License Content Publish License Creative Commons Integration

License Content Publish License Creative Commons Integration
Creative Commons Integration
With Your Website
http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Web_Integration
From simple blogs to elaborate user-generated content sites,
there are easy ways to share website content by publishing it
under a Creative Commons license. This document provides
a basic overview of how you may integrate Creative Commons
licensing into your website.
License Content
http://creativecommons.org/license/
Visit the Creative Commons license page and use our simple
license chooser to select a Creative Commons license that
indicates how others may use your creative content. Many
websites apply a default license to govern all the content on
that site. For example, Creative Commons publishes all content
on its site under the Creative Commons Attribution license
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) and displays this
at the bottom of every page.
Publish License
Basic
http://creativecommons.org/projects/marking
After reviewing the conditions and selecting a license, grab the
basic HTML code that is produced and add it to your website. For
example, users who choose the Creative Commons Attribution
license receive the following code snippet:
Many wikis and remix sites use a single default license for
the entire site so that all the content is cross-compatible.
User-generated content sites like Flickr, Blip.tv, and
SlideShare give contributors the option of setting a default
content license, and allow the use of a different license for
individual content items.
<a rel=”license”
href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/”>
<img alt=”Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License”
src=”http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/us/88x31.png”/>
</a>
<br/>
This work is licensed under a <a rel=”license”
href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/”>
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
United States License</a>.
The code will display an icon as well as a link to the full
license deed hosted at the Creative Commons site. This is the
appropriate way to mark your CC-licensed content.
If you are using multiple licenses on your website, replace the license
URLs with the appropriate variables that signal another license.
The CC Javascript Widget (http://wiki.creativecommons.org/
Jswidget) provides another lightweight method for integrating
license selection into web applications. The licensing widget is
used by TypePad as well as in WpLicense for Wordpress.
Intermediate
http://wiki.creativecommons.org/RDFa
RDFa allows building metadata into XHTML and other XML
documents with attributes. It is a good way to exhibit semantic
relationships for search engines. RDFa allows users to
annotate human readable notices on individual assets that
include the custom properties needed for attribution and other
useful properties.
Creative Commons Integration With Your Website
morePermissions
Advanced
http://wiki.creativecommons.org/XMP
http://creativecommons.org/projects/ccplus
XMP facilitates embedding metadata in files using a subset of RDF.
Most notably, XMP supports embedding metadata in PDF and
other image formats, though it is designed to support nearly any file
type. Further information for more advanced users can be found at
http://creativecommons.org/projects/ccREL.
The CC+ initiative makes it possible for you to grant
users rights beyond the rights granted by a CC license.
Use rel=”cc:morePermissions” to denote links allowing
a user to do more than the CC public license permits,
e.g. purchase commercial rights.
License-aware User Interface
Search
http://search.creativecommons.org/
Some sites facilitate search based on license properties, such as:
1. Any Creative Commons license.
2. Creative Commons licenses that allow remix.
3. Creative Commons licenses that allow commercial use.
Participate
http://wiki.creativecommons.org/
Please visit the Creative Commons Wiki for more
information on this project and to participate in refining
these documentation efforts. See the developer mailing list
(http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/cc-devel) for information
on subscribing and list archives. Finally, help out by adding
your CC-licensed project to our Content Directories
(http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Content_Directories).
Examples of search engines with these capabilities built in can
be found at Creative Commons Search.
Browse
You can create a CC-portal on your site for browsing CC-licensed
content. This could be based upon tags, internal marking of
licensing, or any way you see fit to limit browsing. Good examples
are provided by Flickr (http://flickr.com/creativecommons/) and
Jamendo (http://jamendo.com/creativecommons/).
More Information
Please visit http://creativecommons.org/
Share, reuse, and remix — legally.
www.creativecommons.org
Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising