Paired Sensor(s) / Gateway Demonstration using

Paired Sensor(s) / Gateway Demonstration using
Paired Sensor(s) / Gateway Demonstration using
Anaren Integrated Radio Modules with Texas
Instruments SimpliciTI Network Protocol
Anaren Application Note: ANA-010-1
Revised / Updated: December 12, 2011
Introduction
The Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration shows several different facets of low-power wireless
communications in a single configurable demo package using very low-cost development kits. The basis
for this demo is very simple: A small number (1-3) of low-power, battery-operated sensors transmit their
sensor data to an always-on receiver in a star topology network, using a pairing method that allows
several of these star networks to operate within the same radio range while minimizing their interference
with one another, and assuring that a single network’s receiver listens only to its paired transmitters.
The demonstration uses Texas Instruments SimpliciTI wireless protocol, along with TI’s low-cost
development kits using TI’s MSP-430 microcontrollers, and Anaren’s target boards equipped with Anaren
Integrated Radio (AIR) modules based on TI’s low-power CC1101 and CC2500 radios. The TI MSP-430
microcontroller used in the demo may be one of TI’s new Value Line products (i.e. very low cost) as the
demonstration requires only 16 KB Flash and 512B RAM to operate. The AIR module used can have
either an embedded PCB antenna, or an external whip antenna. And the demonstration can operate on
either the 915 MHz or the 2.4 GHz ISM band. Different configurations of the demonstration allow the user
to view the effects of frequency, baud rate, and transmission power on range, and reliability.
This demonstration has been designed to run on either the TI EZ430-RF2500 development kit together
with Anaren’s -EZ4x AIR target boards, or on the TI MSP-EXP430G2 LaunchPad development kit in
concert with Anaren’s -LPD AIR BoosterPack target boards. Please note:
•
Each TI EZ430-RF2500 comes with a USB stick, and a battery pack – allowing for a two-node
system. The Anaren –EZ4x boards come packaged individually. So there are two –EZ4x boards
required for each TI EZ430-RF2500 kit.
•
The TI MSP-EXP430G2 LaunchPad comes with a single board, so two are needed to create a
two-node network. The Anaren –LPD BoosterPack includes two boards per package. So there
are two TI MSP-EXP430G2 boards needed for each Anaren BoosterPack.
The demonstration comes with pre-built code images for each of the configurations, so no rebuilding or
recompiling is required in order to simply run the demonstration. Should rebuilding be desired, all of the
source code is provided.
There are free, 30-day trial versions of all the development software available as well. Once the trial
period ends, some of the development software will require licensing fees. Other tool kits could be used
– since all source code is provided, but for the purposes of this demonstration, one specific set of tools is
used – namely: IAR Systems Embedded Workbench for MSP-430 (30-day trial), and Elprotronic FETPro430 Standard Edition (30-day trial), Tera Term (freeware), Texas Instruments SimpliciTI v1.1.1
(freeware).
Since the same AIR Radio Module is used on either the BoosterPack target board, or on the EZ4x Target
Board, the different boards can be used together without issue – i.e. a BoosterPack target board receiver
can communicate with an EZ4x transmitter and vice versa.
Since this is a demonstration, the sensor data is not actually collected from a sensor. But there are two
ways to source the data for the demo. The sensor node (aka transmitter) can source its own data, or it
can receive it as input via UART. In addition, the gateway node (aka receiver) can send the sensor data
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received out its UART port, or it can send summary diagnostic information out the UART port. The TI
development kits (both EZ430 and LaunchPad) have built in USB COM port capability. So when the
gateway / receiver dev kit is plugged into a PC, this received data can easily be displayed using a
terminal emulator program (Tera Term).
Each gateway / receiver node, together with its one to n sensor / transmitter nodes form a single star
network (in the 1-1 case it is actually a point-to-point topology). The Star Network is formed through a
“pairing” process that is described below in more detail. When a gateway / receiver node pairs with a
sensor / transmitter node (or nodes), the pairing remains in force, even after power cycling. Nodes can
be “re-paired” – but they remain paired permanently otherwise.
The nodes in a paired star network communicate with each other on a single radio channel within the
band chosen (either 915 MHz or 2.4 GHz). Each star network formed (i.e. each gateway / receiver)
selects a random channel from a pre-selected set of 60 available channels. Through this technique, it is
highly unlikely that two star networks would operate on the same frequency channel. Thereby allowing
several independent star networks to be formed in a single radio range (e.g. room) without interfering with
one another at all.
In order to keep this demonstration very simple, allowing TI’s Value Line MSP-430’s to operate it, this
demonstration does not use Direct Sequenced Spread Spectrum (DSSS), Frequency Hopping Spread
Spectrum (FHSS), or Frequency Agility. Once paired the star network operates on a single channel.
Additionally, the demonstration uses the maximum transmission power for the band allowed by the FCC
for a single-channel transmission – i.e. 10 dBm for 915 MHz and 0 dBm for 2.4 GHz.
Configurations
There are several different configurations all supported by this demo.
1. The demo supports two different development kit hardware configurations. And of course since
the AIR modules used are identical, the different development kits can communicate with each
other.
a. TI EZ430-RF2500 development kits can be used in conjunction with Anaren –EZ4x target
boards
b.
TI MSP-EXP430G2 LaunchPad development kits can be used in conjunction with
Anaren –LPD BoosterPack target boards.
2. 915 MHz or 2.4 GHz ISM bands can be used. This demonstrates the trade-off between worldwide use and range for the two different bands. The 2.4 GHz band is an unlicensed ISM band
available worldwide, but it has significantly reduced range capabilities compared to 915 MHz.
Conversely, the 915 MHz band is available primarily in North America, but with greatly increased
range.
3. The over-the-air transmission rate can be either 250 Kb/s or 38.4 Kb/s. This demonstrates the
effect of baud rate on the trade-off between range and power consumption. 250Kb/s is the
shortest range and lowest power consumption.
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4. The transmitter can either create its own “sensor data” – which it will do by creating a 12-byte
payload at a 16 Hz rate – or it can receive its “sensor data” on its UART port.
a. In 16 Hz “simulated” mode, the transmitter creates its own data – and does not use the
UART for input at all.
b. In UART input mode, the transmitter’s only requirements on UART input is that the
payload is always 12 bytes, and that there is a gap of at least 5 ms between payloads.
c.
There is also a UARTgen hex file if a third unit is being used to generate the 12-byte
payloads. In this configuration there is an MSP-430 that generates the 12-byte payload
and transmits it over UART to the “UART_TX” node that receives it on UART and then
transmits the packet over the air to the RX unit.
d. In either case, the transmitter sleeps between sensor data reception in order to reduce
power consumption. In the low-power sleep mode, the transmitter consumes only about
2 uA.
5. The receiver can either send each 12-byte payload to its UART, or it can present summary
diagnostic information. In the summary mode, it presents information with every 64 packets
received – rather than with every reception. The receiver also uses a very simple error checking
scheme (for the demonstration only) and can signal when a packet is missed – in summary
mode.
During manufacturing, all the receivers are identically programmed, and so are all the transmitters. Each
receiver / transmitter is programmed with a unique serial number that is later used as address identifier in
the pairing process. When originally programmed, the RX and TX units are unpaired -- and will go to
"deep sleep" when powered on until they are paired.
A simultaneous button push on the RX and TX units will cause them to pair with one another, select a
random channel to use for communication, and then to begin to transmit / receive. Status information can
be retrieved from the receiver's UART (serial settings: 9600,8N1). Once paired and transmitting, the RX
unit will toggle its red LED every time a packet is received; the blink rate is 1/2 the packet received rate -i.e. 8Hz for one TX paired with one RX.
The demo can operate with 1-n transmitters paired with a single receiver. And by default, it is shipped
built for a maximum of two transmitters paired with the one receiver. A transmitter can be paired only with
one receiver.
The demo is supplied with the ability to operate at two different bit rates for transmission / reception: 250
Kbaud and 38.4 Kbaud. This can be used to show the effects of bit-rate on range and power
consumption. The higher 250 Kbaud bit rate will consume about ¼ the power of the 38.4 Kbaud version.
But in exchange, its range is significantly reduced.
Operating in the 2.4 GHz band, the demo transmits at 0 dBm (1mW) transmit power. In the 915 MHz
band, the demo transmits at 10 dBm (10mW). This will maximize range within the FCC regulated power
settings.
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Transmitter Operation:
The transmitter basically has three major states:
1. Deep Sleep -- stays this way until pairing is completed (LPM4).
2. Transmitting – sleeps (MSP-430 in LPM3, AIR module in SLEEP mode) until woken up by either
the 16 Hz timer (simulated mode), or until a 12-byte packet has been received via the UART.
The TX then transmits the 12-byte packet at 0dBm (if 2.4 GHz) or 10dBm (if 915 MHz) transmit
power and 38.4 or 250 Kb/s baud rate.
3. Pairing -- upon button push, looks for an RX unit also in pairing mode, and attempts to complete a
pairing. If the TX fails or times out, it will either revert to Deep Sleep or Transmitting mode (as it
was before pairing).
The Transmitter is in deep sleep until paired. Pushing the button on the transmitter causes it to look for a
RX unit to pair with; it will turn on the red LED and blink the green LED while looking. If it does not find an
RX unit within approximately 5 seconds, it will go back to its prior status (either Deep Sleep or
Transmitting). Once paired with an RX unit, the TX will transmit 12-byte packets at 16Hz continuously. It
engages a routine called getData to retrieve the 12-byte message to send. In the demo, the data is an
ASCII sequence.
Receiver Operation:
The receiver also had three major states:
1. Deep Sleep -- stays this way until pairing is completed (LPM4).
2. Receiving -- continuously listens for packets, receives and toggles the red LED, and checks and
prints status out the UART when received (in summary mode), or outputs the 12-byte packet
each time (in UART mode).
3. Pairing -- upon button push, looks for a TX unit also in Pairing mode, and attempts to complete a
pairing. If the RX fails or times out, it will revert to either Deep Sleep or Receiving mode (as it
was before pairing).
The receiver is in deep sleep until paired. Pushing the button on the receiver causes it to look for a TX
unit to pair with -- it will turn on the red LED and blink the green LED while looking. If it does not find a TX
unit within approximately 5 seconds, it will go back to its prior state (either Deep Sleep or Receiving).
Once paired, it will receive 12-byte packets and output occasional status information via the UART port.
It engages a routine called putData to move the 12-byte message and status information out the UART.
Number of Transmitters Paired with a Single Receiver:
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The receiver will pair with and receive messages from up to NUM_CONNECTIONS transmitters. Note
that due to memory limitations on the MSP-430 processor, the maximum value for NUM_CONNECTIONS
is 14 for the EZ430-based demo, and 2 for the LaunchPad-based demo.
NUM_CONNECTIONS is set in the smpl_config.dat file. Because of the hierarchy created for this demo,
there are two separate smpl_config.dat files – one for the EZ4x version, and one for the LaunchPadbased version. They are located in the following two folders. Both have NUM_CONNECTIONS set to 2
by default.
•
L\Projects\Examples\eZ430RF\PairingDemo\IAR\Configuration\End_Device folder
•
L\Projects\Examples\BoosterPack\PairingDemo\IAR\Configuration\End_Device folder
rd
The default is NUM_CONNECTIONS=2. Upon the NUM_CONNECTIONS+1’th connection (i.e. 3 by
default), the receiver will un-pair from the least-recently paired partner (in a FIFO fashion). For example,
for NUM_CONNECTIONS=2:
1. RX unit 0 Pairs with TX unit 1 – forming its first pair on a new random channel.
2. RX unit 0 pairs with TX unit 2 – forming its second pair on the same channel.
3. RX unit 0 pairs with TX unit 3 – exceeding NUM_CONNECTIONS, un-pairing from units 1, and
forming a pair with units 2 and 3 on the same channel.
The receiver will ignore pairing requests from a transmitter with which it is already paired. For example,
1. RX unit 0 pairs with TX unit 1 – forming the first pair on a new random channel
2. RX unit 0 pairs with TX unit 2 – forming the second pair on the same channel.
3. RX unit 0 pairs with TX unit 2 (again) – having no effect.
A long button push on the receiver unit (greater than about 5 seconds) will cause the receiver to un-pair
from all of its partners (a RESET operation), and move to LPM4 factory reset state. Hence, upon the next
pairing, it will choose a new random channel to use. A long button push on the transmitter unit will do the
same – i.e. unpair and move to LPM4.
Paired Communications:
Two simple techniques are used to maximize the bandwidth available to an RX / TX pair, and to minimize
interference from other pairs that are within radio range. First, the receiver will only listen to messages
received from its paired transmitter(s). If there are multiple pairs within radio range, one pair's TX will not
affect another pair's RX. Second, each RX / TX pair randomly selects a channel for operation from a list
of available channels, so it is likely that two pairs will be on two different channels within the 2.4 GHz
band.
If two pairs are on the same channel, and within radio range, then there is some probability of packet
collision. But it is minimized by the short transmission periods and long sleep periods.
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The term pair is used here because for a multiple TX, single RX situation, all the TX’s and the RX share a
single frequency channel, and are “paired”. With two TX’s on a single channel, the probability of packet
collisions and hence packet loss is increased.
Random Channel Selection
The random channel numbers are selected from an array of pre-selected channel numbers. The receiver
module selects a channel randomly from the channel numbers below. In addition, the receiver keeps
track of previously selected channels, and will not repeat a channel selection until all the channels have
been used. Further, the receiver only selects a new channel upon initial pairing – i.e. when fresh from
factory, or after a long-button-push RESET operation.
The array of channels to select randomly from (mrfiLogicalChanTable) is located in the file
•
L\Components\mrfi\radios\common\mrfi_f1f2.c
•
The following are the settings for the 2.4 GHz version of the demonstration. There are 60
channels in total. In the demonstration, the RX unit outputs the index into the
mrfiLogicalChanTable array – not the actual channel number. The actual channel number can be
deduced from the table below. Appendix I shows the complete listing of 2.4 GHz channels.
static const uint8_t mrfiLogicalChanTable[] =
{
SMARTRF_SETTING_CHANNR, // = 3 from smartRF.h file
6, 9, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 38, 41,
44, 47, 57, 60, 63, 70, 73, 76, 86, 89,
92, 101,104,107,110,113,118,121,124,127,
134,140,143,150,153,156,166,169,172,175,
182,185,188,191,194,200,203,206,209,212,
215,218,225,228,231,234,237,242,245,
};
•
The following are the settings for the 915 MHz version of the demonstration. There are 60
channels in total. In the demonstration, the RX unit outputs the index into the
mrfiLogicalChanTable array – not the actual channel number. The actual channel number can be
deduced from the table below. Appendix II shows the complete listing of 915 MHz channels.
static const uint8_t mrfiLogicalChanTable[] =
{
SMARTRF_SETTING_CHANNR, // = 3 from smartRF.h file
7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 39, 43,
47, 51, 55, 59, 63, 67, 70, 73, 77, 81,
87, 91, 95, 99, 103, 107, 111, 115, 119, 123,
127, 131, 135, 139, 143, 147, 151, 155, 159, 163,
167, 171, 175, 179, 183, 187, 191, 195, 199, 203,
209, 213, 217, 221, 225, 229, 233, 237, 241,
};
Timer A Usage
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The demo uses MSP-430 Timer A driven off the ACLK – which is driven by the VLO (approx 12 KHz
oscillator) -- for two purposes: the 16 Hz Wakeup, and the 5 Second Pairing Timeout. The 16 Hz is an
arbitrary number used in this demo, so one change that the user may wish to make is to change the
sample rate from 16 Hz to some other value.
In order to change the sample rate to a value other than 16 Hz, there are four files that each need minor
changes:
1. In the files, L\Components\bsp\boards\Anaren-EZ4x\bsp_board.c and
L\Components\bsp\boards\Anaren-BP\bsp_board.c, in the BSP_InitBoard function, the line that
reads: “TACCR0 = 620;” needs to be changed to the new timer value corresponding to the time
desired. This value may need to be heuristically determined. Also note that the VLO clock is not
completely accurate, so there will be some variation between MSP-430 chips.
2. In the file L\Projects\Examples\Applications\genericAppFunctions.c, in the interrupt service
routine (ISR) function Timer_A, the line reading: “TACCR0 += 620;” needs to be changed to the
same new timer value as in step 1 above.
3. Also, in the same ISR as in step 2 above, the line that reads: “if (++fiveSecondCnt >= 64)” must
be changed to a multiple of the Hz rate that equals about 5 seconds (the pairing timeout time).
For example, as shown above, a 16 Hz rate will result in a pairing timeout after 4 seconds (64/16
Hz).
With these four changes, the demo should now operate with the new timing. For example, for a 1 Hz
rate, a TACCR0 value of 10000, and a fiveSecondCnt value of 5 should work well. Of course all the
needed configurations will need to be rebuilt and new .hex files created.
State Storage
The demo stores state information in the INFO Flash segment B – and potentially also in the C and D
segments. This is the mechanism that allows pairing to be permanent. It also enables previously paired
devices to reestablish their connections without having to go through the pairing and linking stages each
time power is cycled.
The amount of Info Flash used is 32 + 11 * NUM_CONNECTIONS. Each Info Flash Segment is 64 bytes
long. So for example with NUM_CONNECTIONS = 2, the demo uses 54 Flash locations – which fits
entirely in Info Segment B (segments C and D are unused by the demo). For NUM_CONNECTIONS = 8,
the demo uses 120 bytes (i.e. Info segments B and C) – so segment D is unused by the demo. And for
NUM_CONNECTIONS = 14, the demo uses 186 bytes (i.e. Info Flash segments B, C and D).
Note that these three segments (INFO B and dependent upon NUM_CONNECTIONS, potentially
segments C and D) are completely erased each time a pairing is done – and then rewritten. As such, the
user should not use these segments for any other data – as such data will be lost if a pairing sequence is
executed. Conversely, if segments C and / or D are unused by the demo (based on
NUM_CONNECTIONS), they are available for use by the user.
The following outline shows the major elements stored in the Info Flash.
INFO FLASH SEGMENT B (addresses 0x10B0 – 0x10BF)
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Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
•
0x10B0 - 0x10B3 is the device’s serial number.
•
0x10B4 is the channel index -- not the actual channel number, but rather the index into the array
of channels.
•
0x10B5 is the number of partner TX's.
•
0x10B6 is the next available slot for partner information (0..NUM_CONNECTIONS-1).
0x10B8 – 0x10BF is a 64-bit bit-field with bits 0..59 representing the 60 channels used (0=unused,
1=Used in prior random selection). Note that channel index 0 is the pairing channel – and thus is always
marked as used.
INFO FLASH SEGMENT Rest of B, C and D (addresses 0x10AF – 0x1000)
This is where up to fourteen partners' info is be stored. The information is stored from high address to
low. Notable addresses within this range:
•
0x10AA - 11*N – Partner #N state: 0 = Not Connected, 2 = Connected
•
(0x10A8-11*N) – (0x10A5-11*N) is the Partner #N four-byte serial number
Power Consumption / Timing:
When unpaired, the RX and TX units are in LPM4 with the radio in Sleep Mode, and current consumption
is about two microamperes. Thus it is reasonable that transmitter and receiver units could be shipped
with batteries installed, and still have a very long shelf life with only a few microamperes of drain.
Receiver Power Cycle:
Once paired, the receiver is in constant receive mode – drawing approximately 23mA fairly continuously –
with some variation due to LED blinking. The scope trace below was taken using a 4.3ohm resistor. So
the approximate 100mv reading corresponds to the 23mA average value.
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Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 1. Receiver Power Consumption
Transmitter Power Cycle:
Transmitter power consumption is affected by several factors, with the transmit power setting and the
baud rate having the most significant effect. As a result, there are four different power consumption
settings in this demo.
1. 915 MHz, 10 dBm Transmit Power, 38 Kb/s
2. 915 MHz, 10 dBm Transmit Power, 250 Kb/s
3. 2.4 GHz, 0 dBm Transmit Power, 38 Kb/s
4. 2.4 GHz, 0 dBm Transmit Power, 250 Kb/s
The longest possible range and highest power consumption for this demo would be achieved in
configuration 1, with the shortest possible range, and lowest power consumption achieved in
configuration 4. See the table below for more details.
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Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Based on the nature of RF transmissions, raising the baud rate raises the noise floor. This in turn
reduces receiver sensitivity, thereby reducing link budget, and ultimately reducing range. Such
engineering trade-offs and their resulting configurations are to be based on the needs of a specific
application.
We have two different transmission baud rates for this demonstration. The lowest power consumption is
achieved by transmitting at 250Kbaud. But this is also the lowest range (about 50 ft at 2.4 GHz). As a
comparison, transmitting at 38.4Kbaud increases the range significantly (to about 150 ft at 2.4 GHz), but it
quadruples the power consumption – by extending the transmission time from approximately 1.2 to 7.3
ms. See the chart and analysis below for more detail.
A complete power cycle for the transmitter is composed of the following steps:
1. Sleep: Either 59.5 ms @ 250 Kb/s or 53.5 ms @ 38.4 Kb/s – drawing < 5 uA.
2. Radio Wake Up: About 0.9 ms – drawing 4.5 mA.
3. Radio Calibration: About 0.8 ms – drawing 11 mA.
4. Listen-before-Talk: About 0.2 ms – drawing 21 mA.
5. Transmit: Either 1.2 ms @ 250 Kb/s or 7.3 ms @ 38.4 Kb/s – drawing 24 mA at 0 dBm / 2.4 GHz
or 37 mA at 10 dBm / 915 MHz.
So total power consumption for a 62.5ms cycle is approximately 46 micro-Ampere seconds (at 250Kb) or
190 uA-s( at 38.4Kb). See the diagrams below for more detail.
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Figure 2. Oscilloscope trace for 250Kb/s 2.4 GHz version
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Figure 3. Oscilloscope trace for 38.4Kbaud 2.4 GHz version
Notes on potential power savings in the transmitter:
1. The demo setup does a calibration on every transmission – for maximum robustness. However
these calibrations could be done every fifth transmission, eliminating about 7uAs per cycle
consumption.
2. The current setup will execute a “Listen before Talk” step on each transmission for maximum
robustness. However, this could be eliminated to save 4.3uAs per cycle.
For increased range, running the baud rate at 38.4Kbaud will significantly increase the range – while
increasing the power consumption. The following table compares the power consumption of the two
modes. Note that the Wake Up, Calibrate, and Listen phases are identical for the two baud rates and two
power settings. Also note that in the table below we show some approximate operation times for a
CR2032 battery operation.
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Current Consumption for Anaren Pairing Demo
Current
Usage per
Cycle
(mAh)
1.3E-06
2.5E-06
1.1E-06
Time
(ms)
0.9
0.8
0.2
Current
(mA)
5.1
11.2
19.1
Current
Usage per
Cycle (uAs)
4.6
8.9
3.8
1.2
7.3
1.2
7.3
24.0
24.0
37.0
37.0
28.8
175.2
44.4
270.1
8.0E-06
4.9E-05
1.2E-05
7.5E-05
Sleep at 38.4 Kb/s
Sleep at 250 Kb/s
53.3
59.4
5.0E-03
5.0E-03
0.3
0.3
7.4E-08
8.3E-08
Total at 0dBm, 250 Kb/s
Total at 0dBm, 38.4 Kb/s
Total at 10dBm, 250 Kb/s
Total at 10dBm, 38.4 Kb/s
62.5
46.4
192.8
62.0
287.7
1.3E-05
5.4E-05
1.7E-05
8.0E-05
Cycles per Second
CR2032 Capacity (mAh)
16
240
Wake Up
Calibrate
Listen
Transmit at 0dBm, 250 Kb/s
Transmit at 0dBm, 38.4 Kb/s
Transmit at 10dBm, 250 Kb/s
Transmit at 10dBm, 38.4 Kb/s
ANA-010-1 Page 14
CR2032
Battery
Life (hrs)
323
78
242
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Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Setting up the demonstration:
Notes on the instructions below. For this document, we are prescribing a specific way to debug, serialize,
program, and monitor the demo. These are not the only tools available. They are simply the tools that
we have used.
For example, we used Tera Term to monitor the COM port, however there is no reason that Hyperterm, or
Minicom, or any other terminal emulator could not be used.
Download the Needed Software:
Download and install the IAR Embedded Workbench (30-day Evaluation Edition).
http://www.iar.com/website1/1.0.1.0/675/1/
Note that as a side-effect of loading the IAR Embedded Workbench, you will also load the MSP-430
Virtual COM Port (VCP) drivers. If you choose not to load IAR, you will still need to load the MSP-430
VCP software to make the demo operational. The VCP drivers can be found at:
http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/MSP430_JTAG_Interface_USB_Driver. You will need to
download and install the low-level driver first, and then the high-level driver.
Download and install the Elprotronic FET-Pro430 Standard Edition.
http://www.elprotronic.com/download.html
Download and install the Tera Term program.
http://sourceforge.jp/projects/ttssh2/downloads/53081/teraterm-4.71.exe/
Download and install the TI SimpliciTI for IAR package. http://www.ti.com/tool/simpliciti
Download the Anaren Pairing Demo from the Anaren website.
http://www.anaren.com/content/File/AIR/AIRapplicationassist.cfm
Acquire the Needed Hardware:
You will need one of the two following hardware combinations. This matches the Anaren target board
with the TI MSP-430 development kit. Each of the below choices will have enough hardware for two
nodes – e.g. a RX and a TX. Of course, one can acquire more pairs to create a bigger demonstration as
desired. Plus, an EZ430-based system can communicate with a LaunchPad-based system. But the
Anaren target boards are specific to the development kit – so EZ4x target boards go with EZ430, and
BoosterPack target boards go with LaunchPad.
1. EZ430-based System
a. Texas Instruments EZ430-RF2500 development kit. http://www.ti.com/tool/EZ430RF2500. You will need at least one of these kits – as each kit comes with enough
hardware for a receiver and a transmitter node.
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Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
b. Anaren AxxxxRxxA-EZ4x target boards. Can be A1101R09A for 915 MHz or
A2500R24A for 2.4GHz. Can be either –EZ4A or –EZ4E, but one of each would be ideal.
http://components.arrow.com/part/search/A1101R09A-EZ4 or
http://components.arrow.com/part/search/A2500R24A-EZ4
2. LaunchPad-based System
a. You will need at least two Texas Instruments MSP-EXP430G2 LaunchPad development
kits – as each only comes with one node. http://www.ti.com/tool/msp-exp430g2
b. Anaren A1101R09A-LPD or A2500R24A-LPD BoosterPack target boards.
http://www.anaren.com/content/File/AIR/430BOOSTAIR.cfm
The demo comes with all source code and with pre-built code images.
Serialize and Program the MSP-430 Chips:
The program and serial number need to be loaded into the Flash memory on the MSP-430 chips. For the
EZ430-based system, the MSP-430 resides on the Anaren –EZ4x target board. For the LaunchPad
system, the MSP-430 generally resides on the LaunchPad board – although it is also possible to put it on
the BoosterPack target board as well.
For EZ430-based system:
•
On the two Anaren EZ4x target boards, (if they are not already labeled) label one A (for Access
Point or RX) and one E (for End Point or TX); please note that the labeling can be done with a
marker on the back of the target boards.
•
Remove the plastic housing entirely from the EZ430-RF2500 USB stick.
•
Plug the End Point / TX target board into the USB stick.
•
Plug the EZ430-RF2500 USB stick into the PC.
For the LaunchPad-based system:
•
On the two LaunchPad boards, label one A (for Access Point or RX) and one E (for End Point or
TX).
•
Perform the LaunchPad modifications – as outlined in Appendix II. This will set jumpers
appropriately, load the MSP-430 into the board.
•
Plug the USB cable (supplied with LaunchPad) into the LaunchPad / BoosterPack target board
combo labeled End Point / TX, and then into the PC.
Determine the COM port that the TI development kit is connected to (e.g. COM 11) -- using Device
Manager. See the picture below. The COM port will be listed as MP430 Application UART.
ANA-010-1 Page 16
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 4. Device Manager showing MSP430 Com Port
Set up serialization on the Elprotronic FET-Pro430 Standard Edition software. You can choose different
formats as long as the “Used Size” shown is 4-bytes. The important item here is that each unit (RX or
TX) has a unique serial number programmed into Info Flash B addresses 0x10B0 – 0x10B3. See the
picture below for the proper settings.
ANA-010-1 Page 17
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 5. Elprotronic Serialization Setup
Set up the Elprotronic FET-Pro430 programmer – making sure that the MSP430F2274 is selected as the
processor for EZ430, or that MSP430G2553 is selected as the processor for LaunchPad. Verify that
Serialization is set up by checking the Next SN value. Choose Setup – Connection / Device Reset on the
menu to verify that the proper USB COM port is selected (lower left below).
ANA-010-1 Page 18
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 6. Programming Setup
Programming the MSP-430 Microcontrollers
This demonstration comes pre-built with several different configurations. This guide will show the
complete path through one of the configurations, and it offers notes about how to use the other
configurations.
The different configurations can be summarized based on seven different choices for programming the
MSP-430 microcontrollers that will be used in this demonstration.
1. Receiver vs. Transmitter. Note that in this usage, receiver and transmitter refer to the over-the-air
component of the demo – e.g. the transmitter transmits over the air, and the receiver receives
ANA-010-1 Page 19
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
over-the air. The executable .hex file names begin with RX for the receivers, and TX for the
transmitters.
2. Frequency: 915 MHz vs. 2.4 GHz. The projects are in different sub-folders of the demo that
begin with A1101R09A- for 915 MHz and A2500R24A- for 2.4 GHz. Plus, the file name will have
either 915 or 2400 in the file name, respectively.
3. Development Kit: TI LaunchPad with MSP430G2553 microcontroller vs. TI EZ430-RF2500 with
MSP430F2274 microcontroller. The projects are in different sub-folders of the demo that end
with –BB for the LaunchPad BoosterPack target board, and –EZ4x for the EZ430-RF2500 target
board. Plus, the executable .hex file will have either g2553 or f2274 in the file name, respectively.
4. 38 Kb/s vs. 250 Kb/s – a trade-off of range vs. power consumption. The .hex file with the
executable will have either 38kb or 250kb in the file name.
5. For the transmitter, the sensor data can be either self-generated (12 bytes every 62.5 ms) on the
transmitter itself – dubbed simulated mode, or it can be received by the transmitter over its UART
(UCA0RXD) interface – dubbed UART input mode. The executable .hex file will have UART in
the file name for UART input mode – blank otherwise.
6. For the receiver, the receiver can either output every 12-byte packet received out its UART
(UCA0TXD) port – dubbed UART output mode, or it can output only summary information every
64 received packets – dubbed summary mode. The executable .hex file will have UART in its file
name for UART output mode – blank otherwise.
7. For UART Input Mode, there is a simple program supplied that will generate the 12-byte packets
on a 16 Hz cycle, and output them from its UCA0TXD port. This executable .hex file is named
UARTGen.hex. Thus, a target board running UARTGen, can connect its UCA0TXD to the
TX_UART board’s UCA0RXD – which will then transmit over the air to an RX_UART board –
which will in turn transmit the received packet information on its UCA0TXD pin.
For the instructions below, we have chosen 2.4 GHz, 38Kb/s and Simulated mode. The file name
changes for the other modes are as follows.
•
TX_2400_38kb_f2274.hex – Transmitter, Simulated Mode, 38Kb/s, EZ4x Board
•
TX_UART_2400_38kb_f2274.hex – Transmitter, UART Mode, 38Kb/s, EZ4x Board
•
UARTGen_2400.hex – 16 Hz Sensor Data created, and transmitted out the UART.
•
Substitute RX for TX to get the Receiver vs. Transmitter.
•
Substitute 250kb for 38kb to get the 250 Kb/s version.
•
Substitute g2553 for f2774 to get the LaunchPad BoosterPack target board MSP-430G2553
version.
•
Substitute 900 for 2400 for the 915 MHz version.
ANA-010-1 Page 20
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Programming the End Point / TX Node:
Using the Open Code File Button, select the code file for download (note either EZ430 or BoosterPack
target board below):
•
L\Projects\Examples\eZ430RF\PairingDemo\IAR\firmware\TX_2400_38kb_f2274.hex
•
L\Projects\Examples\BoosterPack\PairingDemo\IAR\firmware\TX_2400_38kb_g2553.hex
Once ready push the AUTO PROG button, which will cause the programming and verification to run.
Upon completion, you should get a green PASS in the Status box.
Once passed, push the RESET button to reset the target board.
Exit Elprotronic FET-Pro430.
Remove the USB stick or LaunchPad from the PC. For the EZ430, unplug the EZ4x target board from
the USB stick, and plug it into the battery pack.
Programming the Access Point / RX Node:
For EZ430, plug the Access Point, RX Target Board into the USB stick, and the USB stick into the PC.
For LaunchPad, plug the LaunchPad / BoosterPack target board combo labeled A for Access Point / RX
into the PC using the USB cable supplied.
Restart Elprotronic FET-Pro430.
Do Setup – Connection / Device Reset, and verify that it is connected to the appropriate serial port
(different than the TX combo).
Using the Open Code File Button, select the code file for download:
•
L\Projects\Examples\eZ430RF\PairingDemo\IAR\firmware\RX_2400_38kb_f2274.hex
•
L\Projects\Examples\BoosterPack\PairingDemo\IAR\firmware\RX_2400_38kb_g2553.hex
Once ready push the AUTO PROG button, which will cause the programming and verification to run.
Upon completion, you should get a green PASS in the Status box.
Once passed, push the RESET button to reset the target board.
The two target boards are now programmed and running in LPM4 awaiting pairing.
Configure the Hardware Connections
If you wish to run the transmitter in UART mode, then you will need to connect the UART UCA0RXD and
GND lines. On the EZ4x boards, this is Port 3.5. See the Port Mappings table below for the rest of the
port mappings.
ANA-010-1 Page 21
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
If you wish to also use the UARTGen.hex file to create the sensor data and send over UART to the TX
module, then you can use two boards, and run the UCA0TXD signal on the UARTGen module to the
UCA0RXD signal on the TX_UART_... module. Plus, you should run a GND on the UARTGen module to
a GND on the TX_UART_... module – as shown below for the EZ4x boards.
For the RX module, by using either the EZ430-RF2500 USB Stick, or the LaunchPad, the MSP-430’s
UCA0 UART is connected via a USB Virtual COM Port (VCP) to the PC. If you prefer to connect the
UART to something else, you will need then to connect the MSP-430’s UCA0TXD pin.
Run the Demonstration
Run a Terminal Emulation program (like Tera Term) to connect to the COM port being used by the
Access Point / RX at 9600 baud, no parity, one stop bit, no flow control (9600, 8N1). Remember that for
the LaunchPad-based approach, there will be two COM ports (one for TX and one for RX). It is important
to connect the Terminal Emulation to the RX port.
ANA-010-1 Page 22
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 7. Tera Term Serial Port Setup
Now the Access Point / RX unit is connected to the terminal emulator program for display on the PC.
For the EZ430, the End-point / TX unit is plugged into the battery pack – with the power jumper installed
on JP1.
For the LaunchPad, the LaunchPad / BoosterPack target board combo is plugged into another serial port
on the PC – using the USB for power only in this case.
Now the boards are ready to pair. The boards go into a pairing mode for about three seconds on a button
push. Once paired, the boards remain paired permanently, or until “re-paired”. During pairing, a random
channel is selected for permanent communication use by the pair.
At approximately the same time, push and release the button on both the RX and TX Target Boards. For
EZ430, the button is located on the EZ4x target board. For LaunchPad, the button is labeled S2 and is in
the corner of the LaunchPad board in line with the J1 connector.
ANA-010-1 Page 23
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
During pairing you should observe the following:
•
The red LED on both boards should light for a few seconds – indicating pairing operations.
•
There may also be some green LED blinking observed as part of the pairing process.
After a few seconds, once pairing completes you should observe the following:
•
On the TX board, all LEDs should turn off.
•
On the RX board, you should see the red LED blinking at an 8Hz rate (16 Hz transmission rate
toggles LED – so an observed 8Hz blink is seen).
•
On the RX board, you may also observe an occasional green LED blink – indicating a packet
loss.
If after pairing you do not see the 8Hz red LED blinking on the RX board, it means that the pairing was
not successful. Please retry the pairing steps above.
Because each RF environment is different, there may be interference on a selected channel causing
packet loss. If after pairing there is excessive green blinking on the RX board, try re-pairing the TX/RX
again to select a new random channel.
Once paired and transmitting, the COM port should get a printout about once every 4 seconds (every 64
messages received), plus once each time an error (missed packet) is detected. The printout will look like
the image below and in general, you should see very few errors. (For demonstration’s sake, we have
ANA-010-1 Page 24
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
forced some errors so that you can see what they look like in the printout.)
Figure 8. Typical COM port output from RX
The information in the COM port printout is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ch 11 -- Selected 0x11 of the random channels -- this is not the frequency, just a table index.
Rx 0x05 -- the last byte of the receiver’s four-byte serial number.
TX 0x06 -- the last byte of the transmitter’s four-byte serial number.
MSG -- the 12-byte message. Note that in this demo it is always printable ascii. Also note
that in the absence of errors, the data should remain the same (as there are 64 different
messages sent, and the printout is once every 64 messages – so it will wrap around).
Tot – the next-to-last byte of the total messages received count – i.e. MsgCount/256 – note
that this will wrap around about every 1.1 hours (assuming 16 Hz => wraps every 4096
seconds).
Err -- the total number of errors detected. An error is defined as four or more consecutive
packet losses. Note that losing 16 consecutive packets constitutes a single error in this
count. Also note that pairing and startup will result in errors, but once operational, the
number should hold steady.
Miss -- the number of consecutive packets that were lost between the currently received
packet and the prior received packet. This may or may not count in Err – depending on
whether the count was >=4, so losing three consecutive packets will show Miss 03, but will
add 0 to Err. Missing 8 consecutive packets will show as 8 and add 1 to Err. Also note that
because this is a single byte, it will wrap around and alias every 256, so losing 8 and losing
264 packets will both show a loss of 8.
Additional Information:
ANA-010-1 Page 25
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
The main source files in the demonstration are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Transmitter: L\Projects\Examples\Applications\Tx_main.c
Receiver: L\Projects\Examples\Applications\Rx_main.c
Support Functions: L\Projects\Examples\Applications\genericAppFunctions.c and .h
Channel Number Tables: L\Components\mrfi\radios\common\mrfi_f1f2.c
Radio Register Files:
a. L\Components\mrfi\smartrf\CC1101\smartrf_CC1101.h
b. L\Components\mrfi\smartrf\CC2500\smartrf_CC2500.h
6. BSP Board Definitions:
a. L\Components\bsp\boards\Anaren-BP\...
b. L\Components\bsp\boards\Anaren-EZ4x\...
The MSP-430 uses one port for input -- the push button, the UCB0 SPI port for communication with the
Anaren module, two LEDs (if present), and the UCA0 UART. The specific port used depends on the
hardware platform. The table below outlines the specific ports used.
Port Mappings for LaunchPad / BoosterPack target board / MSP430G2553 and EZ430RF2500 / EZ4x / MSP430F2274
EZ4X
P2.6
BoosterPack
target board
P2.6
Set by JP2
GDO2
P2.7
P1.0
Set by JP1 -- Also connected to GDO2
UCB0SIMO/MOSI
P3.1
P1.7
Set by JP4
UCB0SOMI/MISO
P3.2
P1.6
Set by JP5
UCB0CLK/SCLK
P3.3
P1.5
CSN
P3.0
P2.7
Set by JP3
LED1 (Red)
P1.0
P1.0
Also connected to GDO2
Signal Name
GDO0
BoosterPack target board Notes
Only when mated to LaunchPad. Requires
jumper change. Disconnect P1.6 to LED2
Jumper. Connect Jumper from LED2 to J1 pin
6 on BoosterPack target board.
LED2 (Green)
P1.1
P1.4
Switch
P1.2
P1.3
Marked as SW2 on LaunchPad
UCA0TXD
P3.4
P1.2
Requires Criss-Cross Jumpers to operate with
USB interface on LaunchPad.
UCA0RXD
P3.5
P1.1
Requires Criss-Cross Jumpers to operate with
USB interface on LaunchPad.
ANA-010-1 Page 26
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Power Measurement:
By installing a 4ohm (or approximate) resistor across the power jumper on the battery pack, you can use
a scope probe to monitor the current flow in the transmitter or receiver (divide voltage by the resistor
value to get current). Here is an example trace showing the transmitter in low-power sleep mode most of
the time with occasional packet transmissions; in this case, the resistor value was 4.3 ohms. So the peak
current is about 24 mA.
Figure 9. Multiple Cycles showing sleep vs. transmit time
Conclusion:
This demo can be used as a starting point for real applications. Care has been taken to minimize power
consumption on the transmit side by assuming that the receiver is powered on and always listening. In
addition, power consumption is minimized by doing un-acknowledged transmissions -- on the assumption
that missing a single reading is not critical. The goal was to be generally useful, but not specific to any
one application.
Areas that likely will need customization for specific applications:
ANA-010-1 Page 27
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
•
•
Transmitter:
• We have chosen a 16Hz timer interrupt as the trigger for a transmission -- so that dataflow is
readily apparent. However, a button push or other triggers can be used by modifying the MSP430 code.
• We have filled in 12-bytes of ASCII data in the message. This will need to be customized for
application data.
Receiver:
• Output is sent to the UART. But, again, this can be modified for real applications.
• There is no error correction implemented, though this function may be desired.
• The error detection mechanism that is implemented is very specific to the test data being sent. As
such, it will need to be changed for real data.
For questions or comments regarding this white paper, please do not hesitate to contact us at
Anaren -- [email protected]
ANA-010-1 Page 28
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Appendix I. 2.4 GHz Frequency Band Channels Used
Pairing
Demo
Index
Number
(0-59)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Channel
Number
(0-255)
3
6
9
15
18
21
24
27
30
38
41
44
47
57
60
63
70
73
76
86
89
92
101
104
107
110
113
118
121
124
127
134
140
143
150
153
156
166
169
ANA-010-1 Page 29
Frequency
(MHz)
2402.230
2403.160
2404.090
2405.950
2406.880
2407.810
2408.740
2409.670
2410.600
2413.080
2414.010
2414.940
2415.870
2418.970
2419.900
2420.830
2423.000
2423.930
2424.860
2427.960
2428.890
2429.820
2432.610
2433.540
2434.470
2435.400
2436.330
2437.880
2438.810
2439.740
2440.670
2442.840
2444.700
2445.630
2447.800
2448.730
2449.660
2452.760
2453.690
Avoided Conflict
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Base
Channel
(MHz)
2401.300
Channel
Spacing
(KHz)
310
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
172
175
182
185
188
191
194
200
203
206
209
212
215
218
225
228
231
234
237
242
245
0
1
2
4
5
7
8
10
14
16
17
19
20
22
23
25
26
28
29
31
32
39
40
42
43
ANA-010-1 Page 30
2454.620
2455.550
2457.720
2458.650
2459.580
2460.510
2461.440
2463.300
2464.230
2465.160
2466.090
2467.020
2467.950
2468.880
2471.050
2471.980
2472.910
2473.840
2474.770
2476.320
2477.250
2401.300
2401.610
2401.920
2402.540
2402.850
2403.470
2403.780
2404.400
2405.640
2406.260
2406.570
2407.190
2407.500
2408.120
2408.430
2409.050
2409.360
2409.980
2410.290
2410.910
2411.220
2413.390
2413.700
2414.320
2414.630
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
45
46
48
56
58
59
61
62
64
69
71
72
74
75
77
85
87
88
90
91
93
94
102
103
105
106
108
109
111
112
114
117
119
120
122
123
125
126
128
129
135
136
141
142
144
145
ANA-010-1 Page 31
2415.250
2415.560
2416.180
2418.660
2419.280
2419.590
2420.210
2420.520
2421.140
2422.690
2423.310
2423.620
2424.240
2424.550
2425.170
2427.650
2428.270
2428.580
2429.200
2429.510
2430.130
2430.440
2432.920
2433.230
2433.850
2434.160
2434.780
2435.090
2435.710
2436.020
2436.640
2437.570
2438.190
2438.500
2439.120
2439.430
2440.050
2440.360
2440.980
2441.290
2443.150
2443.460
2445.010
2445.320
2445.940
2446.250
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
151
152
154
155
157
158
167
168
170
171
173
174
176
177
183
184
186
187
189
190
192
193
198
199
201
202
204
205
207
208
210
211
213
214
216
217
219
224
226
227
229
230
232
233
235
236
ANA-010-1 Page 32
2448.110
2448.420
2449.040
2449.350
2449.970
2450.280
2453.070
2453.380
2454.000
2454.310
2454.930
2455.240
2455.860
2456.170
2458.030
2458.340
2458.960
2459.270
2459.890
2460.200
2460.820
2461.130
2462.680
2462.990
2463.610
2463.920
2464.540
2464.850
2465.470
2465.780
2466.400
2466.710
2467.330
2467.640
2468.260
2468.570
2469.190
2470.740
2471.360
2471.670
2472.290
2472.600
2473.220
2473.530
2474.150
2474.460
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
238
241
243
244
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
2475.080
2476.010
2476.630
2476.940
2477.560
2477.870
2478.180
2478.490
2478.800
2479.110
2479.420
2479.730
2480.040
78
2425.480
79
2425.790
80
2426.100
159
2450.590
160
2450.900
161
2451.210
162
2451.520
239
2475.390
240
2475.700
255
33
34
35
36
37
49
50
51
52
65
66
67
68
81
82
2480.350
2411.530
2411.840
2412.150
2412.460
2412.770
2416.490
2416.800
2417.110
2417.420
2421.450
2421.760
2422.070
2422.380
2426.410
2426.720
ANA-010-1 Page 33
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
1-Other SimpliciTI
devs
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
83
84
98
99
100
115
116
130
131
132
133
146
147
148
149
163
164
165
195
196
197
11
12
13
53
54
55
95
96
97
137
138
139
178
179
180
181
220
221
222
223
ANA-010-1 Page 34
2427.030
2427.340
2431.680
2431.990
2432.300
2436.950
2437.260
2441.600
2441.910
2442.220
2442.530
2446.560
2446.870
2447.180
2447.490
2451.830
2452.140
2452.450
2461.750
2462.060
2462.370
2404.710
2405.020
2405.330
2417.730
2418.040
2418.350
2430.750
2431.060
2431.370
2443.770
2444.080
2444.390
2456.480
2456.790
2457.100
2457.410
2469.500
2469.810
2470.120
2470.430
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
2-WiFi
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
3-Crystal Issue
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Appendix II. 915 MHz Band Channel Usage
Pairing
Demo
Index
Number
(0-59)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Channel
Number
(0-255)
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
43
47
51
55
59
63
67
70
73
77
81
87
91
95
99
103
107
111
115
119
123
127
131
135
139
143
147
151
155
ANA-010-1 Page 35
Frequency
(MHz)
902.794
903.186
903.578
903.970
904.362
904.754
905.146
905.538
905.929
906.321
906.713
907.105
907.497
907.889
908.281
908.673
909.065
909.359
909.653
910.045
910.437
911.025
911.417
911.809
912.201
912.593
912.985
913.377
913.769
914.161
914.553
914.945
915.337
915.728
916.120
916.512
916.904
917.296
917.688
Avoided Conflict
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Base
Channel
(MHz)
902.500
Channel
Spacing
(KHz)
97.99
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
159
163
167
171
175
179
183
187
191
195
199
203
209
213
217
221
225
229
233
237
241
245
0
1
2
4
5
6
8
9
10
12
13
14
16
17
18
20
21
22
24
25
26
28
29
30
ANA-010-1 Page 36
918.080
918.472
918.864
919.256
919.648
920.040
920.432
920.824
921.216
921.608
922.000
922.392
922.980
923.372
923.764
924.156
924.548
924.940
925.332
925.723
926.115
926.507
902.500
902.598
902.696
902.892
902.990
903.088
903.284
903.382
903.480
903.676
903.774
903.872
904.068
904.166
904.264
904.460
904.558
904.656
904.852
904.950
905.048
905.244
905.342
905.440
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
32
33
34
36
37
38
40
41
42
44
45
46
48
49
50
52
53
54
56
57
58
60
61
62
64
65
66
68
69
71
72
74
75
76
78
79
80
82
83
84
85
86
88
89
90
92
ANA-010-1 Page 37
905.636
905.734
905.832
906.027
906.125
906.223
906.419
906.517
906.615
906.811
906.909
907.007
907.203
907.301
907.399
907.595
907.693
907.791
907.987
908.085
908.183
908.379
908.477
908.575
908.771
908.869
908.967
909.163
909.261
909.457
909.555
909.751
909.849
909.947
910.143
910.241
910.339
910.535
910.633
910.731
910.829
910.927
911.123
911.221
911.319
911.515
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
93
94
96
97
98
100
101
102
104
105
106
108
109
110
112
113
114
116
117
118
120
121
122
124
125
126
128
129
130
132
133
134
136
137
138
140
141
142
144
145
146
148
149
150
152
153
ANA-010-1 Page 38
911.613
911.711
911.907
912.005
912.103
912.299
912.397
912.495
912.691
912.789
912.887
913.083
913.181
913.279
913.475
913.573
913.671
913.867
913.965
914.063
914.259
914.357
914.455
914.651
914.749
914.847
915.043
915.141
915.239
915.435
915.533
915.631
915.826
915.924
916.022
916.218
916.316
916.414
916.610
916.708
916.806
917.002
917.100
917.198
917.394
917.492
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
154
156
157
158
160
161
162
164
165
166
168
169
170
172
173
174
176
177
178
180
181
182
184
185
186
188
189
190
192
193
194
196
197
198
200
201
202
204
205
206
207
208
210
211
212
214
ANA-010-1 Page 39
917.590
917.786
917.884
917.982
918.178
918.276
918.374
918.570
918.668
918.766
918.962
919.060
919.158
919.354
919.452
919.550
919.746
919.844
919.942
920.138
920.236
920.334
920.530
920.628
920.726
920.922
921.020
921.118
921.314
921.412
921.510
921.706
921.804
921.902
922.098
922.196
922.294
922.490
922.588
922.686
922.784
922.882
923.078
923.176
923.274
923.470
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
215
216
218
219
220
222
223
224
226
227
228
230
231
232
234
235
236
238
239
240
242
243
244
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
ANA-010-1 Page 40
923.568
923.666
923.862
923.960
924.058
924.254
924.352
924.450
924.646
924.744
924.842
925.038
925.136
925.234
925.430
925.527
925.625
925.821
925.919
926.017
926.213
926.311
926.409
926.605
926.703
926.801
926.899
926.997
927.095
927.193
927.291
927.389
927.487
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
0-None
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
APPENDIX III. PREPARING THE TI MSP-430 LAUNCHPAD AND THE ANAREN BOOSTERPACK
TARGET BOARD
The Anaren Pairing Demo can run in conjunction with TI’s MSP-430 LaunchPad Value Line development
kit (TI P/N MSP-EXP430G2) using Anaren’s low-power RF BoosterPack target board (Anaren P/N
A2500R24A-LPD). The following procedure may be used to prepare the two boards for operation with
this demonstration.
The LaunchPad can be used to program the MSP-430 chip, and the LaunchPad’s USB Virtual COM Port
(VCP) can be used to monitor operation of the pairing demo receiver. In this “Mated” mode of operation,
the BoosterPack target board is connected to the LaunchPad – with the LaunchPad providing power, and
USB VCP connectivity to the BoosterPack target board.
An additional “Stand-Alone” mode of operation is available wherein the BoosterPack target board
operates independently without being connected to the LaunchPad board at all. This will require some
modifications to the BoosterPack target board, and will require external power supplied by a battery or
other source.
In either case (stand-alone or mated), there are modifications needed to the LaunchPad (for operation
with the Anaren BoosterPack target board). The modifications to the LaunchPad are very easy
modifications. No modifications are required to the BoosterPack target board to operate connected to the
LaunchPad. So mated operation is recommended whenever possible.
There are modifications needed to the BoosterPack target board for stand-alone operation. The
modifications to the BoosterPack target board require more sophistication and are only recommended for
the expert.
CHANGES TO LAUNCHPAD BOARD AS SHIPPED TO OPERATE WITH BOOSTERPACK TARGET
BOARD:
For LaunchPad boards version 1.4 and below, the LaunchPad is supplied with both male and female 0.1”
10-pin headers that can be used in the J1 and J2 positions on the board. But they are not shipped
installed on the LaunchPad. They generally come in the package mated. Unmate the two Male/Female
connectors supplied. Solder two 10-pin M-M 0.1" Headers into J1 and J2 on the LaunchPad -- with the
long leads sticking up out of the LaunchPad. For version 1.5 and above, the connectors arrive preinstalled.
ANA-010-1 Page 41
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 10: LaunchPad with (2) 10-pin Headers Installed in J1 and J2
1. The LaunchPad is supplied with a 14-pin MSP-430 Value Line chip installed in the 20-pin DIP
socket IC1 on the board. Remove the 14-pin DIP MSP-430 from DIP socket on LaunchPad
Board. The demo uses a 20-pin DIP MSP430G2553 instead. It will be installed in a later step in
this process. (See Figure 1).
2. The LaunchPad is supplied with a jumper that connects LED2 to P1.6 on the MSP-430. The
demo will be using P1.6 for other purposes. Remove Jumper P1.6 -- to disconnect the LED from
P1.6.
3. The LaunchPad is supplied assuming a software UART on the 14-pin MSP-430 – requiring a
change to the RXD/TXD jumpers in order to use the hardware UART on the MSP430G2553.
Check the LaunchPad revision number (see picture below).
4. For LaunchPad versions 1.4 & earlier:
a. Remove Jumper RXD
b. Remove Jumper TXD
c. Using two wire jumpers, connect Jumper RXD Pin 2 to Jumper TXD Pin 1
ANA-010-1 Page 42
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
5. For LaunchPad versions 1.5 and higher, remove and turn the RXD/TXD jumpers 90 degrees and
replace.
6. The 20-pin DIP MSP430G2553 can be plugged into either the LaunchPad board (for mated
operation) or into the BoosterPack target board (for stand-alone operation). If no stand-alone
operation is needed, plug the 20-pin DIP MSP-430G2553 into DIP socket IC1 on the LaunchPad.
Otherwise, for stand-alone operation continue onto the rest of the procedure.
7. Mount the BoosterPack target board onto the J1/J2 headers -- with J1 on Booster to J1 on
LaunchPad, and J2 on Booster to J2 on LaunchPad.
ANA-010-1 Page 43
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
8. This step is optional, and for mated operation only. This will allow use of the second LED on the
LaunchPad board in the demo. Connect a wire jumper from the LED2 jumper pin on the
LaunchPad to J1 Pin 6 on the BoosterPack target board top-side. This will connect the LED2 to
P1.4 on the MSP-430.
Figure 11: Green LED jumper from LED2 to J1 pin 6
CHANGES TO BOOSTERPACK TARGET BOARD FOR STAND-ALONE OPERATION:
No changes are required to the BoosterPack target board for mated operation with the LaunchPad board.
So this section is completely optional.
Anaren makes a –LPF version of the BoosterPack target boards – with a DIP socket, LED, and switch
installed. This allows the board to operate in stand-alone mode – without connection to the LaunchPad
(given that power is applied as well).
One can also modify a –LPD version of the BoosterPack target board to create the –LPF version. These
changes are more sophisticated, and will require finer pitch soldering to accomplish. The BoosterPack
target board schematics and BOM will identify the exact part numbers needed for S1, R2, D1, and U2
below. Note that steps 1-4 are included in the –LPF version.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Install Switch S1
Install Resistor R2
Install LED D1
Install 20-pin DIP Socket U2
Connect a battery pack or connector for battery to the VDD and GND pads adjacent to Pin 20 and
19 of J2 on the BoosterPack target board.
6. Plug the 20-pin DIP MSP430G2553 into DIP socket U2 on the BoosterPack target board.
ANA-010-1 Page 44
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Figure 12: BoosterPack target board with S1, R2, D1, and U2 Installed
IMPORTANT NOTES:
•
•
•
•
Switch S1 (if present) on the BoosterPack target board and Switch S2 on the LaunchPad are both
connected in parallel to P1.3 on the MSP-430, when mated. So they are identical, and either can
be used for pairing.
LED D1 (if present) on the BoosterPack target board, and LED1 on the LaunchPad are both
connected in parallel to P1.0 on the MSP-430 when mated. So they should operate identically.
DIP Socket U2 (if present) on the BoosterPack target board, and DIP Socket IC1 on the
LaunchPad are both connected in parallel when mated. So they are identical, and the MSP-430
can be plugged into either socket (but obviously not both).
The J1 and J2 pins on the top of the BoosterPack target board are designed so that additional
non-Anaren BoosterPack target boards (e.g. Capacitive Touch) can be stacked vertically on top
of the Anaren BoosterPack target board.
ANA-010-1 Page 45
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
Thank you for learning more about the
Anaren Integrated Radio (AIR) module line.
If you have additional questions,
need samples, or would like a quote –
please do not hesitate to email the AIR team
at [email protected] or contact any of these
authorized distributors of the AIR product line.
Worldwide
Anaren Microwave, Inc.
6635 Kirkville Road
East Syracuse, NY 13057
Tel: +1 315 432 8909
+1 800 411 6596
Fax: +1 315 432 8970
ANA-010-1 Page 46
North America
Anaren Microwave (Europe), Inc.
12 Somerset House, Suite 16 & 17
Hussar Court, Waterlooville
Hampshire, England P07-7SG
Tel: +44 2392 232392
Fax: +44 2392 251369
Worldwide
Anaren Communication Suzhou Co. Ltd.
No. 5 Chun Hui Road
Wei Ting, Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou 215122, PR China
Tel: +86 512 6287 6400
Fax: +86 512 6274 9283
Anaren Paired Sensor / Gateway Demonstration
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