Your Ambulatory Infusion Pump (AIP)

Your Ambulatory Infusion Pump (AIP)
Your Ambulatory Infusion Pump (AIP)
Princess Margaret
This pamphlet has information about:
• What an AIP pump is used for
• How to use and care for your AIP pump
• Important tips for safety
• Important numbers to call if you need help
Please visit the UHN Patient Education website for more health information: www.uhnpatienteducation.ca
© 2016 University Health Network. All rights reserved.
This information is to be used for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional
medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific
medical condition. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for non-commercial personal use only.
Author: AIP Task Force/ Updated by: Diana Incekol
Revised: 07/2016
Form: D-5649
It is important that you read through this whole pamphlet, and talk to your health care
team if you have any questions.
This pamphlet contains information about:
What is an Ambulatory Infusion Pump and what is it for?............................. page 2
What preparation is needed before I get the pump?....................................... page 3
How do I use the pump?................................................................................. page 3
How do I turn the pump on and off?............................................................... page 6
How do I start and stop the pump?................................................................. page 6
How do I change the batteries?....................................................................... page 6
What should I do if the alarm comes on?................................................... page 8
How do I take care of the pump? ................................................................... page 9
What should I be careful about if I am getting chemotherapy using
the pump?........................................................................................................ page 9
What should I watch out for and call the hospital about?............................... page 11
What should I do with the pump when I’m done treatment?.......................... page 12
Who do I call for help?................................................................................... page 13
What is an Ambulatory Infusion Pump (AIP) and
what is it for?
An Ambulatory Infusion Pump (AIP) is a small battery powered pump that slowly puts
medicine, like chemotherapy or antibiotics, into your body. The pump gives you the
medicine for the amount of time prescribed by your doctor.
You and your health care team have decided that you will get your medicine using an
AIP. This lets you get your medicine without having to stay at the hospital overnight and
lets you carry on with most of your daily activities.
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What preparation is needed before I get the pump?
You will need an intravenous catheter (IV). The type of IV that you get depends on the
type of medicine you need and how long you need to get the medicine.
Here is a list of types of IV’s that can be used with the pump:
• PICC line
• Tunneled catheter e.g. Hickman™
• Implanted port
• Peripheral IV
Try to wear loose clothing with large sleeves, short sleeves, or no sleeves. A shirt or
blouse with buttons at the front will make it easier for the nurse to get to your IV to
change the bandage and attach your medicine to the pump.
How do I use the pump?
Your nurse will attach the medicine to the pump and set the timer for the pump to give
you your medicine at specific times. The pump will then be connected to your IV. Your
nurse will tell you how long you will need to wear the pump. During this time you can
go about your normal activities, but with care.
The hospital will provide you with a carrying case for your pump. You can use a carrying
case of your own, like a waist fanny pack or shoulder purse.
Your nurse will go over instructions on how to take care of the pump and what to do
in case of an emergency. These instructions are very important and are included in this
pamphlet for you to review.
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The pump has several safety features that will keep you from accidentally changing
the settings. Your nurse will tell you which information is important for you to know.
Display Screen
Keypads
Medication Cassette
Medication Tubing
Clamp
Clamp is Closed
Clamp is Open
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ON
OFF
START
STOP
NEXT
ENTER
CLEAR
To save power when the pump is not being used, or
to return the pump to full power.
To start and stop the medicine, and to silence the
pump’s alarms.
To change from one display screen to the next.
Used by your nurse to program the pump.
To increase or decrease a setting, or to scroll up and
down through items on a menu.
PRIME
LOCK
To be used only by a nurse.
To be used only by a nurse.
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How do I turn the pump on and off?
Turning the pump on and off yourself can be very dangerous as it can affect when the
medicine is given to you. The nurse will set the pump timer for you before you leave
the hospital or before leaving your home. Please check with your nurse if you have any
questions or concerns.
How do I stop and start the pump?
Your pump will be started by the nurse at the hospital or in your home. Stopping and
starting the pump on your own may lead to your medicine being given too early, too late
or not at all. This can be very dangerous. Please check with your nurse if you have any
questions.
How do I change the batteries?
If “LowBat” or “Battery Depleted” appears on the pump’s display screen you will need
to change the batteries.
Use 2 “AA” batteries (like Duracell™ or Energizer™). You will be given two spare
batteries with the pump when you leave the hospital. Do not use rechargeable or heavyduty batteries because the pump will not work properly with these batteries.
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Follow steps 1 to 5 to change the battery:
1)
The battery compartment is on
the back of the pump. Press the lid
down and slide the battery cover
off.
2)
BATTERY
BATTERY
Remove the old batteries and
replace with new batteries. Make
sure to match the negative (-) and
positive (+) charge as shown in the
picture located inside the battery
compartment.
3)
Place the battery cover at the
middle of the battery
compartment and then slide
it on to close until you hear
a click.
4) The pump should turn on right away. You will hear several beeps as the pump turns on.
Once completed, the display screen will show “STOPPED”.
5) You must restart the pump after changing the batteries to make sure you are getting
the medicine. Press and hold the “STOP/START” button until 3 sets of dashes
(--- --- ---) go away from the display screen. If the pump is restarted correctly, the
word “STOPPED” goes away from the screen and the word “RUN” appears on the
screen. It is important to start the pump as soon as possible so your medicine will be
given to you at the right time.
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WARNING: For Your Safety
Do not use the pump if the battery door compartment is broken or loose because the
batteries will not be held properly in place. This may cause: the pump to lose power,
give you the wrong medicine, or give you the medicine at the wrong time.
What should I do if the alarm comes on?
If you hear an alarm from the pump, check the message on the display screen and follow
the directions in the Alarm Message Table below:
Alarm Message Table
Message on the
Screen Display
What should I do?
Error
There is a problem with the pump. Do not use the pump.
Press the stop/start key to silence the alarm, and turn off
the pump. You will need to come to the hospital to exchange
the pump. Please call the hospital (please see page 13) to ask
whether or not the pump needs to be replaced right way.
LowBat or Battery
Depleted
The batteries are low. Change the batteries as soon as
possible (see page 6 on how change the batteries).
High Pressure
This means that the medicine is not getting through the
tubing. There may be a “kink” or twist in the tubing or a
clamp might be closed. Check the tubing and make sure
that all clamps are open.
Service due
Press the stop/start key to silence the alarm. The pump will
still function but, you will need to come to the hospital to
exchange the pump. Call the hospital (see page 13) to discuss
whether or not the pump needs to be replaced immediately.
Air in line detected
Press the stop/start key to silence the alarm. Contact the
hospital (see page 13) and ask for help with your pump.
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How do I take care of the pump?
Here are a few safety tips you can follow while you have the pump:
• Keep the pump away from damp and humid areas, such as a bath or sauna.
• Do not place the pump in water and keep it away from any fluid that may spill on it.
• If you drop the pump in water, take it out right away and wipe it dry with a towel.
Please call the hospital (see page 13). You might need to come to the hospital to
replace the pump.
• When bathing or showering keep the pump and your IV dressing dry by covering
them with a plastic bag. Place the pump on a chair beside the tub or hang it on a
hook outside the shower. Using a handheld showerhead can help keep the pump
and IV dressing dry.
• When sleeping, you may place the pump under your pillow.
Do not place it on the floor.
• Always check to see that the pump and tubing are near each other. This will stop
the tubing from being pulled and coming apart from the IV or pump.
What should I be careful about if I am getting
chemotherapy using the pump?
Chemotherapy drugs are dangerous to cancer cells and healthy cells. Your body can
take in chemotherapy drugs by direct skin contact, breathing them in (inhalation), or by
swallowing them (ingestion).
Here are some safety steps you can take to lessen the chances of your family and pets
coming in contact with chemotherapy drugs:
• Do not remove or disconnect the pump tubing or medicine bag containing
chemotherapy. Keep the tubing and bag attached to the pump and return everything
to the hospital.
• You and your family members should know how to use the items found in the
chemotherapy spill kit given to you at the start of your treatment. Keep this kit
somewhere where you will be able to get it quickly.
• Disposable gloves should be worn if someone other than yourself is cleaning up your
bodily waste (vomit, stool, or urine) and when handling soiled linens, a bedpan or
urinal, or anything else that may have come in contact with chemotherapy.
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• Once your treatment is completely done, do not re-use the carrying case that was
used to carry the chemotherapy bag and pump during your treatments until it has
been washed. The carrying case must be washed by itself.
• If you notice that the chemotherapy bag or IV tubing connector is leaking, or if the
IV tubing is not connected to the catheter, you or your caregiver should refer to the
instructions on your chemotherapy spill kit.
1. Open kit.
2. Put on the plastic gloves, or use a plastic bag if gloves are not available.
3. Close all the clamps on the IV.
4. Stop the pump by pressing the “STOP/START” button and continue to hold
until 3 sets of dashes (--- --- ---) appear on the display screen. If the pump is
stopped correctly, the word “STOPPED” will appear on the screen.
5. Wrap blue absorbent pad or towel around leaking area and tape. If completely
disconnected, place treatment bag and AIP in the re-sealable bag provided.
6. If the chemotherapy has spilled or dripped onto a surface, place the other blue
absorbent pad or towel over the spill to soak up excess.
7. Put this blue absorbent pad or towel into the re-sealable bag.
8. Use a cloth that can be thrown away to wash the area with warm soapy water
and rinse with clear water 2 times.
9. Put this cloth into the re-sealable plastic bag when you are finished washing
the surface.
10.Remove the gloves and place them in the re-sealable bag.
11.Close the re-sealable bag securely.
12.Wash you hands well with warm soapy water.
13.You will need to bring the plastic bags with the bottle, cloth and gloves to the
hospital to be thrown away in a special garbage bin.
14.Call the hospital (see page 13). Tell the person who answers the phone that
you have a "chemotherapy spill". You may need to come to the hospital to
replace the chemotherapy bag or tubing.
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What should I watch out for and call the hospital about?
Take a look at your pump, IV and the medicine bag at least once or twice a day and watch
for any of the points below. Call the hospital right away (see page 13 for important phone
numbers) if you notice any of the following:
• Redness, swelling, discharge, or fluid leakage from or around the IV.
• Long lasting pain or discomfort, numbness or tingling around the IV site, shoulder,
chest, or jaw.
• The pump does not appear to be working or continues to alarm.
• The amount of fluid in the medicine bag or the plastic cassette does not seem to be
getting lower as the day goes on.
• A pocket of air in the tubing, casette bad or IV bag
• Blood pooled along the IV site or tubing connection site
• The IV catheter or needle is coming out from the IV insertion site. Do not push the
IV catheter back into place as this can lead to an infection.
Then, follow steps 1 to 3 below:
1. Clamp the IV tubing immediately.
2. Stop the pump by pressing the “STOP/START” button and continue to hold until
3 sets of dashes (--- --- ---) appear on the display screen.
3. If the pump is stopped correctly, the word “STOPPED” will appear on the screen.
4. Call the hospital (see page 13) for further instructions.
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What should I do with the pump when I am
done treatment?
Your nurse will tell you whether you will need to come into the hospital to have your
pump removed or if a community nurse will visit you in your home to remove the pump.
You must bring the pump back to the clinic on your next visit.
It is very important that the pumps are returned. If you are not able to return the pump,
please call the hospital (see page 13) and ask the hospital operator for the Chemotherapy
Unit or the Transfusion Unit. Ask to speak to the “Charge Nurse” to talk about ways of
returning the pump.
Please return the pump to:
The Chemotherapy Unit (4th Floor) or
Hematology South Clinic (2nd Floor)
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
610 University Ave, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9
Who do I call for help?
This section has important phone numbers to call if you have questions or need help.
If at anytime you are not able to get help from someone at the hospital go to your nearest
emergency department to get help with the pump.
Please have the following information ready when calling the hospital:
1. Name of medicine on the medicine label: 2. Start date of medicine: 3. Expected stop date: 4. Your doctor’s name: 5. Your nurse case manager’s name and phone number:
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Important phone numbers
Call the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre at
416-946-2000 (English phone line)
Weekdays (Monday-Friday) between 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
• Chemotherapy Unit and Transfusion Unit Patients:
Ask the operator to connect you to the unit then ask for the "Charge Nurse".
• If your pump was connected when you were an inpatient:
Ask the operator to page the “IV Resource Nurse”.
Weekdays from 5:00 pm - 7:30 am, any time on weekends, and during holidays:
Ask the operator to "page" the Nursing Supervisor.
Weekdays (Monday - Friday) between 7:30 am to 9:00 am
Go to your nearest Hospital Emergency Department.
Do you need an interpreter? Please tell your healthcare provider or
phone operator to contact UHN Interpretation and Translation Services.
Interpretation is provided free of charge to University Health Network
patients.
The development of patient education resources is supported by the Princess Margaret
Cancer Foundation.
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