the
data center, for any purpose, should be equipped with High Efficiency Particulate Air
(HEPA) filtration. Inadequately filtered equipment cannot arrest smaller particles, but
rather simply agitates them, degrading the environment they were meant to improve.
It is also important that mop-heads and dust wipes are of appropriate non-shedding
designs.
Cleaning solutions used within the data center must not pose a threat to the hardware.
Solutions that could potentially damage hardware include products that are:
■
Ammoniated
■
Chlorine-based
C-8 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Cleaning Procedures and Equipment
■
Phosphate-based
■
Bleach enriched
■
Petro-chemical based
■
Floor strippers or re-conditioners
It is also important that the recommended concentrations are used, as even an
appropriate agent in an inappropriate concentration can be potentially damaging. The
solution should be maintained in good condition throughout the project, and excessive
applications should be avoided.
Quarterly Tasks
The quarterly statement of work involves a much more detailed and comprehensive
decontamination schedule and should only be conducted by experienced computer
room contamination-control professionals. These actions should be performed three to
four times per year, based on the levels of activity and contamination present. All
room surfaces should be thoroughly decontaminated including cupboards, ledges,
racks, shelves and support equipment. High ledges and light fixtures and generally
accessible areas should be treated or vacuumed as appropriate. Vertical surfaces
including windows, glass partitions, doors, and so forth should be thoroughly treated.
Special dust cloths that are impregnated with a particle absorbent material are to be
used in the surface decontamination process. Do not use generic dust rags or fabric
cloths to perform these activities. Do not use any chemicals, waxes or solvents during
these activities.
Settled contamination should be removed from all exterior hardware surfaces
including horizontal and vertical surfaces. The unit’s air inlet and outlet grilles should
be treated as well. Do not wipe the unit’s control surfaces as these areas can be
decontaminated by the use of lightly compressed air. Special care should also be taken
when cleaning keyboards and life-safety controls. Use specially treated dust wipes to
treat all hardware surfaces. Monitors should be treated with optical cleansers and
static-free cloths. No Electro-Static Discharge (ESD) dissipative chemicals should be
used on the computer hardware, since these agents are caustic and harmful to most
sensitive hardware. The computer hardware is sufficiently designed to permit
electrostatic dissipation thus no further treatments are required. After all of the
hardware and room surfaces have been thoroughly decontaminated, the access floor
should be HEPA vacuumed and damp mopped as detailed in the Weekly Actions.
Biennial Tasks
The subfloor void should be decontaminated every 18 months to 24 months based on
the conditions of the plenum surfaces and the degree of contaminant accumulation.
Over the course of the year, the subfloor void undergoes a considerable amount of
activity that creates new contamination accumulations. Although the weekly above
floor cleaning activities will greatly reduce the subfloor dust accumulations, a certain
amount of surface dirt will migrate into the subfloor void. It is important to maintain
the subfloor to a high degree of cleanliness since this area acts as the hardware’s
supply air plenum. It is best to perform the subfloor decontamination treatment in a
short time frame to reduce cross contamination. The personnel performing this
operation should be fully trained to assess cable connectivity and priority. Each
exposed area of the subfloor void should be individually inspected and assessed for
possible cable handling and movement. All twist-in and plug-in connections should be
checked and fully engaged before cable movement. All subfloor activities must be
conducted with proper consideration for air distribution and floor loading. In an effort
to maintain access floor integrity and proper psychrometric conditions, the number of
Controlling Contaminants C-9
Activity and Processes
floor tiles removed from the floor system should be carefully managed. In most cases,
each work crew should have no more than 24 square feet (six tiles) of open access
flooring at any one time. The access floor’s supporting grid system should also be
thoroughly decontaminated, first by vacuuming the loose debris and then by
damp-sponging the accumulated residue. Rubber gaskets, if present, as the metal
framework that makes up the grid system should be removed from the grid work and
cleaned with a damp sponge as well. Any unusual conditions, such as damaged floor
suspension, floor tiles, cables and surfaces, within the floor void should be noted and
reported.
Activity and Processes
Isolation of the data center is an integral factor in maintaining appropriate conditions.
All unnecessary activity should be avoided in the data center, and access should be
limited to necessary personnel only. Periodic activity, such as tours, should be limited,
and traffic should be restricted to away from the hardware to avoid accidental contact.
All personnel working in the room, including temporary employees and janitorial
personnel, should be trained in the most basic sensitivities of the hardware to avoid
unnecessary exposure. The controlled areas of the data center should be thoroughly
isolated from contaminant producing activities. Ideally, print rooms, check sorting
rooms, command centers or other areas with high levels of mechanical or human
activity should have no direct exposure to the data center. Paths to and from these
areas should not necessitate traffic through the main data center areas.
C-10 StorageTek SL150 Modular Tape Library Systems Assurance Guide
Glossary
This glossary defines terms and abbreviations in this publication.
Some of the definitions are taken from other glossaries. The letters in the parentheses
that follow some definitions indicate the source of the definition:
(A) The American National Standard Dictionary for Information Systems, ANSI
X3.172-1990, copyright 1990 by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).
(E) The ANSI/Electronic Industries Association (EIA) Standard-440-A, Fiber Optic
Terminology.
(I) The Information Technology Vocabulary, developed by Subcommittee 1, Joint
Technical Committee 1, of the International Organization for Standardization and
International Electro-technical Commission (ISO/IEC/JTC1/SC1).
(IBM) The IBM Dictionary of Computing, copyright 1994 by IBM.
(T) Draft international standards committee drafts, and working papers being
developed by the ISO/IEC/JTC1/SC1.
alphanumeric
A character or group of characters that identifies a register, a particular part of storage,
or some other data source or destination. (A).
arm
The robotic assembly that is lowered between the columns of tapes. The arm hangs on
four wires from the Z mechanism. The arm includes the hand, the rails the hand rides
on, the track motor that moves the hand along the rails, and the KLT card.
audit
The process of recording the location of all tapes in a library.
base chassis
The sheet metal and plastic chassis that makes up the framework of Module 1.
base module
The smallest, fully functional library consisting of the base chassis with the midplane,
robot, front control panel, mailslot, one or two power supplies, up to two half-height
LTO Ultrium tape drives, left magazine, and right magazine.
cartridge
A storage device that consists of magnetic tape on a supply reel in a protective
housing. The spine of the cartridge usually contains a label listing the volume
identification number. Also called tape, tape cartridge, tape volume, or cassette.
Glossary-1
cell
cell
See slot.
cleaning cartridge
A tape cartridge that contains special material to clean the tape path in a transport or
drive. LTO Ultrium cleaning cartridge labels have a CLN prefix and a CU media
identifier.
configuration
The manner in which the hardware and software of an information processing system
is organized and interconnected. (T)
data cartridge
A term used to distinguish a cartridge onto which a tape drive may write data.
diagnostics
Pertaining to the detection and isolation of errors in programs and faults in
equipment.
dismount
To remove a tape from a drive.
drive
A drive controls the movement of the tape and records or reads the data on the tape as
desired by the customer (see tape drive).
drive cleaning
The device feature that uses a cleaning cartridge to clean a tape drive.
drive slot
The space in the library where the tape drive resides.
drive tray
See tape drive.
dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP)
A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to
devices on a network. DHCP assigns a number dynamically from a defined range of
numbers for a given network.
encryption
The process of changing data into a form that cannot be read until it is deciphered,
protecting the data from unauthorized access and use.
Ethernet
A local-area, packet-switched bus topology that enables the connection of several
computer systems. The Ethernet architecture is similar to the IEEE 802.3 standard.
expanded mailsot
An optional library configuration to increase the capacity of the Mailslot from four to
19 cartridges. A logical entity containing four slots in the Standard Mailslot plus 15
slots in the Base Module right magazine (the Mailslot Expansion).
Glossary-2
GUI
expansion cable
A cable used to connect modules 2–10 to Module 1. Each end of the cable has a USB A
style connector.
expansion chassis
The sheet metal and plastic chassis that makes up the framework for Module 2–10.
expansion module
A module that can be added to the bottom of an existing library to increase its capacity
for drives and tape cartridges (tapes). The module consists of the expansion chassis, a
module controller, up to two power supplies, up to two half-height LTO Ultrium tape
drives, a left magazine, and a right magazine. The expansion module connects to the
base module by an expansion cable.
export
The action in which the device places a cartridge into the mailslot so that the operator
can remove the cartridge. Also called eject.
FC
See Fibre Channel.
fiber optics
The branch of optical technology concerned with the transmission of radiant power
through fibers made of transparent materials such as glass, fused silica, and plastic. (E)
fiber-optic cable
A cable made of ultra-thin glass or silica fibers which can transmit data using pulses of
laser light. Fiber-optic cables have several advantages over copper cables: they have
much less signal loss; they allow information to be transmitted at higher speeds and
over longer distances; they are not affected by external electrical noise; and they are
better for transmissions which require security.
Fibre Channel
The National Committee for Information Technology Standards standard that defines
an ultrahigh-speed, content-independent, multilevel data transmission interface that
supports multiple protocols simultaneously. Fibre Channel supports connectivity to
millions of devices over copper or fiber-optic physical media and provides the best
characteristics of both networks and channels over diverse topologies.
front control panel
An assembly mounted on the front of the base chassis. It includes the touch screen
operator panel, various LEDs and switches, and associated electronics.
get
An activity in which a robot obtains a cartridge from a slot or drive.
gripper
The portion of the hand assembly that grasps and holds a cartridge.
GUI
Graphical user interface. Software that allows the user to control the device through
visual screens.
Glossary-3
hand
hand
The robotic mechanism that grabs tape cartridges and moves them between slots and
the drive. It is a component of the arm. The hand has a reach mechanism that gets tape
cartridges from slots or drives and puts them into slots or drives. The hand also has a
wrist mechanism that rotates the hand to allow it to reach cartridges on either side or
the drives at the back of the library.
hardware
All or part of the physical components of an information processing system, such as
computers or peripheral devices. (T) (A)
HBA
See host bus adapter.
host bus adapter (HBA)
A circuit installed in a multi-platform host or device that interfaces between the device
and the bus.
host computer
In a computer network, a computer that usually performs network control functions
and provides end users with services such as computation and database access. (T)
host interface
An interface between a network and host computer. (T)
import
The process of bringing a cartridge into the library from the mailslot. Also called enter.
indicator
A device that provides a visual or other indication of the existence of a defined state.
(T)
initial program load (IPL)
A process that activates a device reset and loads system programs to prepare a
computer system for operation. Processors having diagnostic programs activate these
programs at initial program load execution. Devices running firmware usually reload
the functional firmware from a diskette or disk drive at initial program load execution.
initialization
The operations required for setting a device to a starting state, before the use of a data
medium, or before implementation of a process. (T)
interface
Hardware, software, or both, that links systems, programs, or devices. (IBM)
internet protocol (IP)
A protocol used to route data from its source to its destination in an Internet
environment. (IBM)
inventory
The process of reading and storing in memory the bar code identification and location
of all tape cartridges in a library.
Glossary-4
mailslot expansion
IP
See internet protocol.
IPL
See initial program load.
LC connector
A standard fiber-optic cable connector for Fibre Channel data transfer.
LED
Light emitting diode. An electronic device that lights up when electricity is passed
through it.
left magazine
A plastic assembly containing 15 tape slots that can be inserted into the left side (as
viewed from the front) of Modules 1–10. Left magazines and right magazines are not
interchangeable.
library
A robotic system that stores, moves, mounts, and dismounts tape cartridges that are
used in data read or write operations.
LTO
An acronym for Linear Tape-Open technology which is set of data format standards
created to enable data interchange among tape drive produced by a consortium of
manufacturers. With LTO standards, the tape cartridges are interchangeable between
tape drive brands.
LUN
Logical Unit Number. An address for a component of a SCSI device. In this device, the
host computer sends the SCSI commands for the library to LUN 1 of the master tape
drive and sends SCSI commands for the tape drive itself to LUN 0.
MAC address
The media access control address is a unique identifier assigned to devices for
communication on a physical network.
magnetic tape
A tape with a magnetizable layer on which data can be stored. (T)
magnetic tape drive
A mechanism for controlling the movement of magnetic tape, commonly used to move
magnetic tape past a read head or write head, or to allow automatic rewinding. (I) (A)
mailslot
The standard mailslot is a plastic and metal assembly located in the upper right corner
of the base chassis used to enter tapes into the library and to remove tapes from the
library. Previous StorageTek libraries called this a CAP (Cartridge Access Port).
mailslot expansion
A term describing the Base Module right magazine (the magazine immediately below
the Standard Mailslot) when the library has the expanded mailslot configuration. The
mailslot capacity expands from four cartridges (Standard Mailslot) to 19 cartridges.
Glossary-5
management information base (MIB)
management information base (MIB)
An ASCII text file organized hierarchically that describes the elements (configuration
and statistical information) of a managed device. When a manager requests
information, or a managed device generates a trap, the MIB translates the numeric
strings into readable text that identifies each data object within the message.
midplane
A card mounted in the base chassis or expansion chassis that is behind the tape slots
and in front of the tape drives. Other cards connect to it either by direct connection or
by a cable.
Module 1
See base module.
module controller
A card inserted into the back of Modules 2–10 that controls the operation of the
module. It is connected to the robot by an expansion cable.
Module X (2 through 10)
See expansion module.
mount
To place a tape in a drive and make it accessible to the host system.
multimode fiber
An optical fiber designed to carry multiple signals, distinguished by frequency or
phase, at the same time.
net mask
A 32-bit, or 4-byte number, in dotted decimal format (typically written as four
numbers separated by periods, such as 255.255.0.0 or 255.255.255.0) that is applied to
an IP address to identify the network and node address of a host or router interface.
(Synonymous with subnet mask.)
network
An arrangement of nodes and branches that connects data processing devices to one
another through software and hardware links to facilitate information interchange.
offline
Neither controlled by, nor communicating with, a computer. (IBM)
online
Pertaining to the operation of a functional unit when under the direct control of the
computer. (T)
operator panel
A component of the front control panel consisting of a seven inch WVGA color touch
screen.
port
A specific communications end point within a host. A port is identified by a port
number. (IBM) (2) In Fibre Channel, an access point in a device where a link attaches.
Glossary-6
switch
power supply
An AC to DC power supply that mounts into the rear of a module Module (1–10).
Referred to as top power supply or bottom power supply when referring to a power
supply installed in a specific module.
power supply filler
A metal frame that slides into a power supply slot when a power supply will not be
used in that slot.
put
An activity in which a robot places a cartridge into a slot or drive.
release
A distribution of a new product or new function and fixes for an existing product.
(IBM)
right magazine
A plastic assembly containing 15 tape slots that can be inserted into the right side (as
viewed from the front) of Modules 1–10. Right magazines and left magazines are not
interchangeable.
robot
An assembly that incorporates the bulk of the Module 1 electronics and the robotic
components. This assembly is a combination of mechanical components, electronics,
and a sheet metal housing. It is located at the top of the base chassis and incorporates
the arm, Z mechanism, a CPU board, plus the KLC and KLZ cards.
SAS
Serial Attached SCSI. A computer bus technology and serial communication protocol
for direct attached storage devices, including disk drives and high-performance tape
drives.
SCSI
Small Computer System Interface. A standard interface and command set for
transferring data between mass storage and other devices. The host computer uses
SCSI commands to operate the device. Depending on the model, physical connection
between the host computer and the tape drive will use a parallel SCSI, SAS, or Fibre
Channel interface.
SLAAC
Stateless automatic address configuration. The process of a host generating its own
address by using a combination of locally available information, such as a MAC
address, and information that is advertised by routers.
slot
An empty location into which something else may be placed. Most commonly used
when referring to the locations in the magazine or mailslot where tape cartridges are
placed. Power supplies and drives are also placed in slots.
switch
In Fibre Channel technology, a device that connects Fibre Channel devices together in
a fabric.
Glossary-7
tape
tape
Also known as cartridge, tape cartridge, tape volume, volume, or cassette.
tape cartridge
A container holding magnetic tape that can be processed without separating the tape
from the container. The device uses data and cleaning cartridges. These cartridges are
not interchangeable. See cartridge.
tape drive
An electro-mechanical device that moves magnetic tape and includes mechanisms for
writing and reading data to and from the tape. The drive is mounted into a proprietary
tray (sometimes called a sled).
tape drive filler
A metal frame that slides into a tape drive slot when a tape drive will not be used in
that slot.
Terabyte
A unit of storage, abbreviated T or TB, equal to 1,024 Gigabytes.
U
A measure of chassis height. 1U in rack measurement is 44.45 millimeters (1.75 inches).
Ultrium
An LTO tape format optimized for high capacity and performance. The Ultrium tape
format uses a single reel cartridge to maximize capacity.
USB
Universal Serial Bus. A serial bus standard used to interface devices.
World Wide Name
A unique identifier in a Fibre Channel or SAS storage network. The first three bytes
are derived from an IEEE Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI), which defines the
manufacturer or vendor. The remaining five bytes are assigned by the vendor.
WORM
An acronym for Write Once Read Many times, a class of recording systems that allow
recording and adding data, but not altering recorded data.
wrist
A component of the hand assembly that rotates the hand horizontally.
Z mechanism
The robotic assembly mounted at the back of the robot that raises and lowers the arm.
The Z mechanism includes a motor, gears, the bullwheel, and the wires and pulleys
that hold the arm. As the motor turns, the bullwheel rotates and extends or retracts the
wires to lower or raise the arm.
Glossary-8
Index
A
filtration, C-6
ACSLS, 1-10
addressing, USER physical, A-1
air quality, C-1
I
C
cables
Ethernet, 3-3
Fibre Channel
multimode, 3-3
plenum, 3-3
riser, 3-3
SAS, 3-4
cartridge magazine
description, 1-1
part number, 3-1
cartridges
locations, diagnostic and cleaning, A-6
placement in slots, A-1
types supported, 1-4
class 1 laser product, 1-4
cleaning procedures, data center, C-8
command
SCSI MOVE, B-4
SCSI READ ELEMENT STATUS, B-4
contaminants, controlling, C-1
control interface, 1-2
cord, power supply, 3-4
interface
host, 1-2
library control, 1-2
interface cables, 3-3, 3-4
L
labels, ordering, 3-5
laser product, 1-4
Left side wall, A-1
library control interface, 1-2
locations
diagnostic & cleaning cartridges, A-6
tape slots, A-1
M
magazine
cartridge, 1-1
part number, 3-1
mailslot
description, 1-6
shared, B-3
media
ordering, 3-5
types supported, 1-4
multimode cable part numbers, 3-3
D
data center cleaning procedures, C-8
description, SL150, 1-1
drive, tape, 1-1, 1-4
E
environmental
contaminants, C-1
information, SL150, 1-11
Ethernet cables, 3-3
F
Fibre Channel cables, 3-3
N
numbering
diagnostic & cleaning cartridges, A-6
SCSI element, B-2
tape slots, A-1
O
ordering SL150, 3-1
P
part numbers
Ethernet cables, 3-3
Index-1
fiber optic cables, 3-3
power cords, 3-4
SAS cables, 3-4
SL150, 3-1
partition
description, 1-8
feature, B-1
mailslot assignment, B-3
setting of, B-1
placement, data cartridges into slots, A-1
plenum cables, 3-3
power cord part numbers, 3-4
power supply
expansion module tape drive, 3-2
location, 1-2
part numbers, 3-1
R
rack
depth, minimum, 1-11
rail spacing, front to rear, 1-11
requirements, 1-10
rail spacing, front to rear, 1-11
Right side wall, A-1
riser cables, 3-3
S
SAS
cable part number, 3-4
serial connection, 2-2
SCSI MOVE command, B-4
SCSI READ ELEMENT STATUS command, B-4
service clearance, 2-3
shared mailslot, B-3
SL150
description, 1-1
mailslot, 1-6
ordering, 3-1
part numbers, 3-1
partitions, 1-8
tape drive, 1-1, 1-4
slots
diagnostic & cleaning cartridges, A-6
overview, A-1
StorageTek Tape Analytics (STA), 1-9
T
tape cartridge
ordering, 3-5
types supported, 1-4
tape drive
bridging, 1-2
mixing models, 1-4
overview, 1-1
part number, 3-1
Index-2
W
wall
Left side, A-1
Right side, A-1
Windows device driver, 2-1
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