What`s New
What’s New for
Avid® Media Composer® v4.0
The following lists what’s new for the current editor release.
Feature
Description
For More Info
Mixing Frame Rates and
Field Motion Types
The Avid editing application allows you to
work with clips of any frame rate or field
motion type regardless of the project’s type.
See “Mixing Frame Rates and
Field Motion Types” on page 3.
Stereoscopic
The Avid editing application allows you to
display and edit additional types of
stereoscopic (3D) material.
See “Working with Stereoscopic
Material” on page 17.
Ancillary Data Handling
The Avid editing application allows you to
See “Preserving HD Closed
use a Console command to turn ancillary data Captioning and Ancillary Data”
preservation on and off and to control which on page 24.
data is preserved.
Due to software DNx codec performance
requirements, you must have a dual quad core
system in order to capture DNxHD 220 or
220x with ancillary data on the Nitris DX
platform.
Video Satellite (supported
on the Macintosh)
With the previous Avid Media Composer
For more information, see the
editing application release, Video Satellite
Video Satellite Guide provided by
was supported only on the Microsoft
Avid Digidesign®.
Windows operating system. With this release,
Video Satellite is also supported on the
Macintosh operating system.
1080p/24 Hi Quality
SD/HD Downconvert
The editing application now supports
1080p/24 downconvert.
See “1080p/24 Downconvert” on
page 27.
Auto-Zoom for Motion
Tracking and Stabilization
This feature automatically zooms in to
remove exposed black edges on a stabilized
effect.
See “Reviewing and Adjusting a
Stabilized Image” on page 29.
2
Feature
Description
For More Info
AAF Edit Protocol
A new option in the AAF Export Settings
allows you to choose “AAF Edit Protocol.”
With this option selected, the Avid editing
application can export AAF files which are
AAF Edit Protocol compliant.
See “Export Settings: OMFI,
AAF, and AFE” on page 30.
Updated Nvidia Driver
v182.65
An updated version of the Nvidia
Driver is in the Utilities folder.
See the ReadMe for details on
installing the Nvidia Driver.
720p Proxy Transcode
Workflow
This release supports 720p Proxy (H.264)
Transcode.
See the Avid Interplay Best
Practices Guide for information
on the 720p Proxy Transcode
Workflow.
Clip Color Changes
Options for displaying clip colors in the
Timeline have been updated.
See “Displaying Clip Colors in
the Timeline” on page 33 and
“Assigning Local Colors to Clips
in the Timeline” on page 37.
Commit Multicamera Edits Lets you remove the grouped clips in a
sequence and replace each of them with its
selected clip.
See “Committing MultiCamera
Edits” on page 39.
Edgecode support
enhancements for
Timecode Burn-in effect
Lets you display edgecode for either the
sequence or for the source clips.
See “Timecode Burn-In Effect
Parameters” on page 39.
Transition Preservation
The editing application includes
improvements made to clips containing
transistion effects.
See “Transition Preservation” on
page 44.
Recapturing and
Decomposing
The new Expert Decompose feature allows
you to decompose only certain tapes or clips
used by a sequence, and allows you to fine
tune target formats to which you want to
recapture.
See “Recapturing and
Decomposing” on page 45.
Support for Ikegami
GFCAM™
You can edit directly from Igekami GFPAKs See Ikegami GFCAM Media.
without having to capture.
Numeric Keypad and
Mouse Support for
MultiCamera Editing.
You can now use the numeric keypad and
mouse buttons to switch the display of
camera angles and to swap camera banks.
See Numeric Keypad and Mouse
Support for MultiCamera Editing.
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
Feature
Description
For More Info
Entering Timecode
changes.
If using a laptop or computer without a
See Using Timecode to Find a
dedicated numeric keypad, you can press and Frame.
release the left Ctrl key twice quickly to use
standard number keys to enter timecode.
Undo up to 100 previous
actions.
Previously, you could undo or redo up to 32
previous edits. The limit has been increased
to 100 actions.
Support for rendering,
transcoding and mixing
down AVC-Intra
resolutions
Previously, you could not choose an
AVC-Intra resolution in the Media Creation
Settings. Now AVC-Intra resolutions are
selectable in Media Creation Settings.
See Undoing or Redoing Edits.
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
You can work with clips of any frame rate or field motion type (interlaced or progressive) in
a project, regardless of the project’s type. For example, you can work with 30i clips in a 24p
project. In your Avid editing application and in this documentation, clips that do not match
the frame rate or field motion type of the project are known as mixed rate clips.
You can view and play mixed rate clips in the Source monitor or in pop-up monitors. You
can also edit mixed rate clips into a sequence.
Mixed rate clips always play at the project’s frame rate, both in Source or pop-up monitors
and in sequences. Audio remains synchronized with video.You can stack clips with different
frame rates or field motion types on multiple video tracks, apply effects, and otherwise
perform all normal editing operations.
The following topics provide more information on mixed rate clips:
•
How Your Avid Editing Application Handles Mixed Rate Clips
•
Viewing Mixed Rate Clips in the Timeline
•
Viewing and Adjusting Motion Adapter Parameters
•
Modifying the Field Motion Attribute for a Clip
•
Refreshing Motion Adapters
•
How Your Avid Editing Application Modifies the Format of a Sequence
•
Modifying the Format of a Sequence
•
Considerations When Working with Mixed Rate Clips
3
How Your Avid Editing Application Handles Mixed Rate Clips
Motion Adapter Effects
Your Avid editing application uses Motion Adapter effects to handle:
•
Clips that have a different frame rate from the project’s frame rate
•
Clips with field motion that need adjustment to be compatible with the project
•
Clips with 2:3 pulldown or strobe frames
Motion Adapter effects allow mixed rate clips to play at the project’s frame rate and to have
the correct field motion.
Motion Adapter effects are different from other effects in several ways:
•
You do not apply Motion Adapter effects manually. The Motion Adapter effect does not
appear in the Effect Palette and does not have an effect icon. Your Avid editing
application applies Motion Adapter effects and sets their parameter values
automatically.
•
Your Avid editing application applies Motion Adapter effects when they load into a
Source or pop-up monitor for viewing and playing as well as when they are edited into a
sequence.
•
You cannot remove a Motion Adapter effect that adjusts the speed of a clip by using the
Remove Effect button. If you promote a Motion Adapter effect to a Timewarp effect and
then use the Remove Effect button to remove the Timewarp, your Avid editing
application re-applies a Motion Adapter effect.
•
You often do not need to adjust Motion Adapter effects in any way. Most of the time,
they work automatically and seamlessly to allow mixed rate clips to play correctly in a
project. For information on when you might want to adjust a Motion Adapter effect and
on how to do so, see “Viewing and Adjusting Motion Adapter Parameters” in the Help.
You might need to provide accurate frame layout information for a clip, such as its field
motion or whether it contains pulldown, by changing the Field Motion attribute for the clip
in the bin. Motion Adapter effects use this attribute to set the Source parameter. For
information on how to do this, and more details of the circumstances that might require it,
see “Modifying the Field Motion Attribute for a Clip” in the Help.
4
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
User Interface Summary for Mixed Rate Clips
The following table summarizes the user interface for working with mixed rate clips.
Illustration
Description
In the Timeline, several visual indicators highlight
mixed rate clips. For more information, see “Viewing
Mixed Rate Clips in the Timeline” on page 6.
In the Motion Effect Editor, you can view the
parameter values for a Motion Adapter effect, and
adjust the render type. To make further adjustments,
you need to promote the Motion Adapter effect to a
Timewarp effect. For more information, see “Viewing
and Adjusting Motion Adapter Parameters” in the
Help.
In the bin, the Field Motion column provides field
motion and frame layout information for a clip. Motion
Adapter effects use the Field Motion attribute value to
determine their Source parameter value. For more
information, see “Modifying the Field Motion Attribute
for a Clip” in the Help and “Refreshing Motion
Adapters” in the Help.
In the Modify dialog box, set a new format for a
sequence to create a version of the sequence that plays
at a different rate from its original rate. You can then
work with that sequence in a project that uses the new
frame rate. For more information, see “How Your Avid
Editing Application Modifies the Format of a
Sequence” in the Help and “Modifying the Format of a
Sequence” in the Help.
5
Viewing Mixed Rate Clips in the Timeline
You have several ways to identify mixed rate clips in the Timeline.
Mixed rate clips that are unrendered always appear with a green dot that represents the
Motion Adapter effect. You see the green dot on mixed rate clips edited into a sequence. If
you use the Toggle Source/Record button to view the Timeline for a mixed rate clip loaded
in the Source monitor, you also see the green dot on that clip.
Mixed rate clips also display with their original frame rate appended to the clip name. For
example, if you have a 24 fps clip named sunset that you edit into a sequence with a frame
rate other than 24 fps, the clip name displays as sunset (24.00 fps).
The following illustration shows a mixed rate clip in the Timeline.
To further distinguish mixed rate clips from other material in the Timeline, you can display
them in distinct colors. For more information, see “Displaying Clip Colors in the Timeline”
on page 33.
Viewing and Adjusting Motion Adapter Parameters
You use the Motion Effect Editor to view and adjust parameters for a Motion Adapter effect.
If you are not happy with the appearance of a mixed rate clip, you can select a different
rendering option from the Type list to change the way your Avid editing application
interprets and displays frames.
The other Motion Adapter effect parameters are inactive. You can check the values your
Avid editing application has calculated, but you cannot change them.
If you need to make other adjustments, promote the Motion Adapter effect to a Timewarp
effect. The full set of Timewarp effect parameters become available and you can freely
change or animate the speed at which the clip plays.
The following illustration shows the Motion Adapter effect in the Motion Effect Editor, with
the Type list and the Promote button active, and other parameters inactive.
6
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
n
In some circumstances, the Adaptive Deinterlace Source option is active in the Motion Effect
Editor for a Motion Adapter effect. Adaptive deinterlacing is a processing option that can
improve the look of interlaced source material that is being converted to progressive frames.
For more information, see “Using Adaptive Deinterlacing” in the Help.
To view parameter values for a motion adapter and adjust the render type:
1. Move the position indicator to the mixed rate clip that uses the Motion Adapter effect
you want to adjust.
2. Click the Motion Effect button.
The Motion Effect Editor opens and displays the current parameter settings for the
Motion Adapter effect.
You see the current parameter values for the adapter. If you have not yet made any
manual adjustments to the adapter, the values you see are those your Avid editing
application created automatically. For example, you see a Speed percentage value that
adjusts the clip’s speed to the project’s rate.
The Type list (render options) is active. The Adaptive Deinterlace Source option might
also be active. Other parameters are inactive.
3. (Option) Open the Speed or the Position graph to see a graphical representation of the
effect.
The graphs are not active for editing. For example, you cannot add keyframes.
7
4. Select a rendering option from the Type list.
For information on the rendering types available, see “Rendering Options for Timewarp
Effects” in the Help.
To promote a motion adapter to a Timewarp effect
1. Move the position indicator to the mixed rate clip that uses the motion adapter you want
to adjust.
2. Click the Motion Effect button.
The Motion Effect Editor opens.
3. Click the Promote button.
The motion adapter is promoted to a Timewarp effect and all standard Timewarp effect
parameters are available.
4. Adjust the Timewarp parameters as necessary to create the motion that you want for the
clip.
Modifying the Field Motion Attribute for a Clip
The Field Motion bin column contains information about the frame layout of a clip or
subclip. It indicates whether the clip is interlaced or progressive, or whether it contains 2:3
pulldown or repeated (strobe) frames. Your Avid editing application uses the Field Motion
attribute to set the default Source parameter value for the Motion Adapter effect.
When you create a clip or subclip, its Field Motion attribute is set to either Interlaced or
Progressive, depending on the project type. In most cases this value accurately represents the
field motion of the clip or subclip, but you sometimes need to override the value to match the
actual field motion of the video source or to indicate that the source contains 2:3 pulldown or
repeated frames.
The following illustration shows the Field Motion bin column and the context menu that
allows you to change the Field Motion attribute value.
8
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
Changes you make to the Field Motion attribute apply only to the individual clip or subclip.
You can have several subclips derived from the same master clip, and set different Field
Motion values on each of them.
When you change the Field Motion attribute of a clip or subclip, it updates if it is loaded in a
Source or pop-up monitor, and new edits into a sequence from the clip or subclip use the
new Field Motion attribute value. However, edits that you made from that clip or subclip
before changing the Field Motion attribute continue to use the old value. If you want to
update a sequence so that all its Motion Adapter effects use the current Field Motion
attribute values for their source clips, you must refresh the Motion Adapter effects for the
sequence. For more information, see “Refreshing Motion Adapters” on page 10.
To modify the Field Motion attribute for a clip or subclip:
1. Open the bin that contains the clip or subclip you want to modify.
For more information, see “Opening and Closing Bins” in the Help.
2. (Option) If it is not already visible, display the Field Motion bin heading.
For more information, see “Using Text View” in the Help.
3. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+click (Macintosh) the Field Motion item for the clip or
subclip, and select one of the following:
Option
Description
Interlaced
Use for all video with interlaced field motion.
2:3 Film
This option is only available for clips or subclips created in 30 fps projects.
Use for a clip or subclip that contains 2:3 pulldown.
Video material can contain pulldown frames in a number of circumstances,
such as the following:
Progressive
•
The telecine process inserts pulldown frames when it transfers film
footage shot at 24 fps to 30 fps video.
•
Some cameras can shoot at 24 fps but record at 30 fps, and insert
pulldown frames to achieve the record frame rate.
•
Some HD video decks insert pulldown frames when downconverting
material, for example, from 1080p/24 to NTSC 30i.
Use for progressive video.
9
Option
Description
Progressive Strobe Use for a clip or subclip that contains repeated frames, for example, a
traditional strobe motion effect clip, or a clip where the original video was
shot at a reduced frame rate such as 15 fps.
This option usually results in a better finished look because blending
between frames reduces stuttering motion.
Refreshing Motion Adapters
You can update a sequence so that all Motion Adapter effects in the sequence use the current
Field Motion attribute value for their source clips.
For more information on the Field Motion attribute and how to change it, see “Modifying the
Field Motion Attribute for a Clip” on page 8.
To refresh mixed-rate segments in a sequence, do one of the following:
t
Select the sequence in the bin, and then select Clip > Refresh Motion Adapters.
t
Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+click (Macintosh) the sequence in the bin, and then
select Refresh Motion Adapters.
How Your Avid Editing Application Modifies the Format of a Sequence
You must modify a sequence if you want to open and play it in a project whose frame rate
does not match the sequence frame rate. For step-by-step instructions, see “Modifying the
Format of a Sequence” on page 12.
Your Avid editing application modifies a sequence by applying or removing Motion Adapter
effects if necessary, and making other adjustments, such as modifying existing motion
effects and changing keyframe positions in video effects. Modifying a sequence does not
change audio information.
You might need to make minor adjustments to a modified sequence if you need to match the
look and timing of the original sequence. For example, the calculations your Avid editing
application performs might result in minor changes to the relative position of video effect
keyframes, or to the lengths of clips. As a result, you should check for such issues as
audio/video synchronization, misaligned edits on multiple tracks, or small changes to the
overall length of the sequence.
n
10
Your Avid editing application rounds down values when it makes calculations to modify a
sequence. Clips in a modified sequence might be slightly shorter than their equivalents in the
original sequence. They can never be longer.
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
Think of the modified sequence your Avid editing application creates as a good first draft. In
some cases you do not need to make further adjustments, but in others you need to do some
fine tuning.
Modifying Imported Mattes
When you modify a sequence, your Avid editing application handles any imported Matte
Key clips (either moving mattes or static, single-frame mattes) in the sequence by mixing
down the part of the sequence that contains the matte. The mixed down clip replaces the
matte, and then a Motion Adapter effect is applied to the mixed down clip to adjust its play
rate.
You should be aware of the following:
•
If a sequence includes an imported matte, you must modify the sequence in its original
project by following the second procedure in “Modifying the Format of a Sequence” on
page 12. Your Avid editing application cannot modify a sequence that includes an
imported matte when you double-click the sequence in a different project.
•
If you cancel a mixdown that is taking place as part of the Modify process, the entire
Modify process stops and your Avid editing application does not create a modified
sequence.
For more information, see “Working with Real-Time Moving Mattes,” “Working with
Imported Graphics and Animation,” and “Performing a Video Mixdown” in the Help.
Modifying Sequences with Titles
When you modify a sequence, your Avid editing application does not modify title media
automatically. A [Wrong Format/Media Offline] image appears in the monitor for titles in a
modified sequence. You must re-create the title media as a separate process. For more
information, see “Re-creating Title Media” in the Help.
Modifying Sequences that Include Rendered Effects
When you modify a sequence, your Avid editing application removes any precomputed clips
for existing rendered effects. This is necessary because the frame rate of the precomputed
clips no longer matches that of the modified sequence, and because the modify process adds
or changes Motion Adapter effects.
Modifying Sequences that Include Grouped Clips
When you modify a sequence that includes grouped clips, your Avid editing application
removes the grouped clips and replaces each with its selected clip. A message box informs
you when a sequence includes group clips that will be modified in this way.
11
Console Information
Your Avid editing application writes information to the Console when you modify a
sequence. This information is a list of items that you might need to check in the modified
sequence, for example, titles that you might need to regenerate or effects with tracking data
that you might need to retrack. For each item, the list includes the track number, the time
code at which the item starts, and a description.
You might want to save the Console information for a modified sequence to a log file,
particularly when you modify a long sequence that might have many items to check. If the
list of Console messages is very long, the first lines of the list might not appear in the
Console window itself. However, if you open a log file, perform the Modify, and then close
the log file, you capture the entire list to the file.
The following is an example of Console information for a simple modified sequence:
Modifying sequence: My Sequence 1
Group clips were found. All group clips will be flattened into their
selected clips.
V2 01:00:39:14 Group clip containing filler + timewarp was flattened.
Check timewarp effect results.
V2 01:00:39:14 Imported Matte Key was mixed down.
V3 01:00:43:20 Imported Matte Key was mixed down.
V2 01:00:33:09 Title - needs to be regenerated.
V2 01:00:28:11 Title's video fill was removed - needs replacement.
V2 01:00:22:18 Title - needs to be regenerated.
V2 01:00:10:22 Roll/Crawl title - needs to be regenerated and may need
length changed.
V2 01:00:00:00 Roll/Crawl title - needs to be regenerated and may need
length changed.
V3 01:00:51:05 Effect contains tracking data - may require retracking.
Modify completed
Modifying the Format of a Sequence
You have two options for modifying a sequence so that its format matches a different project
frame rate.
•
You can modify a sequence when you double-click to open it in a project whose frame
rate does not match the sequence frame rate.
•
You can also modify a sequence from a bin at any time.
For example, you might modify a sequence from its original project so that you can
open the sequence at a later time in a project with a different frame rate.
If the sequence you want to modify includes imported mattes, you must use this second
method.
12
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
You can also view or log Console information for the modified sequence.
For more information, see “How Your Avid Editing Application Modifies the Format of a
Sequence” on page 10.
To modify a sequence that does not match the frame rate of the current project:
1. Open the bin that contains the sequence.
2. Double-click the sequence.
A message box opens that asks if you want to create a modified copy of the sequence
and open the copy.
3. Do one of the following:
t
Click Yes.
Your Avid editing application creates a copy of the sequence, modifies the copy so
that it plays at the project’s frame rate, and opens the modified copy.
The name of the new sequence includes a suffix that indicates its new format, and
the new format of the sequence appears in the Format bin column. The following
illustration shows an example of a sequence modified from 720p/59.94 to 30i
NTSC. The name of the original sequence is my_sequence. The name of the
modified sequence is my_sequence (29.97i).01.
t
Click No.
Your Avid editing application does not modify the sequence. As the original
sequence does not match the project frame rate, it does not open.
4. (Option) Select Tools > Console to view a list of messages about items in the modified
sequence that you might need to check.
You can also output the Console information to a log file by using the Open Log File
and Log Console Output commands on the Console Fast menu, or save the Console text
to a file by using the Save Console Text command.
To modify a sequence so that it can open and play in a project with a different frame
rate:
1. Select the sequence you want to modify in the bin.
2. Select Clip > Modify.
13
The Modify dialog box opens.
3. Select Set Format from the top list.
4. Select the new format for the sequence from the Format list, and then click OK.
14
Mixing Frame Rates and Field Motion Types
Your Avid editing application creates a new sequence with the format you selected, and
a message box informs you of the change. The original sequence is unchanged.
The name of the new sequence includes a suffix that indicates its new format, and the
new format of the sequence appears in the Format bin column. The following
illustration shows an example of a sequence modified from 720p/59.94 to 30i NTSC.
The name of the original sequence is my_sequence. The name of the modified sequence
is my_sequence (29.97i).01.
You can now open a project whose type matches the format of the modified sequence,
open the bin that contains the sequence, and work with the sequence in that project.
5. (Option) Select Tools > Console to view a list of messages about items in the modified
sequence that you might need to check.
You can also output the Console information to a log file by using the Open Log File
and Log Console Output commands on the Console Fast menu, or save the Console text
to a file by using the Save Console Text command.
Considerations When Working with Mixed Rate Clips
•
You can use effect templates that you save in bins with clips of all frame rates and in
sequences of any project type. When you apply such a template, your Avid editing
application adjusts keyframes if necessary to account for differences in frame rate.
•
You should be aware of the following if you are grouping clips or working with grouped
clips:
•
-
You cannot group clips that have different frame rates
-
You cannot load a grouped clip whose frame rate does not match the project's frame
rate. If you attempt to load this type of clip into the Source monitor or drag it into
the Timeline, an error message appears.
-
You can create a sequence that includes both grouped clips that have the same frame
rate as the project and single clips of other frame rates.
When your mixed rate sequence includes clips of different frame sizes, consider using
the High-Quality Scaling for Real-Time Decode setting. This setting improves image
quality during playback of mixed-format sequences where material requires resizing.
For more information, see “Setting the Video Quality for Playback” in the Help.
15
•
•
You should be aware of the following if you are working with mixed rate clips using the
Draft Quality, Best Performance, or DNxHD Native video quality options:
-
If you are field-stepping through material where pulldown is inserted, you do not
see an accurate pulldown cadence. This is a limitation of Timewarp and Motion
Adapter effects when you are working in draft qualities. If you switch to a Full
Quality option, or render the Motion Adapter effects, the pulldown cadence is
correct.
-
If you are using Avid Adrenaline input/output hardware with the DNxcel HD video
board, a Full Quality option is not available in HD projects. As a result, pulldown
cadence is not accurate while field-stepping, or while playing back material,
regardless of your Video Quality setting. To guarantee smooth playback of HD
material with pulldown insertion, you must render the Motion Adapter effects.
You should be aware of the following when you are working with locators on mixed-rate
material:
-
Depending on the frame rates of your clips and your project, you might not be able
to add a locator at the exact location of the position indicator. For example, if you
are adding a locator to a 30 fps clip in a 720p/59.94 project, you can move the
position indicator to a location that does not match a frame in the clip. Your Avid
editing application adds the locator at the closest valid location in the clip.
-
Depending on the frame rates of your clips and your project, you might not be able
to access all of the locators on a clip in the Source monitor. For example, if you load
a 720p/59.94 clip in a 30 fps project, the position bar in the Source monitor cannot
display every possible locator position. You can use the Locators Window to access
all the locators.
For more information, see “Moving to the Previous or Next Locator” and “Using the
Locators Window” in the Help.
•
Playback limitations when you are working with XDCAM AMA media on an optical
disk are particularly noticeable with mixed rate sequences or with mixed rate clips
loaded into the Source monitor. Consider consolidating the media to a local disk. For
more information, see “Workflow for Editing XDCAM and XDCAM EX Clips with
AMA” in the Help.
•
You should be aware of the following if you are performing a digital cut of an SD
sequence that contains HD clips whose frame rate does not match the sequence frame
rate.
If you turn on Digital Cut Safe Mode in the Digital Cut tool, your Avid editing
application determines whether your SD sequence contains HD clips. Because this
combination can sometimes result in dropped frames during the digital cut, you have the
option of transcoding the HD clips, continuing with the digital cut without transcoding,
or cancelling the digital cut. However, your Avid editing application cannot transcode
HD clips whose frame rate does not match the sequence frame rate.
16
Working with Stereoscopic Material
You have the following options:
-
You can render the motion adapters on the mixed-rate HD clips before you begin
the digital cut. Then select Continue without Transcoding to proceed with the
digital cut. This workflow should result in a digital cut that does not drop frames.
-
You can choose to transcode, but HD clips whose frame rate does not match the
sequence frame rate are not transcoded, and those clips might result in dropped
frames in the digital cut.
In either case, Avid recommends that you turn on Stop on Dropped Frames in the
Digital Cut tool to ensure that you have an opportunity to render any dropped frames.
For more information, see “Using the Digital Cut Tool” in the Help.
Working with Stereoscopic Material
If you are working in a progressive HD project, your Avid editing application allows you to
display and edit stereoscopic (3D) material.
You can work with stereoscopic content that uses any of the following frame layouts:
•
Over/Under, which stores the left and right eye images one above the other in a
horizontal split frame (left eye on top).
•
Interlaced (full height images), which stores the left and right eye images as interlaced
pairs of scan lines.
•
Side-by-side, which stores the left and right eye images one beside the other in a vertical
split frame.
Your Avid editing application displays stereoscopic content in a proxy resolution that uses
one-half of the pixels available in the source material. For example, your Avid editing
application displays material in Over/Under mode using one-half of the vertical lines.
You can view the stereo frames together, or view either the left or the right eye image alone.
If you have appropriate stereo monitoring or projection equipment connected to your
system, you can also view the material in stereo.
The normal workflow for stereoscopic projects uses your Avid editing application for offline
editing. You then conform the project for finishing on another system where you can view
the material at full resolution.
c
Prolonged viewing of stereoscopic material in three dimensions might cause fatigue,
dizziness, or physical discomfort, or might affect your sense of balance.
17
The following topics provide more information on working with stereoscopic material:
•
Acquiring Stereoscopic Files
•
Setting Up Your System For Viewing Stereoscopic Material in Three Dimensions
•
Displaying Stereoscopic Material
•
Considerations When Working with Stereoscopic Material
Acquiring Stereoscopic Files
One way to create stereoscopic files that you can edit in your Avid editing application is by
using Avid MetaFuze. This topic briefly explains how MetaFuze works and directs you to
more information in the Avid MetaFuze User’s Guide.
You might also import stereoscopic files that have been created using third-party
applications and processes.
Avid MetaFuze merges sets of single-frame files into playable MXF media files. The
sources MetaFuze operates on might be files from the film scanning process or files
produced by CGI applications.
For information on how to transcode files for stereoscopic editing, see “Transcoding Files
for Stereoscopic Editing” in the “Using Avid MetaFuze” chapter of the Avid MetaFuze
User’s Guide.
For information on how to import a bin containing your stereoscopic files into your Avid
editing application, see “Importing the ALE into Media Composer” in the “Using Avid
MetaFuze” chapter of the Avid MetaFuze User’s Guide.
Setting Up Your System For Viewing Stereoscopic Material in
Three Dimensions
If you want to view your stereoscopic material in stereo (three dimensions) while you are
working on your Avid editing application, you have two main options:
•
Connect a stereo projector or monitor to your Avid input/output hardware.
This typically requires an additional device connected between your Avid input/output
hardware and the projector that converts the signal so that it can be used by the
projector.
•
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Connect a DLP (Digital Light Processing) monitor with 3D capabilities directly to the
video card on your system for use as one of your display monitors. Use active (shutter)
glasses synced with an active glasses emitter to view the monitor.
Working with Stereoscopic Material
For the first option, consult the documentation provided with the projector and the
conversion device for details on making connections.
For the DLP monitor option, the following procedure describes the general workflow for
setup. The details of which connections are available and how they are labeled, and of how
you access and adjust the monitor’s settings, vary depending on the model of the monitor
and of the active glasses and emitter.
To set up a DLP monitor for use with your system:
1. Connect the monitor to your system’s video card.
Depending on the digital connectors available on your monitor and your video card, you
might make this connection to DVI or to HDMI connectors.
2. Mount the active glasses emitter on the monitor according to the manufacturer’s
instructions, and connect the emitter to the monitor.
The emitter is a device that provides a syncing signal to the active glasses so that you see
the left image of the stereo pair with your left eye and the right image with your right
eye.
The emitter typically connects to the rear of the monitor. The connector might be
labelled “Glasses” or “3D Glasses Emitter” or something similar. For more information,
see the documentation for the monitor and for the emitter.
3. Turn on stereo display in the monitor’s settings.
The exact name of the setting and its location in the monitor’s user interface varies
depending on the model of the monitor.
4. Start your Avid editing application, and display your stereo material on the DLP
monitor using the Stereo (Checkerboard) setting.
For more information, see “Displaying Stereoscopic Material” on page 20.
5. Put on your active glasses and play the stereo material.
The image appears three-dimensional.
6. (Option) If the image quality appears poor, the monitor might not be displaying the left
and right images in the appropriate sequence. Change the monitor setting that controls
which image (left or right) appears first.
The exact name of the setting and its location in the monitor’s user interface varies
depending on the model of the monitor. On some monitors, the name of the setting is
“Reverse” or includes the word “Reverse.”
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Displaying Stereoscopic Material
You can display stereoscopic material in several different views in the Composer window, or
in full-screen playback if you are using your Avid editing application in a software-only
configuration. You can:
•
View the left and right images together (squeezed vertically or horizontally, or
interlaced, depending on the frame layout of the stereoscopic material)
•
View either the left image or the right image only
•
View the image in stereo
On a stereo monitor with appropriate 3D glasses, the image appears three-dimensional.
On other monitors the left and right image information is superimposed and slightly
offset, resulting in a ghosted or blurred look.
A common approach when editing is to do most of your work viewing either the left or the
right image at all times. Your facility might have common standards for which image to use.
So, for example, you might set your Avid editing application to display the Left image for
stereoscopic material while you are editing, and switch to the Stereo view only when you
want to check the material in three dimensions.
You control which stereo view displays in the Composer window or in full-screen playback
by using the Stereo 3D Display in Edit Monitors menu in the Composer Settings dialog box
or the Stereo 3D Display menu in the Full-Screen Playback Settings dialog box.
To select a stereo view:
1. In the Settings tab of the Project window, double-click Composer or Full-Screen
Playback, depending on the type of display you want to control.
The Composer Settings or Full-Screen Playback Settings dialog box opens.
2. (Composer Settings dialog box only) If it is not already active, click the Window tab.
3. Click Stereo 3D Layout, and select the option that matches the frame layout of your
stereoscopic material:
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Option
Description
None
Turns stereo viewing off. When this option is selected, the Stereo 3D Display in
Edit Monitors menu is not available in the Composer Settings dialog box and
the Stereo 3D Display menu is not available in the Full-Screen Playback
Settings dialog box.
Over/Under
Select this option if your stereoscopic material uses over/under frame layout.
Working with Stereoscopic Material
Option
Description
Interlaced
Select this option if your stereoscopic material uses interlaced frame layout.
The Interlaced stereoscopic layout requires full video display quality. If you are
using a Video Quality setting other than Full Quality or Full Quality 10-bit,
your Avid editing application automatically switches to Full Quality when you
select this option.
This option is not available if you have Avid Adrenaline input/output hardware
connected to your Avid editing application and active. The Interlaced
stereoscopic layout requires full-resolution uncompressed support, which Avid
Adrenaline does not provide. To use this option, you must click the DNA/1394
button to disable the Avid Adrenaline and enter software mode.
Side/Side
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Select this option if your stereoscopic material uses side-by-side frame layout.
If you are in an SD or an interlaced HD project, the menus that control stereo 3D are not
available. You can only work with stereoscopic material in a progressive HD project.
4. Click Stereo 3D Display in Edit Monitors (Composer Settings) or Stereo 3D Display
(Full-Screen Playback Settings), and select one of the options described in the following
table.
Option
Description
Off
Displays both the left and right images. This is the default view.
The look of the image depends on the frame layout of the
stereoscopic material.
•
Over/under material displays in a horizontal split with the left
image on top.
•
Interlaced material displays as an interlaced image where one
set of scan lines is the left image and the other set of scan lines
is the right image.
•
Side-by-side material displays in a vertical split.
Left
Displays the left image.
Right
Displays the right image.
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Option
Description
Stereo (Checkerboard) Displays both the left and the right images for stereo viewing. With
the correct monitor and viewing equipment, the image appears
three dimensional. On a monitor without stereo display capability,
the left and right images appear superimposed and slightly offset
from one another. (The term “checkerboard” refers to the way the
pixels of the left and right images are displayed for stereo viewing
on a DLP monitor.)
Stereo (Interlaced)
Displays both the left and the right images for stereo viewing. With
the correct monitor and viewing equipment, the image appears
three dimensional. On a monitor without stereo display capability,
the left and right images appear superimposed and slightly offset
from one another.
Follow Source/Record Causes the full-screen playback display to use whichever view is
(Full-Screen Playback selected for the Composer window in the Composer Settings
Settings only)
dialog box.
5. Click OK.
When you load a clip, the Composer window or the full-screen playback display uses
the view type you selected.
Considerations When Working with Stereoscopic Material
You should be aware of the following when working with stereoscopic material:
•
The stereoscopic editing capabilities of your Avid editing application are designed for
use with progressive media and have not been tested with interlaced media.
Stereoscopic material that uses the interlaced frame layout is still progressive media
because the interlaced pairs of scan lines are the left and right image views from the
same moment in time.
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•
You can only use stereoscopic material that uses the interlaced frame layout in
sequences that match the image height of that material. For example, you can only use
720p stereoscopic material that uses the interlaced frame layout in a 720p sequence.
•
Your Avid editing application does not support stereoscopic material that interlaces half
height images.
•
Your Avid editing application can only play back stereoscopic material that uses the
interlaced frame layout at full video quality. Only the Full Quality and Full Quality
10-bit options are available in the Video Quality menu in the Timeline when you are
working with interlaced stereoscopic material. For more information, see “Video
Quality Options for Playback” in the Help.
Working with Stereoscopic Material
•
When you are in Multicam mode, or performing dual-roller trims, your Avid editing
application ignores the Stereo View setting and stereoscopic material always displays in
a single-eye view.
•
Your Avid editing application does not provide special bin headings for stereo clips, or
any other indication in the bin that a clip is stereoscopic material. A good practice is to
keep all stereo clips in bins that are clearly named to indicate that their content is
stereoscopic. If you are unsure whether a particular clip is stereo, load the clip in the
Composer window with the Stereo View setting set to Off, and verify that the image
display shows the left image above the right image (Over/Under).
•
Many of the effects available in your Avid editing application are not appropriate for use
with stereoscopic material. For example, you cannot resize a stereoscopic image without
affecting the separation between objects in the left and right images that creates the
illusion of three dimensions. Effects that are suitable for use with stereoscopic material
include dissolves and color corrections.
•
The settings that control your monitor setup for stereoscopic editing are user settings
rather than project settings. This might be inconvenient, for example, when you switch
between a 3D and a non-3D project. Consider creating a user profile specifically for
stereoscopic work that you can switch to whenever you load a stereoscopic project.
•
Your Avid editing application does not provide methods for correcting problems with
the stereoscopic footage itself, which might affect the synchronization between the left
and right images. For example, the timecode might be inconsistent between the two
cameras used to capture the left and right images.
•
The interface for your Avid editing application is difficult to read when it is positioned
on a stereo display monitor that you are viewing with 3D glasses. The best solution to
this problem is to arrange your workspace so that as much of the Avid interface as
possible is arranged on the non-stereo monitor. You might be able to make the text in
items such as bins or the Project window more readable when they are on the stereo
monitor by changing the font or the point size used for the text (for more information,
see “Changing Font and Point Size” in the Help). Alternatively, remove your 3D glasses
to read user interface text.
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Preserving HD Closed Captioning and
Ancillary Data
Unlike SD closed captioning data, which is transferred in the vertical blanking interval
(VBI), HD closed captioning and ancillary data packets are transferred in the HD-SDI
data stream.
In certain circumstances, your Avid editing application lets you capture closed captioning
and other ancillary data in HD media, preserve this data during editing, and output the data
through the HD-SDI port of your Avid input/output hardware. You use a Settings window or
Console commands to turn ancillary data preservation on and off and to control which data
is preserved.
Ancillary data preservation is subject to the following requirements and limitations:
•
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You must capture and output the HD media using Avid Nitris DX, Avid Mojo DX,
Avid Adrenaline or Avid DNxchange® input/output hardware.
Avid Nitris (classic) does not support HD ancillary data.
•
Due to software DNx codec performance requirements, you must have a dual quad core
system in order to capture DNxHD 220 or 220x with ancillary data on the
Avid Nitris DX or the Avid Mojo DX platform.
•
You can control which types of ancillary data are captured through the Capture Settings
tab in the Media Creation tool or by using Console commands. The data you capture is
the same as the data you output.
•
Four data slots are available, and the maximum size of the four data slots combined is
256 bytes, of which 7 bytes per enabled slot is for Avid control data. Therefore, you
cannot capture more than four types of data, and you might need to disable some data
slots in order to have enough space for the data you need to preserve.
•
(Avid Adrenaline) You must limit your editing to Full Quality. Any other actions make
the ancillary data unusable and prevent it from being preserved.
•
You must output through the HD-SDI port of your Avid input/output hardware.
Ancillary data is only supported through the HD-SDI input/output of your Avid
hardware.
•
Ancillary data is not supported when crossconvert or downconvert is enabled.
Preserving HD Closed Captioning and Ancillary Data
Your Avid editing application can capture and preserve any of the following four types of
ancillary data by default:
•
Closed Captioning (CEA 608, CEA 708): Closed captioning ancillary data packets are
captured from the HD-SDI source according to the SMPTE 334M standard.
•
Program Description (AFD): AFD ancillary data packets are captured from the HD-SDI
source according to the SMPTE 334M standard.
•
Ancillary Time Code (ATC): Ancillary time code packets are captured from the HD-SDI
source.
The options that you set for ancillary data preservation are associated with the project. When
you create a new project, you must set the ancillary data options you need for that project.
Controlling Ancillary Data through a Settings Window
You can turn the ancillary data option on and off and set the slots through the Media
Creation Settings.
To switch the ancillary data feature on and off through a Settings window:
1. Do one of the following:
t
Double-click Media Creation in the Settings list.
t
Select Tools > Media Creation.
2. Click the Capture tab.
3. Select Ancillary Data Enabled.
A check mark appears. The system enables all four slots.
4. Click OK.
5. To turn off the ancillary data feature, click Capture Ancillary Data again to deselect the
feature.
To set options for ancillary data preservation:
1. Double-click Media Creation in the Settings list.
2. Click the Capture tab.
3. Select Capture Ancillary Data.
A check mark appears.
4. Select a Data Type for each slot you want to display ancillary data for.
The default DID and SDID number displays for that slot.
5. Select Enabled next to the appropriate slot.
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6. (Option) Select Custom from the Data Type and enter the custom DID and SDID
numbers.
7. Deselect Enabled for those slots you do not want to capture ancillary data for.
8. Click OK.
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For more information about ancillary data options, see “Media Creation Settings: Capture
Tab” in the Help.
Controlling Ancillary Data with a Console Command
You can turn the ancillary data option on and off and set the slots with Console Commands.
To switch the ancillary data feature on and off with a Console command:
1. Select Tools > Console.
2. Type the following command:
Embeddnxcc
To set the default for ancillary data preservation for all four slots:
1. Select Tools > Console.
2. Type the following command:
Embeddnxccdefault
The default for all four slots is set to the values listed in the table below.
The following table lists the DID and SDID number values for the four ancillary data
packets that your Avid editing application can capture and preserve by default:
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Data Packet
DID
SDID
CEA 708
61
01
CEA 608
61
02
AFD
41
05
ATC
60
60
The slot 3 default has changed from DTV to AFD, which is different from previous releases.
To set options for ancillary data preservation for a single slot:
1. Select Tools > Console.
2. Type the following command with the appropriate options:
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1080p/24 Downconvert
Embeddnxccoptions <slot> <on/off> <optional DID & SDID>
The following table describes the options you can set in the command:
Option
Description
Slot
A value from 1 to 4 that specifies a data slot
On/Off
A value of 1 or 0
DID
A hex number (for example, 0x61)
SDID
A hex number (for example, 0x60)
For example:
-
To turn off data slot 1, type Embeddnxccoptions 1 0
To set data slot 2 to hold CEA 708 data, type
Embeddnxccoptions 2 1 0x61 0x01
-
To set data slot 4 to hold a custom data type, type
Embeddnxccoptions 4 1 0xaa 0xbb
where aa and bb are the DID and SDID of the custom data type
To view the current status of each slot:
1. Select Tools > Console.
2. Type the following command:
Embeddnxccoptions
1080p/24 Downconvert
The following topic has been updated to include support for 1080p/24 downconvert.
•
Crossconversion and Downconversion Formats
Crossconversion and Downconversion Formats
The following table lists the available crossconversion and downconversion formats for each
HD format. Not all formats are available for all Avid editing configurations.
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Raster Type selection does not affect the conversion options for HD projects, with the
exceptions noted in the table.
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HD Sequence Format
Crossconverted
HD Format
Downconverted
SD Format
720p/59.94
1080i/59.94
30i NTSC
720p/23.976
1080i/59.94
30i NTSC
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When crossconverting the 720p/23.976 format, your Avid editing application adds 2:3
pulldown frames to create a sequence with the correct frame rate.
720p/25
1080i/50
25i PAL
720p/50
1080i/50
25i PAL
1080p/23.976
1080i/59.94
720p/59.94
30i NTSC
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When crossconverting the 1080p/23.976 format, your Avid editing application adds 2:3
pulldown frames to create a sequence with the correct frame rate.
1080p/24
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1080i/59.94
(Nitris DX and
Mojo DX only)
30i NTSC
(Nitris DX and
Mojo DX only)
Non-DX systems: To crossconvert a1080p/24 sequence to HD, output a tape master and
then convert. To downconvert a1080p/24 sequence to SD, change the project format and
transcode the media, then output a digital cut.
1080p/25
720p/50
25i PAL
1080i/50
720p/50
25i PAL
1080i/59.94
720p/59.94
30i NTSC
Reviewing and Adjusting a Stabilized Image
Reviewing and Adjusting a Stabilized Image
After you stabilize an image, you typically need to review the results to determine whether
the stabilized image looks good. You can also adjust the effect using one or more of the
following options:
•
Use SteadyGlide: This option often provides good results when you use it with
FluidStabilizer tracking data, and is particularly useful if you want to remove jittery
motion, such as that in a hand-held camera shot, while retaining underlying motion such
as a pan.
•
Run Auto-Zoom: This option automatically adjusts the Position and Scaling parameters
for the effect so that exposed black edges are removed and the stabilized image fills the
frame.
•
Manually adjust the Position and Scaling parameters: Although in most cases
Auto-Zoom provides good positioning and scaling results, you might want to make
further adjustments, or use the Position and Scaling parameters as an alternative to using
Auto-Zoom.
For information on how to stabilize an image, see “Stabilizing an Image” in the Help.
To review the look of a stabilized effect:
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In the Effect Editor, click the Play Loop button.
The effect plays repeatedly, allowing you to see how your Avid editing application
repositions each frame or field in accordance with the tracking data.
To apply SteadyGlide processing to the tracking data:
t
In the Tracking window, click the SteadyGlide button for the tracker.
For complete details on using SteadyGlide, see “Understanding the SteadyGlide and
Smoothing Options for Tracking” in the Help and “Using SteadyGlide or Smoothing to
Process Tracking Data” in the Help.
To use Auto-Zoom to remove exposed black edges on a stabilized effect:
1. (Option) If the effect is not already using advanced keyframes, in the Effect Editor, click
the Promote to Advanced Keyframes button.
Auto-Zoom is only available for the Stabilize effect when it is using advanced
keyframes.
2. In the Tracking subcategory of the Position parameter category, click Run Auto-Zoom.
Your Avid editing application processes the tracking information and generates values
for the Position and Scaling parameters that reposition and enlarge the image enough to
remove black edges. Any existing keyframes on the Position and Scaling parameters are
removed.
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A warning message appears if no tracking data exists. A warning message also appears
if some tracking points are too far outside the frame. Such extreme tracking results do
not allow your Avid editing application to calculate values that remove black edges
throughout the effect.
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The Position and Scaling values that Auto-Zoom creates are only valid with the original
tracking data that Auto-Zoom operates on. If you create new tracking data by selecting a
new region of interest and retracking the image, you must run Auto-Zoom again to remove
exposed black edges.
To manually remove exposed black edges on a stabilized effect:
t
In the Effect Editor, adjust the Position and Scaling parameter sliders until black edges
are no longer visible in the effect.
Export Settings: OMFI, AAF, and AFE
The following table describes options available in Export Settings: OMFI, AAF, and AFE.
Option
Description
Export As:
The following options are available:
•
AAF: Select this option if the application to which you are exporting supports AAF
•
OMF 1.0: Select this option if the application to which you are exporting does not
support OMFI Version 2.0
•
OMF 2.0: Select this option if the application to which you are exporting supports
OMFI Version 2.0. If you are not sure, select OMF 1.0.
•
AFE (Windows only): Select this option if the application to which you are exporting
supports AFE
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There are no options available to you when you select AFE. Your Avid editing
application uses the default settings.
Use Marks
When you select this option, your Avid editing application uses current IN and OUT
points in the selected clip or sequence to determine starting and ending frames for the
export. To export the entire clip or sequence, deselect this option.
Use Enabled Tracks
When you select this option, your Avid editing application exports only the currently
enabled tracks for a selected sequence or clip. To export all tracks in the sequence,
deselect this option.
Include All Video
Tracks in Sequence
Select this option to include all video tracks from the sequence in the AAF or the OMFI
file. The Video Details tab appears.
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Export Settings: OMFI, AAF, and AFE
Option
Description
AAF Edit Protocol
Select this option to export AAF files which are AAF Edit Protocol compliant. The AAF
Edit Protocol specification supports interchange of metadata that describes edit
decisions, audio and visual effects, and embedded non-AAF files. This option only
appears when Export As is set to AAF.
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Include All Audio
Tracks in Sequence
The AAF Edit Protocol exported files can exceed the 2GB size limit.
The AAF Edit Protocol compliant files are not compatible with Pro Tools v7.1 and
earlier.
Select this option to include all audio tracks from the sequence in the AAF or the OMFI
file. The Audio Details tab appears.
The following options appear in both the Video Details tab and the Audio Details tab:
Export Method:
Select an export method. Other options in the dialog box change depending on which
method you choose.
•
Link to (Don’t Export) Media: Select this option when you want to export an AAF or
an OMFI composition with links to the media in its current location. Media is not
embedded in the file and is not exported.
•
Copy All Media: Select this option when you want to copy media to another drive or
folder and export an AAF or an OMFI composition
•
Consolidate Media: Select this option when you want to export an AAF or an OMFI
composition with links to media that you have consolidated. For more information
about consolidating media, see “Consolidating Media” in the Help.
[xbook xref above is to Managing_Basics (level1)]
Use the Handle Length: nn Frames text box to enter the number of frames you want
to use as handles for consolidated clips. Handles refer to material outside the IN and
OUT points and are used for dissolves and trims with the new, shorter master clips.
The default is 60.
The following options appear in the Video Details tab only, depending on the export method:
Export Method:
Video Mixdown
Creates a new video mixdown track for the sequence. For more information about video
mixdown, see Performing a Video Mixdown” in the Help.
•
Mixdown with Video Edits: Creates a mixdown compatible with Avid Digidesign
Pro Tools v7.2 or later
•
Mixdown without Video Edits: Creates a mixdown compatible with all Avid
Digidesign Pro Tools versions
Render Video Effects Select this option to render video effects during export.
Transcode Video to:
Select a resolution to which you want to transcode the video to during export.
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Option
Description
The following options appear in the Media Destinations area for Video and Audio, depending on the
export methods:
Media Drive
Specify a media drive as the destination for newly created or copied media.
Select Use Media Creation Settings to use the drive you selected in the Media Creation
dialog box. If you deselect Use Media Creation Settings, you can select a different
destination drive.
Folder
Specify an arbitrary folder as the destination for newly created or copied media.
If you deselect Use Same Folder as AAF File, a path name appears. Click Select Folder
to navigate to a different folder.
Embedded in
AAF/OMF
Media files are embedded in the exported an AAF or OMFI file specified in the Export
dialog box.
The following options appear in the Audio Details tab only, depending on the export method:
Include Rendered
Audio Effects
Select this option to include rendered audio effects during export.
Render All Audio
Effects
Select this option to render all audio effects during export.
Add Audio Mixdown Select this option to add an audio mixdown track, and then select the type of track you
Track(s)
want, either Mono or Stereo. For more information about audio mixing, see “Using Live
Mix Mode” in the Help.
Convert Audio
Sample Rate to:
Select this option if your sequence has a mix of sample rates and you need to create a
single sample rate. (You set the project rate in the Audio Project Settings window. For
more information see “Audio Project Settings” in the Help.) You can also use this option
to change the sample rate if the application to which you are exporting does not support
the current sample rate.
Depending on your system, the following suboptions are available:
32
•
Project rate
•
32 kHz
•
44.1 kHz
•
48 kHz
•
88.2 kHz
•
96 kHz
Displaying Clip Colors in the Timeline
Option
Description
Convert Audio
Select this option if your sequence has a mix of sample bit depths and you need to create
Sample Bit Depth to: a single sample bit depth. (You set the project bit depth in the Audio Project Settings
window. For more information see “Audio Project Settings” in the Help.) You can also
use this option to change the sample bit depth if the application to which you are
exporting does not support the current sample bit depth.
The following suboptions are available:
Convert Audio File
Format to:
•
Project rate
•
16 bit
•
24 bit
If your sequence has a mix of audio file formats, and you want to embed media, you
must choose a single audio file format. (You set the project format in the Audio Project
Settings window. For more information see “Audio Project Settings” in the Help.) Audio
files are converted to this format during export. This choice is optional if you want to
consolidate and link media.
The following suboptions are available:
•
Project rate: Select to use the rate that matches the project format
•
WAVE: Select to link to or embed audio tracks in the WAVE format (.WAV file name
extension). Nearly all Windows applications that support sound use WAVE files.
QuickTime also supports the WAVE format.
•
AIFF-C: Select AIFF-C to link to or embed audio tracks in the industry-standard
AIFF-C format. Note that your Avid system does not compress audio media.
•
PCM: This is the only audio file format available for AAF export
Displaying Clip Colors in the Timeline
You can use colors to highlight the following types of clips in the Timeline:
•
Clips that have offline media
If you are working with nested layers, a clip that contains offline media appears colored
even if the missing media is nested many layers deep.
•
Clips whose frame rate does not match the sequence frame rate (mixed-rate clips)
•
Clips that do not match the video resolution type of the project (HD clips in an SD
project, or SD clips in an HD project).
•
Clips to which you assign a local color in the Timeline
•
Clips to which you assign a color in the bin
33
If you are working in a MultiRez environment, you can also use colors to track available
resolutions.
You can control which types of clip coloring are enabled, and customize the colors
themselves.
The options that you set for clip colors are saved when you save a customized Timeline
View, so you can set up several coloring schemes and then switch between them. For more
information, see “Managing Customized Timeline Views” in the Help.
Displaying clip colors overrides any track color you assign from the Timeline Fast menu.
The following illustration shows a typical example of clip coloring. In this example, an SD
clip in an HD project is colored using the default SD/HD color.
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For HD and SD projects, DVCPRO HD clips are colored light red. You cannot customize this
color, which is an indicator that DVCPRO HD media plays by skipping frames. To avoid
skipped frames, use the Transcode command and select a compatible resolution.
To display clip colors in the Timeline:
1. Click the Timeline Fast Menu button, and select Clip Color.
The Clip Color dialog box opens.
34
Displaying Clip Colors in the Timeline
2. Select one or more of the following:
Option
Description
Resolution Tracking
Colors clips to indicate the availability of particular resolutions in a
MultiRez environment. For more information, see “Using Clip
Coloring to Show Available Resolutions” in the Help.
This option is only available if you are working in a MultiRez
environment.
Offline
Colors clips that have offline media.
In a MultiRez environment, colors clips that do not match the working
resolution, if you have selected Relink to Offline in the Dynamic
Relink Settings dialog box. For more information, see “Using Clip
Coloring to Show Available Resolutions” in the Help.
Mixed Rates
Colors clips whose frame rates do not match the sequence frame rate.
A different color is available for each frame rate.
35
Option
Description
SD/HD
Colors clips that do not match the video definition type of the project
format — that is, in an HD project this option colors the SD clips,
while in an SD project this colors the HD clips.
n
You can also display clip text that can help you to identify
particular clips by selecting Clip Text > Clip Resolutions from
the Timeline Fast menu.
Timeline Local
Colors clips to which you have assigned a local color in the Timeline.
For more information, see “Assigning Local Colors to Clips in the
Timeline” on page 37.
Source
Colors clips to which you have assigned a color in the bin. (Colors
assigned to sequences, groups, motion effects, and title clips do not
appear as source colors in the Timeline.) For more information, see
“Assigning Color to Bin Objects” in the Help.
The order of the options in the Clip Color dialog box indicates the priority order in
which your Avid editing application applies colors when you select more than one
option. For example, if you have Offline and SD/HD selected, an offline SD clip in an
HD project uses the higher-priority Offline color rather than the SD/HD color.
To change the display colors for the Resolution Tracking, Offline, Mixed Rates, or
SD/HD options:
1. Click the Timeline Fast Menu button, and select Clip Color.
The Clip Color dialog box opens.
2. Click the color swatch for the option you want to change.
A color picker grid opens.
3. Click a color in the grid.
The color you select becomes the display color for that option.
36
Assigning Local Colors to Clips in the Timeline
To reset the display colors for the Resolution Tracking, Offline, Mixed Rates, and
SD/HD options:
1. Click the Timeline Fast Menu button, and select Clip Color.
The Clip Color dialog box opens.
2. Click Default Colors.
The Offline, Mixed Rates, and SD/HD color swatches reset to their default colors.
Assigning Local Colors to Clips in the Timeline
You can assign local colors to clips in the Timeline, for example, to indicate clips that should
be grouped together, or to make clips stand out for any other reason while you are working
in the Timeline.
For more information on clip colors in the Timeline, see “Displaying Clip Colors in the
Timeline” on page 33.
To assign a local clip color:
1. Click the Timeline Fast Menu button, and select Clip Color.
The Clip Color dialog box opens.
37
2. Select Timeline Local, and then click OK.
3. Click one of the Segment Mode buttons, and select a clip you want to color.
4. Do one of the following:
t
Select Edit > Set Local Clip Color > color to select a standard color.
t
Select Edit > Set Local Clip Color > Pick to select a custom color from the
Windows Color dialog box.
The assigned local color appears in the clip in the Timeline.
To remove a local clip color:
1. Click one of the Segment Mode buttons, and select the clip whose color you want to
remove.
2. Select Edit > Set Local Clip Color > None.
The assigned local color no longer appears in the clip in the Timeline.
38
Committing MultiCamera Edits
Committing MultiCamera Edits
You can remove the grouped clips in a sequence and replace each of them with its selected
clip. This might be useful if you experience poor performance with a very complex
multicamera sequence on a slower system, for example, a sequence that uses many
multicamera clips and many effects or color corrections.
To commit multicamera edits:
1. Select the sequence you want to affect.
2. Right-click the sequence and select Commit Multicam Edits.
Your Avid editing application duplicates the sequence, and then replaces each grouped
clip in the duplicate sequence with its selected clip. The original sequence is unaffected
and still contains the grouped clips.
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters
The following table describes the parameter controls available in the Timecode Burn-In
effect.
Timecode Burn-In effect parameters are not keyframeable.
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters
Category
Description
Display 1,
Display 2,
Display 3
Allow you to add up to three timecode displays to the video. Click the Enable button for the
category to activate the display.
Each Display category contains Reader and Type menus, and Timecode Display and
Appearance subcategories, as described in the following rows of this table.
39
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters (Continued)
Category
Description
Reader menu
Selects the basic type of timecode or other information for the display. The following options
are available:
•
Timecode
•
Source Timecode
The timecode of the source clip at the current location. If there are multiple clips on different
tracks in the timeline, you can use the Source Track menu to select the clip whose timecode
you want to display, as described in the Timecode Display row of this table.
•
Edgecode (if available for film-originated material)
•
Source Edgecode (if available for film-originated material)
The edgecode of the source clip at the current location. If there are multiple clips on
different tracks in the timeline, you can use the Source Track Number menu to select the clip
whose edgecode you want to display, as described in the Timecode Display row of this table.
•
Frames
•
Source Clip Name
The name of the source clip at the current location. If there are multiple clips on different
tracks in the timeline, you can use the Source Track menu to select the clip whose name you
want to display, as described in the Timecode Display row of this table.
•
Sequence Name
•
Source Bin Column, Sequence Bin Column
The information from the bin column you select. Select the bin column name you want to
use from the Column Name menu that appears below the Display Label and Display Fields
buttons. To display a custom, user-defined bin column, select either Custom Property or
Enhancement from the Column Name menu, and then type the name of the custom column
in the text box that appears below the Column Name menu.
40
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters (Continued)
Category
Description
Type menu
Selects an option to control how the timecode to display is calculated. These are equivalent to
options available in the Tracking Information menus above the monitors (for more information,
see “Tracking Format Options” in the Help).
Depending on your selection in the Reader menu, options in the Type menu might not be
relevant or might result in an unchanged display. For example, if you select Frames in the
Reader menu, the Start and Absolute options yield the same display.
The following options are available:
•
Current
•
End
•
Duration
•
Mark IN
•
Mark OUT
•
I/O
•
Remaining
•
Absolute
Display Label If this option is selected, the display begins with a label identifying the timecode format, for
example, Mas TC1 01:00:01:16. If this option is deselected, the display shows only the
timecode itself, for example, 01:00:01:16.
Display Fields If this option is selected, the display shows the field number, for example, 01:00:01:16.2 for
field-based media.
41
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters (Continued)
Category
Description
Timecode
Display
Provides additional controls for selecting the format or source of the information that appears in
the timecode displays. The controls vary depending on the selection you make in the Reader
menu, as follows:
42
•
If Timecode, Source Timecode, Edgecode, or Source Edgecode is selected in the Reader
menu, a Timecode Format menu appears that allows you to select the timecode format when
multiple timecode formats are available for the material. For more information, see
“Displaying Timecodes in a 24p or 25p Project” in the Help.
•
If Edgecode or Source Edgecode is selected in the Reader menu, a Film Controls
subcategory appears, containing a Film Type menu that allows you to select the film type. In
most circumstances you can use the “default film type” option. However, depending on the
information available in your bins and your selection in the Film and 24p Settings dialog box
for a film project, you might have more than one ink number format that you can display.For
more information, see “Film Shoot Specifications” and “Film and 24P Settings” in the Help.
•
If Source Timecode, Source Edgecode, or Source Clip Name is selected in the Reader menu,
a menu appears that allows you to select the track in the Timeline that is the source of the
timecode or clip name information. You can select Current Track, which refers to the track
the Timecode effect is on, or any other video or audio by its track name, for example, V3.
•
If Frames is selected in the Reader menu, a Local Frame Count button appears below the
Display Label and Display Fields buttons. Select Local Frame Count to display the frame
number for the current clip. Deselect Local Frame Count to display the frame number for the
sequence..
•
If Sequence Name is selected in the Reader menu, the Timecode Display category does not
contain any controls.
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters
Timecode Burn-In Effect Parameters (Continued)
Category
Description
Appearance
Each Display category and the Notes Track category contain an Appearance subcategory. The
Appearance subcategory in turn contains the following subcategories and controls:
•
Position — Use the X and Y sliders to set the position of the display’s anchor point within
the video frame. You can also position the display directly in the monitor by dragging the
anchor point (located at the top left corner of the display).
•
Font Size — Use the thumbwheel to set the font size used for the display’s text.
The font size value is in absolute pixels, based on the font’s metrics. The relative size of the
display’s text changes when you switch between SD and HD because HD resolutions have
more vertical pixels than SD resolutions. Text that is relatively large and readable in SD
becomes considerably smaller if, for example, you switch the project type to an HD format.
If you need to switch resolutions and need your timecode display to maintain the same
relative size, render the effect.
Notes Track
•
Text — Use the color controls to set the color of the text (you can use the R, G, and B
sliders, or use the Other Options button or the eyedropper to pick a color, as described in
“Adjusting a Color Parameter” in the Help). Use the Text Opacity slider to set the opacity of
the text — values range from 0 (fully transparent) to 1 (fully opaque) in 0.1 increments. Use
the Line Weight thumbwheel to control the width of the black outline around text characters
(when Use Text Outline is selected), or to add thickness to the text characters (when Use
Text Outline is deselected).
•
Background — Use the color controls to set the color of the rectangular background for the
display (you can use the R, G, and B sliders, or use the Other Options button or the
eyedropper to pick a color, as described in “Adjusting a Color Parameter” in the Help). Use
the Border Opacity slider to set the opacity of the rectangular background — values range
from 0 (fully transparent) to 1 (fully opaque) in 0.1 increments.
Lets you enter a text annotation in the text box, for example, a comment that you want to display
in a review version of a sequence. This category also contains an Appearance subcategory for
controlling the look of the notes track, as described in the previous row of this table.
The anchor point for the notes track is always visible in the monitor. The display itself appears
as soon as you type text in the text box.
43
Transition Preservation
The following details improvements made to the behavior of clips with transition effects
when you trim and move them in the Timeline.
Error Message
When you splice or overwrite from a sequence with marks that intersect a transition effect,
you no longer receive the error message “Unable to perform this operation because it splits a
transition effect.”
Segment Mode
In previous versions, your Avid editing application removes the effects when you move a
segment with transition effects into filler.
Now, the effects remain with the segment when you move a segment with a transition effect
into filler.
In previous versions, when you move a segment with a transition effect into another
segment, the effect is removed.
Now, when you move a segment with a transition effect into another segment, the effect
remains with the stationary segment.
Splicing and Overwriting
In previous versions, when you attempt to splice or overwrite a sequence onto another
sequence, the transition effects at the marks in the source are ignored.
Now, when you splice or overwrite a sequence onto another sequence, the transition effects
at the marks in the source are preserved, depending on the position of the mark. For
example:
44
If you:
The result is:
Place the Mark In at the cut
Your Avid editing application leaves the
transition effect as is.
Place a Mark In before the cut
Your Avid editing application leaves the
transition effect, but the transition is shortened.
Place a Mark In after the cut
Your Avid editing application removes the
transition effect.
Recapturing and Decomposing
Trim Mode
In previous versions, if you attempt to trim a clip and it abuts a transition effect, your Avid
editing application does not let you move any further past the effect.
Now, you can trim past the edge of the transition effect up to the cut.
Cut or Extract
In previous versions, when you cut or extract a clip with a transition effect, the effect is
removed.
Now when you cut or extract a clip with a transition effect, the effect remains in the
Timeline.
Recapturing and Decomposing
Recapturing is the process of recording previously captured source footage based on existing
clips and sequences. Recapturing uses the batch-capturing process and does not require extra
logging time because the clip information for items, such as source tracks, timecodes, and
compression settings, already exists in the bin.
Decomposing creates new, shorter master clips based only on the material you have edited
into a sequence, which saves disk space. You can decompose an entire sequence, or you can
use the Expert Decompose feature for additional control. For example, you can use Expert
Decompose to decompose only some of the material in a sequence, or use it to “up-rez” your
clips from SD to HD. After decomposing, you use the batch-capturing process to recapture
footage for the new master clips.
Understanding Recapturing
There are three main situations in which you might want to recapture:
•
The original media files are unavailable
For example, you might transfer a sequence to a system that does not have access to the
original media files, or you might accidentally delete media files.
•
The original media files have errors
For example, you might forget to check audio levels or set the wrong resolution when
you first capture the media.
•
You need to work in a different format from that of the original media files
For example, a common workflow involves offline editing using low-resolution clips
followed by online editing using high-resolution clips.
45
c
Recapturing requires your original source footage. Do not delete the media files if the
source footage is no longer available, unless you are sure you do not need the material.
For information on loading the media database to relink clips, see “Loading the Media
Database” in the Help.
Recapturing Master Clips and Subclips
The procedure for recapturing master clips and subclips is identical to the process for batch
capturing logged clips. See “Batch Capturing from Logged Clips” in the Help.
Although the procedure is the same, the result is slightly different, as follows:
•
Master clips link to entire media files and serve as sources for subclips and sequences.
When you recapture a master clip, changes in compression settings and levels affect all
subclips and sequences created from the master clip.
•
Subclips are smaller sections of master clips. When you recapture a subclip, your Avid
editing application creates a new master clip that links to new media files and reflects
the shortened length of material. Therefore, recapturing subclips streamlines the
capturing process.
Also, recapturing breaks the link from the subclip to the original master clip. But if you
edit the subclip into a sequence, the sequence reflects any changes in the newly captured
subclip.
Recapturing Sequences
When you recapture a sequence, you create new master clips and associated media files
based on the length of each clip edited into the sequence. Recapturing breaks any links to the
original source clips, and only the sequence and its new master clips are linked to the newly
captured media files.
You can recapture a sequence in two ways:
•
Decompose to create new master clips, and then batch capture the clips.
•
Recapture without using decompose, which creates new master clips and batch captures
new media files in a single operation.
Although recapturing without using decompose might save a small amount of time,
decompose offers much more control and flexibility. You should only recapture sequences
without using decompose if you are sure you do not need any of the additional control
decompose provides. For more information, see “Understanding Decompose and
Expert Decompose” on page 47.
46
Recapturing and Decomposing
You cannot recapture a mixed-rate sequence without using decompose because you cannot
batch capture or batch import material in formats other than the project format. A message
box appears if you attempt to recapture such material. Instead, you can decompose the
sequence, then recapture the resulting clips by opening the bin in projects that match each of
the decomposed formats.
Consider creating a duplicate of the original version of your sequence before recapturing.
You might also want to create a new bin to store the duplicate sequence and keep the new
master clips created by the recapture or decompose operations separate from existing clips.
For example, duplicate a sequence that uses low-resolution clips to save storage space if you
want to recapture the sequence at a higher resolution while retaining the low-resolution
version.
n
If you use decompose, you can choose to create a duplicate sequence automatically in the
Decompose dialog box. However, if you want to organize new master clips in a separate bin,
you need to duplicate the sequence and place it in a new bin before you start the decompose
process.
Understanding Decompose and Expert Decompose
Decompose creates new master clips in the bin based on the lengths of the clips edited into a
sequence. You can then recapture media for the new master clips. Decompose breaks any
links to the original source clips, and only the sequence and its new master clips are linked to
the newly captured media files. If decomposing results in a change to the edit rate of some
clips in the sequence, your Avid editing application adds Motion Adapter effects, or
modifies existing Motion Adapter effects, to manage the edit rate change.
Decompose gives you more control over the recapturing process than simply recapturing a
sequence without using decompose. You can sort or modify the clips that decompose creates
before you recapture media. You can also use the Expert Decompose feature to customize
how decompose operates.
For film projects, clips you create with decompose retain all the information from the
original master clips, including Pullin column information, key numbers, ink numbers, or
any other information formerly entered in the bin.
n
You do not need to decompose clips that were linked with the AMA (Avid Media Access)
method. For information about AMA, see “File Based Media,” in the Help.
47
Expert Decompose
Expert Decompose allows you to control the following aspects of the decompose process:
•
You can select which material in the sequence to decompose, either by tape/source or by
clip.
•
For tapes/sources or clips that you can recapture in several different formats, you can
select the target format to which you want to recapture.
For information on the available formats, see “Target Formats for Expert Decompose”
on page 48.
If you decompose only some of the clips in a sequence, the resulting sequence contains some
clips that remain linked to existing master clips and media (the clips you did not decompose)
and other clips that are linked to new offline master clips (the clips you did decompose).
Once you recapture media for the new master clips, all the clips in the sequence are available
in the formats you have chosen.
There are several situations in which you might want to decompose some but not all of the
clips in a sequence. For example, you might have made an error while capturing from only
one of the tapes or sources you are using in the sequence. In this case, you can decompose
the clips from just the one tape or source and recapture them. Or you might have a
mixed-rate sequence that is composed mostly of low-resolution clips but that also contains
some high-resolution clips. If you want to up-rez the entire sequence for the online phase of
your workflow, you might not need to recapture the high-resolution material, so you can
decompose only the low-resolution parts of the sequence.
Expert Decompose is particularly useful when you need to recapture some or all of a
mixed-rate sequence because you have complete control over what to decompose and which
target formats to create. You can decompose to several different target formats if necessary,
creating new master clips in the bin. You can then open the bin successively in projects that
provide the correct format for recapturing, select the clips that match each project format,
and batch capture those clips.
For information on activating and using Expert Decompose, see “Decomposing Sequences”
on page 49 and “Using Expert Decompose” on page 52.
Target Formats for Expert Decompose
The following table lists the target formats that are available using Expert Decompose. If the
format of an existing clip is listed in the first column, you can decompose the clip to any of
the formats listed in the second column, and then recapture the clip in that format. If the
format of an existing clip is not listed in the first column, then you can only decompose and
recapture it in its existing format.
48
Recapturing and Decomposing
The third and fourth columns indicate whether or not the format change involves a change to
the source or edit frame rate.
Existing Format
Target Formats
Source Rate Change
Edit Rate Change
23.976p NTSC
23.976p NTSC
1080p/23.976
No
Yes
No
No
24p NTSC
24p NTSC
1080p/24
No
Yes
No
No
30i NTSC
30i NTSC
720p/29.97
720p/59.94
1080i/59.94
1080p/29.97
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
24p PAL
24p PAL
1080p/24
No
Yes
No
No
25i or 25p PAL
25i PAL
25p PAL
720p/25
720p/50
1080i/50
1080p/25
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Decomposing Sequences
You can decompose sequences to create new master clips that you can then recapture. For
more information on this process, see “Understanding Decompose and Expert Decompose”
on page 47.
To decompose one or more sequences:
1. Activate the appropriate bin and select the sequence or sequences.
2. Select Clip > Decompose.
The Decompose dialog box opens.
49
3. To preserve clips that already have existing media files, select “Offline media only.”
Do not select this option if you plan to decompose and recapture any material in the
sequence or sequences that has available media.
4. Select other options for the types of clips to decompose: captured only, imported only,
captured and imported, or all clips in a group edit.
5. Click the Handle Length text box and type the number of additional frames you want to
capture at the heads and tails of the new master clips.
This provides enough overlap for trimming and adding transition effects.
c
If you attempt to trim or add effects with no handles, you receive an error message
notifying you that there is insufficient media.
6. (Option) Select “Extend handles beyond master clip edges” to allow the handles to
extend before the beginning and after the end of the original master clip.
When you batch capture, deselecting this option prevents capturing across a
discontinuous timecode error.
For example, if the starting timecode for a master clip is 1:00:10:00 and the resulting
master clip after a decompose with handles causes the new master clip to begin at
1:00:09:00, batch capturing will fail if there are any timecode discontinuities between
1:00:09:00 and 1:00:10:00.
50
Recapturing and Decomposing
7. (Option) If you want to create a copy of each selected sequence to use for the
decompose, select Create New Sequence.
When the decompose process starts, your Avid editing application creates a duplicate of
each of the selected sequences, named using the suffix .Decomposed.xx. For example,
the duplicate of a sequence named MySequence is named
MySequence.Decomposed.01. Your application decomposes the duplicate sequences,
and the original sequences remain unchanged.
8. (Option) If you want to use Expert Decompose, select Expert Decompose, and then
select one of the following options to control how information displays in the Expert
Decompose dialog box:
Option
Description
Display tapes/sources An item appears in the Expert Decompose dialog box for each tape
only
or other source represented in the selected sequences. That is, this
option groups all clips from each unique source into one item.
Display clips
An item appears in the Expert Decompose dialog box for each clip
in the selected sequences. Depending on the number of sequences
you have selected and the length of the sequences, this might result
in a very long list of items in the Expert Decompose dialog box.
9. Click OK.
If you selected Expert Decompose in step 8, the Expert Decompose dialog box opens.
For information on how to use this dialog box, see “Using Expert Decompose” on page
52.
New master clips appear in the bin, named using the suffix .new.xx. You can now sort
and select these clips like all other objects in the bin.
n
Your Avid editing application selects a resolution for each new clip that is appropriate for
the target format you select in the Expert Decompose dialog box. If the target format
matches the current project type, your application uses the capture resolution set in the
Media Creation settings. Otherwise, your application uses the resolution of the original clip
or the default resolution for the project. The clip’s resolution is a default that you can
override when you recapture.
10. Proceed with the recapturing procedures described in “Batch Capturing Clips” in the
Help.
51
Using Expert Decompose
If you select the Expert Decompose option in the Decompose dialog box, the Expert
Decompose dialog box opens before the decompose process begins.
In the Expert Decompose dialog box, you can:
•
View information about the tapes/sources or clips in the sequences you are decomposing
If you select “Display tapes/sources only” in the Decompose dialog box, a line of
information appears for each tape or source used in the sequences you are decomposing,
and the information columns display the name of each tape or source, the source frame
rate, and the edit frame rate.
If you select “Display clips” in the Decompose dialog box, a line of information appears
for each source clip represented in the sequences you are decomposing, and an
additional column displays the name of each clip.
•
Sort the information in any of the columns
•
Select the tapes/sources or clips that you want to decompose
•
Select the target format at which you want to recapture the decomposed tapes/sources or
clips
The following illustration shows the Expert Decompose dialog box as it might appear if you
select sequences that contain clips of a variety of different formats and then select “Display
clips” in the Decompose dialog box. In some cases, the edit rate for a clip differs from the
source rate.
For more information, see “Understanding Decompose and Expert Decompose” on page 47
and “Decomposing Sequences” on page 49.
52
Recapturing and Decomposing
To sort or reverse sort a column of information:
t
Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+click (Macintosh) the column heading for any column,
and then select one of the following:
Command
Description
Sort Column
Sorts the information in order, for example, alphabetically A to Z.
Reverse Sort
Column
Sorts the information in reverse order, for example, reverse alphabetically
Z to A
To select or deselect a single tape/source or clip to decompose:
t
Click the check box for the tape/source or clip in the Decompose column.
To select or deselect multiple tapes/sources or clips to decompose:
1. In any of the information columns, click the first tape/source or clip you want to select.
2. Do one of the following:
t
To select a contiguous group of tapes/sources or clips, Shift+click the last
tape/source or clip you want to select.
Your Avid editing application selects the last tape/source or clip and all the
tapes/sources or clips between the first and last.
t
To select or deselect additional tapes/sources or clips from anywhere in the list,
Ctrl+click (Windows) or Command+click (Macintosh) on each tape/source or clip
you want to select or deselect.
3. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+click (Macintosh) on any selected item, and then select
one of the following:
Command
Description
Include in Decompose
Selects the check box in the Decompose column for each of the
selected items.
Exclude from Decompose Deselects the check box in the Decompose column for each of
the selected items.
To deselect all selected tapes/sources or clips:
t
Click below the last item in any of the information columns.
To select the target format for a tape/source or clip:
t
Select a format from the menu for the tape/source or clip in the Target Format column.
53
The available target formats vary depending on the source formats.
Some source formats can only be recaptured in their original format. For these formats,
the entry in the Target Format column is only for your information, and you cannot
select a different format.
For more information, see “Expert Decompose” on page 48.
To proceed with the decompose process:
t
Click OK.
Recapturing a Sequence Without Using Decompose
When you recapture a sequence without using decompose, your Avid editing application
creates new master clips and captures new media in a single operation.
For more information on recapturing a sequence with and without decompose, see
“Recapturing Sequences” on page 46 and “Understanding Decompose and
Expert Decompose” on page 47.
To recapture a sequence:
1. Select the proper Capture settings and set up the capture tools, as described in
“Preparing for Capture: Basics” in the Help.
2. Open or activate the bin that stores the sequence.
3. Select Bin > Go To Capture Mode.
4. Select the sequence you want to recapture.
5. Select Clip > Batch Capture.
The Batch Capture dialog box opens.
6. To preserve clips that already have existing media files, select “Offline media only.”
Deselect this option if you plan to recapture the entire sequence.
7. (Option) Select “All clips in a group edit.”
8. Click the Handle Length text box and type the number of additional frames you want to
capture at the heads and tails of the new master clips.
This provides enough overlap for trimming and adding transition effects.
c
If you attempt to trim or add effects with no handles, you will receive an error message
notifying you that there is insufficient media.
9. (Option) Select “Extend handles beyond master clip edges” to allow the handles to
extend before the beginning and after the end of the original master clip.
54
Ikegami GFCAM Media
When you batch capture, deselecting this option prevents capturing across a
discontinuous timecode error.
For example, if the starting timecode for a master clip is 1:00:10:00 and the resulting
master clip after a decompose with handles causes the new master clip to begin at
1:00:09:00, batch capturing fails if there are any timecode discontinuities between
1:00:09:00 and 1:00:10:00.
10. Click OK.
Your Avid editing application prompts you to load the first tape.
11. Load the tape into the tape deck if you have not already done so.
12. Click Mounted to indicate to the system that the correct tape is loaded and ready for
capturing.
A dialog box opens.
13. Click OK to confirm the tape and deck entries.
Your Avid editing application captures each clip from the tape, in start timecode order. If
another source tape is needed, your application prompts for the tape. You can stop the
batch-capturing process at any time by clicking the Trash button in the Capture tool. A
message box notifies you when batch capturing finishes. The new master clips appear in
the bin, and associated media files exist on the targeted drive or drives.
Ikegami GFCAM Media
The GFCAM HDS-V10 is a tapeless camera/re corder that uses flash memory instead of
video tapes as a recording medium. GFCAM devices record MPEG-2 Long GOP/I-Frame
media onto a GFPAK™, a removable high-speed storage medium.
You can edit d irectly from GFPAKs, without having to capture. You can link to a GFPAK
attached to your system or copy a GFPAK to the root of a drive.
GFCAM is only available through the AMA method. For more information, see “The Avid
Media Access (AMA) Workflow” in the Help.
The following topics provide more information on working with GFCAM media:
•
GFCAM Formats and Resolutions
•
GFCAM Files and Folders
•
Connecting the GFPAK Device
•
Spanned Clips and GFCAM
•
Copying GFCAM Files to a FireWire or Network Drive
55
GFCAM Formats and Resolutions
The following table lists the formats and resolutions available when you work with GFCAM
media:
Format/Resolution
Number of Audio Channels
(maximum)
MPEG-2 HD LongGOP 50 Mbits (1080i/59.94,
1080i/50, 1080p/23.98 pulldowna, 1080p/29.97b,
1080p/25c, 720p/59, 720p/50, 720p/25c,
720p/23.98 pulldowna)
4
MPEG 30
MPEG 40
MPEG 50
4
MPEG-2 HD I-Frame 100 Mbits
4
a. 1080p/23.98 pulldown and 720p/23.98 pulldown record at 59.94fps and are only compatible
with 1080i/59.94 and 720p/59.94 projects.
b. 1080p/29.97 records as PSF at 59.94fps and is only compatible with 1080i/59.94 projects.
c. 1080p/25 and 720p/25 record as PSF at 50fps and are only compatible with 1080i/50 and
720p/50 projects.
GFCAM Files and Folders
GFCAM video and audio media files record in MXF format.
Each GFPAK stores the video MXF files in:
•
(Windows) drive:\BINxxx\VIDEO
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/BINxxx/VIDEO
Each GFPAK stores the audio MXF files in:
•
(Windows) drive:\BINxxx\AUDIO
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/BINxxx/AUDIO
The GFCAM video file directory stores MXF files regulated by SMPTE 390M (MXF
OP-Atom) and SMPTE 381M (MXF mapping MPEG streams into MXF GC). If a video clip
needs to split, such as under the FAT32 file system, the system creates multiple MXF files
for that clip.
56
Ikegami GFCAM Media
The GFCAM audio file directory stores MXF files regulated by SMPTE 382 (MXF mapping
AES3 and BWF into the MXF GC). Each file has an AES channel that consists of two audio
channels. For example, the system creates two MXF files from two AES channels (four
audio channels). If an audio clip needs to split, the system creates multiple audio files for
that clip.
Connecting the GFPAK Device
You connect the GFPAK directly through an industry-standard USB 2.0 port on your
computer. Use a cable to connect the GFPAK to a Windows system or a Macintosh system.
The GFPAKs mount as individual media drives on your desktop and then link to your Avid
editing system through AMA.
Spanned Clips and GFCAM
GFCAM allows gapless recording over several GFPAKs, however, each GFPAK handles the
contents as a separate clip. If you record across three GFPAKs, you create three separate
clips. You can then edit those clips together into one continuous sequence.
Copying GFCAM Files to a FireWire or Network Drive
After you mount the GFPAK, you can copy the GFCAM media to a FireWire drive or a
network drive and then eject the GFPAK. You might find it convenient to copy several
GFPAKs to other drives so you can reuse the GFPAK quickly. Your editing application
supports GFCAM copies as though they were actual GFPAKs.
You can connect a FireWire drive, for example, and store the contents of several GFPAKs on
it so you can keep using the GFPAKs in the camera.
To copy the GFPAK to another drive:
1. On the drive, set up a folder for each GFPAK you want to copy.
2. Give each folder a unique name that identifies the GFPAK.
The name does not have to be the same as the actual GFPAK name.
3. Navigate to the actual GFPAK and select the contents of the folder.
4. Do one of the following:
t
Copy and paste the contents of the folder to the folder on the other drive.
t
Click the GFPAK folder and drag it to the folder on the other drive.
5. Remove the GFPAK.
57
Numeric Keypad and Mouse Support for
MultiCamera Editing
You can use the numeric keypad and mouse buttons to switch the display of camera angles
and to swap camera banks. These options provide a quick and intuitive way to do
multicamera editing.
To switch camera angles, do one of the following:
t
Click a camera angle in the split display during playback to switch to that camera angle.
t
Press a number key on the numeric keypad to switch to a new camera angle.
For Quad Split display, the following table describes the key mappings:
Keys
Position in Split Display
7
Upper left
8 or 9
Upper right
4 or 1
Lower left
2, 3, 5, or 6
Lower right
For Nine-Split display, each of the nine keys 1 through 9 maps to a position in the split
display based on its location on the keypad. For example, the 7 key maps to the upper
left camera angle in the split display, while the 5 key maps to the center camera angle.
To switch camera banks in Quad Split display, do one of the following:
t
Click the right mouse button.
t
Press either the 0 (zero) key or the . (period) key on the numeric keypad.
Using Timecode to Find a Frame
You can cue a loaded clip or sequence to a specific frame by typing timecode values with the
numeric keypad on the right side of the keyboard. In addition, you can cue backward or
forward from the current location in the clip or sequence by a specified number of minutes
and seconds, or feet plus frames, by using positive or negative frame-offset values.
58
Using Timecode to Find a Frame
The system interprets the numbers you type with the numeric keypad according to the type
of tracking format you have selected from the Tracking Information menu (timecode or
frames). If you have two rows of information displayed above the monitor, the system looks
at the top row. For more information on selecting the display of tracking information, see
“Displaying Tracking Information” in the Help.
To use timecode to find a frame, the top row of information must include timecode, for
example, V1.
To cue to a frame based on a known timecode:
1. Click the monitor that is displaying the clip or sequence you want to search.
2. Select a timecode tracking format from the Tracking Information menu that appears
above the monitor.
If two rows of information are displayed above the monitor, make sure the timecode
format is in the top row.
3. (Option) If you are using a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, press and release the left Control key twice quickly.
This allows you to enter timecode using standard keys on the keyboard, such as the
number keys and the Enter key (Windows) or Return key (Macintosh).
4. Enter the timecode for the frame by using the numeric keypad on the right side of the
keyboard.
If you have performed step 3 on a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, use the standard keyboard number keys.
Master track
Type a master
timecode to find
a frame in the
sequence.
59
In this example, the interface displays master timecode. Use one of the following
formats:
Format
Description
SMPTE timecode
Use two digits each for the hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.
For example, type 01230200 to enter 01:23:02:00.
Current timecode
To find a timecode that starts at the same hour, minute, or second as
the current timecode, type only the last digits. For example, if the
current timecode is 1:05:12:13 and you type 425, the system finds
the frame at 1:05:04:25.
5. Press Enter on the numeric keypad.
If you have performed step 3 on a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, press the Enter key (Windows) or Return key (Macintosh).
To cue a frame using frame offset timecode:
1. Click the monitor that is displaying the clip or sequence that you want to search.
2. (Option) If you are using a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, press and release the left Control key twice quickly.
This allows you to enter timecode using standard keys on the keyboard, such as the
number keys and the Enter key (Windows) or Return key (Macintosh).
3. Using the numeric keypad, type a plus sign (+) to move forward or a minus sign (–) to
move backward from the current position.
If you have performed step 2 on a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, use the standard keyboard plus (+) and minus (-) keys.
4. Type a number for the frame offset, and then press Enter on the numeric keypad.
If you have performed step 2 on a notebook computer or a keyboard that does not have a
dedicated numeric keypad, use the standard keyboard number keys, and then press the
Enter key (Windows) or Return key (Macintosh).
Use the following formats:
60
Format
Description
One or two digits
Type 1 through 99 to specify a number of frames forward or backward.
For example, type –42 to move backward 42 frames.
Undoing or Redoing Edits
Format
Description
Three digits
Type 100 or greater to move forward or backward a specified number of
seconds and frames. The results vary depending on the tracking format
you have selected in the Tracking Information menu that displays
information above the monitor. For example, if you type +100 and the
master timecode is displayed in the top row of the tracking information
above the monitor, you move forward 1 second and zero frames. If you
select frames to display above the monitor and type +100, you move
forward 100 frames.
Frames only
To move by frames (regardless of the display in the Tracking
Information menu) add an f to the end of the number you type. For
example, if you have a timecode displayed in the Tracking Information
menu and type +100f, the display changes to 3:10 (3 seconds and 10
frames) and you move forward 100 frames.
Undoing or Redoing Edits
You can undo or redo up to 100 previous actions listed in the Edit menu. You can quickly
undo or redo a just completed command, or you can search through a submenu to undo or
redo all commands leading back to a particular command.
Undo/Redo commands
for previous edit
Prior Redo commands
appear in the upper
portion of the
Undo/Redo List
submenu.
Prior Undo commands
appear in the lower
portion of the submenu.
You can limit the Undo function to undo only record actions by selecting the Undo Only
Record Events option in the Edit tab of the Composer Settings dialog box.
61
For example, you can select the Undo Only Record Events option and then mark several IN
and OUT points in clips loaded in the Source monitor. If you decide to undo the last edit
made to the sequence, then you would not lose the IN and OUT points in the source clips.
To undo only the previous edit or function, do one of the following:
t
Select Edit > Undo.
t
Press Ctrl+Z.
To redo only the previous edit or function, do one of the following:
t
Select Edit > Redo.
t
Press Ctrl+R.
To undo or redo every edit and function back to a particular command:
t
Select Edit > Undo/Redo List, and then select a command.
All the previous commands, including the command selected from the submenu, are
undone or redone as appropriate.
62
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
Product specifications are subject to change without notice and do not represent a commitment on the part of Avid Technology,
Inc.
This product is subject to the terms and conditions of a software license agreement provided with the software. The product
may only be used in accordance with the license agreement.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following United States Patents: 5,077,604; 5,267,351;
5,309,528; 5,355,450; 5,396,594; 5,440,348; 5,467,288; 5,513,375; 5,528,310; 5,557,423; 5,568,275; 5,577,190; 5,584,006;
5,634,020; 5,640,601; 5,644,364; 5,654,737; 5,715,018; 5,719,570; 5,724,605; 5,726,717; 5,729,673; 5,745,637; 5,752,029;
5,754,180; 5,754,851; 5,799,150; 5,812,216; 5,828,678; 5,842,014; 5,852,435; 5,905,841; 5,929,836; 5,930,445; 5,946,445;
5,986,584; 5,987,501; 6,016,152; 6,018,337; 6,023,531; 6,058,236; 6,061,758; 6,091,778; 6,105,083; 6,118,444; 6,130,676;
6,134,607; 6,141,691; 6,198,477; 6,201,531; 6,223,211; 6,249,280; 6,269,195; 6,330,369; 6,351,557; 6,353,862; 6,357,047;
6,392,710; 6,404,435; 6,407,775; 6,417,891; 6,426,778; 6,477,271; 6,489,969; 6,512,522; 6,532,043; 6,546,190; 6,552,731;
6,553,142; 6,570,624; 6,571,255; 6,583,824; 6,618,547; 6,636,869; 6,665,450; 6,678,461; 6,687,407; 6,704,445; 6,747,705;
6,763,134; 6,766,063; 6,791,556; 6,810,157; 6,813,622; 6,847,373; 6,871,003; 6,871,161; 6,901,211; 6,907,191; 6,928,187;
7,043,058; 7,081,900; 7,103,231; 7,266,241; 7,280,117; RE40,107; 7,403,561; 7,433,519; 7,512,885; 7,545,957; D352,278;
D392,267; D392,268; D392,269; D395,291; D396,853; D398,912. Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following European Patents: 0506870; 0515031;
0635188; 0674414; 0694243; 0705517; 0752174; 0857293; 0976108; 0988756; 1068723; 1068734; 1111910; 1173850;
1629675. Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following United States Patents: 5,267,351; 5,309,528;
5,355,450; 5,396,594; 5,440,348; 5,467,288; 5,513,375; 5,528,310; 5,557,423; 5,577,190; 5,584,006; 5,640,601; 5,644,364;
5,654,737; 5,715,018; 5,719,570; 5,724,605; 5,726,717; 5,729,673; 5,745,637; 5,752,029; 5,754,851; 5,799,150; 5,812,216;
5,828,678; 5,842,014; 5,852,435; 5,986,584; 5,999,406; 6,038,573; 6,061,758; 6,069,668; 6,141,007; 6,211,869; 6,532,043;
6,546,190; 6,596,031; 6,636,869; 6,747,705; 6,763,523; 6,766,357; 6,813,622; 6,847,373; 7,081,900; RE40,107; 7,403,561;
7,433,519; D352,278; D372,478; D373,778; D392,267; D392,268; D392,269; D395,291; D396,853; D398,912.
Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following European Patents: 0506870; 0515031;
0635188; 0674414; 0694243; 0705517; 0752174; 0895623; 1068617; 1111910; 1629675. Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following United States Patents: 5,077,604; 5,267,351;
5,309,528; 5,355,450; 5,396,594; 5,440,348; 5,467,288; 5,513,375; 5,528,310; 5,557,423; 5,568,275; 5,577,190; 5,584,006;
5,634,020; 5,640,601; 5,644,364; 5,654,737; 5,715,018; 5,719,570; 5,724,605; 5,726,717; 5,729,673; 5,745,637; 5,752,029;
5,754,180; 5,754,851; 5,799,150; 5,812,216; 5,828,678; 5,842,014; 5,852,435; 5,905,841; 5,929,836; 5,930,445; 5,946,445;
5,986,584; 5,987,501; 5,999,406; 6,016,152; 6,018,337; 6,023,531; 6,038,573; 6,058,236; 6,061,758; 6,069,668; 6,091,778;
6,105,083; 6,118,444; 6,130,676; 6,134,607; 6,141,007; 6,141,691; 6,198,477; 6,201,531; 6,211,869; 6,223,211; 6,249,280;
6,269,195; 6,330,369; 6,351,557; 6,353,862; 6,357,047; 6,392,710; 6,404,435; 6,407,775; 6,417,891; 6,426,778; 6,477,271;
6,489,969; 6,512,522; 6,532,043; 6,546,190; 6,552,731; 6,553,142; 6,570,624; 6,571,255; 6,583,824; 6,596,031; 6,618,547;
6,636,869; 6,665,450; 6,678,461; 6,687,407; 6,704,445; 6,747,705; 6,763,134; 6,763,523; 6,766,063; 6,766,357; 6,791,556;
6,810,157; 6,813,622; 6,847,373; 6,871,003; 6,871,161; 6,901,211; 6,907,191; 6,928,187; 7,043,058; 7,081,900; 7,103,231;
7,266,241; 7,280,117; RE40,107; 7,403,561; 7,433,519; 7,512,885; 7,545,957; D352,278; D372,478; D373,778; D392,267;
D392,268; D392,269; D395,291; D396,853; D398,912. Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following European Patents: 0506870; 0515031;
0635188; 0674414; 0694243; 0705517; 0752174; 0857293; 0895623; 0976108; 0988756; 1068617; 1068723; 1068734;
1111910; 1173850; 1629675. Other patents are pending.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following European Patents: 0506870; 0515031;
0635188; 0674414; 0694243; 0705517; 0752174; 0895623; 1068617; 1111910; 1629675. Other patents are pending.
The following disclaimer is required by Apple Computer, Inc.:
APPLE COMPUTER, INC. MAKES NO WARRANTIES WHATSOEVER, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, REGARDING
THIS PRODUCT, INCLUDING WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO ITS MERCHANTABILITY OR ITS FITNESS FOR ANY
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE EXCLUSION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES IS NOT PERMITTED BY SOME STATES. THE
ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS WARRANTY PROVIDES YOU WITH SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS.
THERE MAY BE OTHER RIGHTS THAT YOU MAY HAVE WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
The following disclaimer is required by Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics, Inc. for the use of their TIFF library:
Copyright © 1988–1997 Sam Leffler
Copyright © 1991–1997 Silicon Graphics, Inc.
63
Permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and sell this software [i.e., the TIFF library] and its documentation for any purpose
is hereby granted without fee, provided that (i) the above copyright notices and this permission notice appear in all copies of
the software and related documentation, and (ii) the names of Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics may not be used in any
advertising or publicity relating to the software without the specific, prior written permission of Sam Leffler and Silicon
Graphics.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS-IS” AND WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR
OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
IN NO EVENT SHALL SAM LEFFLER OR SILICON GRAPHICS BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT
OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE,
DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER OR NOT ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF DAMAGE, AND ON ANY THEORY OF
LIABILITY, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
The following disclaimer is required by the Independent JPEG Group:
This software is based in part on the work of the Independent JPEG Group.
This Software may contain components licensed under the following conditions:
Copyright (c) 1989 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph
are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such
distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the University of California, Berkeley. The name of the
University may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written
permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES,
INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 by Jef Poskanzer.
Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation for any purpose and without fee is hereby
granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and that both that copyright notice and this permission
notice appear in supporting documentation. This software is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty.
Copyright 1995, Trinity College Computing Center. Written by David Chappell.
Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation for any purpose and without fee is hereby
granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and that both that copyright notice and this permission
notice appear in supporting documentation. This software is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty.
Copyright 1996 Daniel Dardailler.
Permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and sell this software for any purpose is hereby granted without fee, provided that
the above copyright notice appear in all copies and that both that copyright notice and this permission notice appear in
supporting documentation, and that the name of Daniel Dardailler not be used in advertising or publicity pertaining to
distribution of the software without specific, written prior permission. Daniel Dardailler makes no representations about the
suitability of this software for any purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty.
Modifications Copyright 1999 Matt Koss, under the same license as above.
Copyright (c) 1991 by AT&T.
Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software for any purpose without fee is hereby granted, provided that this
entire notice is included in all copies of any software which is or includes a copy or modification of this software and in all
copies of the supporting documentation for such software.
THIS SOFTWARE IS BEING PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY. IN PARTICULAR,
NEITHER THE AUTHOR NOR AT&T MAKES ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND CONCERNING THE
MERCHANTABILITY OF THIS SOFTWARE OR ITS FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
This product includes software developed by the University of California, Berkeley and its contributors.
The following disclaimer is required by Nexidia Inc.:
© 2006 Nexidia. All rights reserved.
Manufactured under license from the Georgia Tech Research Corporation, U.S.A. Patent Pending.
64
Legal Notices
The following disclaimer is required by Paradigm Matrix:
Portions of this software licensed from Paradigm Matrix.
The following disclaimer is required by Ray Sauers Associates, Inc.:
“Install-It” is licensed from Ray Sauers Associates, Inc. End-User is prohibited from taking any action to derive a source code
equivalent of “Install-It,” including by reverse assembly or reverse compilation, Ray Sauers Associates, Inc. shall in no event be
liable for any damages resulting from reseller’s failure to perform reseller’s obligation; or any damages arising from use or
operation of reseller’s products or the software; or any other damages, including but not limited to, incidental, direct, indirect,
special or consequential Damages including lost profits, or damages resulting from loss of use or inability to use reseller’s
products or the software for any reason including copyright or patent infringement, or lost data, even if Ray Sauers Associates
has been advised, knew or should have known of the possibility of such damages.
The following disclaimer is required by Videomedia, Inc.:
“Videomedia, Inc. makes no warranties whatsoever, either express or implied, regarding this product, including warranties with
respect to its merchantability or its fitness for any particular purpose.”
“This software contains V-LAN ver. 3.0 Command Protocols which communicate with V-LAN ver. 3.0 products developed by
Videomedia, Inc. and V-LAN ver. 3.0 compatible products developed by third parties under license from Videomedia, Inc. Use
of this software will allow “frame accurate” editing control of applicable videotape recorder decks, videodisc recorders/players
and the like.”
The following disclaimer is required by Altura Software, Inc. for the use of its Mac2Win software and Sample Source Code:
©1993–1998 Altura Software, Inc.
The following disclaimer is required by Ultimatte Corporation:
Certain real-time compositing capabilities are provided under a license of such technology from Ultimatte Corporation and are
subject to copyright protection.
The following disclaimer is required by 3Prong.com Inc.:
Certain waveform and vector monitoring capabilities are provided under a license from 3Prong.com Inc.
The following disclaimer is required by Interplay Entertainment Corp.:
The “Interplay” name is used with the permission of Interplay Entertainment Corp., which bears no responsibility for Avid
products.
This product includes portions of the Alloy Look & Feel software from Incors GmbH.
This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org/).
© DevelopMentor
This product may include the JCifs library, for which the following notice applies:
JCifs © Copyright 2004, The JCIFS Project, is licensed under LGPL (http://jcifs.samba.org/). See the LGPL.txt file in the Third
Party Software directory on the installation CD.
Avid Interplay contains components licensed from LavanTech. These components may only be used as part of and in
connection with Avid Interplay.
Portions © Copyright 2003-2007 of MOG Solutions.
Attn. Government User(s). Restricted Rights Legend
U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS. This Software and its documentation are “commercial computer software” or
“commercial computer software documentation.” In the event that such Software or documentation is acquired by or on behalf
of a unit or agency of the U.S. Government, all rights with respect to this Software and documentation are subject to the terms
of the License Agreement, pursuant to FAR §12.212(a) and/or DFARS §227.7202-1(a), as applicable.
65
Trademarks
003, 192 Digital I/O, 192XD I/O, 888 I/O, AirPlay, AirSPACE, AirSPACE HD, AirSpeed, ALEX, Alienbrain, AniMatte,
AudioMarket, AudioPages, AudioSuite, AudioVision, AutoSync, Avid, Avid Advanced Response, Avid DNA, Avid DNxcel,
Avid DNxHD, AVIDdrive, Avid DS Assist Station, Avid EditStar, Avid Learning Excellerator, Avid Liquid,
Avid Liquid Chrome Xe, Avid MEDIArray, Avid Mojo, AvidNet, AvidNetwork, Avid NewStar, Avid Remote Response,
AVIDstripe, Avid Unity, Avid Unity ISIS, Avid VideoRAID, Avid Xpress, AVoption, AVX, Beauty Without The Bandwidth, Boom,
C|24, CaptureManager, ChromaCurve, ChromaWheel, Command|24, Conectiv, CountDown, DAE, Dazzle,
Dazzle Digital Video Creator, Deko, DekoCast, D-Fi, D-fx, DigiDelivery, Digidesign, Digidesign Audio Engine,
Digidesign Intelligent Noise Reduction, DigiDrive, DigiLink, DigiMeter, DigiSerial, DigiStudio, DigiStudio Control,
Digital Nonlinear Accelerator, DigiTranslator, DINR, DNxchange, do more, DVD Complete, D-Verb, Eleven, Equinox,
EveryPhase, ExpertRender, Fastbreak, Fast Track, FieldPak, Film Composer, FilmScribe, Flexevent, FluidMotion, FXDeko,
G7, G-Rack, HD Core, HD Process, HDPack, HYBRID, HyperControl, HyperSPACE, HyperSPACE HDCAM, IllusionFX,
Image Independence, iNEWS, iNEWS Assign, iNEWS ControlAir, Instantwrite, Instinct,
Intelli-sat Broadcasting Recording Manager, Intelli-Sat, InterFX, Interplay, inTONE, Intraframe, iS9, iS18, iS23, iS36, ISIS,
IsoSync, KeyRig, KeyStudio, LaunchPad, LeaderPlus, Lightning, ListSync, Lo-Fi, Magic Mask, Make Anything Hollywood,
make manage move | media, Marquee, M-Audio, M-Audio Micro, Maxim, Mbox, MCXpress, Media Browse, Media Composer,
MediaDock, MediaDock Shuttle, Media Fusion, Media Illusion, MediaLog, Media Reader, Media Recorder, MEDIArray,
MediaShare, MediaStream, Media Suite, Meridien, MetaFuze, MetaSync, MicroTrack, Midiman, MissionControl, Mix Rack,
MixLab, Moviebox, Moviestar, NaturalMatch, Nearchive, NetReview, NewsCutter, Nitris, NRV-10 interFX, Octane, OMF,
OMF Interchange, OMM, OnDVD, Open Media Framework, Open Media Management, Palladium, Pinnacle,
Pinnacle DistanTV, Pinnacle Geniebox, Pinnacle HomeMusic, Pinnacle MediaSuite, Pinnacle Mobile Media, Pinnacle Studio,
Pinnacle Studio MovieBoard, Pinnacle Systems, ProEncode, ProServices, ProSessions, Pro Tools, QuietDrive, Recti-Fi,
Reel Tape Delay, Reel Tape Flanger, Reel Tape Saturation, RetroLoop, rS9, rS18, Salesview, Sci-Fi, Scorch, Scorefitter,
ScriptSync, SecureProductionEnvironment, Session, Show Center, Sibelius, SIDON, Soft SampleCell, Soft-Clip Limiter,
Sound Designer II, SPACE, SPACEShift, SpectraGraph, SpectraMatte, Sputnik, Starplay, SteadyGlide, Streamfactory,
Streamgenie, StreamRAID, Strike, Structure, Studiophile, SubCap, Sundance Digital, Sundance, Symphony, SYNC HD,
SynchroScience, SynchroScope, Syntax, TDM FlexCable, Thunder, Titan, Titansync, TL Aggro, TL AutoPan, TL Drum Rehab,
TL Everyphase, TL Fauxlder, TL In Tune, TL MasterMeter, TL Metro, TL Space, TL Utilities, Torq, Torq Xponent, Transfuser,
Trigger Finger, Trillium Lane Labs, TruTouch, UnityRAID, Vari-Fi, Velvet, Venom, VideoRAID, Video Slave Driver, VideoSPACE,
VideoSpin, Vortx, Xdeck, X-Form, Xmon, Xponent, and X-Session are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Avid
Technology, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.
Adobe and Photoshop are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States
and/or other countries. Apple and Macintosh are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other
countries. Windows is either a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other
countries. All other trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
Footage
Arri — Courtesy of Arri/Fauer — John Fauer, Inc.
Bell South “Anticipation” — Courtesy of Two Headed Monster — Tucker/Wayne Atlanta/GMS.
Canyonlands — Courtesy of the National Park Service/Department of the Interior.
Eco Challenge British Columbia — Courtesy of Eco Challenge Lifestyles, Inc., All Rights Reserved.
Eco Challenge Morocco — Courtesy of Discovery Communications, Inc.
It’s Shuttletime — Courtesy of BCP & Canadian Airlines.
Nestlé Coffee Crisp — Courtesy of MacLaren McCann Canada.
Saturn “Calvin Egg” — Courtesy of Cossette Communications.
“Tigers: Tracking a Legend” — Courtesy of www.wildlifeworlds.com, Carol Amore, Executive Producer.
"The Big Swell" — Courtesy of Swell Pictures, Inc.
Windhorse — Courtesy of Paul Wagner Productions.
News material provided by WFTV Television Inc.
GOT FOOTAGE?
Editors — Filmmakers — Special Effects Artists — Game Developers — Animators — Educators — Broadcasters — Content
creators of every genre — Just finished an incredible project and want to share it with the world?
Send us your reels and we may use your footage in our show reel or demo!*
For a copy of our release and Avid’s mailing address, go to www.avid.com/footage.
*Note: Avid cannot guarantee the use of materials submitted.
Avid Media Composer What’s New Part Number 0130-30224-01 September 2009
66
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