2011

2011
sKIs
f11 sKIeR weIght RecommendatIons
tourING serIes
FreerIDe serIes
moDel
sIZe
WeIGht (KG / lB)
185
over.74 .8.kg./.165.lb
175
under.79 .4.kg./.175.lb
186
over.77 .1.kg./.170.lb
176
68.-.81 .6.kg./.150.-.180.lb
over.77 .1.kg./.170.lb
166
under.72 .6.kg./.160.lb
175
68.-.81 .6.kg./.150.-.180.lb
186
over.77 .1.kg./.170.lb
165
under.72 .6.kg./.160.lb
176
68.-.83 .9.kg./.150.-.185.lb
192
over.81 .6.kg./.180.lb
166
59.-.72 .6.kg./.130.-.160.lb
182
72 .6.-.90 .7.kg./.160.-.200.lb
156
under.63 .5.kg./.140.lb
190
over.81 .6.kg./.180.lb
176
68.-.86 .1.kg./.150.-.190.lb
180
70 .3.-.88 .5.kg./.155.-.195.lb
168
59.-.72 .6.kg./.130.-.160.lb
170
under.77 .1.kg./.170.lb
160
under.63 .5.kg./.140.lb
188
over.77 .1.kg./.170.lb
176
68.-.86 .1.kg./.150.-.190.lb
178
68.-.83 .9.kg./.150.-.185.lb
167
59.-.72 .6.kg./.130.-.160.lb
168
59.-.72 .6.kg./.130.-.160.lb
158
under.63 .5.kg./.140.lb
sIZe
WeIGht (KG / lB)
195
over.74 .8.kg./.165.lb
185
under.79 .4.kg./.175.lb
188
over.74 .8.kg./.165.lb
178
under.79 .4.kg./.175.lb
185
Gigawatt
megawatt
amPerage
Zealot
Verdict
Warrant
moDel
Justice
Drift
aspect
stigma
Guru
WomeN's tourING serIes
WomeN's FreerIDe serIes
moDel
WeIGht (KG / lB)
176
over.68.kg./.150.lb
166
59.-.72 .6.kg./.130.-.160.lb
65 .8.-.79 .4.kg./.145.-.175.lb
156
under.63 .5.kg./.140.lb
under.70 .3.kg./.155.lb
168
65 .8.-.79 .4.kg./.145.-.175.lb
160
59.-.70 .3.kg./.130.-.155.lb
152
under.63 .5.kg./.140.lb
WeIGht (KG / lB)
175
65 .8.-.79 .4.kg./.145.-.175.lb
165
.under.70 .3.kg./.155.lb
168
158
element
ember
sIZe
sIZe
moDel
starlet
syncra
tunIng specs
SANDwich.coNStRuctioN
toRSioN.box.cAp.coNStRuctioN
Detune tips and tails to personal preference. We recommend feathering edges 3-4 cm past contact points.
-1.5º
-2º
-1.5º
-1º
factory.base.bevel:..
-.1 .5.degree
factory.base.bevel:..
-.1 .5.degree
factory.Edge.bevel:.
-.2.degree
factory.Edge.bevel:.
-.1.degree
F11 BD TEch Manual
www.BlackDiamondEquipment.com | 1.11
SKIS
2011 ski MOUNTING specs
Measurements taken from tail, in millimeters:
model
Gigawatt*
Megawatt*
AMPerage /
Element*
Zealot*
Verdict
Warrant /
Ember
Justice
Drift /Starlet
Aspect
Stigma /
Syncra
Guru
SIZE
tele: pin line (mm)
ALPINE: MID-BOOT (mm)
25.5 and smaller boot
26.0 to 27.5 boot
28.0 and larger boot
All Boot Sizes
195
994
999
1004
874
185
949
954
959
829
188
928
933
938
808
178
885
890
895
765
185
949
954
959
829
175
904
909
914
784
165
859
864
869
739
192
968
973
978
848
182
940
945
950
820
190
956
961
966
836
180
912
917
922
792
170
868
873
878
748
188
937
942
947
817
178
894
899
904
774
168
850
855
860
730
158
807
812
817
687
185
960
965
970
850
175
898
903
908
776
186
937
942
947
817
176
893
898
903
773
166
849
854
859
729
156
805
810
815
685
186
926
931
936
806
176
882
887
892
762
166
838
843
848
718
156
795
800
805
675
176
857
862
867
737
168
823
828
833
703
160
789
794
799
669
152
757
762
767
637
176
869
874
879
749
167
827
832
837
707
158
790
795
800
670
Use 3.6 Ø x 9.5mm drill bit for non-metal skis. For metal, use 4.1 Ø x 9.5mm and tap for metal skis. Also cross reference with binding manufacturer's screw recommendation, if any. For alpine and AT, we recommend using white wood glue as a sealant. For tele, for maximum screw retention, we recommend 1-hour epoxy.
Please read and know proper telemark mounting best practices. Among many guidelines, these include using a mandatory 8-10 Nm screw torque with 1-hour epoxy. Alpine binding screw mounting torques are not enough for telemark binding forces. Any less torque than 8-10 Nm does not create enough clamping force to overcome upward binding force. As a result, your screws can loosen, resulting in the binding ripping out.
*Reference the forward mounting recommendations on the next page for alternative positions.
1.12
F11 BD Tech Manual
SKIS
2011 ski MOUNTING specs
Measure
It’s important that you accurately determine your mounting location based on the recommended specifications (see chart on the Mounting Specs
page) with personal preference adjustments, if applicable or known. Measure twice, drill once.
Alpine: For AT or alpine mid-boot, the ski is marked with our recommendation. We list in our specs what the exact location of this mark is on the ski,
so be sure to double-check tolerances as it can shift by a few mm’s. We don’t recommend moving the mount location backward from here, but it’s
personal preference if you want to mount select skis forward. See our recommendations for forward mounting on this page.
Tele: Again, things get complicated with tele. If you base all things off of the chord-center (or some reference point along those lines), different boot
sole lengths will affect the mounting position and its relationship to the sidecut and overall length. In the BD mounting chart you’ll see that we break
it down into three overall shell sizes and give recommendations based on that. The middle 26-27.5 is the baseline, shift 5 mm forward for 28.0 and up,
and 5 mm backward for 25.5 and smaller. This keeps a good relationship between balance point of the ski and, most importantly, mid-boot in relation
to the center of the sidecut. On BD boots we have that mid-boot marked on the shell itself to keep this easy, which is based on the distance from pinline to heel. When in doubt, trust that lining up this mark with the mid-boot mark on the ski is your best option, as modern designs have thrown the
old standard rules of thumb out the window.
*Forward Mounting
Binding mount position dramatically affects your ski’s performance characteristics. We spend quite a bit of time dialing in this location for each model
and for each length of ski. During development, our test skis end up looking like Swiss cheese from all the mount holes. The relationship between
radius arc center, running length, and balance of stiffness all play into this decision.
That said, we recognize that personal preference also plays an important role. You know your tastes and skiing style, and if you prefer a more centered
stance for a more playful feel, the following skis have excellent alternative mounts forward of the recommended boot midsole mark.
Gigawatt: Up to +3 cm
BD athlete Zack Griffin goes large at +3 cm. We’d recommend no more than +2 cm, but he seems to make it work.
Megawatt: Up to +2.5 cm
With the 2011 Megawatt’s stiffer tip, you can really stomp on the nose and trust it. Getting more centered on this ski gives it a more playful
twist. If you’re using it as an everyday ski and want to arc on hard pack, mount at +2.5 cm. If you want a more classic powder ski feel, stick with
the recommended position.
Zealot: +1.5 to +2 cm (182 cm only)
If you’re interested in the playfulness of the AMPerage, but want the dampness and power of a metal laminate GS ski at times, shift the
mounting point of the 182 cm Zealot forward between 1.5 cm to 2 cm, max. Ski the 192 cm length on the recommended mounting point—it’s
just plain old built for speed and power. The tail is less rockered than the 182 cm version, so the mounting point is already more centered in
relation. Don’t mess with it.
AMPerage: +2.5 cm
The AMPerage can be safely mounted up to +2.5 cm before you start washing out your tails. However, BD athletes Johnny Collinson and Callum Pettit say to go with +3 cm. If you’re of their likes, we can’t argue with them.
MOUNTING TIPS
“Standard protocol” varies from shop to shop, so here, in detail, is what we feel makes for a solid binding mount.
Precision
This is paramount for telemark bindings, which have much higher peak loads than an alpine or AT binding. What is often overlooked is that the ISO
standard minimum for binding pull-out strength for alpine skis is 292 pounds per screw, which is fine for alpine binding systems but is not nearly
enough for an active tele binding. Our pullout strength exceeds 440 pounds per screw, but that pullout strength is only achieved with a precision
mount. For example, that strength drops 40% if the screw doesn’t thread in straight. How many times have you chased a screw hole that wasn’t completely in line with the binding and you just kind of forced it in, cocked over, until it snugged down straight? That's a major no-no.
Torque specs
Most alpine specs have around 4-5 Nm per screw when you are using a TLD (torque limiting device). For an active tele binding you need upwards of
8-10 Nm. Some company’s skis may not take this much, but for BD skis, feel free to crank it down this much (in fact you must on bindings such as
the O1.) In addition, we recommend a 3.6 Ø drill bit to get the best thread retention based on the minor diameter of the screw. This tighter screw fit
also mandates a higher torque to get the screw into the ski, so again, the traditional TLD setting probably would not seat the screw tightly enough.
F11 BD Tech Manual
www.BlackDiamondEquipment.com | 1.13
SKIS
MOUNTING TIPS
Witchcraft
With tele there’s a bit of witchcraft at every corner. All bindings are not the same and in fact have drastically different forces associated with each. The
boot size and skiing style greatly influence the degree of mounting sloppiness that can be tolerated. In addition, the screws, screw heads and shapes
are different, and the industry lacks any sort of standard or unification, resulting in very specific mounting issues. For example: The tapered-head
screws provided with K2’s older inserts work fine with BD bindings except for the O3, which requires a flat-head screw that interfaces with the plastic.
We supply a substitute screw (See Black Diamond Spare Parts Manual) to be used with the O3 binding and K2 inserts. For the O2 and O1, the screw
interfaces with a tapered stainless steel or aluminum section, and the K2 screw is fine but can require periodic tightening.
Cleanliness
Be sure to remove any dust or shards from the drilled hole. It is important to use clean screws, without any chunks of material embedded from a previous mount. A screw with smooth threads ensures proper thread cutting when you turn the screw in. It is also important to apply adequate downward
pressure when starting the screw so the threads cut immediately and don't spin and grind away the first engagement. Tapping the hole first is never
a bad practice regardless of metal or not. When mounting thinner skis that require the screws to be ground down shorter, be extra careful to grind a
slight taper and to avoid leaving any sharp burrs which will not cut a smooth thread into the ski.
Epoxy
We recommend using epoxy for all telemark mounts. Epoxy can increase your overall maximum pullout strength, but most importantly acts as a buffer to decrease screw-loosening possibilities. This in turn can lead to a degradation of the ski’s core and increase peak shock loads that will eventually
result in the binding ripping out of the ski. For alpine and alpine touring bindings, if you don’t prefer epoxy, use simple wood glue to seal the hole and
lubricate the screw as it is being twisted in to help achieve suitable clamping force for given torque values.
O1 Binding Screw Torque vs. Clamping Force
Max peak screw force possible during use = .
