HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start

HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Solution Quick Start Guide
HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat
Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Implementation overview on HP ProLiant WS460c Graphics Server Blade
Version 2, March 2015
Table of contents
Purpose of this document ...................................................................................................................... 2
Skill Set ................................................................................................................................................... 2
Prerequisite Reading .............................................................................................................................. 2
Overview of Linux configuration options for the WS460c with RGS ...................................................... 2
X Configuration Option 1: Virtual display method (single screen) ......................................................... 2
X Configuration Option 2: Connected CRT display method (Single Screen) ........................................... 4
X Configuration Option 3: The twin-view display method (Dual Screen) ............................................... 6
Understanding WS460c Graphics Server Blade video modes .............................................................. 10
WS460c Configuration guidelines for Linux ......................................................................................... 12
Configuring Hardware-Accelerated Graphics on WS460c Graphics Server Blade ................................ 12
Installing RHEL on a WS460c G6 or later with HP RGS.......................................................................... 13
Appendix A - Sample xorg.conf file twin view ...................................................................................... 19
Appendix B – Understanding WS460c Graphics Server Blade video modes ......................................... 20
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Purpose of this document
This document provides an overview of the configuration steps for setting up Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)
with HP RGS on an HP WS460c Graphics Server.
Skill Set
The installer should be familiar with Linux and basic X-server configuration as well as HP BladeSystems; the
G6, Gen8, or Gen9 WS460c Graphics Server Blade; and HP RGS.
Prerequisite Reading
Please read Hardware Accelerated Graphics for Desktop Virtualization for a detailed conceptual overview of
the overall solution before proceeding. This document can be found at the following address:
http://h71028.www7.hp.com/enterprise/downloads/4AA4-1701ENW.pdf
Overview of Linux configuration options for the WS460c
with RGS
Linux X Server configuration options
The WS460c Graphics Server Blade does not have physically-attached displays. Because of this, the X server
requires special configuration. There are three ways to configure the X-server:
1.
2.
3.
The virtual display method – a single screen size using the “Virtual” Display option
The connected CRT display method – a single screen using “ConnectedMonitor” “CRT” to trick the
driver into thinking that there is a CRT attached.
The twin-view display method – “TwinView” – which allows multi-screen displays using digital flat
panel (DFP) extended display identification data (EDID).
X Configuration Option 1: Virtual display method (single screen)





The virtual-display method is the easiest to set up. (Note that RGS does not support the Match Receiver
Display Resolution feature with this method.)
One screen size only per xorg.conf file is supported.
The “task bar” will span across all displays, and when application windows are maximized they will
maximize across all displays.
You cannot change the screen resolution in the graphical-user interface when using this method (for
example, using the Gnome “Screen Resolution” control panel). Any resolution changes have to be made by
editing the xorg.conf file.
A virtual display can support very large displays limited only by frame buffer memory. Even if you use
multiple monitors, it will be one “screen” stretched across all displays. The following are some possible
layouts:
2
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Figure 1. A single-client display with a standard size (1680 by 1050).
Figure 2. A multiple-client display acting as single monitor with the “screen” stretched across all of them. Up
to 4 displays are supported with total resolution of 6720 by 1050.
Configuring a Virtual Display

Below is an example configuration. Configuration changes to focus on are highlighted in red.
Section "Monitor"
Identifier
HorizSync
VertRefresh
Option
EndSection
Section "Device"
###
###
###
###
###
"Monitor0"
30.0 - 110.0
50.0 - 150.0
"DPMS“
Set the Option "UseDisplayDevice" "none" in this section
and specify a specific resolution in the Screen section below
using the "Virtual" attribute. This mechanism is very flexible
in adjusting to unusual resolutions, but it offers no capability
for dynamic resizing and resolution matching.
Identifier
"Device0"
Driver
"nvidia"
VendorName
"NVIDIA Corporation"
BusID
"PCI:19:0:0"
Option
"UseDisplayDevice" "none"
Option
"UseEDID" "false"
# Enable X shared memory extension pixel maps:
Option
"AllowSHMPixmaps" "1"
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier
"Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth
24
SubSection "Display“
### When using "UseDisplayDevice" "none" in the Device Section,
### you must specify a virtual resolution here.
### Any modes you specify will be ignored.
Virtual
3360 1050
Depth
24
EndSubSection
EndSection
3
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
X Configuration Option 2: Connected CRT display method (Single Screen)



This provides a single screen using the “ConnectedMonitor” “CRT” statement to trick the driver into
thinking there is a CRT attached.
With the CRT Method, the “task bar” spans across all displays, and when application windows are
maximized they will maximize across all displays.
You can adjust the screen resolution in the graphical-user interface when using this method.
Figure 3. Possible layouts using the connected-CRT display method
Configuring a CRT Display
Below is an example configuration. Red text represents configuration changes to focus on.
Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0“
# Do not remove the HorizSync or VertRefresh.
HorizSync
30.0 - 110.0
VertRefresh
50.0 - 150.0
Option
"DPMS“
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier
Driver
VendorName
BusID
Option
Option
Option
"Device0"
"nvidia"
"NVIDIA Corporation"
"PCI:19:0:0"
"ConnectedMonitor" "CRT"
"UseEDID" "false"
"AllowSHMPixmaps" "1"
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier
"Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth
24
SubSection "Display“
### Put the largest resolution you support at the front of this list, and that will also become
the ### default. For maximum flexibility, use "1920x1440" and rely on Resolution Matching.
Modes
"1920x1440"
Depth
24
EndSubSection
EndSection
With a Modes line in the “Screen” section, sub-section “Display”, you are setting the maximum resolution. Note
that this will be the resolution seen for the login prompt initially. After login, RGS will resize the desktop to
match the receiver if the “Match Receiver Resolution” option is checked. Because the resize cannot take place
until after logging in, the login prompt may be off the screen if the receiver resolution is smaller than the
maximum resolution configured in xorg.conf.
4
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Without the Modes line, the xrandr command will show you a basic default configuration:
Figure 4. xrandr output
Figure 5 shows what is displayed by xrandr with a mode line that has a single value: Modes "1920x1440”
Figure 5. xrandr output with a single mode specified.
5
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Figure 6 below shows what results when you supply a Modes line like this:
Modes "1920x1440“ “1680x1050” “1280x1024”
Figure 6. xrandr output after specifying three modes
X Configuration Option 3: The twin-view display method (Dual Screen)

With Twin View, the “task bar” will span only one display, and when application windows are maximized
they will only maximize to a single display (not across multiple displays). See Figure 7, below.
Figure 7. A twin-view configuration.

Twin View is a mode of operation where two display devices (e.g., digital flat panels, CRTs) can display the
contents of a single X screen in different configurations. This method of multiple-monitor use has several
distinct advantages over other techniques such as Xinerama. (Note that Xinerama is not supported by
RGS.)
Section "ServerFlags"
Option
"Xinerama" "0"
EndSection


A single X screen is used. The NVIDIA driver conceals all information about multiple display devices from
the X server. As far as X is concerned, there is only one screen.
Both display devices share one frame buffer. Thus, all the functionality present on a single display (e.g.,
accelerated OpenGL) is available with Twin View.
6
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start


No additional overhead is needed to emulate having a single desktop.
You cannot adjust the screen resolution in the graphical-user interface when using this method.
Configuring a Twin-View Display
Below is a configuration example, red text highlights configuration changes to focus on.
Section "Monitor"
Identifier
HorizSync
VertRefresh
Option
"Monitor0"
30.0 - 110.0
50.0 - 150.0
"DPMS“
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier
Driver
VendorName
BusID
Option
Option
1:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin"
Option
EndSection
"Device0"
"nvidia"
"NVIDIA Corporation“
"PCI:19:0:0"
"ConnectedMonitor" "DFP-0,DFP-1”
"CustomEDID" "DFP-0:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin; DFP"AllowSHMPixmaps" "1"
Section "Screen"
Identifier
“Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth
24
### Dual-monitor (headless) configuration:
Option
"TwinView" "True“
Option
"MetaModes" "DFP-0:/etc/X11/19edid.bin; DFP-1:/etc/X11/19edid.bin"
SubSection "Display“
Depth
24
EndSubSection
EndSection
Note: “ConnectionMonitor” “CRT-0, CRT-1” will no longer work. Most new NVIDIA drivers only support a single
CRT device per card. You can see this in the Xorg.0.log file.
With the above MetaModes defined, you can support a single- and dual-display sender with each display
configured at 1680 by 1050, as shown in Figure 8, below:
Figure 8
To support more receiver display resolutions, define additional combinations in the MetaModes line:
7
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Section "Screen"
Identifier
“Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth
24
### Dual-monitor (headless) configuration:
Option "CustomEDID" "DFP-0:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin; DFP-1:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin"
Option
"TwinView" "True“
Option
"MetaModes“ "DFP-0: 1920x1200 +0+0, DFP-1: 1920x1200 +1920+0; DFP-0: 1920x1200 +0+0,
DFP-1:NULL; DFP-0: 1680x1050 +0+0, DFP-1: 1680x1050 +1680+0; DFP-0: 1680x1050 +0+0, DFP-1:NULL;
DFP-0: 1600x1200 +0+0, DFP-1: 1600x1200 +1200+0; DFP-0: 1600x1200 +0+0, DFP-1:NULL;
DFP-0: 1400x1050 +0+0, DFP-1: 1400x1050 +1400+0; DFP-0: 1400x1050 +0+0, DFP-1:NULL;
DFP-0: 1280x1024 +0+0, DFP-1: 1280x1024 +1280+0; DFP-0: 1280x1024 +0+0, DFP-1:NULL“
SubSection "Display“
Depth
24
EndSubSection
EndSection
With the above MetaModes defined, the system can support several single- and dual-display sender
resolutions, as shown in Figure 9, below.
Figure 9
Important note: For dual display receivers, both displays must have the same resolution and orientation.
It should also be noted that depending on the graphics card being
used, the “ConnectedMonitor” line will have to be modified.
For example, the Quadro 6000 has 3 external outputs, but only two
can be used at once. These three external ports are DFP-0 for the
DVI-I connector and DFP-1 & DFP-2 for the display ports.
So, a valid option would be the following:
Option
"ConnectedMonitor" "DFP-1,DFP-2”
Creating custom Twin-View display EDID files
Why do we need the Option “CustomEDID” line in the xorg.conf file?
Option
"CustomEDID" "DFP-0:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin; DFP-1:/etc/X11/lp2465edid.bin“
To emulate a DFP we need an EDID file for the NVIDIA driver. This defines what display resolutions we can
support.
8
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
If you’re using RGS on a graphics server blade or even a Z-class system without displays attached, you have to
tell the driver what you’re capable of doing. Normally the driver probes the displays for this information but
without them attached, you have to supply the EDID information.
With Twin View, if you do not have monitors attached and do not provide the CustomEDID, this would be shown
in the Xorg.0.log file:
Figure 10. Error messages in the /var/log/Xorg.0.log file.
As a result, the system would default to a display resolution of 1280 by 480.
To get the custom EDID file, you can use the NVIDIA tool nvidia-settings, shown in Figure 11, below.
Note: You must have a system with a display attached to it to use the tool. Desk-top systems are the easiest
way to capture the display’s EDID as you can connect them directly to the NVIDIA card.
In this example, we have a system with two different LCD displays attached – an HP L2035 and LP2465.
Under the GPU section you select the DFP-0 (or DFP-1) and then press the Acquire EDID button.
Figure 11. Generating an EDID file.
9
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Understanding WS460c Graphics Server Blade video modes
The WS460c Graphics Server Blade has an embedded graphics card as well as add-in high-end graphics card
options. In Gen8 or Gen9 WS460c blades, the embedded graphics chip is a Matrox G200. In earlier Gen6 blades,
it was an ATI RN-50. Depending on the configuration, it may be necessary to disable the embedded graphics so
that the add-in graphics card can run as primary without any conflicts. The WS460c has specific BIOS modes
that control which graphics cards are enabled and seen by the operating system. During system setup, all
cards should be enabled (“Setup Mode”) and the system is accessed from the iLO remote console or front
dongle SUV connection. Once setup is complete, the embedded controller is disabled and the system is booted
to production mode where only the add-in card is enabled and primary (“User Mode”). In this state, the system
can only be accessed via a remoting protocol such as HP RGS, PCoIP (Horizon View), or HDX 3D pro (Citrix
XenDesktop).
WS460c G6 and Gen8 Graphics Server Blade graphics modes
User mode

In this mode, the add-in card is enabled and the embedded is disabled. The OS only sees the add-in
card.

This mode is used when the installed operating system does not support using two different graphics
architectures, such as a Microsoft Server 2008 or Windows 7.

For a Gen8 WS460c, this is the primary production mode when the following operating systems are
installed:

o
Microsoft Windows 7 or 8.1
o
Linux on bare metal
o
Windows Server 2008 running RemoteFX or XenApp.
In this mode, the iLO remote console and front SUV console are available during the POST, but when
control is passed to the OS, the console becomes inaccessible because the server uses the embedded
video card to generate video to the iLO/SUV console. In this mode the server console will show a
message indicating it is in User Mode:

In this mode, once the operating system is booted, the system can only be accessed via a remote
protocol.
10
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Setup mode

This mode enables all video cards but the add-in card is secondary and the embedded is primary.

This mode is used in the following configurations:
o
Full-production mode when the installed operating system supports using two different
graphics architectures at the same time. Currently the operating systems that use this
mode for production include the VMware and XenServer hypervisors.
o
During system installation and configuration when the installed operating does not support
using two different graphics architectures at the same time. For example, this mode is used
during installation and configuration of Microsoft Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and
Linux (bare metal). The system is switched to User Mode before going into production.
Admin mode

This mode is used for troubleshooting only and is not used in production.

This mode disables the add-in card and only the integrated graphics card is active.
WS460c Gen9 Graphics Server Blade graphics modes
Starting with the Gen9 WS460c, the graphics modes have changed. There are now only two video modes:


Add-in Video Enabled, Embedded Video Disabled
•
In this mode, only the add-in cards are enabled and the embedded GPU is disabled. This has
the same functionality and purpose as “User” mode in Gen8 and G6 WS460c blades.
•
For Gen9 WS460c blades, this is the primary production mode when the following operating
systems are installed:

Microsoft Windows 7 or 8.1 on bare metal.

Linux on bare metal.
Both Add-in and Embedded Video Enabled
•
In this mode, all cards are enabled and seen by the operating system. This is the same
functionality and purpose as “Setup” mode in Gen8 and G6 WS460c systems.
•
For the Gen9 WS460c this is the primary production mode when the following operating
systems are installed:

Microsoft Server 2012 R2

VMware vSphere ESXi

XenServer
11
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
WS460c Configuration guidelines for Linux
There are many differences between the G6 and later versions of the WS460c. But from the perspective of
configuring graphics on the WS460c, the only important difference is that the embedded video cards are
different. On the G6 WS406c, the embedded card is an ATI Corporation video card, but in newer versions of the
WS460c it is made by Matrox.
Configuring Hardware-Accelerated Graphics on WS460c Graphics Server Blade
The following section covers only configuration requirements specific to the HP WS460c G6 and Gen8 graphics
configuration. It does not cover the full set of NVIDIA and HP RGS configuration options. See the documentation
from your vendor for their specific configuration steps.
The following information complements the blade workstation documentation with configuration
requirements specific to a WS460c blade workstation being used for hardware-accelerated graphics.
Minimum Recommended Versions
Table 1. Recommend minimum versions
Component
Version
NVIDIA Linux Driver
340.65
WS460c Gen8 and Gen9 systems BIOS and Firmware
Update all to level on HP SPP
version 2015.03.0
http://www.hp.com/go/spp
HP RGS
7.0.2
Supported Video cards for HP Hardware Accelerated Graphics on a WS460c with RHEL
WS460 Gen9

NVIDIA Quadro K4000, K5000, and K6000

Quadro K3100M MXM
WS460 Gen8

NVIDIA Quadro 4000, 5000, 6000, K4000, K5000, and K6000

Quadro MXM 500M, 1000M, 3000M, and K3100M
12
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Installing RHEL on a WS460c G6 or later with HP RGS
Please use Red Hat installation documentation for detailed instructions and configuration for RHEL 5 and 6.
This section only highlights certain steps that may be required for successful installation on a WS460c.
Required Installation steps for RHEL



For installation and configuration the systems should be in “Setup” (Gen8) or “Both Add-in and Embedded
Video Enabled” (Gen9) mode.
For production use, the system should be switched to “user mode” (Gen8) or “Add-in Video Enabled,
Embedded Video Disabled”(Gen9) mode.
The Nouveau drivers that comes with RHEL can cause a kernel panic during installation. For that reason,
when starting the installation, you may need to select the following option: “Install system with basic
video driver.” (See Figure 6.0.) Otherwise, the installation may freeze.
Figure 21. Red Hat installation menu
Suggested Post-Installation configuration steps on a WS460c
The WS460c can run in two graphical modes. The first is where the ATI (G6) or Matrox (Gen8 and Gen9) GPU are
the primary GPU, and the other is where the system only sees the NVIDIA card. In order to accommodate these
two modes, it is recommended in most cases to create two xorg.conf configurations that can dynamically
switch between X11 configurations for each mode. The following process describes one way to do this.
Note: This procedure is a configuration example, as with most things Linux, there may be more than one way to
accomplish this task. In this procedure we show you how to create two separate X configuration depending on
boot mode. It is possible to run in “Setup” mode with all cards on and only configure the NVIDIA card and not do
a multi configuration as described below. If you run in this mode, it will work but the SUV/iLO console will not
function once you enable X server to run NVIDIA cards as all video will be redirected to NVIDIA.
1.
Download the latest supported WS460c NVIDIA driver from the HP support web site and put it into the
/tmp directory. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/drivers.html
2.
Download the HP RGS Linux installation pack and put it into the /tmp directory.
http://www.hp.com/go/rgs
3.
Set up the system BIOS for installation
a. WS460c Gen9
i. Set video mode
1. Connect to the blade using either the iLO remote console or a local SUV
connector.
2. When prompted during boot, press the F9 key.
3. Select System Configuration and press ENTER
4. Select BIOS/Platform Configuration and press ENTER
5. Go to and select System Default Options  Restore Default Options and
13
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
press ENTER.
System will reset
Connect to the blade using either the iLO remote console or a local SUV
connector.
8. When prompted during boot, press the F9 key.
9. Select System Configuration and press ENTER
10. Select BIOS/Platform Configuration and press ENTER
11. Select Advanced Options and press ENTER
12. Select Video options and press ENTER
13. choose Both Add-in and Embedded Video Enabled
ii. Set the blade to static high performance mode
1. From BIOS configuration
2. Select Power Management
3. For Power Profile, select Maximum Performance
b. WS460c Gen8
i. Boot to the HP RBSU (BIOS configuration utility) by pressing F9 during boot.
ii. Go to and select System Default Options  Restore Default Options and press ENTER.
iii. System will reset
iv. Boot to the HP RBSU (BIOS configuration utility) by pressing F9 during boot.
v. Set the video mode to Setup.
1. Select System Options.
2. Select Remote Console Mode
3. Select Setup Mode.
vi. Set the blade to static high performance mode
1. Select Power Management Options  HP Power Profile.
2. Select and enable Maximum performance.
Install RHEL Workstation
Log in as root
Type” lspci”, or filter with ” lspci | grep VGA” or ” lspci | grep NV” and press Enter.
Locate the PCI Address for the embedded and add in graphics cards. The WS460c G6 will show an
embedded ATI controller and a WS460c gen8 or gen9 will display an embedded Matrox graphics card.
6.
7.
3.
4.
5.
6.
a.
If running a G6 system, locate and document the PCI address of the ATI card. In this example it is
01:03.0:
01:03.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc ES1000 (rev 02)
Note: When running lspci, the output for PCI device ID is a hexadecimal number, but in the
xorg.conf file it is a decimal number. For example, if in lspci the ID reads as 21, in the xorg.conf
you need to type 33.
b.
If you are running a Gen8 or Gen9 system, locate and document the PCI address of the Matrox
card. In this example it is 01:00.1:
01:00.1 VGA compatible controller: Matrox Graphics, Inc. MGA G200EH
c.
Locate and document the PCI address of the NVIDIA card. In this example it is 21:00:0:
21:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation Device
7.
Log into the system through SSH using a client like PuTTY.
a. Change to run level 3 by typing telinit 3 and pressing Enter.
b. On RHEL 6 only, disable the default Nouveau driver.
i.
Edit the /boot/grub/grub.conf file. (On a Gen9 system using UEFI, the file will be located
in /boot/efi/EFI/redhat/ instead.)
14
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
ii.
On the line beginning with the word kernel, append the following string:
rdblacklist=nouveau nouveau.modeset=0
As an example, the original line may look like this:
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.32-220.el6.x86_64 ro root=/dev/mapper/VolGrouplv_root rd_NO_LUKS LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rd_NO_MD
rd_LVM_LV=VolGroup/lv_swap SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 rhgb quiet
rd_LVM_LV=VolGroup/lv_root KEYBOARDTYPE=pc KEYTABLE=us rd_NO_DM
It would be changed to this:
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.32-220.el6.x86_64 ro root=/dev/mapper/VolGrouplv_root rd_NO_LUKS LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rd_NO_MD
rd_LVM_LV=VolGroup/lv_swap SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 rhgb quiet
rd_LVM_LV=VolGroup/lv_root KEYBOARDTYPE=pc KEYTABLE=us rd_NO_DM
rdblacklist=nouveau nouveau.modeset=0
iii.
Edit the /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf file and add following lines:
blacklist nouveau
options nouveau modeset=0
iv.
v.
Reboot the system.
After rebooting, make sure the Nouveau driver is not installed by running the following
command:
modprobe -r nouveau
8.
9.
Go to the /tmp directory.
Install the NVIDIA driver. In this example we are using version 304.60:
a. Be sure you are in run level 3. You can check by typing runlevel and pressing Enter.
b. You should have the install file, in this example our file name is this:
NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.65.run
c.
Run the installer using the following command:
sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.65.run
d. Accept the license.
e. Install the 32-bit compatibility OpenGL libraries if prompted.
f. Agree to update the X configuration file.
g. Complete the setup.
10. Don’t reboot yet.
11. Install HP RGS.
a. After unpacking the RGS archive, run the installer:
sh /tmp/install.sh
b. Accept the agreement.
c. Accept the customizations.
d. Don’t start X yet, even though the installer states it.
12. Change directory to /etc/X11
13. Create a backup copy of the xorg.conf file created by the installers by typing this command:
15
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
cp xorg.conf xorg.conf.bak
14. Create two additional copies of the xorg.conf file created by installers
a. If on a G6, type the following commands:
i. cp xorg.conf xorg.NVIDIA (This creates a file named xorg.NVIDIA)
ii. cp xorg.conf xorg.ATI (This creates a file named xorg.ATI)
b. If on a Gen8 or Gen9, type these commands, instead:
i. cp xorg.conf xorg.NVIDIA (This creates the file xorg.NVIDIA)
ii. cp xorg.conf xorg.MATROX (This creates the file xorg.MATROX)
15. Configure the xorg.conf files
a.
xorg.NVIDIA (Both G6, Gen8, and Gen9)
i.
ii.
Type vi xorg.NVIDIA and press Enter.
Customize the file to match one of the three configurations mentioned in section
titled, “Linux X Server configuration options.”
Note: There is a section at the bottom of the xorg file added during RGS installation that must
remain intact.
b.
Xorg.Matrox (Gen8 only)
Make following changes to the file, making sure you customize the BusID line in the “device“
section using the PCI ID you recorded earlier.
Section "Device"
Identifier "Videocard0"
Driver "vesa"
EndSection
16
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
c.
Xorg.Matrox (Gen9 only)
Make the following changes, making sure you customize the BusID line in “device” section
using the PCI ID you recorded earlier.
Section "Device"
Identifier "Videocard0"
Driver "mga"
EndSection
d.
Xorg.ATI (G6 only)
i.
Make the following changes to the following sections. Note the bus ID.
Section "Monitor"
Identifier
VendorName
ModelName
HorizSync
VertRefresh
Option
EndSection
"Monitor0"
"Unknown"
"Unknown"
28.0 - 33.0
43.0 - 72.0
"DPMS"
Section "Device"
Identifier
Driver
VendorName
BusID
Option
EndSection
"Device0"
"radeon"
"ATI Corporation"
"PCI:01:03:0"
"UseEDID""false"
Section "Screen"
Identifier
"Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth 24
SubSection "Display"
Depth 24
Modes "1024x768" "800x600"
EndSection
16. Remove the old xorg.conf file after making sure you have a backup.
17. Create a new script in /etc/init.d that will automatically detect what mode you are in and change to the
appropriate xorg file.
e.
On Gen8 and Gen9 Systems
i.
Create new file with vi called VID_CHANGE using the following command:
vi /etc/init.d/VID_CHANGE
ii.
Add the following lines to the file:
#!/bin/sh
if lspci |grep 'Matrox';then
ln -sf /etc/X11/xorg.MATROX /etc/X11/xorg.conf
modprobe nouveau
else
ln -sf /etc/X11/xorg.NVIDIA /etc/X11/xorg.conf
fi
17
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
iii.
Make the file executable using this command:
chmod +x /etc/init.d/VID_CHANGE
f.
On G6 Systems
iv.
Create new file with vi called VID_CHANGE:
vi /etc/init.d/VID_CHANGE
v.
Add the following lines to file:
#!/bin/sh
if lspci |grep '';then
ln -sf /etc/X11/xorg.ATI /etc/X11/xorg.conf
else
ln -sf /etc/X11/xorg.NVIDIA /etc/X11/xorg.conf
fi
vi.
Add execution permissions to the file using this command:
chmod +x /etc/init.d/VID_CHANGE
18. Create a new symbolic link in /etc/rc5.d and give it is a low S number. In our case we use S03:
ln -s /etc/init.d/VID_CHANGE /etc/rc5.d/S03VID_CHANGE
19. Make sure the file named xorg.conf was deleted from /etc/X11/.
20. Reboot
This configuration will load appropriate driver depending on what video mode you are in. For example, if both
the add-in card and the integrated GPU were enabled (as they are in setup mode), the NVIDIA driver will not
load and you would not be able to connect to the server using RGS. However, you would be able to connect to
the server through the iLO integrated remote console or directly using an SUV cable. On the other hand, if you
are in only the add-in card is enabled (as, for example, in user mode), then the NVIDIA driver will load and RGS
will be enabled, but you will not be able to connect to the blade using the iLO remote console or through an SUV
cable.
18
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Appendix A - Sample xorg.conf file twin view
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Layout0"
Screen 0 "Screen0"
InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
# generated from default
Identifier "Mouse0"
Driver
"mouse"
Option
"Protocol" "auto"
Option
"Device" "/dev/input/mice"
Option
"Emulate3Buttons" "no"
Option
"ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
# generated from data in "/etc/sysconfig/keyboard"
Identifier "Keyboard0"
Driver
"kbd"
Option
"XkbLayout" "us"
Option
"XkbModel" "pc105"
EndSection
Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
HorizSync 30.0 - 110.0
VertRefresh 50.0 - 150.0
Option
"DPMS"
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier "Device0"
Driver
"nvidia"
VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation"
BusID
"PCI:135:00:0"
Option
"ConnectedMonitor" "DFP-0,DFP-1"
Option
"CustomEDID" "DFP-0:/etc/X11/E201.txt; DFP-1:/etc/X11/E201.txt"
Option
"AllowSHMPixmaps" "1"
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device
"Device0"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth 24
Option
"TwinView" "True"
Option
"MetaModes"
1:NULL"
SubSection "Display"
Depth 24
EndSubSection
EndSection
"DFP-0:1600x900 +0+0, DFP-1:1600x900 +1280+0; DFP-0:1600x900 +0+0, DFP-
# Begin HP Remote Graphics Software
Section "Module"
# HP Remote Graphics Extension
Load "rge"
# extmod recommended for preventing XID overflow.
Load "extmod"
# Ensure X.org defaults are loaded
Load "glx"
Load "dbe"
Load "record"
EndSection
# End HP Remote Graphics Software
# Begin HP Remote Graphics Software
19
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
Section "Extensions"
Option "Composite" "Disable"
EndSection
# End HP Remote Graphics Software
Appendix B – Understanding WS460c Graphics Server Blade
video modes
The WS460c Graphics Server Blade has an embedded graphics card as well as add-in high-end graphics card
options. In Gen8 or Gen9 WS460c blades, the embedded graphics chip is a Matrox G200. In earlier Gen6 blades,
it was an ATI RN-50. Depending on the configuration, it may be necessary to disable the embedded graphics so
that the add-in graphics card can run as primary without any conflicts. The WS460c has specific BIOS modes
that control which graphics cards are enabled and seen by the operating system. During system setup, all cards
should be enabled (“Setup Mode”) and the system is accessed from the iLO remote console or front dongle SUV
connection. Once setup is complete, the embedded controller is disabled and the system is booted to
production mode where only the add-in card is enabled and primary (“User Mode”). In this state, the system can
only be accessed via a remoting protocol such as HP RGS, PCoIP (Horizon View), or HDX 3D pro (Citrix
XenDesktop).
WS460c G6 and Gen8 Graphics Server Blade graphics modes
User mode

In this mode, the add-in card is enabled and the embedded is disabled. The OS only sees the add-in
card.

This mode is used when the installed operating system does not support using two different graphics
architectures, such as a Microsoft Server 2008 or Windows 7.

For a Gen8 WS460c, this is the primary production mode when the following operating systems are
installed:
o Microsoft Windows 7 or 8.1
o Linux on bare metal
o Windows Server 2008 running RemoteFX or XenApp.

In this mode, the iLO remote console and front SUV console are available during the POST, but when
control is passed to the OS, the console becomes inaccessible because the server uses the embedded
20
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
video card to generate video to the iLO/SUV console. In this mode the server console will show a
message indicating it is in User Mode:

In this mode, once the operating system is booted, the system can only be accessed via a remote
protocol.
Setup mode

This mode enables all video cards but the add-in card is secondary and the embedded is primary.

This mode is used in the following configurations:
o Full-production mode when the installed operating system supports using two different
graphics architectures at the same time. Currently the operating systems that use this
mode for production include the VMware and XenServer hypervisors.
o During system installation and configuration when the installed operating does not support
using two different graphics architectures at the same time. For example, this mode is used
during installation and configuration of Microsoft Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and
Linux (bare metal). The system is switched to User Mode before going into production.
Admin mode

This mode is used for troubleshooting only and is not used in production.

This mode disables the add-in card and only the integrated graphics card is active.
21
Solution Quick Start Guide | HP Graphics Server Blade Red Hat Enterprise Linux Quick Start
WS460c Gen9 Graphics Server Blade graphics modes
Starting with the Gen9 WS460c, the graphics modes have changed. There are now only two video modes:

Add-in Video Enabled, Embedded Video Disabled
•
In this mode, only the add-in cards are enabled and the embedded GPU is disabled. This has
the same functionality and purpose as “User” mode in Gen8 and G6 WS460c blades.
•
For Gen9 WS460c blades, this is the primary production mode when the following operating
systems are installed:

Microsoft Windows 7 or 8.1 on bare metal.

Linux on bare metal.

Both Add-in and Embedded Video Enabled
•
In this mode, all cards are enabled and seen by the operating system. This is the same
functionality and purpose as “Setup” mode in Gen8 and G6 WS460c systems.
•
For the Gen9 WS460c this is the primary production mode when the following operating
systems are installed:

Microsoft Server 2012 R2

VMware vSphere ESXi

XenServer
© Copyright 2012–2015 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for
HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as
constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
March 2015, Rev. 2
22
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising