The Development of a Closed-circuit camera Error Alarming System

The Development of a Closed-circuit camera Error Alarming System
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research ISSN 0973-4562 Volume 11, Number 2 (2016) pp 793-797
© Research India Publications. http://www.ripublication.com
The Development of a Closed-circuit camera Error Alarming System Using
Current Detection Technique
Lee Yong Hui
Professor, Dept., of Steel industry Engineering,
Shinsung Univ., Daehackro 1, Jungmimyun Dangin city, ChungNam, South Korea
E-mail: lyhkpi@shinsung.ac.kr
Kim Hwan Seok, Kim Baek Ki
Professor, Dept., Information & Telecommunication Engineering
Gangneung Wonju National Univ., Wonju city, Kangwondo, South Korea
E-mail: hskim8805@gwnu.ac.kr, bkkim@hskim8805@gwnu.ac.kr
detection techniques.[1,2] The system allows the confirm the
operational status of a closed-circuit camera with the naked
eye, even without a monitor or DVR program after the
cameras are installed
Abstract
In the present study, a system that gives an alarm to a user
when an error occurs to a closed-circuit camera using current
detection technique was developed. In existing error detection
methods, recorded data on a DVR are checked or real-time
monitoring is used to find errors in a camera. Therefore, it
takes a considerable amount of time to find the source of
error. The error alarming system developed in this paper
enables easy detection of errors with the naked eye or an
alarm sound. The detection circuit was designed for maximum
current of 0.5W or 1A and using an A/D embedded with 10bit
MCU. The current was set to the reference level using a
potentiometer. A 2-color LED was used to monitor voltage
and current status; When it is normal, it turns ‘green’ and
when it is not normal; it turns ‘red’. When error occurs to a
camera alarm buzzer flickers every 0.5 second with a loud
sound. This system was designed in 4 channel modes by the
number of cameras connected to the system: 1-channel, 4channel, 8-channel, and 16-channel.
Closed-Circuit Camera
Existing closed-circuit cameras are connected with coaxial
cables, a DVR, and a power source. When multiple cameras
are connected, a TV monitor is the only way to check the
operational status of the cameras through a DVR.
Furthermore, it is not possible to confirm the proper status of
recording or check errors in the cameras. Therefore, manual
disconnection of the cameras from power and connection
plugs one by one is necessary to find the source of an error in
the power cable. Moreover, it is difficult to determine whether
there is an error or not with the naked eye, so the recorded
images on the DVR have to be restored to track the timing of
error.[3]
Even if the time of the error is found, it is impossible to gain
the recording data of actual happening. More than, anything
else, the weakness of the current system is the difficulty of
confirming the operational condition.
To tackle these problems, this study developed a system to
detect current running condition between the power source
and a closed-circuit camera and displays error status on LED
device accompanied by a buzzer sound so a user can easily be
made aware of an error and take proper action against it.
Figure 1 shows the configuration of the 1-channel system unit
developed in this study.
Keywords: Closed Circuit Camera, Voltage regulator, Shunt
resistor, Analog to Digital Converter,
Introduction
A closed-circuit camera is a monitoring system that is
installed where it can always be observed by a person to
monitor or record possible accidents or such situations in real
time. As the industry gets more complicated and diversified, a
closed-circuit cameras are used more widely and diversely.
Furthermore, it is a rising trend that a closed-circuit camera is
often used as a tool for accident prevention or evidence
collection after accident.
We frequently witness safety accidents in public facilities or
general construction sites every day. It is the recorded image
data of a closed-circuit camera that gives a decisive clue to a
safety accident after it happens. However, it usually happens
that such closed-circuit cameras do not function properly due
to negligent care such as lack of regular checkups or
inspections. In addition, it is burdensome to confirm the
recorded data because one has to go to the control center
connected to the closed-circuit cameras. For this reason, the
present study developed a property control power distributor
to detect errors in a closed-circuit camera system using current
Figure 1: Configuration of the 1-channel system unit
connected to a closed-circuit camera Error-Sensing Circuit
Using Current Detection Technique
793
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research ISSN 0973-4562 Volume 11, Number 2 (2016) pp 793-797
© Research India Publications. http://www.ripublication.com
B. 8-Channel Closed-Circuit Camera Circuit
A shunt was designed for 0.5ohm, a maximum current of 1A,
and 0.5W or over (P = 1A2 * 0.5). A/D converter #17 was
designed with embedded 10bit M.C.U[15].; A/D #1 ~ AD#8
with external 8-channel 10bit; and A/D #9 ~ AD#16 with
external 8-channel 10bit. The reference current was set using
a VR. A 2-color LED[16, 17] was used to monitor voltage and
current status (green for normal and red for abnormal or an
error). A buzzer sound was designed to occur when abnormal
(on and off every 0.5 second). The RS-232C was used as a PC
communication port to check the state of the equipment. Here
is the summary of operations. To check for an error in the
current, this system detects the difference in voltage at both
ends of the shunt to know the amount of current consumed by
a closed-circuit camera. In general, the voltage difference at
both ends of the shunt is 50mV per 0.1A (V=IR).
