High-Rely RAIDFrame51 Backup System Documentation V1.2

High-Rely RAIDFrame51 Backup System Documentation V1.2
High-Rely RAIDFrame51 Backup System
Documentation V1.2
1
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Table of Contents
1 READ THIS FIRST...................................................................................4
2 Introduction..........................................................................................5
3 Hardware Description...........................................................................6
3.1 Performance..........................................................................7
3.2 Attaching to your Host Computer.........................................9
4 Basic Operation and Troubleshooting.................................................10
4.1 Creating a RAID 1 (Mirror) Between the two RAIDPacs......10
4.2 Removing/Inserting Drives..................................................10
4.3 Re-Initializing a RAIDPac.....................................................12
4.4 Off-site Backup....................................................................13
5 Detailed Controller Operation............................................................14
5.1 Operating the Group RAID Controller Screen.....................14
5.2 Status and Errors.................................................................15
5.3 Group RAID Controller Error Messages..............................16
5.4 Group RAID Controller Status Messages.............................17
5.5 Reinitializing the RAIDFrame51 Mirror...............................19
5.6 Basic Group RAID Controller Operations............................20
5.7 Changing Group RAID Controller RAID Types.....................20
6 Detailed RAIDPac Operation...............................................................20
6.1 Replacing Drives in a RAIDPac ............................................20
6.2 RAIDPac Drive Preparation..................................................25
6.3 Field Service Access.............................................................26
6.4 Rebuilding RAIDPacs with Drive Failures............................27
6.5 RAIDPac Configurations......................................................28
6.6 Over 2TB..............................................................................30
6.7 Physical Security..................................................................30
6.8 RAIDPac Status Indicators and Errors..................................31
2
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Illustration Index
Illustration 1: RAIDFrame 51 Block Diagram....................................6
Illustration 2: RAIDPac Rebuild Times and Performance.................7
Illustration 3: Back of RAIDFrame 51 Connections and Switches....9
Illustration 4: RAIDPac Removal.....................................................11
Illustration 5: RAIDPac Jumper Settings.........................................13
Illustration 6: RAIDFrame51 Group RAID Controller Front Panel.. 14
Illustration 7: Removing RAIDCore From Wrap..............................21
Illustration 8: RAIDPac Disassembly - Screw Locations..................21
Illustration 9: Removing the Front RAIDPac Wrap.........................22
Illustration 10: Inserting the Key into the Level Release Hole.......23
Illustration 11: Applying Pressure Towards the Status LED...........23
Illustration 12: Lever Will Pop Open..............................................24
Illustration 13: Removing Defective Drive and Tray Assembly.......24
Illustration 14: RAIDPac with Rear Cover Removed Exposing
MOLEX and SATA Connectors.........................................................26
Illustration 15: RAIDPac DIP Switch Settings for Selecting RAID
Type................................................................................................28
Illustration 16: RAIDPac DIP Switches and Jumper Blocks.............29
Illustration 17: RAIDPac Indicator Meanings.................................31
3
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
1 READ THIS FIRST
Important Quick Start Information for your RAIDFrame 51
●
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE RAIDFrame 51 media
(RAIDPacs) from their drive bays without pressing the
“release lever” on the drive slot first! Forced removal of
the drive will void your warranty and damage the
mechanism.
●
RAIDPacs will not “power up” until they are fully inserted
and the release lever is in the locked position.
●
WE HIGHLY RECOMMEND that the RAIDFrame 51 is
placed on a UPS or at least a quality surge protector. This
will insure stable operation and product life during unstable
power situations.
●
The latest Service Packs are important! Microsoft has
continued to Debug removable drives on the Windows
2000, XP, 2003 and Vista product lines.
●
If you use Veritas Backup Exec, only version 9.0 or higher
should be used. Always choose the “Backup to Removable
Disk” folder. Never use the “Backup to Disk” folder since
Backup Exec may become confused when restoring data
from removable drives.
●
Many operating systems are unable to deal with volumes
over 2 TB of size and not all RAIDPacs support this either.
If you need volumes over 2TB, be sure that your OS,
backup software and RAIDPacs support it.
●
Particular photos in this manual may not be your exact unit.
The information in this manual primarily documents
Windows 2000, 2003, or XP systems with some coverage of
Vista. Although the RAIDFrame may work with Windows
NT, Linux, Mac OS X and other operating systems, at this
time, our tech support can assist with Windows platforms
only.
4
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
2 Introduction
The RAIDFrame51 is a unique new product from Highly Reliable
Systems. It is designed to combine redundancy and portable near
line storage with high capacity, as well as more redundancy than a
simple RAID 1 array would normally allow. You can be sure that
your primary data is safe on a robust and durable local RAID array,
while off-site backups are conveniently stored in the same media
type of RAIDed media.
Essentially, the RAIDFrame51 was designed to combine the high
capacity and redundancy available on the High-Rely RAIDPac and
RAIDFrame systems which can be set to RAID 0 or RAID 5 with the
further redundancy of a RAID 1 array, hence the namesake
RAIDFrame51. This allows for “softwareless” backup if so desired
by allowing the user to hot swap a RAIDPac when the host is done
writing. The removed RAIDPac can then be stored or taken offsite as a backup copy while the replaced RAIDPac is automatically
re-synced (mirrored) to the current data and all the while, the
host has no idea that anything has happened since the hardware
mirror maintains data integrity and a drive connection to the host
uninterrupted.
By using RAIDPac media, the user has the ability to store up to 3
times the storage capacity of the highest capacity 3.5” SATA drive
available which at the time of this writing would be 2 TeraBytes
equaling 6 TeraBytes total per RAIDPac (or 4 TeraBytes in RAID5).
5
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
The RAID
51 then
allows two
RAIDPacs
up to a
capacity of
4 TB at
RAID 5 and
6TB at
RAID 0
3 Hardware Description
The RAIDFrame51 uses the same chassis as our 5-BAY RAIDFrame
product. Instead of five bays however, two RAIDPacs sit on
opposite ends separated by our new RAID controller. The
RAIDFrame51 is designed to create a hardware mirror between
two RAIDPacs. This gives the unit mirroring functionality similar to
our Tandem DXR product, it is capable of mirroring data on a
“Master Pac” to a “Slave Pac”. This makes for easy off-site backup.
The RAID controller also has an interface mounted on the front,
making the unit easy to control and customize as per individual
needs.
Host Computer
RAIDFrame51
appears as a single
volume in RAID 1
eSATA
RAID Group
Controller
(RAID 0/1)
RAID 0/5
Controller
RAID0/5
Controller
Mirror (RAID 1)
SATA S ATA SATA
Drive Drive Drive
1
2
3
RAIDPac 1
S ATA SATA S ATA
Drive Drive Drive
1
2
3
RAIDFrame 51
RAIDPac 2
Illustration 1: RAIDFrame 51 Block Diagram
6
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
3.1
Performance
When a RAIDPac goes offline, the replacement, even if it is the
same RAIDPac, maybe considered “dirty” by the RAID controller
and will cause a rebuild. The RAID controller operates on the
block level, not the file level. So, even if you're only using 1 Byte
of the volume, the entire volume's capacity will be mirrored. Also,
the controller knows nothing of partitions, it will mirror all
partitions allocated or not.
The RAIDFrame51 can mirror at up to 200 GigaBytes per hour.
Thus, the time for it sync up both RAIDPacs is dependent on the
usable capacities of the RAIDPacs. A safe bet is use 150 GigaBytes
per hour for your calculations. In the event that there is host
activity on the RAIDFrame51 while it is rebuilding the mirror, it will
slow the rebuilding process down. Here are some example rebuild
times:
Useable Capacity
Rebuild Time 150GB/Hr
Rebuild Time at 200GB/Hr
1 TB
About 6.6 Hours
About 5 Hours
1.5 TB
About 10 Hours
About 7.5 Hours
2 TB
About 13.3 Hours
About 10 Hours
3 TB
About 20 Hours
About 15 Hours
4.5TB
About 26.6 Hours
About 22.5 Hours
6 TB
About 40 Hours
About 30 Hours
Illustration 2: RAIDPac Rebuild Times and Performance
*Approximate Hours of Rebuild Time = Useable capacity in
GigaBytes / 150 GigaBytes per Hour or 200 GigaBytes per Hour.
7
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Your performance will vary depending on the RAIDType of the
RAIDPacs your using (RAID 0 or RAID 5), the activity on the
RAIDFrame51 from the host and the manufacturer and
performance of the drives located in the RAIDPacs.
RAIDPacs need not be the same type, size or configuration.
However, the if sizes are different, the RAID controller will use the
smaller of the two and discard the space of the larger.
8
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
3.2
Attaching to your Host Computer.
The RAIDFrame 51 can be attached to the host computer eSATA
(recommended). A USB converter maybe used for USB but if so
used, the JBOD function will not work.
Note: Because of the
capacities the RAIDFrame51 is capable of, USB 2.0's slower
throughput may limit the system's capabilities.
WARNING!!! Be sure your the power supply on the back of the
unit is set to your proper outlet voltage before installing the
power cord!
Connect the power cord to the back of the machine.
Connect your eSATA cable to the RAIDFrame 51 and the back of
your host computer.
ESATA to host
connection.
Primary Power Switch
Power cord
connection.
Illustration 3: Back of RAIDFrame 51 Connections and Switches
110/220 Voltage Selector
Be sure the Primary Power switch is in the On position. Power can
then be controlled from the front power switch. Install your
RAIDPacs into the two empty bays as described below. Then,
create a RAID 1 (Mirror) array, also described lower.
9
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
4 Basic Operation and Troubleshooting
4.1
Creating a RAID 1 (Mirror) Between
the two RAIDPacs
This operation maybe necessary upon receiving a new unit. It will
also be necessary in the event that both RAIDPacs fail before a
successful rebuild or if there is system trouble.
Press the down button on the controller face and scroll to the
“Quick Setup” option. Press enter and scroll to the “Create New
RAID” option. If the controller says “RAID NOT ENOUGH,” return
to the “Quick Setup” menu and select the “delete” all RAID option
then try again. After selecting the “Create New RAID” option,
select “RAID 1”. After selecting the create new RAID and the RAID
format the unit will request that you enter a password, simply
press the ENT button.
This will set the RAIDFrame51 in its default configuration. From
this point forward, data written to the RAIDFrame51 will be
duplicated across both RAIDPacs.
4.2
Removing/Inserting Drives
It is common to switch RAIDPacs after the RAID is stable and there
is a desire to remove a RAIDPac for an off-site back up or to freeze
the data set. Removing RAIDPacs from the RAIDFrame51 unit is
very straightforward. Depress the small metal tab and
simultaneously pull the handle on the RAIDPac. The RAIDPac will
slide out of the system. RAIDPacs are inserted in the same way.
When doing so, the RAID 1 will enter a “degraded mode” and
begin to beep. The beeping will cease once you replace the
RAIDPac with the same or a different RAIDPac. Rebuilding will
start shortly unless there is a problem. Once rebuilt, either
RAIDPac maybe removed again and will be a complete image of
the data.
10
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
RAIDPacs are inserted in the same way. Slide the RAIDPac gently
but firmly into the bay. When it is seated properly, the tab will
click and the lights on the RAIDPac will turn red, beep and then
turn green.
In the event that a RAIDPac of a different size must be installed,
the size can be larger, but not smaller than the remaining drive.
The additional space of the newly installed pack simply will not be
used.
Illustration 4: RAIDPac Removal
11
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
4.3
Re-Initializing a RAIDPac
Very rarely, RAIDPacs themselves will need to be reinitialized. This
can be necessary if:
1. More than one drive within the RAIDPac fails before a
successful rebuild in a RAID 5 configuration.
2. A dive fails in a RAID 0 configuration.
3. The drive set is purposely upgraded (for example
increasing drive sizes).
4. There is a RAIDPac controller issue or poor or low power
causes corruption within the RAIDPac.
5. If the RAID type is changed from RAID 0 to RAID 5 or vice
versa.
This process rebuilds the RAID in the RAIDPac, so be sure that you
only use this as a last resort as irreparable data loss will occur. If
you cannot access your drive for some reason, this is often a
viable solution.
To Re-Initialize a RAIDPac, first locate one of the jumpers that
were shipped with the RAIDPac unit. On the back of the RAIDPac,
there is a cut-out in the steel backplane. The jumper pins are
located inside of this cut-out.
12
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Jumper 1
(Initialize. Only
installed during
Initialize.)
Jumper 2
Illustration 5: RAIDPac Jumper Settings
Place the jumper on the pins immediately below the two dipswitches in the cutout. Re-insert RAIDPac into the RAIDFrame
chassis. The RAID will immediately begin to rebuild. This is
signaled by several beeps, followed by the LED’s turning blue.
Once complete, the LED’s will cease flashing and turn green.
Remove the RAIDPac and remove the jumper before reinserting.
If the RAIDPac is reinserted with the jumper on, it will rebuild
again and must be allowed to complete.
4.4
Off-site Backup
The RAIDFrame51 is designed to provide easy off-site backup.
After an initial backup has run, it is then safe to swap one of the
RAIDPacs for another and take the original off-site. The
RAIDFrame51 will then proceed to mirror to the new RAIDPac.
Once the RAIDFrame51 has finished mirroring (as indicated by the
progress display on the front) it is then safe to swap in a new
RAIDPac.
13
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
(Over 2TB. Although not
depicted here, this jumper
should always be in place on
RAIDPacs larger than 2TB.)
5 Detailed Controller Operation
5.1
Operating the Group RAID Controller
Screen
Illustration 6: RAIDFrame51 Group RAID Controller Front Panel.
• Scroll up button (up arrow): to scroll up message.
• Scroll down button (down arrow): to scroll down message.
• Enter button (ENT): to confirm or enter your selection.
• ESC button (ESC): to go back to the top level of options.
• Power LED: shows RAIDFrame51 Group RAID controller has
power (on/off).
• Status LED: shows when computer is reading or writing to
a drive.
• Host LED: shows connection to host
• Err LEDs: shows when a group RAID drive is in trouble.
• ACT/LINK LED’s: shows a link and activity with of the group
RAID drive with the Group RAID controller.
14
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
5.2
Status and Errors
RAIDFrame 51's group RAID status can be viewed through the LCD
display. By using the scroll buttons to scroll through the messages,
the following information is available:
• Group RAID level and capacity
• Group RAID disk drive models
• Group RAID controller firmware version
• Group RAID controller serial number
• Group RAID disk capacity
• Group RAID controller temperature
15
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
5.3
Group RAID Controller Error Messages
Keep in mind these messages only apply to RAIDPacs in the group
RAID. Check status indicators on the front and rear of the machine
for other errors. In most cases, an audible alarm will sound in
addition to the display of an error message. This alarm can be
silenced by pressing the ESC button.
“DISK NOT ENOUGH CANNOT CREATE!” — No RAIDPacs were
discovered. This means a RAID is not possible because there are
not enough RAIDPacs working properly. Check to see that the
media is installed correctly (bays 1 and 2) (see “Inserting and
Removing Media”). If all looks ok, try powering off the
RAIDFrame51 machine, remove and reinstall the media before
restoring power. Also, this can happen if you are trying to create a
RAID, but have not deleted the previous group RAID.
“RAID SET 0 IS IN DEGRADE MODE!”— This can happen when a
RAIDPac is removed from the RAID 1 array, or if a RAIDPac fails. If
you replace the RAIDPac with a working RAIDPac, or simply
reinsert the removed RAIDPac, the RAID 1 array will rebuild itself.
“RAID SET 0 IS IN BROKEN MODE!”— This error presents itself in
the event of multi- RAIDPac failure. If more than one RAIDPac
failure occurs concurrently in the RAID 1 set, irreparable data loss
will occur. Note that at this point, full data recovery is usually not
possible but partial maybe.
16
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
5.4
Group RAID Controller Status Messages
In most modes, the up or down buttons can be pressed to see
status information. To access the menu, simply press up or down
on the controller while the LCD is at the main screen.
System Manager → Hardware Monitor→ Temp. Monitor
This will display the current temperature inside of the unit.
Temperature:
XX degrees
System Manager → System Info → Firmware Version (1st screen)
This will display the current firmware information.
Firmware
Version: x.xx
System Manager → System Info → Firmware Version (2nd screen)
This is the second screen of the above. It will display the controller
number.
Controller Number:
1
Disk Manager → Show Disk Info (2nd screen) → Select Disk → Scroll
(In scrolling order)
17
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
This screen will display information about the various RAIDPacs in
the RAID array.
Model #:
Serial #:
Firmware Version:
Total Capacity:
Free Capacity:
Disk State:
Raid Manager → Raid Information → Select Raid → Scroll (In
scrolling order)
This screen displays information about the RAID array currently in
use.
Raid Name:
Raid Level: (e.g. RAID 1, RAID 0, etc...)
Raid Capacity:
Member Count:
Raid State: (Broken, rebuilding, etc...)
18
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
5.5
Reinitializing the RAIDFrame51 Mirror
At some point, it may be that you need to reinitialize the RAID
array. (Out of the box, multiple drive failure, etc...). To do this,
scroll to the quick-start menu, press ENT, and then scroll to the
option DELETE ALL RAID, and select the option. Repeat the
process, except this time select CREATE NEW RAID. From the host
computer (if Windows), open “Disk Management”, by right
clicking on “My Computer” and clicking “Manage”. It should be in
the panel on the left. Navigate to disk management. In the disk
management pane, you should see an uninitialized drive. If this
drive is not initialized, the Windows host will not be able to see
the device.
19
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
5.6
Basic Group RAID Controller
Operations
Creating a new RAID:
Scroll down → Quick Setup → Create One RAID
(Please note that it is not possible to create a RAID if one already
exists!)
Deleting the RAID:
Scroll down → Quick Setup → Delete all RAID
5.7
Types
Changing Group RAID Controller RAID
This information is provided for the benefit of professionals with
computer experience. It is not supported nor recommended for
end users. The Group RAID controller, with 2 RAIDPacs installed
can perform RAID 0 (striped) as well. You will note that other
RAID types are possible as well but those require more RAIDPacs
than the two so they're simply not possible in this configuration.
To change to RAID 0
Enter the menu by pressing any of the scrolling buttons. Select
“Create Raid” and scroll to Raid 0.
6 Detailed RAIDPac Operation
6.1
Replacing Drives in a RAIDPac
Twelve screws are used to hold the RAIDPac together. 4 larger
screws on each side of the RAIDPac attach the RAIDPac's wrap
(the metal piece which supports the unit and the handle) to the
RAIDCore (internal unit housing the drives and controller).
Remove all eight of these screws. Next, four smaller screws (2 on
each side) attach the back plate of the RAIDPac to the RAIDPac's
20
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
wrap. Remove these four screws. DO NOT CONFUSE THE
POSITIONS OF LARGER AND SMALL SCREWS WHEN
REASSEMBLING.
Illustration 7: Removing RAIDCore From Wrap.
Four small
screws
Illustration 8: RAIDPac Disassembly - Screw Locations
21
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Grasp the connector side metal back of the RAIDPac with one
hand and pull on the wrap handle with the other. The wrap should
pull off exposing the RAIDCore's bay access—see illustrations
below.
Illustration 9: Removing the Front RAIDPac Wrap.
Pull the Wrap completely off.
22
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Next, use the RAIDCore Tray Key and insert the tip into the
RAIDCore tray lock for the tray you're trying to remove. NOTE: the
key does not operate the way you would think. Apply an even
pressure along the key so that the tip slides towards the status
LEDs – illustration
Illustration 10: Inserting the Key into the Level Release Hole.
Illustration 11: Applying Pressure Towards the Status LED
23
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Illustration 12: Lever Will Pop Open.
The Tray lever should pop out. Once the lever pops out, swing it
fully open and pull the RAIDCore's drive tray out.
Illustration 13: Removing Defective Drive and Tray Assembly.
Replace or install the drive in the tray using regular mounting
screws in the available positions. When reinstalling, push the tray
in firmly and close the lever.
24
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Assemble the RAIDPac by placing the RAIDCore wrap back on.
Install the smaller four screws to the rear plate first. Then, install
the other eight larger screws that attach the wrap to the
RAIDCore. Make sure the wrap is positioned so the three status
viewing holes are on the same side as the status indicators on the
trays. When installing the 8 remaining screws on the wrap, BE
CAREFUL, THESE SCREWS GO INTO PLASTIC AND MAY EASILY STRIP
IF OVER TIGHTENED - TIGHTEN ONLY UNTIL FLUSH WITH THE
SURFACE. Be sure the screws go in plumb and do not stick out of
inserting the RAIDPac may be difficult. When the RAIDPac is
installed, it will begin rebuilding the new drive if it is a RAID 5
configured RAIDPac. The RAIDPac will be on-line but will perform
slower during this time. If your RAIDPac is configured for RAID 0,
read the next section.
6.2
RAIDPac Drive Preparation
NOTE: THIS IS A TECHNICAL SECTION AND SHOULD ONLY BE
PERFORMED BY THE FACTORY OR A QUALIFIED SERVICE
TECHNICIAN TO AVOID DAMAGE TO YOUR RAIDFrame or RAIDPac.
RAIDPac initialization is necessary before the RAIDPac can be
brought on-line for the computer to use. RAIDPac initialization is a
low-level format performed by the RAIDPac's RAID controller
before the operating system performs its high-level format on the
RAIDPac. RAIDPac initialization is normally performed by the
factory on each RAIDPac before it ships. It is not necessary for
your RAIDFrame to be connected to the host to perform this
operation but will not harm anything if it is connected. Technicians
or others with advanced technical knowledge, can perform this
function entirely without a RAIDFrame so long as power is
available from a regular drive power cable (like from a PC's power
supply), by simply wiggling off the rear plate on the RAIDPac, two
standard hard drive 4 pin Molex power connectors are available,
chose either one.
To initialize the RAIDPac, with long tweezers, install a common 100
mil (.1”) center jumper over the two pins closest to the dip
25
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
switches on the inside of the RAIDPac (Jumper 1 – see Illustration
4 above). You can do this though the access window cut in the
metal on the back of the RAIDPac. Once done, install the RAIDPac
into the RAIDFrame51 with power on. The RAIDPac should beep
for about 15 seconds then it will begin to initialize the RAID. Once
the initialization is complete (indicated by 3 steady green only
LEDs on the front of the RAIDPac), remove the jumper. The
RAIDPac may then be partitioned and formatted by your operating
system.
6.3
Field Service Access
In the event you need access to the data of a RAIDPac or to
initialize a RAIDPac outside of the RAIDFrame, the RAIDPac's
RAIDCore accepts a standard 4 pin Molex power connector and a
standard internal SATA connector. To access these, remove the
small screws which hold the rear plate on the back of the RAIDPac
(see Illustration 5 above) Once the four screws are out, grasp the
rear plate lower near the large docking connector and wiggle
while pulling. The plate should come off revealing a set of 4 pin
power connectors and an internal SATA connector with a cable
plugged into it—see Illustration 11 below —unplug this cable
before connecting to a host machine, this is where you will plug
the host's SATA port into. You need to only use one power
connector. DO NOT PLUG OR UNPLUG THE RAIDCore while power
is on!
Illustration 14: RAIDPac with Rear Cover Removed Exposing MOLEX and SATA Connectors.
26
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
When reassembling, be sure the SATA cable is not squished or cut
by the rear cover plate.
6.4
Rebuilding RAIDPacs with Drive
Failures
BEFORE ASSUMING A RAIDPAC HAS A BAD DRIVE, TRY THIS:
Power fluctuations can sometimes cause RAIDPacs to be confused
and go offline (hence the recommendation of a good UPS). If a
RAIDPac is not responding, remove the RAIDPac for 2 minutes
then reinsert it. This amounts to a RESET for the RAIDPac but will
not disturb the data. After 1 more minute, if the RAIDPac is still
unresponsive, then continue with the next steps.
In a three drive RAID 5 configuration, only one drive can
fail at a time in order for the data to remain intact. In a two drive
RAID 1 configuration, again, only one drive can fail at a time.
Should more than one fail before the failed drive is replaced and
the array has rebuilt, unrecoverable data loss will occur and the
array will have to be re-initialized before it can be used again.
Proceed to note which drive is faulty by noticing which
RAIDPac tray has a red indicator light showing. This will be the
drive which needs replacing. Disassemble the RAIDPac as
instructed in section 4.1 & 4.2. Replace the drive in the tray which
was indicated faulty. Preferably, use the same size and model of
drive. However, if this is not possible, a different drive of larger
capacity maybe used but the extra capacity will not be available.
Once the drive is installed, reassemble the unit and install it back
into the RAIDFrame. Once installed, the RAIDPac will reconstruct
the data on the replacement drive automatically. During this time,
the performance of the RAIDPac will be reduced but it is still fully
available and on-line. The rebuilding will have finished when there
are no more flashing RED indicators on the RAIDPac.
27
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
6.5
RAIDPac Configurations
Presently, RAIDPacs can come configured two ways:
• Three Drive RAID 0 (three times the the capacity of the
smallest drive, fast)
• Three Drive RAID 5 (twice the capacity of the smallest
drive, redundant data protection)
RAID level can be changed to the other available RAID level in
the field.
Changing RAID Levels on a RAIDPac
On the rear of your RAIDPac is a small rectangular cut-out
opposite the connector. Using a small stylus like instrument (an
open paper clip, cell phone stylus, jeweler's screw driver) adjust
the dip switches inside the access window according to the figures
and charts that follow.
RAID Level
Switch 1
Switch 2
*RAID 0
OFF (firmware V1.3)
ON (firmware V1.3)
ON (firmware V1.2)
OFF (firmware V1.2)
OFF
OFF
RAID 5
Illustration 15: RAIDPac DIP Switch Settings for Selecting RAID Type.
*Because the firmware version is not displayed on the RAIDPac,
try the older settings if the first do not work.*
28
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
Dip switch 1
Dip switch 2
Illustration 16: RAIDPac DIP Switches and Jumper Blocks.
After changing the RAID level the RAIDPac will need to be
reinitialized, partitioned, and formatted.
See the section above “RAIDPac Preparation”.
29
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
6.6
Over 2TB
RAIDPacs are capable of supporting volumes in excess of 2TB of
capacity. However this is not without limitations and configuration
considerations. First, the RAIDPac must be initialized with Jumper
2 covered. Jumper 2 must remain in placed thereafter as well.
Second, your operating system must support volumes larger than
2TB. At the time of this writing those operating systems known to
support volumes of this size are Windows Server 2003 SP1 and
above (using GPT) and Windows Vista. Other operating systems
may support these volumes size but we have not tested them yet.
6.7
Physical Security
The RAIDFrame 51 can have a small padlocks installed through the
holes on the release lever of the bays you wish to secure
preventing removal or installation of RAIDPacs. High-Rely does not
provide these locks at this time and must be sought elsewhere.
30
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
6.8
RAIDPac Status Indicators and Errors
Each RAIDPac has its own set of visual and audible indicators for
reporting status and errors. The table below explains their
combinations and meanings. This RAIDPac has an audible error
alarm as well as status lights on each drive tray. Should a failure
occur, a beeping audible tone will come from the RAIDPac. A RED
indicator on the drive with trouble will also be lit.
Disk Status (Green, Red or off)
Disk Access
Status
Green
Off
Disk is properly installed.
Green
On/Flash
Disk is being accessed.
Red
Off
No disk installed or disk failure.
Alternating Red/Green
On/Flash
Disk is rebuilding
initialized.
Illustration 17: RAIDPac Indicator Meanings.
31
Copyright © 2010 by Highly Reliable Systems. All rights reserved.
or
being
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising