DM Install Manual

DM Install Manual
Professional Digital Two-Way Radio System
MOTOTRBO™ Mobile
Radio Installation Manual
DM 3400 Numeric Display Mobile
DM 3401 Numeric Display Mobile (with GPS)
DM 3600 Display Mobile
DM 3601 Display Mobile (with GPS)
Foreword
This manual is intended for use by experienced technicians familiar with similar types of equipment. Specifically, it contains
installation information required for the MOTOTRBO Series Mobiles.
For information related to the service of the MOTOTRBO Series Mobiles, refer to Related Publications on page iv for the list
of applicable manuals available separately.
Product Safety and RF Exposure Compliance
See Installation Requirements for Compliance with Radio Frequency (RF) Energy Exposure Safety Standards on page ii..
Parts Ordering
See Appendix A: Replacement Parts Ordering for information on how to obtain replacement parts. For part numbers, refer
to the MOTOTRBO Series Mobile Radio Basic Service Manual (Motorola publication part number 6866575D33).
Computer Software Copyrights
The Motorola products described in this manual may include copyrighted Motorola computer programs stored in
semiconductor memories or other media. Laws in the United States and other countries preserve for Motorola certain
exclusive rights for copyrighted computer programs, including, but not limited to, the exclusive right to copy or reproduce in
any form the copyrighted computer program. Accordingly, any copyrighted Motorola computer programs contained in the
Motorola products described in this manual may not be copied, reproduced, modified, reverse-engineered, or distributed in
any manner without the express written permission of Motorola. Furthermore, the purchase of Motorola products shall not
be deemed to grant either directly or by implication, estoppel, or otherwise, any license under the copyrights, patents or
patent applications of Motorola, except for the normal non-exclusive license to use that arises by operation of law in the
sale of a product.
Document Copyrights
No duplication or distribution of this document or any portion thereof shall take place without the express written permission
of Motorola. No part of this manual may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic
or mechanical, for any purpose without the express written permission of Motorola.
Disclaimer
The information in this document is carefully examined, and is believed to be entirely reliable. However, no responsibility is
assumed for inaccuracies. Furthermore, Motorola reserves the right to make changes to any products herein to improve
readability, function, or design. Motorola does not assume any liability arising out of the applications or use of any product
or circuit described herein; nor does it cover any license under its patent rights nor the rights of others.
Trademarks
MOTOROLA, the Stylized M logo, and MOTOTRBO are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office. All other product
or service names are the property of their respective owners.
© Motorola, Inc. 2007.
i
Installation Requirements for Compliance with
Radio Frequency (RF) Energy Exposure Safety
Standards
ATTENTION!
This radio is intended for use in occupational/controlled conditions, where users have full knowledge
of their exposure and can exercise control over their exposure to meet FCC/ICNIRP limits. This radio
device is NOT authorized for general population, consumer, or any other use.
To ensure compliance to RF Energy Safety Standards:
•
Install only Motorola approved antennas and accessories.
•
Be sure that antenna installation is per Antenna Installation on page 3-8 of this manual.
•
Be sure that Product Safety and RF Safety Booklet enclosed with this radio is available to the end user
upon completion of the installation of this radio.
Before using this product, the operator must be familiar with the RF energy awareness information and
operating instructions in the Product Safety and RF Exposure booklet enclosed with each radio (Motorola
publication part number 6866537D37) to ensure compliance with Radio Frequency (RF) energy exposure
limits.
!
WARNING
WARNING: For radios installed in vehicles fuelled by liquefied petroleum gas, refer to the (U.S.)
National Fire Protection Association standard, NFPA58, for storage, handling, and/or container
information.
This radio has a transmitter Time-out Timer that disables the transmitter during a transmission after a predefined time period, which by default is set to 60 seconds.
!
CAUTION: It is recommended NOT to change the default 60 seconds time period for the Time-out
Timer as the radio is intended for intermittent duty cycle operation.
Caution
For a list of Motorola-approved antennas and other accessories, visit the following web site, which lists
approved accessories for your radio model:
http://www.motorola.com/governmentandenterprise
ii
Table of Contents
Foreword
Product Safety and RF Exposure Compliance ............................................................................................ii
Parts Ordering .............................................................................................................................................ii
Computer Software Copyrights ...................................................................................................................ii
Document Copyrights ..................................................................................................................................ii
Disclaimer....................................................................................................................................................ii
Trademarks .................................................................................................................................................ii
Installation Requirements for Compliance with
Radio Frequency (RF) Energy Exposure Safety Standards ...................... ii
Mobile Radio Model Numbering Scheme ................................................... vi
Chapter 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
Mobile Radio Description ............................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1.1 Overview ........................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1.2 Dimensions ....................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1.3 Connections on the Back of the Radio.............................................................................. 1-2
Standard Configurations ................................................................................................................ 1-3
1.2.1 Dash Mount Configuration ................................................................................................ 1-3
Base/Control Stations .................................................................................................................... 1-3
Chapter 2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
iii
Introduction ......................................................................... 1-1
Reducing Noise Interference.............................................. 2-1
Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1.1 Noise Sources................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1.2 Radiated Noise ................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1.3 Conducted Noise .............................................................................................................. 2-2
2.1.4 Induced Noise ................................................................................................................... 2-2
Operation of a Conventional Ignition System ................................................................................ 2-3
2.2.1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 2-3
2.2.2 Sources of Ignition Interference ........................................................................................ 2-3
Detection of Noise Sources ........................................................................................................... 2-4
2.3.1 Noise Detection Procedure ............................................................................................... 2-4
2.3.2 Sources of Noise............................................................................................................... 2-4
Noise Reduction Techniques......................................................................................................... 2-5
2.4.1 General ............................................................................................................................. 2-5
2.4.2 Ignition System Interference ............................................................................................. 2-5
2.4.2.1 Engine Maintenance and Tune-Up .......................................................................... 2-5
2.4.2.2 Noise Reduction Kits ............................................................................................... 2-5
2.4.2.3 Ignition Coil Interference .......................................................................................... 2-5
2.4.2.4 Distributor Interference ............................................................................................ 2-6
2.4.2.5 Battery Connections ................................................................................................ 2-6
2.4.3 Alternator/Generator Whine .............................................................................................. 2-7
2.4.4 Voltage Regulator Noise ................................................................................................... 2-8
2.4.5 Other Electrical Noises ..................................................................................................... 2-9
2.4.6 Ground Bonding................................................................................................................ 2-9
Table of Contents
Chapter 3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Installation Details for Standard Configurations ............. 3-1
Planning the Installation................................................................................................................. 3-1
Radio Mounting.............................................................................................................................. 3-3
3.2.2 Locking Kit (Optional) ....................................................................................................... 3-5
3.2.2.1 All Radios................................................................................................................. 3-5
3.2.3 DIN Mount......................................................................................................................... 3-5
3.2.3.1 To install the frame into the dashboard ................................................................... 3-5
3.2.3.2 To Mount the radio in the frame............................................................................... 3-6
3.2.3.3 To Remove the radio from the frame....................................................................... 3-6
Power Cable .................................................................................................................................. 3-6
Ignition Sense Cable...................................................................................................................... 3-8
Antenna Installation ....................................................................................................................... 3-8
3.5.1 Selecting an Antenna Site ................................................................................................ 3-8
3.5.2 Antenna Installation Procedure......................................................................................... 3-9
3.5.3 BNC Connection ............................................................................................................. 3-10
Microphone Hang-Up Clip ........................................................................................................... 3-11
3.6.1 Standard Hang-Up Clip................................................................................................... 3-11
Completing the Installation .......................................................................................................... 3-11
Chapter 4
4.1
iv
Options and Accessories Installation ............................... 4-1
Accessory Installation .................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.1 Emergency Pushbutton or Footswitch Installation ............................................................ 4-3
4.1.2 Horn and Lights (External Alarm) Relay ........................................................................... 4-4
4.1.3 External Speaker ............................................................................................................. 4-5
Appendix A EMEA Regional Warranty, Service
and Technical Support .......................................................A-1
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
Warranty and Service Support.......................................................................................................A-1
1.1
Warranty Period and Return Instructions..........................................................................A-1
1.2
After Warranty...................................................................................................................A-1
European Radio Support Centre (ERSC) ......................................................................................A-2
Piece Parts ....................................................................................................................................A-2
Technical Support..........................................................................................................................A-3
Further Assistance From Motorola ................................................................................................A-3
Index ..................................................................................................... Index-1
Related Publications
MOTOTRBO Series Mobile Radio Basic Service Manual............................................................6866575D33
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
List of Figures
Figure 1-1
Figure 1-3
Figure 1-2
Figure 1-4
Figure 1-5
Figure 2-1
Figure 2-2
Figure 2-3
Figure 2-4
Figure 2-5
Figure 2-6
Figure 2-7
Figure 3-1
Figure 3-2
Figure 3-3
Figure 3-4
Figure 3-5
Figure 3-6
Figure 3-7
Figure 3-8
Figure 3-9
Figure 3-10
Figure 4-1
Figure 4-2
Figure 4-3
Figure 4-4
Figure 4-5
v
Front View of Dash Mount Trunnion ..................................................................................... 1-1
Back View of the Mobile Radio ............................................................................................. 1-2
Side View of Dash Mount with Low Profile Trunnion ............................................................ 1-2
Dash Mount Configuration .................................................................................................... 1-3
Example of a Base/Control Station Configuration................................................................. 1-4
Noise Sources....................................................................................................................... 2-2
Typical Vehicular Ignition System, Simplified Schematic Diagram ....................................... 2-3
Ignition Coil Nose Suppression............................................................................................. 2-6
Generator Whine Suppression.............................................................................................. 2-7
Alternator Whine Suppression .............................................................................................. 2-8
Voltage Regulator Noise Suppressions ................................................................................ 2-9
Ground Bonding.................................................................................................................. 2-10
Typical Dash Mount Configuration ........................................................................................ 3-1
Radio Installation (Dash Mount)............................................................................................ 3-2
Trunnion Orientation for Above or Below Mobile .................................................................. 3-3
Transmission Hump Trunnion Mounting ............................................................................... 3-4
Below Dash Trunnion Mounting ............................................................................................ 3-4
Locking Kit (Optional)............................................................................................................ 3-5
Dashboard Mounting............................................................................................................. 3-6
Cabling Interconnect Diagram for Dash Mount..................................................................... 3-7
Antenna connections on the back of the radio...................................................................... 3-9
BNC Connection ................................................................................................................ 3-10
Location of the Rear Accessory Connector .......................................................................... 4-1
Pin Configuration of Rear Accessory Connector (as viewed from the rear of the radio) ...... 4-2
Emergency Switch Wiring Diagram ...................................................................................... 4-3
Horn/Light Wiring Diagram.................................................................................................... 4-4
External Speaker Mounting................................................................................................... 4-5
Mobile Radio Model Numbering Scheme
vi
Mobile Radio Model Numbering Scheme
Model No.Example :
Position
AA
:
M
2
7
Q
P
H
9
L
A
1
A
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Unique Model Variations
N: Standard Package
AZ: Asia/Australia
LA: Latin America
AA: North America (except Mexico)
MD: Europe/Middle East/Africa
Version Letter
Mobile
MOTOTRBO Mobile
Model Series
Feature Level
1: Mini-U
2: BNC
Band
J: 136-174MHz
Q: 403-470MHz
Primary System Type
A: Conventional
Power Level
N: 1-25W
P: 25-40W
Q: 25-45W
Physical Packages
C: Numeric Display Model
H: Display Model
Primary Operation
J: w/o GPS
L: w/ GPS
Channel Spacing
9: Variable/Programmable
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
vii
June 12, 2007
Mobile Radio Model Numbering Scheme
6866575D26
Chapter 1 Introduction
This manual covers the installation procedures for MOTOTRBO Series mobile and accessories
required to complete the radio system. The radio system consists of a control head, radio, antenna,
microphone, speaker, cabling, and accessories.
1.1
Mobile Radio Description
1.1.1
Overview
Model
1.1.2
Description
DM 3400
The Numeric Display model with 2 programmable buttons
and a 2-character 7-segment display.
DM 3401
The Numeric Display model with 2 programmable buttons,
a 2-character 7-segment display, and GPS
DM 3600
The Display model with 4 programmable buttons
and a dot-matrix LCD.
DM 3601
The Display model with 4 programmable buttons,
a dot-matrix LCD, and GPS.
Dimensions
Figure 1-1 and Figure 1-2 show the basic dimensions of the dash mount trunnion of the mobile radio.
When installing the radio, make sure to plan the installation carefully and leave additional room in the
rear of the radio for cabling and accessory connections; in the front of the radio for access, controls,
and cabling; and to the sides of the radio so that you may access and install the trunnion wing
screws.
8.2”
6.8”
Figure 1-1 Front View of Dash Mount Trunnion
1-2
Introduction: Mobile Radio Description
8.3”
7.9”
2“
2.4“
Figure 1-2 Side View of Dash Mount with Low Profile Trunnion
NOTE: The rear accessory connector adds 0.75 in. (1.91 cm) to the overall length.
1.1.3
Connections on the Back of the Radio
Figure 1-3 shows the connections that are found on the back of the radio.
For complete pin configuration of the rear accessory connector, see Figure 4-2, on page 4-2.
Rear Accessory
Connector
Antenna Connector
BatteryBattery+
GPS-Antenna
Connector
Figure 1-3 Back View of the Mobile Radio
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Introduction: Standard Configurations
1.2
1-3
Standard Configurations
Currently the mobile radio can only be dash-mounted.
1.2.1
Dash Mount Configuration
In the dash mount configuration of the mobile radio, the control head is mounted on the front of the
transceiver housing. Electrical connection between the two takes place within the radio via a flexible
cable between the connectors on the front of the transceiver and at the back of the control head.
Figure 1-4 Dash Mount Configuration
For details on this configuration, see Section 3.2.1 on page 3-4.
1.3
Base/Control Stations
If mobile radio equipment is installed at a fixed location and operated as a control station or as a
fixed unit, the antenna installation must comply with the following requirements in order to ensure
optimal performance and compliance with the RF energy exposure limits in the standards and
guidelines listed in the Safety Booklet (Motorola publication part number 6866537D37) provided with
the radio:
!
Caution
CAUTION: For outdoor antenna installations, proper site grounding and lightning protection are vitally
important. Failure to provide proper lightning protection may result in permanent damage to the radio
equipment. Refer to Motorola Quality Standards Fixed Network Equipment Installation Manual R56
(6881089E50), for complete information regarding lightning protection.
• The antenna should be mounted outside the building on the roof or a tower if at all possible and
the antenna cable should be earth grounded.
• The radio chassis must be earth grounded and a lightning surge protector should be used in
line with the radio connector and the outdoor antenna. The lightning surge protector should be
earth grounded and located at the point where the antenna cable enters the building.
• The line voltage power supply must have a proper ground connection (refer to IEC61312-1).
• As with all fixed site antenna installations, it is the responsibility of the licensee to manage the
site in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements, such as EMC (electromagnetic
Compatibility) and IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission). Also, additional
compliance actions such as site survey measurements, signage, and site access restrictions
may be required in order to ensure that exposure limits are not exceeded.
6866575D26
June 13, 2007
1-4
Introduction: Base/Control Stations
NOTE: Only 1-25 watt mobile radio models using the GPN6145_ power supply are approved for
Base/Control Station operation.
Figure 1-5 shows a typical setup of a Base/Control Station configuration.
Walloutlet
Line Cord
with Ground
Power Supply
Outdoor Antenna
Desktop
Power Cable
Lightning Protector With
Quarter Wave Shorting Stub
Speaker
C C CC
C CC C
C
C
CC
CC
CC
CC
CCCC
Desk
Microphone
Antenna
Cable
Antenna Connector
C
C
CC
CC
C
CC C
CC
CC
Radio in
Desktop Tray
Figure 1-5 Example of a Base/Control Station Configuration
•
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Chapter 2 Reducing Noise Interference
2.1
Introduction
Electrical noise generated by the electrical system of a vehicle, as well as local ambient noise, can
interfere with normal operation of mobile radios. Satisfactory operation of a mobile radio may require
slight or heavy noise reduction, depending upon the relative strength of the radio signal, and upon
the ability of the radio to reject undesired noise. These requirements vary from one vehicle to
another, depending upon the vehicle type and required coverage area. When operating in a strong
signal area, a certain amount of noise interference can be tolerated. In weak signal areas, however,
noise reduction becomes very important. As a rule of thumb, noise levels create greatest
interference in the 25-50MHz band and reduce with increasing frequency.
Before attempting any noise reduction procedures, determine the noise source(s). Then, follow a
logical, systematic method of elimination until the interference is eliminated or reduced to an
acceptable level.
!
Caution
CAUTION: DO NOT add interference elimination equipment to vehicles equipped with electronic
ignition systems before obtaining advice from the vehicle manufacturer. Addition of some noise
suppression components may interfere with proper operation of electronic ignition systems and could
seriously damage them.
Care and patience must be exercised in locating and eliminating noise sources. There may be
several sources of noise, each slightly stronger or weaker than the other. Elimination of one source
may seem ineffective because another noise source remains active at a barely discernible difference
in level. Consult a service manual for the vehicle to determine what noise reduction provisions the
manufacturer applies when AM, AM/FM, or CB radios are installed as original equipment. These
radios are also subject to electrical noise interference, and the manufacturer may install noise
suppression components only upon those vehicles which require radio equipment at the time of
manufacture. These noise suppression components should be added in any first attempt to suppress
noise.
2.1.1
Noise Sources
The three major noise sources affecting mobile radio systems are: (1) radiated noise, (2) conducted
noise, and (3) induced noise. (See Figure 2-1 for typical vehicular noise sources.)
2.1.2
Radiated Noise
Radiated noise enters the radio through the antenna along with the desired signal and can block or
degrade desired communication. It can be generated by power lines, fluorescent lights, or by
electrical discharges from static build-up, ignition systems, or electrical motors. Radiated noise is the
most common cause of mobile radio interference.
When a spark discharge or arc takes place through air, energy is radiated at frequencies from a few
kilohertz to hundreds of megahertz. This spurious radiation may have some energy radiated at a
frequency near or even identical to the desired radio signal. The standard receiver may be unable to
distinguish between the two signals (desired and noise). Therefore they both enter the receiver,
resulting in degradation of the desired signal.
2-2
Reducing Noise Interference: Introduction
It is impractical to prevent all arcing in the standard vehicle electrical system. In an 8-cylinder engine
running at 2,000 RPM, arcing occurs across the spark plugs at a rate of 8,000 sparks per minute or
133 sparks per second. Electrical motors and generators also produce arcs.
Windshield Wiper Motor
Inadequate Terminal
or Fuse Block Filtering
Heater Air Conditioner Blower
Radiated Noise Pick-up
Electric Windows Motors
Hood Static
Antenna Ground
or Location
Power Seat Motor
Electric Fuel Pump
Voltage
Regulator
Distributor
Ignition
Coil
Spark Plug
Wires
Alternator or
Generator
Spark Plugs
Idle Stop
Solenoid
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-1 Noise Sources
2.1.3
Conducted Noise
Conducted noise enters the radio through the points where the radio is attached to the vehicle’s
electrical system such as battery cables, ignition switch, chassis ground etc. It can be generated by
electrical transients, electrical motors, poor grounding points, or inadequate electrical system filtering
(from alternators, generators, voltage regulators, or weak batteries). Conducted noise can degrade
both transmit and receive performance of a mobile radio.
2.1.4
Induced Noise
Induced noise enters the radio through the proximity of radio wiring to other wiring in the vehicle.
Electrical currents through the standard vehicular wiring can induce undesirable noise signals into
the radio cabling. Communication is degraded simply because the wiring provides a transformertype coupling action without any actual physical connection. Induced noise can degrade both
transmit and receive performance of a mobile radio.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Reducing Noise Interference: Operation of a Conventional Ignition System
2.2
Operation of a Conventional Ignition System
2.2.1
Introduction
2-3
To effectively reduce ignition interference in a vehicle, it is well to understand the operation of an
automobile ignition system.
Ignition is necessary in a gasoline engine to ignite the gasoline vapor and the air mixture in its
cylinders. The system is made up of the battery, distributor, breaker points, coil, condenser, and
spark plugs. The battery is the only electrical source of power in an automobile, so the lower battery
voltage must be stepped up to the high voltage necessary to arc across the spark plug electrodes.
This arc ignites the gas mixture.
2.2.2
Sources of Ignition Interference
In the conventional ignition system ( Figure 2-2) a mechanical circuit breaker (the cam and points in
the distributor) opens the primary circuit of the ignition coil, and high voltage is developed at the
secondary. This high voltage is synchronized and applied to each spark plug by the distributor.
HV Lead
Distributor
Ignition
Coil
Breaker
Ignition Points
Switch
Spark plug
Battery
leads
Spark
Plugs
Cam
Condenser
Rotor Gap
Breaker
Ignition Points
Switch
Battery
Ignition
Coil
Lead Inductance
Stray
Capacitance
Cam
Spark Plug Gap
Condenser
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-2 Typical Vehicular Ignition System, Simplified Schematic Diagram
The battery is connected to the primary winding of the coil through the ignition switch. The primary
circuit is returned to the battery through the breaker points, which are bypassed by the condenser.
The points are normally closed. As the cam shaft is rotated by the engine, its lobes or corners open
and close the points in proper synchronization with the piston in each cylinder.
With the ignition switch on and the breaker points closed, coil primary current builds up at a rate
determined by the coil inductance.
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
2-4
Reducing Noise Interference: Detection of Noise Sources
When the breaker points open, primary current decreases and, by self-induction, an electromotive
force is induced in the primary which is many times greater than the battery voltage. The high voltage
inducted in the coil secondary causes a spark across the distributor rotor-to-spark plug wire gap and
then across the spark plug gap for a short interval of time when the breaker points open. The
condenser reduces arcing of the points.
The secondary circuit of the ignition coil, including the distributor rotor gap and the spark gap, is the
main source of ignition interference. The lead inductance and stray capacitance provide a tuned
circuit. Because the discharge of the circuit is through a low resistance (ionized spark gap), the
circuit tends to oscillate. The frequency and amplitude of oscillation vary as current changes in the
spark gap.
2.3
Detection of Noise Sources
2.3.1
Noise Detection Procedure
Detection of offending noise sources is the heart of noise suppression because, after the noise
source is identified, the solution becomes obvious. A logical methodical procedure is basic to the
effective noise suppression.
Use your available equipment to best advantage. A pick-up loop, about one inch in diameter, can be
connected to a portable CB radio or a mobile radio being operated at a frequency similar to the
installed radio frequency but from an isolated supply voltage. The pick-up loop can be moved
throughout the vehicle with the radio used as a radiated noise detector. Be sure the pick-up loop has
sufficient insulation to prevent the input of the radio from coming into direct contact with high voltage
points in the vehicle ignition system.
A non-polarized bypass capacitor, which has alligator clips firmly attached, can be used on a trialand-error basis to locate wiring which needs additional filtering. Keep capacitor lead lengths short for
best suppression. Ceramic disc capacitors are not as suitable or effective as automotive coaxial
capacitors.
2.3.2
Sources of Noise
Some interference is due to geographic location. This interference does not need to be eliminated
since it is possible for the vehicle to be moved away from the interfering noise source. Noise from
power lines, fluorescent lights, and other vehicles (emitting high levels of radiated noise) are
examples of noise which depends upon location. Make certain that you are not attempting to
suppress noise in a vehicle while it is in a noisy location. If you suspect that your location is noisy,
simply turn off everything in the vehicle except the radio and listen to the remaining ambient noise. If
the noise level is objectionable, you may have to noise suppress the vehicle during a less noisy time
of day or in a different, quieter location.
Check the installed radio for conducted and inducted noise by using an unmodulated signal
generator to supply a clean RF signal through a coaxial cable directly to the antenna connector on
the radio set. This should prevent radiated noise from entering the receiver and masking conducted
and induced noise. Ensure that the signal generator is not microphonic and is placed away from the
noise of the engine and exhaust.
Operate the controls for fans, blowers, power windows, headlamps, turn signals, windshield wipers,
and other electrical accessories. Listen for the presence of noise in the received radio signal. This
will allow the source of the interference to be determined. Some noise sources cannot be turned on
and off at will. These sources will need to be attacked piecemeal on a trial and error basis: alternator
whine, voltage regulators, electric fuel pump, and other possible sources. Remember that induced
noise can result from radio wiring being too close to other vehicle wiring. This problem is most easily
solved by proper cable routing at the time of installation.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
2-5
Radiated noise must be attacked after conducted and induced noise has been satisfactorily
suppressed. The vehicle ignition system is usually the primary source of this interference. Antenna
placement can be critical in some installations. Remember that static discharge generates static or
radiated noise and will probably be generated only when the vehicle is in motion. Since radiated
noise interference is most noticeable in weak signal areas, it is suggested that suppression be
finalized while listening to a weak “on frequency” signal. (The squelch should be “open” so that even
marginal signals can be heard.)
2.4
Noise Reduction Techniques
2.4.1
General
There are three basic ways to suppress noise. The first is the addition of resistance in circuits subject
to ringing. This method is used for the ignition coil HV cable, spark plug wires, and spark plugs. The
second is to filter noise from low voltage wiring using coaxial bypass capacitors. The third is to
control static charge build-up using wipers for movable parts such as automobile hoods and trunk
lids, or flexible bonding leads for fixed members. Static in wheels may also be controlled using
collector rings. Applications of each of these techniques are discussed below.
The vehicle manufacturer’s service manual also may provide noise suppression information which is
valuable in any first attempt at noise suppression.
2.4.2
Ignition System Interference
2.4.2.1 Engine Maintenance and Tune-Up
The most important step in reducing ignition noise is insuring that the engine is in proper tune. Pay
particular attention to the following points if the noise interference from the ignition system is severe:
1. Be sure the spark plugs distributor points, and condenser are in good condition.
2. Be sure ignition timing is properly adjusted.
3. Be sure the distributor cap and rotor are in good condition. They should be replaced at least
every 30,000 miles.
4. Be sure that spark plug wires make good, solid contact at each end and are routed as far as
possible from low voltage leads.
5. Many late-model automobiles are equipped with a shield over the distributor points. Check to
see that this shield is properly positioned and securely attached.
2.4.2.2 Noise Reduction Kits
Most auto parts dealers can supply 0.05 µF bypass capacitors (condensers), resistive ignition wires,
and resistor spark plugs. The type of spark suppression used in noise reduction should always be in
accordance with the recommendations of the vehicle manufacturer, that is, if spark plugs are to be
replaced with built-in suppressor types, they should be in the proper heat ranges and thread sizes for
the particular engine. In each ignition system, there is a maximum amount of resistance that may be
connected between the distributor and a spark plug. If resistance-type ignition wire is used, the
length of each wire must be limited so that its resistance does not exceed the allowable maximum.
2.4.2.3 Ignition Coil Interference
This type of interference is characterized by a popping sound which is most noticeable when the
engine is running slowly. To suppress the noise, connect a 0.1 µF coaxial capacitor from the battery
side of the ignition coil to vehicle ground (see Figure 2-3). This keeps the distributor noise from
being conducted through the battery lead into the electrical system of the vehicle. Note that some
electronic ignition systems do not route the battery lead to the ignition coil; proper operation of the
ignition system can be impaired if the ”input” terminal is bypassed.
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
2-6
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
Step 3.
Connect wire lead to capacitor
using lockwasher and nut.
Step 4.
Connect capacitor
lead to battery post.
From distributor
Distributor Post
Step 1.
Mount Capacitor
(0.1µF Coaxial Type)
to vehicle chassis
using lockwasher
and self-tapping screw.
Battery Post
Step 2.
Disconnect wire (dashed)
from battery post and
connect to capacitor using
lockwasher and nut.
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-3 Ignition Coil Nose Suppression
2.4.2.4 Distributor Interference
This type of interference is characterized by popping sounds which are present at all engine speeds.
It is caused by sparking between the rotor and the distributor cap inserts as the rotor turns. To
suppress this noise, use resistance ignition wire to connect the ignition coil to the distributor cap.
2.4.2.5 Battery Connections
The radio set power cable can pick up noise generated in the vehicle. This can be minimized by
connecting the power cable directly to the battery instead of the fuse block. The battery acts like a
large capacitor (about one Farad for a 50 amp/hour battery), which bypasses induced noise. The
battery ground lead should be securely bonded to the vehicle frame. Undesirable parallel ground
currents can be minimized by using the vehicle frame as a common ground point. If ignition switch
control of the radio is desired, the radio power leads may be connected to the battery through a relay
which is controlled by the ignition switch.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
2.4.3
2-7
Alternator/Generator Whine
This type of interference is characterized by a high-pitched whine which varies with engine speed. A
0.5 µF coaxial capacitor can be used to bypass the whine. For generators, the capacitors is
connected in the armature lead. Never use a capacitor in the field lead. For alternators, the capacitor
is connected in the lead to the battery post (see Figure 2-4 and Figure 2-5).
Step 1.
Mount Capacitor
(0.5µF Coaxial Type)
under generator ground screw.
Step 3.
Connect wire lead to capacitor
using lockwasher and nut.
Step 4.
Connect capacitor
lead to armature post.
Caution:
Do not connect
capacitor to field teminal.
Step 2.
Disconnect wire (dashed)
from armature post and
connect to capacitor using
lockwasher and nut.
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-4 Generator Whine Suppression
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
2-8
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
Step 2.
Disconnect wire from
battery post and connect
to capacitor using
lockwasher and nut.
Step 1.
Mount Capacitor to
(0.5µF Coaxial Type)
under alternator
ground screw.
Caution:
Do not connect
capacitor to field terminal.
Step 3.
Connect wire lead to capacitor
using lockwasher and nut.
Step 4.
Connect capacitor
lead to battery post.
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-5 Alternator Whine Suppression
2.4.4
Voltage Regulator Noise
This type of interference is characterized by erratic popping noises which change only slightly with
changes in engine speed. The noise is generated by arcing in the vibrating breaker contacts of the
voltage regulator. It can be suppressed by connecting a 0.5 µF coaxial capacitor in the battery and
armature leads of the voltage regulator (see Figure 2-6).
!
CAUTION: Disconnect the battery ground terminal before attempting to connect components to
the voltage regulator.
Caution
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
Step 1.
Mount Capacitor
(0.5µF Coaxial Type)
to vehicle chassis
using lockwasher and
self-tapping screw.
2-9
Vehicle
Step 2.
Disconnect wire (dashed)
from battery post and
connect to capacitor
using lockwasher and nut.
Step 3.
Add lead from battery
post to capacitor using
lockwasher and nut.
Battery
Post
Armature
A coaxial capacitor can
be added here, if required.
FL0830260-O
Figure 2-6 Voltage Regulator Noise Suppressions
2.4.5
Other Electrical Noises
Other elements of the electrical system which can generate noise are listed below. These can be
suppressed by connecting a 0.5 µF bypass capacitor between the noise source and ground.
1. Ammeter-to-battery lead
2. Gauges (oil, fuel, temperature)
3. Ignition Switch
4. Lamp bulbs (headlamps, tail lamps, dome lamps, etc.)
5. Accessory wiring (electrical fuel pump, electric windshield wipers, heater fan motor, window
openers, etc.)
2.4.6
Ground Bonding
If a vehicle is not properly bonded to ground, static charges can increase. This increase can cause
noise from electrical arcing. This type of noise is suppressed by bonding the part using one-inch
wide ground straps (keep them as short as possible). Some common points where bonding may be
helpful are listed below (see Figure 2-7).
A. From engine block to the firewall.
B. From engine block to vehicle frame at points where the engine is shock-mounted.
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
2-10
Reducing Noise Interference: Noise Reduction Techniques
C. From the battery ground terminal to the vehicle body.
D. From top of front wheel “A” frames to chassis, particularly in cases where rubber-mounted
members are used.
Firewall
A
Chassis
Battery
Fender
Well
C
Front Wheel
"A" Frame
FL0830266-O
D
B
D
FL0830266-O
Figure 2-7 Ground Bonding
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Chapter 3 Installation Details for Standard
Configurations
3.1
Planning the Installation
The mobile radio operates only in negative ground electrical systems. Before starting the radio
installation, make sure that the ground polarity of the vehicle is correct. Accidentally reversing the
polarity will not damage the radio, but will cause the cable fuses to blow.
Planning is the key to fast, easy radio installation. Before starting the installation, inspect the vehicle
and determine how and where you intend to mount the antenna, radio, and accessories. Plan wire
and cable runs to provide maximum protection from inching, crushing, and overheating.
CAUTION: Before installing any electrical equipment, check the vehicle manufacturer’s user manual. The
installation of this device should be completed by an authorized servicer or installer.
!
Caution
3.1.1
Tools Required for Installation
Tool
11/32 hex driver
—
Regular slot screwdriver or
Phillips #2
—
Pin removal tool
1/4 hex driver
3.1.2
Motorola Part
Number
6680163F01
—
Installation Example
Currently your mobile radio can only be dash-mounted (see Figure 3-1).
Speaker
Antenna
1/4-Wavelength
Radio
Battery
Figure 3-1 Typical Dash Mount Configuration
3-2
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Planning the Installation
3.1.3
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 3-2 shows the wiring diagrams for some of the possible configurations. Identify the
configuration that you are installing, and use the diagram when planning the installation.
GPS
ANTENNA
BATTERY
(+)
FUSE
RED LEAD
(-)
FUSE
BLOCK
RF ANTENNA
FIREWALL
HOLE
IGNITION CABLE
FUSE
HORN/
LIGHT
DC
POWER
CABLE
ANTENNA
CONNECTION
TRUNNION
MIC
CLIP
SPEAKER
CONTROL HEAD
MIC
EMERGENCY
SWITCH
Figure 3-2 Radio Installation (Dash Mount)
(For complete rear accessory connector pin configuration, see Figure 4-2.)
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Radio Mounting
3.2
3-3
Radio Mounting
!
Caution
CAUTION: DO NOT mount the radio on a plastic dashboard without first reinforcing the dashboard; the
weight of the radio may crack or break the dashboard.
DO NOT mount the radio on a flat or concave surface where the radio could be partially submersed in
water. This is especially important if the cab area of the vehicle is cleaned by spraying with water. If the
radio sits in water for a length of time, moisture may seep inside the radio and damage the electronic
components.
DO NOT allow water to stand in recessed areas of vertically mounted radios. Remove any moisture
immediately to prevent it from seeping down into the radio.
The mounting location must be accessible and visible. Select a location that will permit routing the
RF antenna cable as directly as possible.
For new or existing installations, use one of the mounting kits as specified in Table 3-1. Orient the
mounting trunnion as shown in Figure 3-3.
Table 3-1. Mounting Kits
Motorola Part
Number
Mounting Kit
RLN6076_
Low Profile Trunnion Kit (ships as part of mobile radio package)
RLN6077_
Low Profile Trunnion Kit
RLN6078_
High Profile Trunnion Kit
RLN6079_
Key Lock Trunnion Kit
RLN5933_
DIN Mount Kit
RADIO
FRONT
Figure 3-3 Trunnion Orientation for Above or Below Mobile
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
3-4
3.2.1
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Radio Mounting
Dash Mount with Trunnion
1. Select the location to mount your radio on the transmission hump (see Figure 3-4) or under
the dash (see Figure 3-5). When mounting the trunnion on the transmission hump take care
the transmission housing is not affected.
2. Using the trunnion mounting bracket as a template, mark the positions of the holes on the
mounting surface. Use the innermost four holes for a curved mounting surface such as the
transmission hump, and the four outermost holes for a flat surface such as under the dash.
3. Center punch the spots you have marked and realign the trunnion in position.
4. Secure the trunnion mounting bracket with the self-drilling screws provided. The number of
screws used will depend on how the radio is mounted (see Figure 3-4 and Figure 3-5).
5. Position the radio to align the trunnion with the trunnion mounting features on the radio (see
Figure 3-4). Secure the radio with the two wing screws and lock washers provided.
Wing Screw
Threaded Hole
for Wing Screw
Trunnion
Tabs
Wing Screw
Plastic Guides
Figure 3-4 Transmission Hump Trunnion Mounting
Trunnion
Wing Screw
Lock Washer
Lock Washer
Wing Screw
Figure 3-5 Below Dash Trunnion Mounting
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Radio Mounting
3.2.2
3-5
Locking Kit (Optional)
3.2.2.1 All Radios
If an optional locking kit is used (shown in Figure 3-6), position the lock bottom housing on the
trunnion before installing the radio mounting screws. Then slip the top lock housing on and remove
the key. You can install the lock on either side of the radio.
Lock
Figure 3-6 Locking Kit (Optional)
3.2.3
DIN Mount
3.2.3.1 To install the frame into the dashboard
1. Open up the radio cut-out in the dashboard to ISO7736 specification (182mm x 53mm).
2. Insert the mounting frame into the cut-out and retain it by bending back the relevant fixing
tabs (using all 6 where possible). Check the orientation of the frame is correct by ensuring
that the word “TOP” is uppermost.
NOTE: The tabs are easily bent back by twisting a large flat-head screwdriver in the slot behind the
tabs.
NOTE: For a more secure installation the frame should also be secured with the appropriate number
of screws to the mounting conditions (min. 1)
NOTE: The demounting tool can be used as an aid to mounting as well as demounting.
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June 12, 2007
3-6
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Power Cable
3.2.3.2 To Mount the radio in the frame
1. Provide the electrical connections for the radio (power, antenna, accessories).
2. Plug in all the connectors and push the radio firmly into the mounting frame until the two
springs snap into place (shown in Figure 3-7).
Figure 3-7 Dashboard Mounting
3.2.3.3 To Remove the radio from the frame
1. Push the two demounting tools through the openings in the frame until the two springs
release the radio.
2. Slide out the radio.
NOTE: The fixing tabs should be checked for tightness each time the radio is removed. The tabs are
easily tightened by twisting a large flat-head screwdriver in the slot behind the tabs.
NOTE: The frame is not designed for regular mounting and demounting.
3.3
Power Cable
Route the red radio power cable from the radio to the vehicle’s battery compartment, using accepted
industry methods and standards. Be sure to grommet the firewall hole to protect the cable. Remove
the 15-amp (part number 6580283E06) or 20-amp (part number 6580283E07) fuse from the
fuseholder and connect the red lead of the radio power cable to the positive battery terminal using
the hardware provided as shown in Figure 3-8. Connect the black lead to a convenient solid chassis
ground point. DO NOT connect the black lead directly to the battery’s negative terminal.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
6866575D26
CH
SPEAKER
MICROPHONE
SEE NOTE
ON/ACC
3A OR 4A FUSE
RADIO POWER CABLE
(RED/BATTERY HOT)
RADIO IGNITION
CABLE (thin RED)
15A OR 20A
FUSE
GROMMET
(-)
VEHICLE
BATTERY
(+)
PART OF
VEHICLE
WIRING
VEHICLE BATTERY
COMPARTMENT
Figure 3-8 Cabling Interconnect Diagram for Dash Mount
If the radio’s IGNITION line is wired to the car’s ignition switch, the radio will only function when the car’s ignition switch is turned ON.
MAEPF-27646-O
Caution: if you choose to connect the radio’s IGNITION line directly to the car’s battery, excess use of the radio when the car’s ignition is not running (i.e. alternator running)
could result in a slow discharge of the car’s battery. This configuration allows the radio to operate with the car’s ignition switch ON or OFF.
NOTE:
Rear connector
RADIO
RADIO POWER CABLE (BLK/GROUND)
VEHICLE
IGNITION SWITCH
RADIO COMPARTMENT = OPERATOR COMPARTMENT
A good chassis connection via the black primary
power cable is essential for radio operation and
to prevent damage to the radio and cable kit.
Connection to the vehicle frame is desirable.
CAUTION
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Power Cable
3-7
June 12, 2007
3-8
3.4
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Ignition Sense Cable
Ignition Sense Cable
Motorola supplies an ignition sense cable and recommends that it be used with every mobile
installation. The ignition sense cable allows the radio to be turned on and off with the vehicle ignition
switch, and allows the radio to “remember” the state of the radio on/off switch, even if it is changed
while the vehicle is off.
• For radio ON/OFF control independent of the ignition switch, connect the red ignition cable (pin
25 of accessory connector) to “battery hot” at the vehicle fuse block (dash mount only).
• For radio ON/OFF control via the ignition switch, connect the red ignition cable to “ignition” at
the fuse block.
The ignition sense cable uses either a 3-amp (P/N 6500139764) or 4-amp (P/N 6580283E02) fuse.
For other considerations when connecting the ignition cable, see the Basic Service Manual
(Motorola publication part number 6866575D33).
3.5
Antenna Installation
IMPORTANT NOTE: To assure optimum performance and compliance with RF Energy Safety
standards, these antenna installation guidelines and instructions are
limited to metal-body vehicles with appropriate ground planes and take
into account the potential exposure of back seat passengers and
bystanders outside the vehicle.
NOTE: For mobile radios with rated power of 7 watts or less, the only installation restrictions are to
use only Motorola approved antennas and install the antenna externally on metal body
vehicles. For mobile radios with rated power greater than 7 Watts, always adhere to all the
guidelines and restrictions in section 3.5.1 below.
3.5.1
Selecting an Antenna Site/Location on a Metal Body Vehicle
1. External Installation - Check the requirements of the antenna supplier and install the vehicle
antenna external to a metal body vehicle in accordance with those requirements.
2. Roof Top - For optimum performance and compliance with RF Energy Safety Standards,
mount the antenna in the center of the roof.
3. Trunk Lid - On some vehicles with clearly defined, flat trunk lids, the antennas of some radio
models (see restrictions below) can also be mounted on the center area of the trunk lid. For
vehicles without clearly defined, flat trunk lids (such as hatchback autos, sport utility vehicles,
and pick-up trucks), mount the antenna in the center of the roof.
BEFORE INSTALLING AN ANTENNA ON THE TRUNK LID,
- Be sure that the distance from the antenna location on the trunk lid will be at least
85 cm (33 inches) from the front surface of the rear seat-back to assure compliance with RF
Energy Safety standards.
- Ensure that the trunk lid is grounded by connecting grounding straps between the trunk lid
and the vehicle chassis.
NOTE: If these conditions cannot be satisfied, then mount the antenna on the roof top.
4. Ensure the antenna cable can be easily routed to the radio. Route the antenna cable as far
away as possible from the vehicle electronic control units and associated wiring.
5. Check the antenna location for any electrical interference.
6. Make sure the mobile radio antenna is installed at least 30 centimeters (1 foot) away from any
other antenna on the vehicle.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Antenna Installation
3-9
7. For DGM Series Mobile Radio models with GPS using a GPS only or a combined RF/GPS
antenna, ensure that the antenna has a clear view of the sky and that the antenna base with
the GPS receiver is not covered by any metallic or radio frequency absorbing material. Any
non-glass-mount GPS antenna should be positioned next to the RF antenna. Any other
mobile radio antenna should be at least 30 centimeters (1 foot) away from the RF antenna.
8. Any two metal pieces rubbing against each other (such as seat springs, shift levers,
trunk and hood lids, exhaust pipes, etc.) in close proximity to the antenna can cause
severe receiver interference.
3.5.2
Antenna Installation Procedure
1. Mount the antenna according to the instructions provided with the antenna kit. Run the
coaxial cable to the radio mounting location. If necessary, cut off the excess cable and install
the cable connector.
2. Connect the antenna cable connector to the radio antenna connector on the rear of the radio.
3. In case of a GPS model, connect the GPS antenna to the GPS antenna connector on the rear
of the radio.
Antenna Connector
GPS-Antenna
Connector
Figure 3-9 Antenna connections on the back of the radio
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June 12, 2007
3-10
3.5.3
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Antenna Installation
BNC Connection
To ensure a secure connection of an antenna cable's BNC plug to a radio's BNC jack, their
interlocking features must be properly engaged. If they are not properly engaged, the system will
loosen.
Motorola recommends the following sequence to ensure proper attachment of the system (see
Figure 3-10):
Cable
BNC Jack
Antenna Cable Plug
Figure 3-10 BNC Connection
1. Make sure that there is sufficient slack in the antenna cable.
2. Align the antenna cable plug’s pin then firmly insert fully into the radio jack. Turn it clockwise
to tighten. It should take no more than a 1/4 turn.
3. Give a final tug, by hand, to the antenna cable plug.
NOTE: Forcing an improperly aligned antenna cable plug’s pin into the radio jack can damage the
connector and the radio.
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Microphone Hang-Up Clip
3.6
Microphone Hang-Up Clip
3.6.1
Standard Hang-Up Clip
3-11
The hang-up clip must be within reach of the operator(s). Measure this distance before actually
mounting the bracket. Since the bracket has a positive-detent action, the microphone can be
mounted in any position. The microphone hang-up clip must be grounded.
Use the hang-up clip as a template to locate the mounting holes. To avoid interference when
removing the microphone, install the flathead screw in the top clip hole.
3.7
Completing the Installation
Complete the installation by connecting the power wires and plugging in the microphone cable to the
mobile.
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
3-12
Installation Details for Standard Configurations: Completing the Installation
Notes
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Chapter 4 Options and Accessories Installation
4.1
Accessory Installation
The accessories must be installed through the rear accessory connector that is located on the rear of
the radio, adjacent to the power connector. Most of the Motorola-approved accessories are supplied
with female terminals crimped to a 20-gauge wire specifically designed to fit the plug of the rear
accessory connector.
Insert the female terminal into the accessory connector assembly in the appropriate locations. The
accessory connector assembly is provided together with the accessory. Connect the accessory
connector assembly to the rear accessory connector on the back of the mobile. Do not use other
generic terminals in the plug. Generic terminals can cause electrical intermittences and may cause
damage to the plug.
Rear Accessory
Connector
Figure 4-1 Location of the Rear Accessory Connector
4-2
Options and Accessories Installation: Accessory Installation
Table 4-1 Rear Accessory Connector Pin Functions
Pin
No.
Pin Name
Pin Function
Pin
No.
Pin Name
Pin Function
1
2
USB+
USB-
14
15
Rx Audio
AUX Audio 2
Receive Live Audio2
PUBLIC Address 2
16
GND
Ground
USB GND
MAP_ID_2
MAP_ID_1
SW B+
USB + (Data)
USB - (Data)
USB Power (5V from USB
accessory/cable)
USB/MAP_ID Ground
Accessory Identifier
Accessory Identifier
Switched Battery Voltage
3
VBUS
4
5
6
7
8
PWRGND
Ground
21
9
SPKR-
10
SPKR+
11
Tx Audio
12
Audio GND
Speaker - (3.2 ohm minimum
impedance)
Speaker + (3.2 ohm minimum
impedance)
Rear External Microphone
Input4
Audio Ground
13
AUX Audio 1
PUBLIC Address 1
17
18
19
20
GP5-1 (PTT)
5V Level GPIO, PTT Input1
GND
Ground
GP5-2 (Monitor) 5V Level GPIO, Monitor Input3
GP5-6
5V Level GPIO
5V Level GPIO, Channel
GP5-3
Activity Function
22
GP5-7
5V Level GPIO
23
EMERGENCY
Emergency Switch Input
24
GP5-7
5V Level GPIO
25
IGN SENSE
26
VIP-1
Ignition Sense5
12V Tolerant, 5V GPIO,
External Alarm
1
Pulling this line to ground will activate PTT function, activating the AUX_MIC input.
Fixed level (independent of volume level) received audio signal, including alert tones. Flat or de-emphasis are
programmed by CPS. Output voltage is approximately 330 mVrms per 1kHz of deviation.
3 This input is used to detect when a rear microphone accessory is taken off-hook, to override PL to alert the user to
busy traffic prior to transmitting.
4 This microphone signal is independent of the microphone signal on the front microphone connector. The nominal
input level is 80mVrms for 60% deviation. The DC impedance is 660 ohms and the AC impedance is 560 ohms.
5 See Figure 3-2 and Figure 3-8 for wiring information.
D-
USB / MAP_ID Ground
MAP_ID_1
Power Ground
Spkr+
Audio Ground
Rx Audio
Ground
Ground
GP5_6
GP5_7
GP5_8
VIP_1 (Ext Alarm)
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
D+
Vbus
MAP_ID_2
SW B+
Spkr-
Tx Audio
Aux Audio Out 1 / RxD
Aux Audio Out 2 / TxD
GP5_1 (PTT)
GP5_2 (Monitor)
GP5_3 (Chan Act)
Emerg Sw
Ign Sense
2
Figure 4-2 Pin Configuration of Rear Accessory Connector (as viewed from the rear of the radio)
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Options and Accessories Installation: Accessory Installation
4.1.1
4-3
Emergency Pushbutton or Footswitch Installation
Mount the emergency pushbutton (Motorola part number RLN5926_) or the footswitch (Motorola part
number RLN5929_) using the hardware that comes with the kit. Press the terminal into the accessory
connector housing. Connect the emergency switch wires to pins 23 and 18 (see Figure 4-3). Route
the finished cable from the switch location to the control head location.
NOTE 1
SPST NORMALLY OPEN
EMERGENCY SWITCH
PIN 23
PIN 18
USB / MAP_ID Ground
MAP_ID_1
Power Ground
Spkr+
Audio Ground
Rx Audio
Ground
Ground
GP5_6
GP5_7
GP5_8
VIP_1 (Ext Alarm)
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
Vbus
MAP_ID_2
SW B+
Spkr-
Tx Audio
Aux Audio Out 1 / RxD
Aux Audio Out 2 / TxD
GP5_1 (PTT)
GP5_2 (Monitor)
GP5_3 (Chan Act)
Emerg Sw
Ign Sense
D2
D+
ACCESSORY
CONNECTOR
Figure 4-3 Emergency Switch Wiring Diagram
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
4-4
4.1.2
Options and Accessories Installation: Accessory Installation
Horn and Lights (External Alarm) Relay
For installations that use the horn/lights option, select a suitable location for mounting (normally
under the dash) and, referring to Figure 4-4, perform the following procedure:
1. Horn Relay – Connect the relay contacts across the horn ring switch, typically found in the
steering column. Connect the two control wires (female pins) into locations 26 and 18 of the
connector.
2. Lights Relay – Connect the relay across the headlamp ON/OFF switch, typically found in the
steering column. Connect the two control wires (female pins) into locations 26 and 18 of the
accessory connector.
D-
USB / MAP_ID Ground
MAP_ID_1
Power Ground
Spkr+
Audio Ground
Rx Audio
Ground
Ground
GP5_6
GP5_7
GP5_8
VIP_1 (Ext Alarm)
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
D+
Vbus
MAP_ID_2
SW B+
Spkr-
Tx Audio
Aux Audio Out 1 / RxD
Aux Audio Out 2 / TxD
GP5_1 (PTT)
GP5_2 (Monitor)
GP5_3 (Chan Act)
Emerg Sw
Ign Sense
Y
Figure 4-4 Horn/Light Wiring Diagram
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Options and Accessories Installation: Accessory Installation
4-5
4.1.3 External Speaker
!
Caution
CAUTION: DO NOT ground the radio's speaker leads. This system
has a floating speaker output (dc voltage on both leads); damage
to the audio circuit will result if either lead is grounded or if they are
shorted together.
The external speaker kit includes a trunnion bracket that allows the speaker to be mounted in a
variety of ways. With the trunnion bracket, the external speaker can mount permanently on the
dashboard or in accessible firewall areas. The trunnion allows the external speaker to tilt for best
operation. Mount the external speaker out of the way so that it will not be kicked or knocked around
by the vehicle occupants. Mount the external speaker as follows:
1. Use the external speaker mounting bracket as a template to mark the mounting hole
locations.
2. Use the self-drilling screws provided to fasten the trunnion.
3. Attach the external speaker and fasten to the trunnion with two wing screws.
4. Route the speaker wires under the carpet or floor covering, or behind the kick panels. Be sure
the wires are out of the way and will not be snagged and broken by the occupants of the
vehicle.
Trunnion
Bracket
Dashboard
Firewall
OR
Figure 4-5 External Speaker Mounting
6866575D26
June 12, 2007
4-6
Options and Accessories Installation: Accessory Installation
Notes
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
Appendix A
1.0
EMEA Regional Warranty, Service and
Technical Support
Warranty and Service Support
Motorola offers long term support for its products. This support includes full exchange and/or repair
of the product during the warranty period, and service/ repair or spare parts support out of warranty.
Any "return for exchange" or "return for repair" by an authorized Motorola Dealer must be
accompanied by a Warranty Claim Form. Warranty Claim Forms are obtained by contacting an
Authorized Motorola Dealer.
1.1
Warranty Period and Return Instructions
The terms and conditions of warranty are defined fully in the Motorola Dealer or Distributor or
Reseller contract. These conditions may change from time to time and the following notes are for
guidance purposes only.
In instances where the product is covered under a "return for replacement" or "return for repair"
warranty, a check of the product should be performed prior to shipping the unit back to Motorola.
This is to ensure that the product has been correctly programmed or has not been subjected to
damage outside the terms of the warranty.
Prior to shipping any radio back to the appropriate Motorola warranty depot, please contact
Customer Resources (Please see page A-3). All returns must be accompanied by a Warranty Claim
Form, available from your Customer Services representative. Products should be shipped back in
the original packaging, or correctly packaged to ensure no damage occurs in transit.
1.2
After Warranty Period
After the Warranty period, Motorola continues to support its products in two ways.
1.
Motorola's Managed Technical Services (MTS) offers a repair service to both end users and
dealers at competitive prices.
2.
MTS supplies individual parts and modules that can be purchased by dealers who are technically capable of performing fault analysis and repair.
A-2
2.0
EMEA Regional Warranty, Service and Technical Support:
European Radio Support Centre (ERSC)
The ERSC Customer Information Desk is available through the following service numbers:
Austria:
08 00 29 75 41
Italy:
80 08 77 387
Belgium:
08 00 72 471
Luxemburg:
08 00 23 27
Denmark:
80 88 05 72
Netherlands:
08 00 22 45 13
Finland:
08 00 11 49 910
Norway:
80 01 11 15
France:
08 00 90 30 90
Portugal:
08 00 84 95 70
Germany:
08 00 18 75 240
Spain:
90 09 84 902
Greece:
00 80 04 91 29 020
Sweden:
02 07 94 307
UK :
08 00 96 90 95
Switzerland:
08 00 55 30 82
Ireland:
18 00 55 50 21
Iceland:
80 08 147
Or dial the European Repair and Service Centre:
Tel: +49 30 6686 1555
Please use these numbers for repair enquiries only.
3.0
Piece Parts
Some replacement parts, spare parts, and/or product information can be ordered directly.
If a complete Motorola part number is assigned to the part, it is available from Motorola Radio
Products and Solutions Organization (RPSO). If no part number is assigned, the part is not normally
available from Motorola. If the part number is appended with an asterisk, the part is serviceable by
Motorola Depot only. If a parts list is not included, this generally means that no user-serviceable
parts are available for that kit or assembly.
Orders for replacement parts, kits and assemblies should be placed directly on Motorola's local
distribution/dealer organisation or via Motorola Online at: http://emeaonline.motorola.com
* The Radio Products and Solutions Organization (RPSO) was formerly known as the Radio
Products Services Division (RPSD) and/or the Accessories and Aftermarket Division (AAD).
August 14, 2007
6866575D26
A-3
EMEA Regional Warranty, Service and Technical Support:
4.0
Technical Support
Motorola Product Services is available to assist the dealer/distributors in resolving any malfunctions
which may be encountered.
5.0
North Europe - Stephen Woodrow
Telephone: +44 (0) 1256 488 082
Fax: +44 01256 488 080
Email: [email protected]
Central and East Europe - Siggy Punzenberger
Telephone: +49 (0) 6128 70 2342
Fax: +49 (0) 6128 95 1096
Email: [email protected]
Russia and Belarus - Oleg Machnev
Telephone: +7 495 785 0150
Fax: +7 495 785 0185
Email: [email protected]
Germany - Customer Connect Team
Telephone: +49 (0) 30 6686 1539
Fax: +49 (0) 30 6686 1916
Email: [email protected]
Middle East and Africa - Wayne Holmes
Telephone: +27 11 800 7922
Fax: +27 11 800 7923
Email: [email protected]
Italy - Ugo Gentile
Telephone: +39 0 2822 0325
Fax: +39 0 2822 0334
Email: [email protected]
France - Armand Roy
Telephone: +33 1 6935 7868
Fax: +33 1 6935 7808
Email: [email protected]
France - Laurent Irrmann
Telephone: +33 1 6935 7866
Fax: +33 1 6935 7808
Email: [email protected]
Further Assistance From Motorola
You can also contact the Customer Help Desk through the following web address.
http://www.motorola.com/governmentandenterprise/contactus
6866575D26
August 14, 2007
A-4
August 14, 2007
EMEA Regional Warranty, Service and Technical Support:
6866575D26
Index
Index
F
footswitch, emergency .............................................. 4-3
A
accessories
installing
dash mount ........................................................4-1
alligator clips ..............................................................2-4
antenna
cable, see Cables, antenna
connection ...........................................................3-10
diagrams ..............................................................3-10
installing .................................................................3-8
mounting ................................................................3-8
site .........................................................................3-8
arcing .........................................................................2-2
B
base stations .............................................................1-3
black lead ..................................................................3-6
C
cables
antenna .........................................................3-3, 3-10
diagrams ............................................... 3-2, 3-7, 3-10
ignition ...................................................................3-8
ignition sense .........................................................3-8
power .....................................................................3-6
Conducted noise .......................................................2-2
configurations
dash mount ............................................................1-3
control head
dash mount ............................................................1-3
see also specific model names
control stations ..........................................................1-3
D
dash mount
accessories installations ........................................4-1
configuration ..........................................................1-3
installation ..............................................................3-2
radio dimensions ....................................................1-1
trunnion ..................................................................3-4
E
electrical transients ....................................................2-2
electrodes ..................................................................2-3
electromotive .............................................................2-4
emergency footswitch ................................................4-3
emergency pushbutton ..............................................4-3
H
horn relay .................................................................. 4-4
I
ignition
cable ...................................................................... 3-8
Induced noise ............................................................ 2-2
installation
examples ............................................................... 3-1
J
J2
pin configuration .................................................... 3-2
L
leads
black ...................................................................... 3-6
light relay ................................................................... 4-4
locking kit, installing .................................................. 3-5
M
microphone
hang-up clip, standard ......................................... 3-11
S-hook ................................................................... 3-4
microphonic ............................................................... 2-4
mounting configurations ............................................ 3-3
dash ................................................................1-3, 3-4
mounting, antenna
restrictions ............................................................. 3-9
N
non-polarized bypass capacitor ................................ 2-4
O
ordering replacement parts .......................................A-2
P
parts, ordering replacement ......................................A-2
pin
functions ................................................................ 4-2
removal tool ....................................................1-1, 3-1
pin configurations
J2 ........................................................................... 3-2
pushbutton, emergency ............................................ 4-3
Index-2
R
rear accessory jack, see J2
relays
horn ....................................................................... 4-4
light ........................................................................ 4-4
replacement parts, ordering ......................................A-2
trunnion
bracket for speaker ............................................... 4-5
dash mount ........................................................... 3-4
locking kit .............................................................. 3-5
mounting bracket .................................................. 3-4
orientation ............................................................. 3-3
transmission hump mounting ................................ 3-4
S
U
speaker
connecting ........................................................... 3-11
mounting ............................................................... 4-5
unmodulated ............................................................. 2-4
T
wiring diagrams ........................................................ 3-2
W
tools, required ........................................................... 3-1
June 12, 2007
6866575D26
MOTOROLA and the Stylized M Logo are
registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
All other product or service names are the property
of their respective owners.
© 2007 Motorola, Inc.
All rights reserved. June 2007.
www.motorola.com/mototrbo
@[email protected]
6866575D26-B
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