A. 1-Channel Closed-Circuit Camera Circuit
Currently, it is difficult and time consuming to find the source
of the failure of a closed-circuit camera (camera short circuit,
inferior power supply adapter or something else).
Therefore, the existing countermeasure is to choose normal
status of the electric flow (current) as the prime criterion to
determine the error. However, the power supply devices or
wires of most existing closed-circuit cameras are buried in a
ceiling or inside a wall so that it is very difficult to confirm
the error status. Furthermore, when a power supply device
works normally, we have to connect a monitor to a DVR or a
closed-circuit camera directly to find the error.
Therefore, it requires a long time on site where the camera has
to be disconnected for inspection. With this inconvenience in
mind, the present study developed separate circuit equipment
to control error, displaying power status, operating status,
power, and line status of a camera at a single view.
A Shunt [4, 5] was designed for 0.5ohm, maximum current of
1A, and 0.5W or over. A/D converter[6] was designed with
10bit M.C.U. The reference current was set using VR.[7-10]
A 2-color LED was used to monitor voltage and current
status: when it is normal, it turns ‘green’ and when it is not
normal; it turns ‘red’.
When an error occurs to a camera, an alarm buzzer flickers
every 0.5 seconds with a loud sound. To check for an error in
the current,[11,12] this system detects the difference in
voltage at both ends of the shunt to know the amount of
current consumed by the closed-circuit camera. In general, the
voltage difference at both ends of the shunt is 50mV per 0.1A
(V=IR).
Therefore, this study amplified the resolution of the detected
voltage using a DC bias circuit and detected A/D. The
proposed system was designed with a maximum of 1A as
current consumption and Shunt resistance over 0.5W. A/D
conversion data was 0 ~ 1023. To examine voltage, the input
voltage was divided through a DC bias circuit[13, 14] and
detected for A/D. This system could detect up to a maximum
of 16V and the data was converted in to a 0.1V unit (e.g.
12.3V -> 123). The reference level of the current running
through the closed-circuit camera was set using a VR.
Converted data was A/D conversion data (0 ~ 1023).
For the voltage output state, the input voltage was detected.
When it is abnormal, the ‘red’ LED was designed to turn on
with a buzzer sound. When it is normal, it was designed to
turn on a ‘green’ LED.
In the case of the input voltage deviating less than 10% at
+12V, a ‘red’ LED was designed to flicker every 0.5 second
and when it exceeds 10% at +12V, ‘red’ LED was designed to
keep turning on. For the current output state, the detected
current was compared with the reference current.
When the difference is within ±20, the ‘green’ LED turns on
and when it exceeds the limit, the ‘red’ LED was designed to
turn on. The ‘red’ LED was designed to flicker very every 0.5
seconds when detected current is 20 less than the reference
current. When it exceeds 20, the ‘red’ LED was designed to
remain ‘red’.
It was also designed that a buzzer sounds on and off every 0.5
second, if there is an error (abnormal) in either the current or
the voltage. When there is no error at all, it was designed to
have no output buzzer sound.
Figure 2: The Diagram of an 8-channel closed-circuit camera
error detection circuit
Therefore, this study amplified the resolution of detected
voltage using a DC bias circuit and detected A/D. The
proposed system was designed with a maximum 1A as the
current consumption and a shunt resistance of over 0.5W. A/D
conversion data was 0 ~ 1023. To examine the voltage, the
input voltage was divided through a DC Bias circuit and
detected for A/D. This system can detect up to a maximum of
16V and the data is converted in 0.1V units(e.g. 12.3V ->
123). The reference level of the current running through a
closed-circuit camera was set using a potentiometer.
Converted data was A/D conversion data, which is 0 ~ 1023.
For voltage output state, voltage input was detected. It was
designed to turn on a ‘red’ LED when input voltage deviates
10% at +12V.
When it is normal, a ‘green’ LED was designed to turn on. If
the input voltage stays within 10% at +12V, The ‘red’ LED
794
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research ISSN 0973-4562 Volume 11, Number 2 (2016) pp 793-797
© Research India Publications. http://www.ripublication.com
was designed to flicker every 0.5 second. When the input
voltage deviates more than 10% at +12V, the ‘red’ LED was
designed stay on. For the current output state, the ‘red’ LED
was designed to flicker very every 0.5 second when the
detected current is 20 less than reference current. When it
exceeds 20, the ‘red’ LED was designed to remain ‘red’.