400 lb per screw
When binding force peaks above clamping force screws can loosen:
ŒŒ Example (as shown in bottom left diagram): If torqued only to 5 Nm then
clamp force only equals 275 lb. When torqued to 6.75 Nm you get the
minimum 400 lb of clamping force.
ŒŒ Any loosening creates a shock loading scenario and risk of pull out
increases significantly.
ŒŒ Torque Screws to 8 Nm and always use epoxy!
ŒŒ Note: 8 N-m is way more than you think!
O1 screw torque mounting spec = .
8 N-m per screw
Epoxy
Binding Screw Installation
Torque vs. Clamping Force
Epoxy
Epoxy vs. No Epoxy
Dry
Dry
Pounds Clamping Force N-m
500
Pounds Clamping Force
400
300
200
100
8.0
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
Time
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
N-m Torque per screw
1.14
F11 BD Tech Manual
sKIs
mountIng tIps
JIGs
The BD Jig is a great tool for precision tele mounts and keeping the heel block in the prescribed location every time or if you don’t have the actual boot
to work with. (Sorry if you normally mount skis with the tips facing left. Perhaps you can stand on your head or mount behind your back, Jimi style.)
Fully support the ski so that when applying drilling force you don’t flex the ski; this is crucial because it ensures that the holes are perpendicular. Some
non-BD skis can get quite thin, so make sure your drill bit and provided screws are not going to dimple the base, especially at the heel block areas. Be
careful on the Fritschi jig in case you have to pull the clamp boots off for maximum width, as well as making sure you have all four arms with the boots
facing the correct direction. We highly discourage any type of paper template mount as you will never achieve full strength and can also compromise
the overall strength of your binding.
holes aND sCreWs
For Fritschi aT and BD tele bindings, 3.6 Ø x 9.5 mm is the recommended drill bit and depth for our skis. however, each ski manufacturer has a recommended hole diameter and each binding screw design should have a specific hole diameter recommendation. confused about which to use? Put
down the drill and contact the manufacturer. If all else fails, use the binding recommendation and tap the hole.
as a rule of thumb, the more expected force on the system, the higher torque the screws are going to need to resist the resulting binding force acting against it. When that relationship is out of whack, the screws can begin to loosen and even a single loose thread will dramatically affect pullout
strength. It can also slowly degrade core-retaining properties by slight movements of the screw over time, again reducing pullout strength.
using torque limiting power drills is usually a bad idea unless you’re skilled in the art. We recommend hand tightening each screw with a TlD-enabled
hand posi-driver, making sure that each screw goes directly and perpendicularly in and then doing a final torque spec twist on each screw. If for some
reason you don’t have a TlD and are working on BD skis and bindings, hand tighten more than you think—pushing down with all your strength while
turning the screw means that you’re probably at around 10 nm, which is fine for BD’s O1 binding or skis.
reCaP oF thINGs Not to Do:
Œ Don’t re-use old screws that have crap plugged in the threads. When you screw that into a new ski you are cutting crappy threads
into the core and compromising strength.
ΠIf you need to grind screws for some reason (e.g., the ski is thinner than the screw design provided), be extremely careful not to
leave any burrs—these will mess with the thread cutting of the ski core.
Œ If you get a spinner and strip a hole, don’t half-ass it—fix it right by putting a heli-coil in.
Œ Don’t reverse bend the ski when applying drilling pressure. Support it from beneath so that the screw hole is perpendicular to the
ski. Even a small amount of flex will change the angle and you'll lose full pullout strength potential.
ΠDon't grind out your initial hole threads by carelessly spinning the screw without downward applied force.
waxIng and stoRage tIps
as with any ski, frequent waxing helps prolong base longevity. During long-term storage (i.e., the off-season), leaving a thick coat of
wax on the base will help prevent oxidation.
F11 BD TEch Manual
HOW-TO
VIDEO
www.BlackDiamondEquipment.com | 1.15
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