AgfaPhoto Vista 400, 135-12
Agfa Photo Broschüre_14-6 engl
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Seite 1
Technical Data
Range of AgfaPhoto standard films
-1
400
500
This brochure contains information on the quality and features of
AgfaPhoto amateur colour films. More specific data, figures and
charts are given in the appendix.
AgfaPhoto colour films are high-grade products for all applications in amateur photography. The speed ratings available range
from the standard sensitivity, for normal and very bright conditions, up to high sensitivity for bad to critical lighting conditions
or fast-moving subjects. The optimum material is therefore
available for any situation which may arise in normal practice.
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Vista 100
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Vista 200
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Vista 400
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APS star 200
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CTprecisa 100
Agfa Photo Broschüre_14-6 engl
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General comments
Vista and APS star
A film's colour rendition is governed by a number of factors. The
emulsions' spectral sensitivity or sensitisation is particularly
important, when it comes to reproducing true-to-nature colours
with the maximum accuracy. By means of the EYE VISION
technology incorporated in all Vista and APS star films, it is
now possible to match, to a large extent, the films' sensitisation
to the colour perception of the human eye. The effect is shown
schematically in the following diagrams. The EYE VISION technology achieves more accurate colour fidelity, and largely eliminates the colour falsifications present in films with conventional
sensitisation such as:
• an unpleasant green cast with fluorescent light (e.g. neon tubes),
Spectral sensitivity of the eye
In principle, all these speeds are for all photographic situations
that might occur under normal circumstances (e.g. people, portraits, landscapes, groups, buildings, holidays, animals, plants,
flowers, documentation etc.). Nevertheless, it is still worthwhile observing a number of simple rules in the choice of the
film speed.
Lightning
– Bright, e. g. cloudless
– Medium, e. g. overcast
– Weak, e. g. dawn
Moving subject*
– Almost motionless
– Medium-fast
– Fast
Lens*
– High speed
– Low Speed
Flash (medium light output)
– small rooms
– Large rooms
ISO
100/21°
ISO
200/24°
ISO
400/27°
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
* Depending on the lighting
blue
400
450
green
500
550
Camera setting
red
600
650
nm
Spectral sensitivity of the film emulsions
Modern cameras adjust themselves automatically to the film
speed (by reading the DX code). Cameras without automatic
lighting control must be set manually to the film speed stated
on the pack.
previously
Exposure latitude
blue
400
450
red
green
500
550
600
650
nm
• a shift towards red in certain blue-coloured flowers (hortensia,
clematis, delphinium etc.),
• the brown rendition of particular green fabric colours,
• the absence of texture in certain red colours (e.g. roses).
Most cameras have automatic exposure control, which sets the
most favourable ratio of exposure time and aperture. Nevertheless, many photographs are not correctly exposed, because the
automatic control of some cameras cannot cope with unusual
or critical lighting conditions. Backlit shots are a typical example. Without lighting adjustment, the negative or slide may well
end up being under-exposed by one or two f-stops. Depending
on the film type, AgfaPhoto films tolerate exposure errors
up to 5 f-stops (under-exposure up to 2, over-exposure up to
3 f-stops) without noticeable reductions in quality.
Exposure notes
Directions for use
Film speed
Today‘s ISO values are a combination of the former ASA and
DIN values. The following table illustrates this point.
ISO
100/21°
200/24°
400/27°
2
ASA
100
200
400
DIN
21°
24°
27°
In comparison to ISO 100/21°
twice as fast
four times as fast
When in doubt, it is good to err on the generous side in the
exposure of colour negatives (i.e. stop up = lower f-number),
but to be more cautious with slide films (i.e. stop down slightly
= higher f-number). In this way you are always on the safe side:
over-exposing a negative film and slightly under-exposing a
slide film produces an increase in colour saturation.
Agfa Photo Broschüre_14-6 engl
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Daylight
Long and short-term effects
Daylight is not just daylight. In the morning and in late afternoon the sun is at an angle. As a result, the light is warmer and
contains more red. At noon, on the other hand, when the sun is
shining vertically, the light is colder and contains more blue.
This quality of the light, which is known as the colour temperature, is measured in Kelvin.
All AgfaPhoto films are suitable for use in medium daylight, at
a colour temperature of 5500 Kelvin. If the light is too cold, it
can be adjusted with a red filter (e.g. R 1.5 or R 3), and if it is
too warm, with a blue filter (e.g. B 1.5 or B 3). These corrections
should only be used with slide films.
Extremely long or short exposure times can affect the speed
and colour balance of the film. This is known as the reciprocity
effect.
The reciprocity effect of AgfaPhoto films is excellent. If the
exposure time is within 1/10 000th and 10 second, the colours
and speed remain the same. However if the exposure is any
longer or shorter, then it may be necessary to make exposure
or colour adjustments.
Flash
Electronic flash-guns and flash bulbs are suitable for medium
daylight. The guide number of the flash depends on the film
speed.
Tip: if a subject is dark or far away, you can achieve better flash
photos by stopping up one step.
Artificial light
Artificial light, i.e. light from sources such as photographic
lamps, electric bulbs or fluorescent tubes, has its own characteristics. Photographic lamps have a colour temperature of 3400
K, electric bulbs 3200 K.
AgfaPhoto negative films and AgfaPhoto slide films are ideal for
artificial light. For best results a certain type of filter is required,
depending on the light source. However as each filter reduces
the intensity of the light, this must be compensated as follows.
Type of lamp
Filter
Photographic lamp 80 B
Electric bulbs
80 A
Adjustment
+ 1 2/3 f-stops
+ 2 f-stops
UV blocking filters
Each AgfaPhoto film contains an integrated UV protection filter
which absorbs any invisible UV radiation contained in daylight. It
is therefore not necessary to use a UV blocking filter, though it
is useful for a physical protection of the lens.
Polarizing filters
This type of filter is used either for the reduction of reflections,
e.g. on glass and water (though not metal), or for the production
of certain effects (e.g. a more intensive blue sky). Depending on
the filter type, the exposure time needs to be increased by a
certain factor (see the instructions for your camera or filter).
X-ray checks
X-ray checks, which are inevitable before a flight, can sometimes cause problems. We have found that if an X-ray machine
is marked “Film Safe” and the checks do not exceed the usual
number, then they do not normally affect a film. Nonetheless
films should never be checked in with the normal luggage, but
kept with your hand luggage. Visual checks are always safer.
This applies in particular to high-speed films, because the
sensitivity of a film to X-rays is proportional to its sensitivity to
visible light.
Storage
Remember never to store films under moist or humid conditions.
Neither should films be exposed to heat.
Unexposed films: The cooler an unexposed film is stored, the
longer it will last. Furthermore, we recommend keeping the film
in the original pack, which is moisture-proof (i.e. water-tight), so
that the photographic qualities remain stable. Films that have
been stored in a refrigerator should be kept at room temperature for about two hours before use, as the atmospheric humidity
might otherwise produce condensation on the cold film. A car
glove compartment is not suitable for storing films. If the sun is
hot, they can easily develop temperatures of up to 80°C/175°F.
Fumes, such as formaldehyde, can also be harmful. They are
released by furniture, cosmetics, adhesives and varnish.
The camera itself only provides inadequate protection. Instead,
put your camera in a polyethylene bag if necessary.
Exposed films: Once exposed, a film should be developed as
soon as possible. The “latent” image (i.e. the pre-development
exposure) may otherwise deteriorate as a result of long-term
storage or unfavourable weather conditions, and this disturbs
the colour balance.
Developed films: The same safety precautions apply to developed films, i.e. they must be kept in a cool and dry place and protected from harmful fumes and direct light.
Colour filters
Colour filters are intended for black-and-white photography.
They are not suitable for colour, as they produce considerable
colour shifts.
3
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Processing
Sharpness
Film development processes are standardized throughout the
world.
AgfaPhoto films are “process-compatible” and are developed in
the following processes:
AgfaPhoto negative films
AP 70/C-41
AgfaPhoto slide films
AP 44/E-6
International name of the chart: MTF (Modulation Transfer
Function) which defines the sharpness of the image. The higher
the transfer factor in %, the lower the loss during transmission
of the light. References:
– Exposure:
daylight
– Densitometry:
visual filter (Vλ)
From production to the finished picture –
Agfa quality assurance
Modern production methods and strict inspections ensure that
no films are shipped unless they are within Agfaís extremely
narrow tolerance limits. To ensure that this high quality standard reaches the end user, Agfa has incorporated a number of
features to enhance the stability of its products.
• High storage stability, which largely prevents any changes to
the qualities of the film during storage, by the retailer or by
the customer.
• Extremely wide exposure latitude, which largely compensates for any exposure errors that might occur in practice (e.g.
with backlit photographs or a weak flash).
• High resistance to processing fluctuations during development – fluctuations which can never be totally avoided, even
if process monitoring is very thorough.
Specific product details
The charts and figures shown on page 5 to 7 are briefly explained
below, and the conditions of measurement are also described.
All the figures are averages of various production runs. For some
emulsion batches they may vary slightly from each other, in spite
of the very tightly main-tained tolerances.
Spectral sensitivity
Chart to define the colour sensitivity of an unprocessed film.
References:
– Equi-energy spectrum
– Measured density: 0,5 above minimum density for colour
negativ films, 1,0 above minimum density for colour reversal
films
Absorption of emulsion dyes
Chart to define the relative effect of a processed film on incident light. With colour negative films, it measures the spectral
sensitization of the subsequent print material, with colour slide
films it measures the viewerís perception under certain defined
standard lighting conditions. References:
– Neutral object of medium brightness
– Minimum density
Colour density curves
Chart to define the density of dyes in a processed film, depending on the lighting. References:
– Exposure:
daylight 1/100th sec
– Process:
AP 70/C-41 or AP 44/E-6
– Densitometry:
Status A or Status M
4
Granularity
Granularity is the irregular density of an exposed and processed film surface. The numeric value is based on the RMS (root
mean square) method of measurement. The smaller the value,
the finer the grain of the film. References:
– Exposure:
daylight
– Densitometry:
visual filter (Vλ)
– Reading:
diffused density 1,0
40 µm scanning aperture
– magnification:
12x
Emulsion base
The film base consists of acetyl cellulose and has a thickness
of approx. 120 µm. The base of the films in the Advanced Photo
System is made of PEN (Poly Ethylene Napthalate), and is
approx. 90 µm thick.
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AgfaPhoto Vista 100
AgfaPhoto Vista 200
AgfaPhoto Vista 400
Spectral sensitivity:
Spectral sensitivity:
Spectral sensitivity:
Spectral density:
Spectral density:
Spectral density:
Sharpness:
Sharpness:
Sharpness:
Colour densitiy curves:
Colour densitiy curves:
Colour densitiy curves:
Speed:
Granularity (x 1000):
ISO 100/21°
RMS 3.5
Speed:
Granularity (x 1000):
ISO 200/24°
RMS 4.0
Speed:
Granularity (x 1000):
ISO 400/27°
RMS 4.5
5
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AgfaPhoto CTprecisa 100
Spectral sensitivity:
Spectral sensitivity:
lg Sensitivity
APS star 200
2.0
1.0
Blue
0
Green
Red
–1.0
400
600
700
Wavelength (nm)
Spectral density:
Spectral density
Spectral density:
500
1.5
Visual grey
1.0
Yellow
0.5
0
Cyan
500
600
700
Wavelength (nm)
Sharpness:
Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness:
400
Magenta
150
100
50
20
10
2
10
20
50
100
Lines per mm
Colour densitiy curves:
Density
Colour densitiy curves:
5
4.0
Green
Red
3.0
Blue
2.0
1.0
0
–4.0
Speed:
Granularity (x 1000):
6
ISO 200/24°
RMS 4.1
–3.0
–2.0
Speed:
Granularity (x 1000):
–1.0
0
+1.0
lg exposure (Lx · s)
ISO 100/21°
RMS 10.0
Agfa Photo Broschüre_14-6 engl
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Seite 7
The range
Colour negative films
Film type
Vista 100
ISO 100/21°
Vista 200
ISO 200/24°
Vista 400
ISO 400/27°
135-36
x
x
x
135-24
x
x
x
135-12
x
x
x
Systemcode-no. frames
240-25
Technical Data Sheet AP-F
Stand: 07/2007
AGFAPHOTO is used under License of Agfa-Gevaert NV & Co. KG.
AgfaPhoto Holding GmbH · www.agfaphoto.com
Lupus Imaging & Media GmbH Co. KG
info@lupus-im.com · www.lupus-imaging-media.com
Slide films
APS star 200
ISO 200/24°
CTprecisa 100
ISO 100/21°
x
x
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