Performance Considerations for Configuring the ReadyDATA™ 5200

Performance Considerations for Configuring the ReadyDATA™ 5200
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Performance Considerations for
Configuring the ReadyDATA™ 5200
The ReadyDATA™5200 is a flexible storage platform that is ideal for virtualization, backup, and file sharing data storage. The
storage system can support up to 60 physical drives when using expansion shelves and can facilitate SSDs and SATA and SAS
drives to provide flexible capacity and performance to meet the need of varying applications and solutions.
This document is a guide to assist with choosing the right configuration for your ReadyDATA 5200 system. This document is intended
for anyone designing a storage solution. It assumes some familiarity with storage concepts like RAID, volumes, and shares.
System Arc hitec ture
The ReadyDATA 5200 is a unified storage system that provides the ability to present storage to application servers and directly
to end users via many storage protocols. These protocols include CIFS, NFS, iSCSI, AFP, and FTP. The ReadyDATA 5200 stores
data in shares for NAS-based protocols (CIFS, NFS, AFP, or FTP) or LUNs for iSCSI, a SAN-based protocol. These shares and
LUNs are called data sets and reside within volumes on a ReadyDATA 5200.
Many data sets can reside within one volume. This allows data sets to share both storage capacity and storage performance of
a parent volume. A volume consists of one or more groups of supported drives, configured in a supported RAID level. The
ReadyDATA 5200 supports RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10.
Data sets
(Shares, LUNs)
Volume
Share 1
(CIFS)
Share 2
(NFS)
LUN 1
(iSCSI)
LUN 2
(iSCSI)
Volume 1
RAID group 1
1
2
3
RAID group 2
4
5
6
7
RAID groups
8
Disks
Figure 1. Relationship between disks, RAID groups, volumes, and data sets
Volume Creation and Expansion Rules
To provide predictable and consistent performance, the ReadyDATA 5200 limits the way that volumes can be created. When you
create a volume, you choose which drives within the system are to be used and what RAID level the drives will use.
A volume can only consist of drives with equal performance profiles. These drives are segmented into SAS 15k rpm, SATA 7.2k
rpm, and performance SSD. The only exception to this is when using SSD drives to boost the performance of a SATA volume,
which is deal for virtualization or production workloads.
Once a volume is created, it can only be expanded with drives that are equal in performance to existing drives. As drives are
added, they are configured to use the same RAID level as the existing drives within the volume. This assists in maintaining or
improving existing performance of the volume and the data sets within it. In addition, volumes are expanded by adding entire RAID
groups; they are not expanded by adding individual disk drives. This makes the expansion process instantaneous and risk free.
2
In the following figure, the original volume, shown with solid lines, is expanded by adding an entire RAID group, shown in dotted
lines. The expanded volume offers twice the capacity of the original volume. It also improves the performance of the volume and
the data set within it.
Data set
SAS
SAS
A
SAS
SA
AS
Volume
V
Vo
olum
o
lum
me ex
expansion
e
xpansion
SAS
SA
AS
SA
SAS
AS
SAS
SA
AS
RAID group
SAS
SA
AS
SAS
SA
AS
SAS
SA
AS
Newly added RAID group
(Additional disks)
Figure 2. Instantaneous volume expansion by adding new RAID group
Hybrid Volumes for Performance and Capacity
Workloads such as virtualization or production applications like databases demand both high performance and high capacity.
Achieving both of these requirements on an SMB budget can be challenging. For this reason, the ReadyDATA 5200 enables you
to boost the performance of a SATA-based volume by adding performance SSDs.
Adding one write-optimized SSD and many read-optimized SSDs to an existing SATA-based volume boosts read and write
performance to levels normally seen with SAS 15k rpm drives.
W
rite
Write
operations
Write-optimized SSD
Write-optimized
Read
operations
SSD
SSD
SSD
High-capacity
pacity SA
SATA
ATA
SSD
D
SATA
SATA
SATA
SATA
SATA
Volume
V
Vo
o
olume
e
SATA
SATA
SATA
(virtual
(virt
(v
rtual mach
machines)
hines)
Read-optimized SSD
Figure 3. SSD and SATA drives in one volume
Figure 3 shows a 5200 system with a single eight-disk SATA volume with four SSDs for read and write cache.
Defining Storage Performance Requirements
Your storage performance requirements can differ greatly depending on the type of data being stored, the kinds of applications
accessing the storage, and the number of users access the data or applications that the system hosts.
3
High Performance Applications
Business applications such as databases, email, or virtualization generally require storage to provide fast response time heavy
under load. For example, databases frequently make random requests to storage and therefore have high IOPS requirements.
In these types of environments, 15k rpm SAS drives configured in RAID 5, RAID 6 or RAID 10 usually provide the best results.
These performance levels can also be achieved using a combination of SATA and SSD in a hybrid configuration using a
performance pack (three read-optimized SSDs and one write-optimized SSD).
Figure 4. Drive performance comparison
Figure 4 compares native SATA performance (12 SATA drives using RAID 6) with that of 15k rpm SAS (12 SAS drives in RAID 6)
and a hybrid configurations (eight SATA using RAID 6, one write-optimized SSD, and three read-optimized SSDs).
High-Capacity and High-Throughput Applications
Backup-to-disk and file sharing (for example, CIFS) applications require lower IOPS than database applications; however, they
demand high throughput and high capacity. SATA performance is lower than SAS or hybrid configurations, but its economics
(cost per GB) make it ideal for backup storage.
Because backup operations can run for extended period of times, sustained throughput is usually the most important metric
when building backup solutions.
The following graph shows expected constant write performance when using SATA based configurations in a backup-to-disk
environment.
Figure 5. ReadyDATA 5200 SATA drive sustained throughput
Figure 5 shows sustained throughput to a ReadyDATA 5200 based on different combinations of SATA drives using RAID 6. Note
that burst performance, other drive types, and performance-oriented volume configurations can greatly exceed these metrics.
4
Choosing Bet ween R AID 5 and R AID 6
RAID 5 is frequently used in shared storage environments because it provides a good balance between performance, capacity,
and redundancy. RAID 5 is able to sustain a single drive failure and provides n-1 (number of drives minus 1) capacity.
As drive capacity and the number of drives increase, the likelihood of a second drive failure when replacing a failed drive also
increases. For this reason, storage administrators are increasingly moving to RAID 6 to protect important business data. RAID 6
can sustain two simultaneous drive failures, provides n-2 (number of drives minus 2) capacity, and only slightly lower performance
than RAID 5.
The following graph shows relative performance metrics for RAID 6 and RAID 5.
Figure 6. RAID 5 and RAID 6 performance comparison
Top Performance with R AID 10
RAID 10 is the highest-performing RAID level with respect to IOPS that is supported by the ReadyDATA 5200. If performance is
your top priority, NETGEAR recommends that you use RAID 10. Although RAID 10 offers outstanding low-latency performance,
it comes at a large capacity cost. RAID 10’s approximate capacity is n/2 (number of drives divided by 2). RAID 10 can tolerate
multiple drive failures (depending on which drives fail), and is guaranteed to tolerate any single drive failure.
The following graph shows the relative performance of RAID 10 and RAID 5.
Figure 7. RAID 5 and RAID 10 performance comparison
5
Balancing Capacity and Performance with Volumes
You can create volumes on a ReadyDATA 5200 in two ways:
•
Create a volume out of the total number of drives you desire. This produces a volume consisting of one large RAID group.
This is ideal for getting the most usable capacity within a volume.
•
Create a volume with containing many RAID groups. This is slightly less space efficient because it requires more parity; however it offers much better performance in terms of IOPS.
The following figure shows two volumes, both containing 12 disks. The first volume contains only one RAID group of 12 drives,
and the second volume is made up of two RAID groups with six disks in each.
The first volume has a higher capacity and second volume will be capable of higher performance when using random
operations (IOPs).
1
RAID group 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Volume
2
RAID group 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
6
RAID group 2
1
2
Volume
Figure 8. Capacity and performance configurations
For the best balance between performance and capacity, NETGEAR recommends building volumes using RAID groups
consisting of six drives.
6
The following graph shows relative performance between the following configurations:
•
•
•
•
RAID
RAID
RAID
RAID
5
5
5
5
volume
volume
volume
volume
containing
containing
containing
containing
one RAID group with 12 drives
two RAID groups with six drives each
three RAID groups with four drives each
four RAID groups with three drives each
Figure 9. Performance comparison of volume configurations
Conc lusion
The ReadyDATA 5200 is a flexible, reliable, cost-effective storage system that can be configured to meet a variety of performance
requirements. You can optimize it for virtualization, backup, or file sharing data storage.
For more information about the NETGEAR ReadyDATA 5200, visit www.netgear.com or contact a NETGEAR channel partner or
sales representative.
NETGEAR, the NETGEAR logo, Connect with Innovation and ReadyData are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of NETGEAR, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries in the United States
and/or other countries. Other brand names mentioned herein are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective holder(s). Information is subject to
change without notice. © 2012 NETGEAR, Inc. All rights reserved.
www.netgear.com
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