It was also designed that a buzzer sounds on intermitantly
every 0.5 second if there is an error(abnormal) in either the
current or the voltage. When there is no error at all, it was
designed not to output a buzzer sound. RS-232C was used as
PC communication port to check the state of the equipment
and the system was configured in terminal command.
Communication speed was set to 19200bps; no parity; and
8bit. Figure 2 shows the diagram of an 8-channel closedcircuit camera error detection circuit.
VR Input Circuit for Current Ranging
To set the range of the current error, a VR was used to take
voltage input and deliver it into a MICOM A/D converter
port. It was converted into A/D. R18, C13, and C14 circuits
are filter circuits to reduce the impact of noise.
Detailed Design of Circuit, Manufacturing, and
Test Results
Constant Voltage Circuit for the Circuit
5V of constant voltage is necessary to run MICOM and the
internal circuit. 12V input power of the closed-circuit cameras
was converted into 5V voltage source by constant voltage of
regulator (See Figure 3 Constant Voltage Circuit)
Figure 5: VR input circuit
Closed-Circuit Camera Current Check Circuit
The current check circuit unit consists of mainly 3 circuits.
First, current-measuring shunt resistance: an applied voltage
source is supplied to a closed-circuit camera through a shunt.
Here, potential difference takes place in shunt resistance
0.5ohm. According to the formula I=V/R, when the voltage at
both ends of the shunt is applied to the formula, it results in
running current (e.g. 0.1/0.5 = 0.2A runs through a closedcircuit camera when VShunt =0.1V).
Second, differential amplifying circuit: To detect the current
running through a shunt as ‘V’, a differential amplifying
circuit was used and this voltage gap at both ends of shunt
was obtained.
Third, non-inverting amplifying circuit: the voltage picked out
at both ends of the shunt is just 0.5V per 1A. Therefore, a
non-inverting amplifying circuit was used to amplify signals.
The amplification degrees are as follows
Figure 3: Constant voltage circuit
Voltage Check Circuit
To check the 12V voltage, it was divided into fourths using
voltage-dividing resistance. The divided voltage was entered
into the MICOM A/D converter port and converted from
analogue to digital (A/D). Here, the input range of the A/D
converter was set below 5V. R17, C11, and C12 circuits are
filter circuits to reduce the impact of noise.
Figure 4: Voltage check circuit
Figure 6: Closed-circuit camera current check circuit
795
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research ISSN 0973-4562 Volume 11, Number 2 (2016) pp 793-797
© Research India Publications. http://www.ripublication.com
which LED turns all off due to short power. 9(c) shows the
case of a ‘RED’ LED with a buzzer sound where there is error
in the wire line to a camera or a camera has an error in it.
MICOM Circuit
It is a PIC16F1824 MICOM embedded with an A/D
converter. It is also embedded with general I/O and UART
communication (asynchronous communication method +5V).
J3 connector is for UART communication and J2 is used for
programing MICOM.
LED Control Circuit
Common Cathode type 2-Color LED displays Green/Red.
MICOM outputs HIGH (+5V) to turn a LED color in request.
(a) Red LED turns on with buzzer sound
(b) LED turns all off due to a short in power
Figure 7: LED control circuit
Buzzer Control Circuit
To produce a buzzer sound, it should be switched between on
and off at 2.5KHz frequency. Therefore, when the buzzer
sound outputs, MICOM yields a square wave of 2.5KHz.
When a buzzer sound is not made, the MICOM does not
output.
(c) RED LED with buzzer sound as a result of
an error in the wire line
(d) Vmax = 1.20V, Vmin(1)=400mV
Figure 8: Buzzer control circuit
Figure 9 shows the screen of the developed 1-channel test
products. As seen in Figure 9(a), a red LED turns on
accompanied by a buzzer sound when there is an error in a
closed-circuit camera. And Figure 9(b) shows the state in
(e) Vmax=12.2V, Vmin(1)=11.6V
796
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research ISSN 0973-4562 Volume 11, Number 2 (2016) pp 793-797
© Research India Publications. http://www.ripublication.com
[4]
[5]
(f) The case of the closed-circuit camera in a
normal state
[6]
[7]
[8]
(g) The case of the closed-circuit camera with an error
[9]
Figure 9: Developed 1-channel test products
When it was measured with an oscilloscope and an error was
confirmed, it turned out Vmax = 1.20V, Vmin(1)=400mV as
seen in Figure 9(d) and when it was free of error, the output
was Vmax=12.2V, Vmin(1)=11.6V like Figure 9(e). Figure
9(f) shows the case of normal closed-circuit camera while
Figure 9(g) shows the case of the closed-circuit camera with
an error.
[10]
[11]
Conclusion
To find out the error status of an existing closed-circuit
camera, every each of the connections to the camera has to be
checked. It takes a considerable amount of time has a high. In
this respect, the present study developed a system to give a
user alarm where an error occurs to a closed-circuit camera by
using current detection techniques.
This system allows naked eye error detection of a camera. In
addition, a buzzer sound informs of an error. This study
manufactured the expandable system to connect to one camera
(1-channel), 4-channel, 8-channel and 16-channel. This
system determines an error by sensed state of current and
displays a green LED for no error and a red LED for an error
with a buzzer sound to inform the user of the presence of an
error. Therefore, it can be used in the field right way. It is
expected that the system developed and proposed in this study
will contribute to managing closed-circuit cameras.
[12]
[13]
[14]
[15]
[16]
References
[1]
[2]
[3]
Lee Yong Hui, “Technical Report : A Study on CCTV
Operation and Failure” Shinsung R&DB Foundation,
Technical Report, Vol.1, pp.9-10, Dec., 2012.
Lee Yong Hui, Lee Dae Woo and Kim Hwan Seok,
“Development of Control Circuit for Detecting CCTV
Operation and Failure” Advanced Science and
Technology Letters, (Art, Culture Game, Graphics,
Broadcasting and Digital Contents 2015) Vol.113,
pp.61-65, Dec., 2015.
Poole, N. R, Zhou and Abatis, P. “Analysis of CCTV
Digital Video Recorder Hard Disk Storage System”
[17]
797
Digital Investigation, Vol. 5, Issues 3–4, pp.85–92,
Mar., 2009.
Shin, Seung-Min, Park, Rae-Kwan and Lee, ByoungKuk, “Compensation PWM Technique for Extended
Output Voltage Range in Three-Phase VSI Using
Three Shunt Resistors”, Journal of Electrical
Engineering & Technology, pp.1324-1331, 2014.
Darko P. Marčetić and Evgenije M. Adžić, “ThreePhase Current Reconstruction for Induction Motor
Drives With DC-Link Shunt,” IEEE Trans. Ind.
Electron., Vol. 57, No. 7, pp.2454-2462, Jul., 2010.
ZHAO Xing Sheng, “Voltage Measurement with
Improved Multi-Slope Integral Analog-to-Digital
Converter”, Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol.
742, pp.90-94, 2014.
Marinova, Galia, Guliashki and Vassil, “A
Promethee–Based Approach for Multiple Objective
Voltage Regulator Optimization. In: Nonlinear
Dynamics of Electronic Systems”, Springer
International Publishing, pp.100-113, 2014.
Matsuda Katsuhiro, “Development of Automatic
Voltage Regulator for Low‐Voltage Distribution
Systems”. Electrical Engineering in Japan, Vol.188.
pp.9-19, 2014.
Park C.Y, Kwon J.M and Kwon B.H, “Automatic
Voltage Regulator Based on Series Voltage
Compensation with ac Chopper”, IET Power
Electronics, pp.719-725, May., 2012.
Khan M. M, Rana A and Fei D. “Improved ac/ac
Choppers-Based Voltage Regulator Designs”, IET
Power Electronics, Vol. 7, Issue 8, pp.1989 -2000,
Aug., 2014.
Silvio Ziegler, Robert C. Woodward, Herbert HoChing Iu and Lawrence J. Borle, “Current Sensing
Techniques: A Review,” IEEE Sensors J., Vol. 9, no.
4, pp. 354-376, Apr., 2009.
Chucheng Xiao, Lingyin Zhao, Tadashi Asada, W. G.
Odendaal and J. D. van Wyk, “An Overview of
Integratable Current Sensor Technologies,” in Proc.
Conf. Rec. Ind., Vol. 2, pp.1251-1258, Apr., 2003.
Alak Majumder, Bipasha Nath, Durba Sarkar and
Moushumi Das, “Cycle in a Conventional
Combinational Circuit”, IJAST Volume 80, pp.53-78,
Jul., 2015.
HoSeong Cho, YongYun Cho, ChangSun Shin and
JangWoo Park, “A Study on Renewable Energy
Harvesting and Circuit Design Based on a Maximum
Power Point” IJMUE Vol.8, No.2, pp. 111-122, Mar.,
2013.
LIU, Xin, “GPS Positioning System Design Based on
Micro Control Unit” Advanced Materials Research.
Vol. 915, pp.1171-1174, 2014.
Ik-soo Eo and Keum-yeon Choi, “Study on the Effects
of Learning by Changing the Color-Temperature LED
Lamp” IJMUE Vol.9, No.3, pp.309-316 Mar., 2014.
Keum-yeon Choi and Ik-soo Eo, “A Study of the LED
Module Heat Dissipation Structure Suitable”, IJMUE
Vol.10, No.8, pp. 231-242, Aug., 2015.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising