Solutions and Integrations

Solutions and Integrations
HP Business Availability Center
for the Windows and Solaris operating systems
Software Version: 8.01
Solutions and Integrations
Document Release Date: March 2009
Software Release Date: March 2009
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4
Table of Contents
Welcome to This Guide .......................................................................11
How This Guide Is Organized .............................................................11
Who Should Read This Guide .............................................................13
Getting More Information ..................................................................13
P A R T I : H P B U S I N E S S A V A IL A B I L I T Y C E N T E R F O R S O A
Chapter 1: HP Business Availability Center for SOA...........................17
SOA Solution Overview .......................................................................18
Architecture .........................................................................................19
SOA Discovery and Dependency Mapping Modules ..........................22
Integration of HP Diagnostics Data with SOA ....................................25
Integration of HP SOA Systinet ...........................................................27
SiteScope Monitors for SOA ................................................................28
Anti-Aging Enrichment .......................................................................29
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Workflow ......................30
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Scenarios .......................34
Enrich the SOA Model From Scripts....................................................42
Deploy SiteScope SOA Monitors .........................................................46
Run Business Process Monitor Transactions for SOA .........................48
Troubleshooting and Limitations .......................................................50
Chapter 2: HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views
and Reports.....................................................................................51
SOA Views and Their Components ....................................................52
HP Business Availability Center for SOA Reports ...............................59
View SOA Data in Dashboard .............................................................60
Customize SOA Reports.......................................................................63
SOA Views and Reports User Interface................................................64
PART II: HP BUSINESS AVAILABILITY CENTER FOR SAP APPLICATIONS
Chapter 3: HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications ..115
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications – Overview ...116
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications License .........117
5
Table of Contents
Architecture .......................................................................................118
SAP Service.........................................................................................119
Collecting SAP System Information..................................................120
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications ........121
Deploy the SAP CCMS Monitor to Retrieve Measurements from
the SAP System.............................................................................124
Activate the SAP Service ....................................................................129
Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications ..........130
Create Monitors ................................................................................134
Use a Business Process Monitor Profile to Simulate SAP Users.........135
Troubleshooting and Limitations .....................................................143
Chapter 4: HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
Reports and Views .......................................................................147
SAP Systems View ..............................................................................148
Business Process Monitor CIs in SAP Systems View – Details...........152
SiteScope Measurements in SAP Systems View .................................155
CCMS Counters .................................................................................156
Display SAP Information in Dashboard ............................................157
Default CIs in the SAP Systems View ................................................159
SAP-Related KPIs................................................................................164
SAP-Related Menu Options ...............................................................164
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
User Interface ................................................................................165
P A R T I II : H P B U S I N E S S A V A I L A B IL IT Y C E N T E R F O R S I E B E L A PP L I C A T I O N S
Chapter 5: HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Administration .............................................................................179
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications – Overview ...............................................................180
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications License......182
Architecture .......................................................................................183
Working with Firewalls .....................................................................184
Siebel Monitors..................................................................................185
The Siebel Service ..............................................................................186
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications – Workflow ..............................................................187
Configure HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications ..................................................................................203
Verify Diagnostics-Related Settings...................................................205
Delete Links Between Siebel Applications and Business
Process Steps..................................................................................208
Deploy the SiteScope Siebel Monitors...............................................209
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Table of Contents
Check If the Siebel Service Is Active..................................................212
Customize HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications ..................................................................................213
Siebel CIs Properties ..........................................................................216
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Administration User Interface ......................................................217
Troubleshooting and Limitations .....................................................223
Chapter 6: HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Views and Reports .......................................................................235
Diagnostics Tools...............................................................................236
Siebel Views .......................................................................................240
Run the Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic Tool ......................243
Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostics
Tool – Details ................................................................................244
Define a Different Log Folder Per Siebel Component CI..................248
Display Siebel Information in Dashboard.........................................249
Context Menu Options .....................................................................254
Default CITs in the Siebel View.........................................................254
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Views and Reports User Interface .................................................257
PART IV: THE HP BUSINESS AVAILABILITY CENTER APIS
Chapter 7: Introduction to APIs .......................................................295
APIs Overview....................................................................................295
Chapter 8: Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API .........297
Introducing the Generic Reporting Engine API ................................298
Data Returned ...................................................................................300
Querying with a Browser...................................................................301
Using the Web Service.......................................................................301
Supported SQL Syntax.......................................................................302
Query Limitations .............................................................................303
Date-Time Values ..............................................................................304
byTime Function ...............................................................................305
Query Examples.................................................................................306
Legacy Queries...................................................................................307
Chapter 9: The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API ......................321
Conventions ......................................................................................322
Using the HP Universal CMDB Web Service API ..............................322
HP Universal CMDB Web Service API Reference ..............................324
Returning Unambiguous Topology Map Elements...........................325
Call the Web Service..........................................................................328
Query the UCMDB ............................................................................328
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Table of Contents
Update the UCMDB ..........................................................................333
Query the UCMDB Class Model .......................................................335
Query for Impact Analysis.................................................................337
UCMDB Query Methods ...................................................................337
UCMDB Update Methods .................................................................352
UCMDB Impact Analysis Methods ...................................................355
Use Cases ...........................................................................................357
Examples............................................................................................359
UCMDB General Parameters ............................................................390
UCMDB Output Parameters .............................................................394
Chapter 10: The HP Universal CMDB Java API .................................397
Conventions ......................................................................................398
Using the HP Universal CMDB Java API ...........................................398
General Structure of Application ......................................................399
Retrieve the API Jar File .....................................................................400
Create an Integration User ................................................................401
HP Universal CMDB Java API Reference ...........................................402
Use Cases ...........................................................................................402
Examples............................................................................................404
Chapter 11: Working with the Dashboard API.................................409
Building Queries ................................................................................409
Query Examples.................................................................................412
PART V: EMS INTEGRATIONS
Chapter 12: EMS Integration Administration...................................415
Integration Administration Application Overview ..........................416
Understanding the Host, Host-Software Element, or
Application-Host Integration Adapters ........................................417
EMS Monitor CI.................................................................................420
Reconciliation of Hosts .....................................................................420
Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data) into
HP Business Availability Center....................................................422
EMS Integration Administration User Interface ...............................431
Chapter 13: HP Service Manager Integration .................................441
HP Service Manager Integration Overview .......................................442
Set Up the Integration of HP Service Manager Data with
HP Business Availability Center Components - Workflow ..........447
View HP Service Manager Data in HP Business Availability
Center - Scenario...........................................................................450
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Table of Contents
View HP Service Manager Data in Dashboard and Service
Level Management........................................................................452
Before you Upgrade HP Service Manager From Previous Versions...473
Troubleshooting and Limitations .....................................................474
Chapter 14: HP Operations Manager Integration............................477
Understanding the HP Operations Manager Integration .................477
Use the EMS Integration Tool for HP Operations Manager
Server Events .................................................................................481
Chapter 15: NetScout nGenius Integration ......................................487
NetScout Integration Overview.........................................................487
Use the EMS Integration Tool for NetScout Data .............................490
P A R T V I : H P O P E R A T I O N S O R C H E S TR A TI O N I N T E G RA TI O N
Chapter 16: HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations
Orchestration Integration.............................................................495
HP Operations Orchestration Integration Overview ........................496
Integrate HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations
Orchestration – Workflow ............................................................496
Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to
HP Business Availability Center – Workflow for Windows..........499
Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to
HP Business Availability Center – Workflow for Solaris...............500
Predefined Mappings.........................................................................501
HP Operations Orchestration Integration User Interface .................503
P A R T V I I : D IA G N O S T I C S I N T E G R A T IO N
Chapter 17: HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability
Center Integration ........................................................................513
HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center
Integration Overview ....................................................................514
View HP Diagnostics Data in HP Business Availability Center.........515
Access Online Help for HP Diagnostics in HP Business
Availability Center ........................................................................516
Troubleshooting and Limitations .....................................................517
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Table of Contents
P A R T V I I I : P E R F O R M A N C E A N D A V A IL A B I L I T Y L IF E C Y C L E
Chapter 18: Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production
Analysis Reports ............................................................................521
Production Analysis Reports Overview .............................................522
Analyzing Production Analysis Reports ............................................522
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow............................526
Generate a Script Template ...............................................................529
Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario .........................530
Refine Your Script Template in VuGen.............................................533
Configure and Run a Load Test.........................................................537
Work with the Central Repository Service (CRS)..............................542
Production Analysis Reports User Interface ......................................546
Chapter 19: Business Process Recognition .......................................573
Business Process Recognition Application – Overview .....................573
Business Process Recognition Architecture .......................................575
Convert Real User Monitor Data into Business Process
Recognition Data ..........................................................................576
Deploy Business Process Recognition and Analyze the Results........577
Customize Business Process Recognition..........................................579
Business Process Recognition User Interface.....................................580
Index..................................................................................................601
10
Welcome to This Guide
This guide describes the various solutions and integrations available for
HP Business Availability Center.
This chapter includes:
➤
How This Guide Is Organized on page 11
➤
Who Should Read This Guide on page 13
➤
Getting More Information on page 13
How This Guide Is Organized
The guide contains the following parts:
Part I
HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Describes the tasks to perform in HP Business Availability Center to monitor
your Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) enterprise environment.
Part II
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
Describes how to install the SAP solution, the specific tasks involved in
administering it, how the SAP discovery process discovers SAP-related CIs
and general CIs (such as hosts) that are related to them, and provides
information that can help troubleshoot the HP Business Availability Center
SAP solution.
11
Welcome to This Guide
Part III
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Describes how to administer the Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications solution, the specific tasks involved in administering it, how
the Siebel discovery process discovers Siebel-related CIs and general CIs that
are related to them, and provides information that can help troubleshoot
the Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications solution.
Part IV
The HP Business Availability Center APIs
Describes how to use the HP Business Availability Center generic data
engine API to extract data from HP Business Availability Center for use with
third-party or custom tools. Also describes how to use the CMDB API to
read/write data from/to the CMDB and the Dashboard API to retrieve
information about one or more views in an HP Business Availability Center
system through a URL-based query to the database.
Part V
EMS Integrations
Describes how to build new integrations or customize out-of-the-box
integrations for EMS (Enterprise Management Systems) applications, and
how to integrate HP Operations Manager data, HP ServiceCenter data,
HP Service Manager data, and NetScout nGenius data into HP Business
Availability Center.
Part VI
HP Operations Orchestration Integration
Describes how to set up an integration with HP Operations Orchestration
(OO), enabling you to run OO run books on CIs in Business Availability
Center.
Part VII Diagnostics Integration
Describes how to configure the integration between HP Diagnostics and HP
Business Availability Center.
12
Welcome to This Guide
Part VIII Performance and Availability Lifecycle
Describes how to use Performance and Availability Lifecycle to integrate
HP Business Availability Center and HP Performance Center. Also, enables
you to construct load tests based on real-user transaction data collected by
the Real User Monitor, and how to use the Business Process Recognition tool
to discover business processes that can help you monitor what the business
processes that are important to you.
Who Should Read This Guide
This guide is intended for the following users of HP Business Availability
Center:
➤
HP Business Availability Center administrators
➤
HP Business Availability CenterHP Universal CMDB platform administrators
➤
HP Business Availability CenterHP Universal CMDB application
administrators
➤
HP Business Availability CenterHP Universal CMDB data collector
administrators
➤
HP Business Availability Center end users
➤
HP Business Availability Center integration developers
Readers of this guide should be knowledgeable about navigating and using
enterprise applications, and be familiar with HP Business Availability Center
and enterprise monitoring and management concepts.
Getting More Information
For a complete list of all online documentation included with HP Business
Availability Center, additional online resources, information on acquiring
documentation updates, and typographical conventions used in this guide,
see the the HP Business Availability Center Deployment Guide PDF.
13
Welcome to This Guide
14
Part I
HP Business Availability Center for SOA
16
1
HP Business Availability Center for SOA
This chapter describes Business Availability Center for SOA.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
SOA Solution Overview on page 18
➤
Architecture on page 19
➤
SOA Discovery and Dependency Mapping Modules on page 22
➤
Integration of HP Diagnostics Data with SOA on page 25
➤
Integration of HP SOA Systinet on page 27
➤
SiteScope Monitors for SOA on page 28
➤
Anti-Aging Enrichment on page 29
Tasks
➤
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Workflow on page 30
➤
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Scenarios on page 34
➤
Enrich the SOA Model From Scripts on page 42
➤
Deploy SiteScope SOA Monitors on page 46
➤
Run Business Process Monitor Transactions for SOA on page 48
Troubleshooting and Limitations on page 50
Concepts
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
SOA Solution Overview
HP Business Availability Center enables you to monitor your Service
Oriented Architecture (SOA) environment, by monitoring the performance
of SOA components within the environment. The data is collected by the
following HP Business Availability Center components:
➤
Discovery and Dependency Mapping jobs identify and map the SOA-based
applications in your system from the UDDI registry and from the Web
services deployed on IBM WebSphere, BEA WebLogic, Oracle Application
Server, and IIS containers. For more information, see “SOA Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Modules” on page 22.
➤
Dedicated SiteScope monitors collect Web service metrics and UDDI server
health data. For more information, see “SiteScope Monitors for SOA” on
page 28.
➤
Business Process Monitors collect Web service performance data using
Business Process Monitor transactions that run Web services scripts. For
more information, see “Run Business Process Monitor Transactions for SOA”
on page 48.
➤
Diagnostics probes collect Web service performance and availability metrics
directly on the Web server machines. For more information, see “Integration
of HP Diagnostics Data with SOA” on page 25.
Diagnostics data is displayed in SOA reports and views.
Business Process Monitor and SiteScope are used for synthetic monitoring of
Web services while Diagnostics is used for real monitoring of Web services
calls.
The collected data is used to build the SOA views and reports available from
Applications > Business Availability Center for SOA. For details, see “SOA
Views and Their Components” on page 52.
To gain visibility into performance or availability issues affecting Service
Level Agreements (SLAs), you create SLAs centered around your HP Business
Availability Center for SOA Web Services Configuration Items (CIs) . For
details on SLAs, see “Service Level Management - Overview” in Using Service
Level Management.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
CIs that originate from Systinet (which represent HP SOA Systinet Web
Services) can also be added to SLAs. For details on Systinet CIs, see
“Integration with HP SOA Systinet” in Using Service Level Management. You
can drill down to HP SOA Systinet during agreement creation or editing to
view contract information for Web services in HP SOA Systinet. For details
on the Systinet Web Service Data drill down, see “Systinet Web Service
Data” in Using Dashboard.
Architecture
The following illustration shows the components of HP Business Availability
Center for SOA:
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
All monitors create their own topology in the UCMDB (Universal
Configuration Management database). In addition to user transactions,
Business Process Monitor also sends topology data and SOA samples (events
and performance) to the UCMDB. Automatic discovery adds more
information about the SOA CIs and their relationships in the UCMDB.
The architecture of the HP Business Availability Center for SOA solution
includes the following components:
➤
The DDM Probe communicates with HP Universal CMDB which is used by
both the HP Universal CMDB and HP Business Availability Center. The
HP Universal CMDB server collects information on changes made to a CI’s
properties. Those changes include changes of the SOA infrastructure: hosts,
application servers, and so on) and functional changes of the Web services
(changes to WSDL (Web Services Description Language); for example if a
new parameter or a new operation was added or if an operation was
removed). This information is stored in the History database, and is
available in the SOA-related views in HP Business Availability Center. For
details on the History database, see the HP Business Availability Center
Database Guide PDF. For details on the change feature, see “View Changes
Made to SOA CIs” on page 62.
The appropriate discovery jobs (in Discovery and Dependency Mapping) are
used by the DDM Probe to discover, identify, and map the SOA-based
applications in your system, starting from the UDDI registry, and
continuing with Web services deployed on IBM WebSphere, BEA WebLogic,
Oracle Application Server, and IIS (Internet Information Services). This
information is then used to create SOA-related CIs and other CIs in the
UCMDB. It also creates the hierarchy of CIs displayed in the SOA UDDI
Registry, the SOA Web Services, the SOA Rogue Services, and other views. A
rogue service is a service which is not registered in the UDDI registry.
➤
20
Business Process Monitor collects data on the performance and availability
of Web services by running transactions that run Web services scripts. The
CIs and relationships for the incoming Business Process Monitor samples are
created by the Business Process Monitoring source adapter (described in
“Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter Details” in Model
Management). For details on the samples, see “Data Samples for Business
Process Monitor” in Reference Information.
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
➤
The Diagnostics Monitor monitors real-user traffic to the Web services and
operations and sends the information to the Diagnostics server. The
Diagnostics server uses SDK (Software Development Kit) to send the
topology to the UCMDB and the samples to HP Business Availability
Center. Depending on the incoming Diagnostics samples, the appropriate
Key Performance Items (KPIs) and rules are assigned to the CIs by the SOA
data assignments. Diagnostics data is available in the SOA reports when you
select the Real Data parameter. For details, see each report description in
“SOA Views and Reports User Interface” on page 64.
➤
SiteScope monitors the Web services and retrieves Web services metrics and
UDDI server health data. When working with SiteScope 9.50 and above, the
CIs and relationships for the incoming SiteScope samples are created by the
SiteScope data assignments (described in “SiteScope KPI Assignment Group
Overview” in Using Dashboard). SiteScope data is available in the SOA reports
when you select the Synthetic parameter. For details, see each report
description in “SOA Views and Reports User Interface” on page 64.
➤
Dashboard tabs and reports are used as the central console for viewing all of
the data and analyzing it. For details, see “Introducing Dashboard” in Using
Dashboard.
Data Aggregation
HP Business Availability Center uses data aggregation to make data handling
and management more efficient and to improve the speed and performance
of report generation. For more information on data aggregation in
HP Business Availability Center, see “Data Aggregation” in Reference
Information.
21
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
SOA Discovery and Dependency Mapping Modules
HP Business Availability Center includes discovery patterns for monitoring
your SOA environment.
The Discovery and Dependency Mapping modules listed in this section,
discover the Web services and WSDL files that relate to your SOA
infrastructure. A WSDL file contains several sections that can be mapped to
different Configuration File CIs. For example, the service operations can be
mapped to one CI and the service binding information to a different CI.
This practice enables sharing similar definitions across Web services.
When a module is run, it creates CIs for the discovered elements in the
UCMDB. The appropriate HP Business Availability Center views are
automatically populated with the created CIs, according to the TQL for each
view. For more information about the discovery modules and mechanisms,
see “Discovery and Dependency Mapping – Overview” in Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Guide.
Note: HP Business Availability Center also supports nested WSDL files.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
The Discovery and Dependency Mapping modules are listed in the
following table:
Module (A - Z)
Description
Application - Webservices
Module
The module contains the UDDI registry pattern and
is mainly responsible for mapping the service
providers, Web services, and WSDL files that are
discovered from the UDDI registry (for UDDI
versions 2 and 3). This information is presented in
the SOA UDDI view.
For information on the Application - Webservices
module, see “Application – UDDI Registry” in the
Discovery and Dependency Mapping Guide.
For details on the SOA UDDI view, see “SOA Views
and Their Components” on page 52.
Note: WSDL files should be placed in the UDDI
registry according to the following UDDI hierarchy
(from the UDDI technical specification by OASIS):
BusinessService > TemplateBinding > TModel >
OverViewDoc. They cannot be found in any other
location.
J2EE - WebLogic module
The module discovers Web services and their WSDL
files, deployed on BEA WebLogic servers. The
resulting CIs for the Web services, Web service
operations, and configuration files are presented in
the WebLogic Topology view (along with other
components discovered on the WebLogic servers)
and are added to the SOA Web Services view and
SOA UDDI view, as relevant.
For information on the J2EE - WebLogic module, see
“J2EE – WebLogic” in the Discovery and Dependency
Mapping Guide.
For details on the SOA UDDI and SOA Web Services
views, see “SOA Views and Their Components” on
page 52.
23
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Module (A - Z)
Description
J2EE - WebSphere module
The module discovers WSDL files deployed on IBM
WebSphere servers, and parses the WSDL to identify
the Web service components. The resulting CIs for
the Web services, Web service operations, and
configuration files are presented in the WebSphere
Topology view (along with other components
discovered on the WebSphere servers) and are added
to the SOA Web Services view and SOA UDDI view,
as relevant.
For information on the J2EE - WebSphere module,
see “J2EE – WebSphere” in the Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Guide.
For details on the SOA UDDI and SOA Web Services
views, see “SOA Views and Their Components” on
page 52.
Oracle Application Server
module
The module discovers the Oracle E-Business Suite.
Web Servers - IIS module
The module discovers Web services and their WSDL
files deployed on Microsoft IIS servers. The
discovery process creates CIs for the discovered Web
services, Web service operations, and configuration
(WSDL) files. These CIs are added to the SOA Web
Services view and SOA UDDI view, as relevant, and
the Web service CIs are displayed in the IIS
Topology view (with other components discovered
on the IIS servers).
For information on the Web Servers - IIS module,
see “Web Servers – IIS” in the Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Guide.
For details on the SOA UDDI and SOA Web Services
views, see “SOA Views and Their Components” on
page 52.
24
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Integration of HP Diagnostics Data with SOA
Using HP Business Availability Center with HP Diagnostics, enables you to
view, in HP Business Availability Center applications, end-to-end
performance information for Web services that are monitored by
HP Diagnostics. You can also directly access the HP Diagnostics application
to view Web services reports.
The Web service information is collected by HP Diagnostics probes installed
on the Web Server machine. The probes detect Web service traffic on the
machine and identify Web service operations for the Web services. Part of
the monitoring data, collected for each Web service operation, is stored in
HP Diagnostics, while the rest of the data is stored in HP Business
Availability Center.
HP Diagnostics sends the topology of Web services, which includes the Web
service, its operations and also the monitors, to the UCMDB, but does not
send the WSDL files. The SOA data assignment group assigns the KPIs and
rules appropriate for each CI in the topology depending on the samples
received by HP Business Availability Center.
The key attributes of a Web service are its target name space and service
name. For information on the view, see “SOA Views and Their
Components” on page 52.
For information on deploying the HP Diagnostics probes, and accessing the
HP Diagnostics application from HP Business Availability Center, see the
HP Diagnostics User’s Guide (accessible from the HP Business Availability
Center Help menu after registering the HP Diagnostics server).
Note: HP Diagnostics monitoring is supported for Web services based on
SOAP over HTTP/S protocols.
25
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Availability Calculation
The availability of a Web service/operation is calculated using the
error_count field of the SOA Performance sample. Depending on the data
source, the availability errors may include SOAP faults. The data sources fill
in the error_count field according to the following table:
Error_count Field (part of the SOA Performance sample)
Data Source
(Types of Samples)
SOAP Services
REST Web Services
SOAP Faults
HTTP Errors
ALL
ALL
(performance and
error samples)
All errors generated by
the Business Process
Monitor are real errors.
Reported as an error in
the Performance
sample.
SiteScope
ALL
ALL
(performance sample)
All errors generated by
the SiteScope scripts
are real errors.
Reported as an error in
the Performance
sample.
Diagnostics
Only configured SOAP
faults
None
Business Process
Monitor
(performance, event,
and error samples)
The Receiver SOAP
fault is considered as
an error by default.
The VersionMismatch,
MustUnderstand,
DataEncoding, and
UnknownSender SOAP
faults are not
considered as errors for
the Performance
sample but are sent as
events in the event
sample.
The payload capture
information is stored
only in Diagnostics.
26
Diagnostics does not
have the ability to
recognize HTTP errors.
None
None
HTTP status code
5xx-6ss are
considered as server
side errors and are
reported in
error_count
towards availability
calculation
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Integration of HP SOA Systinet
HP Business Availability Center supports integration with the HP SOA
Systinet platform, enabling you to better manage and monitor your business
services, and to understand the business impact of Web services. The
integration also enables you to streamline the contracts information defined
in HP SOA Systinet with your SLAs in HP Business Availability Center.
For details on enabling the integration, see “Enable HP SOA Systinet
Integration – Optional” on page 32.
The integration with HP SOA Systinet provides the capabilities described in
the following sections:
➤
HP SOA Systinet service model is available in HP Business Availability Center
You can run the Application - Web Services discovery pattern to discover the
content of your HP SOA Systinet Registry, so that the HP SOA Systinet
service model is available in HP Business Availability Center. For details, see
“Application – UDDI Registry” in Discovery and Dependency Mapping Guide.
➤
You can use the drill down links available in Dashboard, Service Level
Management and HP Business Availability Center for SOA, to open HP SOA
Systinet directly at the page for the selected Web service
HP SOA Systinet provides information on the Web service, such as the
contracts on the service, policies and their compliancy, usage plans, and
other general information. This information can be useful for problem
isolation and for understanding their impact on the business.
In Dashboard, you can link to HP SOA Systinet to open the page for the
selected Web service. For details on the link, see “Systinet Web Service Data”
in Using Dashboard.
When defining an SLA in Service Level Management, you can use the link to
HP SOA Systinet to view the contract information in HP SOA Systinet and
then configure the SLA accordingly in HP Business Availability Center. For
details on the link, see “Integration with HP SOA Systinet” in Using Service
Level Management.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
➤
In HP SOA Systinet, you can view service performance status (availability,
performance, and so on) derived from HP Business Availability Center
You can also link to the health report in HP Business Availability Center for
the selected service. This information can help consumers understand and
evaluate service status.
For information on HP SOA Systinet, including service contracts and how to
view service performance status derived from HP Business Availability
Center, see the HP SOA Systinet documentation.
SiteScope Monitors for SOA
You deploy dedicated SiteScope monitors to collect Web service metrics and
UDDI server health data. The collected data is used to calculate KPI values in
the SOA views, and can be viewed in reports of the HP Business Availability
Center for SOA application.
The SiteScope monitors used to monitor your SOA environment are:
➤
UDDI Monitor. Used to perform a search in the UDDI Server. Each time the
monitor is run, SiteScope checks if the UDDI Server can find any business
entity. For details, see “UDDI Monitor Overview” in Using System Availability
Management.
You can deploy this monitor using the Monitor Deployment Wizard. For
details, see “Monitor Deployment Wizard Overview” in Using System
Availability Management.
You can also deploy this monitor from System Availability Management. For
details, see “Deploy a Monitor – Workflow” in Using System Availability
Management.
➤
28
Web Service Monitor. Used to check the availability of a Web service
accepting Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) requests. The Web Service
Monitor checks that the service can send a response to the client in a certain
amount of time and verifies that the SOAP response is correct based on
match specifications. For details, see “Web Service Monitor Overview” in
Using System Availability Management.
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
You can deploy this monitor using the Monitor Deployment Wizard. For
details, see “Monitor Deployment Wizard Overview” in Using System
Availability Management.
You can also deploy this monitor from System Availability Management. For
details, see “Deploy a Monitor – Workflow” in Using System Availability
Management.
➤
Technology Web Service Integration Monitor. Used to integrate Web service
event data or metrics data from an existing EMS system with HP Business
Availability Center. For details, see “Technology Web Service Integration
Monitor” in Using System Availability Management.
You can also deploy this monitor only from System Availability
Management. For details, see “Deploy a Monitor – Workflow” in Using
System Availability Management.
Anti-Aging Enrichment
When you run a Web services script, the script checks the UCMDB for the
Web service CIs mentioned in the script. If the CI already exists, the script
adds the Business Process Monitor CI subtree to the Web Service CI ->
Operations CI topology. If the CI does not exist, the Business Process
Monitor creates the Web Service CI -> Operations CI -> Business Process
Monitor CI topology.
In the UCMDB, CIs that had no activity over a specified period of time are
removed from the database by the aging mechanism. The Business Process
Monitor CIs are sent once to the UCMDB by the Business Process Monitor,
are not refreshed over time, and are candidates for removal by the aging
mechanism. If the Business Process Monitor CI is erased from the UCMDB,
the Web Service CI -> Operations CI topology becomes incomplete and is
also automatically deleted by the aging mechanism.
The BPM_WS_ANTI_AGING TQL is run periodically in the UCMDB to
prevent the removal of those CIs. The TQL searches for the Web Service CI
-> Operations CI -> Business Process Monitor CI subgraph. When it
encounters the subgraph, it automatically postpones the deletion of those
CIs.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
In addition, when you erase the script from Monitor Administration, the
Business Process Monitor CI is erased from the UCMDB, the Web Service CI
-> Operations CI topology becomes incomplete and is therefore
automatically deleted by the aging mechanism.
Tasks
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Workflow
This section describes the processes used to monitor a SOA environment in
Dashboard, and gives examples.
Note:
➤
To discover all the Web Services attached to your network you must use
Discovery and Dependency Mapping.
➤
When you are working with a large amount of Web Services, you must
use Discovery and Dependency Mapping to discover the SOA
architecture of your network.
➤
To Monitor Web Services without discovering them first, you do not need
to perform Discovery and Dependency Mapping as the SiteScope and
Business Process Monitor monitors are able to build the CI topology and
to transfer data directly from the WSDL files.
➤
When you know the Web Services WSDL files, you do not need to
perform Discovery and Dependency Mapping as the SiteScope and
Business Process Monitor monitors are able to build the CI topology and
to transfer data directly from the WSDL files.
➤
Diagnostics analyzes the calls and detects the Web Services, and uses that
knowledge to build the CI topology and to transfer data to HP Business
Availability Center.
This task includes the following steps:
30
➤
“Check That You Have a Valid License” on page 31
➤
“Perform Discovery and Dependency Mapping – Optional” on page 31
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
➤
“Enable HP Diagnostics Integration and Deploy Diagnostics Probes” on
page 32
➤
“Enable HP SOA Systinet Integration – Optional” on page 32
➤
“Deploy SiteScope Monitors” on page 32
➤
“Create Business Process Profiles” on page 33
➤
“Customize How you Monitor SOA in Dashboard” on page 33
➤
“Enrich the SOA Model From Scripts Defined in Monitor Administration”
on page 33
➤
“Monitor SOA Web Services for a Specific Consumer – Optional” on page 33
➤
“Customize SOA Reports – Optional” on page 33
➤
“Set the Appropriate Access Permissions for the Reports” on page 34
➤
“View SOA Information in Dashboard” on page 34
1 Check That You Have a Valid License
To view the HP Business Availability Center for SOA application, you must
have an HP Business Availability Center for SOA license. For details, see
“License Management Overview” in Platform Administration.
2 Perform Discovery and Dependency Mapping – Optional
You can deploy the appropriate discovery patterns to discover the SOA
architecture on your network. HP Business Availability Center includes
discovery patterns for monitoring your SOA environment. The discovery
patterns are deployed from Admin > Universal CMDB > Discovery > Job
Configuration.
➤
UDDI Monitor. Used to discover Web Services in the UDDI Server. Each time
that the monitor is run, SiteScope checks if the UDDI Server can find a Web
Service. For details, see “UDDI Monitor Overview” in Using System
Availability Management.
➤
Application Server. Discover Web Services running on application server
instances (IIS, Weblogic and others).
For information on running discovery, see “Run Discovery – Basic Mode
Workflow” in Discovery and Dependency Mapping Guide.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
For information on the SOA discovery modules, see “SOA Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Modules” on page 22.
3 Enable HP Diagnostics Integration and Deploy Diagnostics
Probes
To view metrics collected by HP Diagnostics probes installed on the Web
server machines, register the Diagnostics server in HP Business Availability
Center. For details, see “HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center
Integration” on page 513.
Note: HP Diagnostics monitoring is supported for Web services based on
SOAP over HTTP/S protocols.
4 Enable HP SOA Systinet Integration – Optional
If you are running HP SOA Systinet, you can integrate it with HP Business
Availability Center to enable more unified management and monitoring of
your business services, and to understand the business impact of Web
services. The integration also enables you to streamline the contracts
information defined in HP SOA Systinet with your SLAs in HP Business
Availability Center.
To enable the HP SOA Systinet and HP Business Availability Center
integration, you must register the HP SOA Systinet server in HP Business
Availability Center. Select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select BAC for SOA, and locate
the Systinet server host and port entry in the BAC for SOA - Systinet
Settings table. Define the host name and port, if required.
5 Deploy SiteScope Monitors
If you want dedicated SiteScope monitors to provide metrics on your SOA
components, you must deploy the monitors. For details, see “Deploy
SiteScope SOA Monitors” on page 46.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
6 Create Business Process Profiles
If you want your SOA views to include performance metrics for running
transactions on your Web servers, you must define the Business Process
profiles and transactions. For details, see “Run Business Process Monitor
Transactions for SOA” on page 48.
7 Customize How you Monitor SOA in Dashboard
You can customize the KPI Integrations groups that attach to pre-defined
CIs, KPIs, rules, tooltips, context menus, and context menu items, under
specified conditions. You can modify the following KPI Integration groups:
➤
The Business Process Monitor KPI assignment group and the Diagnostics KPI
assignment group. For details, see “Factory KPI Assignment Groups” in Using
Dashboard.
➤
The SiteScope KPI assignment groups. For details, see “SiteScope KPI
Assignment Group Overview” in Using Dashboard.
8 Enrich the SOA Model From Scripts Defined in Monitor
Administration
If required, you can enrich the SOA model using scripts that define Web
Services. Those scripts are created in Virtual User Generator and run in
Monitor Administration. For details, see “Enrich the SOA Model From
Scripts” on page 42.
9 Monitor SOA Web Services for a Specific Consumer – Optional
You can define service level agreements to monitor SOA Web services for a
specific consumer. For details, see “Agreements for Monitoring Web Services
Per Consumer” in Using Service Level Management.
10 Customize SOA Reports – Optional
You can customize SOA reports. For details, see “Customize SOA Reports” on
page 63.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
11 Set the Appropriate Access Permissions for the Reports
The availability of report data for a specific user is dependent on:
➤
The profile access permissions granted that user. For details on granting
permissions, see “Permissions Tab” in Platform Administration.
➤
The view permission, which determines the SOA reports permissions, as the
reports are based on views (except for the Top Metrics Report). For details
on granting permissions, see “Permissions Tab” in Platform Administration.
➤
The views that are assigned to SOA. Only those views are available in the
SOA reports. You can assign a view to SOA in the view properties. For details,
see “New View/View Properties/Save As View Wizard” in Model Management.
➤
The report filters specified by the administrator. Those filters limit access to
specific data within a profile. For details, see “Profile Entity Maintenance
Overview” in Platform Administration and “Active Filter Dialog Box” on
page 78.
12 View SOA Information in Dashboard
Once your SOA monitoring environment is set up, you can view SOA
monitoring data in Dashboard, Service Level Management, and the
HP Business Availability Center for SOA application using views and reports.
For details, see “View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60.
Monitor SOA Environment in Dashboard – Scenarios
This section provides scenarios that show how you can use the Business
Availability Center for SOA reports to find the source of problems.
This section includes the following topics:
34
➤
“Availability Problem – Scenario” on page 35
➤
“Performance Problem – Scenario” on page 37
➤
“Throughput Problem – Scenario” on page 40
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Availability Problem – Scenario
The Dashboard Console page displays, in the SOA Web Services view, a
service availability problem. There is no problem with the system. The
problem seems to be with the MedRecWebServices Web service.
You want to drill down to the SOA Health report to understand where the
problem is located. Click the down arrow to the right of the CI and select Go
to Report > Web Services Health.
The Health Report displays the health of the operations.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
A suspect operation is found. Select the appropriate operation and click the
button to access Diagnostics for the selected operation.
Diagnostics displays the SOAP fault that caused the problem.
You can view the SOAP fault information to find the root cause of the
problem. For details, see HP Diagnostics documentation.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Performance Problem – Scenario
The Dashboard Console page displays, in the SOA Web Services view, a
service performance problem. There is no problem with the system. The
problem seems to be with the SlowService Web service.
To drill down to the SOA Health report, click the down arrow to the right of
the CI in the Console page, and select Go to Report > Web Services Health.
The Health Report opens.
A suspect operation is found. Click the appropriate operation.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
The Health report for the relevant operation opens. Scroll down and view
the graphs.
The Throughput graph does not indicate service overload.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Select the operation and click the Drill down to Diagnostics Operations
View button to drill down to Diagnostics.
In Diagnostics, you can drill down from each instance to its call profile.
39
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
You can then view the layers breakdown of the Web Service operations and
find out how much time was spent in each layer (Web Service, database, and
so on). For details, see HP Diagnostics documentation.
Throughput Problem – Scenario
The Dashboard Console page displays, in the SOA Web Services view, a
service performance problem. There is no problem with the system. The
problem seems to be with the MedRecWebServices Web service.
To drill down to the SOA Health report, click the down arrow to the right of
the CI in the Console page, and select Go to Report > Web Services Health.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
A problematic operation (addRecord) is found. Both the response time and
throughput of the operation indicate a problem. A suspected reason for the
response time would be an overloaded service. You can view the correlation
between the response time and the throughput in the Metrics section.
After you assess that the reason is a throughput problem, you can drill down
and find the consumers that overload the service.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Enrich the SOA Model From Scripts
You can enrich the SOA model with scripts defined in the Monitor
administration to create a relationship between Host CIs and Web Service
CIs, and to view status changes for the Web Service CI when the status of
the Host CI monitored by SiteScope changes.
This feature is supported for Virtual User Generator/Service Test 9.10,
LoadRunner 9.10, and Business Process Monitor 7.50.
Business Process Monitor sends SOA data via HTTP, using the BAC API. Web
Data Entry (WDE) converts the data into two UDX samples: SOA
Performance and SOA Event (errors are reported in this sample). The
samples are sent according to the schedule.
When Business Process Monitor sends samples, the data is displayed in the
HP Business Availability Center for SOA Application under the Synthetic
data type.
Limitations:
42
➤
To be supported, a Web Service script must have a WSDL version 1.1, and
the WSDL file, which describes the Web Service and the Web Service
operations, supplied with the script should use WSDL version 1.1.
➤
REST Web Services can be monitored by Business Process Monitor, but
SOA data reporting is not supported (they do not have a WSDL file); only
regular errors are reported. SOAP_request calls are not supported as they
do not have WSDL.
➤
Virtual User Generator/LoadRunner do not support WebServices
protocols on Unix.
➤
Drilldown operations are not supported between SOA and End User
Management reports.
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Record a Script in Virtual User Generator” on page 43
➤
“Add the Web Service Script to Monitor Administration” on page 44
➤
“Run the Web Service Script” on page 44
1 Record a Script in Virtual User Generator
You can define Web Services inside scripts in Virtual User Generator/Service
Test or LoadRunner. You can record Web Service calls with different
operations. Each operation call is then reported as a different transaction.
For details on defining scripts in Virtual User Generator, see Virtual User
Generator documentation.
A Web Service script does not need to include user transactions to produce
data. If more than one script uses the same CI, a single CI is created. A CI is
deleted if none of the scripts use it.
For each SOA script, Virtual User Generator creates a file. The file is used by
the End User Management administrator to add the relevant SOA CIs to the
model (Web Service, Operation, and Monitor CIs). The file is generated or
updated after each save/update operation is done using Virtual User
Generator/Service Test. The file is included in the runtime files used for
exporting to a zip file using Virtual User Generator.
Note: If you are using legacy scripts recorded with Virtual User Generator up
to version 9.0, data reporting is supported by Business Process Monitor, but
you must add the SOA CIs to the model. To add the SOA CIs, download the
script from CRS, open the script in Virtual User Generator 9.10 once and
save the script (the script is saved in the new format), upload the new script
version in CRS, and reload the script version in End User Management for
relevant monitors.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
For each Web service call, the following line is added to the file, regardless of
the status of the Web service call:
<operation_name>; <web_service_name>; <target_namespace>;
<wsdl_name/location>
where <wsdl_name/location> is required to locate the relevant WSDL if
there is more than one WSDL.
An operation called more than once in the script is represented by one line
in the file. The order of the operations in the script is not important.
WSDL files should be imported into the script.
If you override manually the endpoint (name of port) address in Virtual User
Generator, the new address is reported to Business Process Monitor.
Business Process Monitor ignores the Define each step as a transaction
option in Virtual User Generator settings.
The WSDL file and the Operations file are zipped together with other script
files.
If more than one WSDL file is created for one Web Service script (set of
hierarchic WSDL files), Virtual User Generator places them in one folder.
2 Add the Web Service Script to Monitor Administration
To add the Web Service script to Monitor Administration, upload it to the
Central Repository Service (CRS), and assign it to a specific Business Process
Monitor profile and host with a specific scheduling. For details on CRS, see
“Central Repository Service - Overview” in Platform Administration.
3 Run the Web Service Script
If you have set the SOA license, you are running the script in Virtual User
Generator, and the operations file appears in the script, the Enable SOA
breakdown option is automatically enabled in Monitor Administration, and
the SOA Performance and SOA Events samples from the operation are
reported to HP Business Availability Center.
Business Process Monitor sets the Define each step as a transaction option =
true when the script is a Web Service script.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Business Process Monitor plays the script and reports SOA samples by
wrapping each operation call within an automatic transaction. The
automatic transaction is provided by LoadRunner. The automatic
transactions are not displayed in Monitor Administration and are not
counted in the licensed number of transactions for Business Process
Monitor.
Business Process Monitor can distinguish between SOA faults and other
faults (HTTP or other).
If the operation already exists (added to the UCMDB by Discovery and
Dependency Mapping), the SOA KPI assignment group uses the existing
operations CIs. The SOA Monitor CI and the BPM Web Service Monitor CIs,
as well as their performance and the event, are displayed in the SOA UDDI
view in Dashboard.
When you attach a Web Service script to a profile, a CI is created. The CI
status is changed to No data when the profile is stopped, when you do not
attach it to a monitor, or if the script is old.
The following topology is created in the UCMDB: Web Service CI ->
Operations CI -> Business Process Monitor CI. The topology is maintained
by the anti-aging enrichment mechanism. For details, see “Anti-Aging
Enrichment” on page 29.
BPM for SOA CIs are included in the model only when the UCMDB includes
the following information:
➤
WS name, OP name, and target name space CIs exist and the enable field
value is true for these CIs.
➤
Each operation (add/remove/update script, version/change check box) in
Monitor Administration updates this information.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Deploy SiteScope SOA Monitors
Note: Perform this task only when working with SiteScope 9.0.
You deploy dedicated SiteScope monitors to collect Web service metrics and
UDDI server health data. The collected data is used to calculate KPI values in
the SOA views, and can be viewed in reports of the HP Business Availability
Center for SOA application.
SiteScope monitors for SOA monitoring can be deployed from the Monitor
Deployment Wizard, or from System Availability Management.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Use the Monitor Deployment Wizard” on page 46
➤
“Manually Attach SiteScope Monitors” on page 48
1 Use the Monitor Deployment Wizard
You can create and map SiteScope monitors directly on the SOA CIs created
by the discovery process, using the Monitor Deployment Wizard. The
SiteScope monitoring CIs generated by the SiteScope monitors are then
deployed on the UDDI Registry and Web Service Operation CIs, creating a
Monitored By relationship between them. For details, see “Monitor
Deployment Wizard” in Using System Availability Management.
Example
a Proceed as explained in “Monitor Deployment Wizard” in Using System
Availability Management.
b In the left pane of the Select Configuration Items to Monitor page, select
the relevant SOA view. Select the CIs you would like monitored and
move them to the right pane.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Note: You can map Web service operations to Web Service Monitors and
UDDI Registry CIs to the UDDI Registry Monitors.
If the Web Service Operation CIs that you move to the right pane are
already monitored, then they are displayed in italics with an Already
monitored message.
c Click Next. The Select Templates to Apply page opens. The left pane lists
all the available templates in the wizard, including the Web Services
Monitors and UDDI Monitors templates used for the SOA monitors, and
the SiteScope templates for host if the hosts on which the Web services
are deployed are also selected. Expand the template to see the monitors
that are deployed by the template. The right pane lists the CI types (CITs)
for the CIs selected in the previous page of the wizard.
If you added Web Service Operation CIs to the right pane at the previous
stage of the wizard, then the wizard automatically matches them with
the Web Services Monitors template, and displays the Web Service
Operation CIT in the right pane with the template attached.
d Proceed with the wizard as indicated in “Monitor Deployment Wizard”
in Using System Availability Management.
The added Web Service Monitor CIs are given default names as follows:
Synthetic Monitor On <name of relevant Web Service Operation CI>
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
2 Manually Attach SiteScope Monitors
If the monitors are deployed from System Availability Management, you
must manually attach them to SOA discovery CIs. This is done in Admin >
Universal CMDB > Modeling > IT Universe Manager. For details, see
“Working with CIs” in Model Management.
For details on the SiteScope monitors used to monitor your SOA
environment, see “SiteScope Monitors for SOA” on page 28.
Run Business Process Monitor Transactions for SOA
You can deploy Business Process profiles containing transaction monitors to
actively monitor Web service performance. The transaction monitors run
scripts that emulate Web service requests from end users, supplying
end-to-end availability and response time metrics from varied and remote
locations. The metrics are used for the BPM Transaction from Location CIs
that are created in the UCMDB.
You map the created business process monitoring CIs to the SOA CIs created
by the discovery process, to produce an integrated SOA Web Services view.
Note: Business process monitoring data is not available in the HP Business
Availability Center for SOA application.
This task includes the following steps:
48
➤
“Create Scripts in HP Virtual User Generator” on page 49
➤
“Define Business Process Profiles” on page 49
➤
“View Business Process Monitoring CIs in the Views” on page 49
Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
1 Create Scripts in HP Virtual User Generator
Create scripts in HP Virtual User Generator that emulate the Web service
requests. For details, see the HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
2 Define Business Process Profiles
Perform the following steps:
a Define Business Process profiles in Admin > End User Management >
Monitors, using the Business Process Profile Wizard.
b Add to the profiles, the relevant transaction monitors that run the
HP Virtual User Generator scripts for Web service requests.
c Assign the profiles to Business Process Monitor machines/instances at the
required locations.
For details, see “Creating Business Process Profiles and Monitors Overview”
in Using End User Management.
3 View Business Process Monitoring CIs in the Views
To see the business process monitoring CIs immediately in the views,
synchronize the Business Process Monitoring source adapter in the Admin >
Universal CMDB > Source Manager page. Alternatively, wait for the
automatic synchronization to take place.
Note: To include location information in the business process monitoring
CI hierarchy, set the Business Process Monitoring source adapter to use the
Transaction/Location hierarchy structure. For more information, see
“Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter Details” in Model Management.
Once Business Process Monitor has run the scripts, the resulting BPM
Transaction from Location CIs are added to the UCMDB and displayed in
the monitors views and the End Users views. For information on the
hierarchy of these views, see “Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter
Details” in Model Management.
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Chapter 1 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA
To map the SOA CIs in the SOA Web Services view (discovered during the
discovery process) to the relevant Business Process Step CIs and BPM
Transaction from Location CIs, you must manually attach the business
process monitoring CIs to the higher level CIs. This is done in Admin >
Universal CMDB > Modeling > IT Universe Manager. For details, see
“Attaching Existing CIs” in Model Management.
Troubleshooting and Limitations
The SOA reports reflect the relative view of the user. Therefore, if in a
customized view, specific operations are attached to a Web service, the SOA
reports based on the view display information related only to the Web
service and the selected operations. Other operations connected to the Web
service in the UCMDB are not displayed.
If the monitors attached to the operations are not added to the customized
view, the SOA reports display information that does not take into
consideration the thresholds defined in the monitors.
50
2
HP Business Availability Center for SOA
Views and Reports
This chapter describes the Business Availability Center for SOA views and
reports.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
SOA Views and Their Components on page 52
➤
HP Business Availability Center for SOA Reports on page 59
Tasks
➤
View SOA Data in Dashboard on page 60
➤
Customize SOA Reports on page 63
Reference
➤
SOA Views and Reports User Interface on page 64
Concepts
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
SOA Views and Their Components
The SOA views include Web services performance, availability, and
throughput (load on the Web service) information. The information is
collected by SiteScope, Business Process Monitor, and Diagnostics. They
monitor traffic to selected Web services, operations, endpoints, or servers.
The data enables you to analyze the detected performance issues, and helps
you to identify the cause of delays. In addition, the views display
information about the system status impacting the Web service, as well as
change information.
In the UCMDB, a Web service discovered on an application server
(WebLogic, WebSphere, Oracle Application Server, or IIS) has a relationship
with the application server host (the host is a child of the Web service). For
example, when you monitor the host’s CPU, the Host CI is assigned a
System KPI that propagates to the Web service CI. This relationship helps to
triage Web service problems, when the Web service has a performance/
availability problem due to a system issue.
This section includes the following topics:
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➤
“CIs Discovered by the Discovery Process” on page 53
➤
“SOA Views in Dashboard” on page 54
➤
“Accessing Other Information” on page 59
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
CIs Discovered by the Discovery Process
The following CIs are discovered by the SOA discovery processes. For details,
see “SOA Discovery and Dependency Mapping Modules” on page 22.
The default KPIs are described in “List of Dashboard KPIs” in Using
Dashboard.
The CIs discovered by the discovery process are:
CI Name
Icon
Description
UDDI Registry
The UDDI Registry CIs represent the UDDI
registries that were discovered in your network.
Business Unit
The Business Unit CIs represent the service
providers discovered in your network.
Web Service
Monitor
The Web Service Monitor CIs represent the
Web services monitors discovered in your
network.
Web Services
The Web Services CIs represent the Web
services discovered in your network.
Web Service
Operation
The Web Service Operation CIs represent the
operations discovered in your network.
Configuration
File
The Configuration File CIs represent the URLs
of the WSDL pages used by the Web service.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
SOA Views in Dashboard
HP Business Availability Center for SOA displays information about the
performance, availability, and throughput of the UDDI registry, Web
services, operations, SiteScope monitors, SiteScope Web services monitors,
and nested WSDLs in the following views:
➤
SOA Monitored Web Services View
Includes all of the Web services discovered by Discovery and Dependency
Mapping or created by SiteScope, Business Process Monitor or
HP Diagnostics that are stored in the UCMDB and are currently monitored.
The TQL for the view is built as follows:
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
➤
SOA Web Service View
Includes all of the Web services that were discovered and stored in the
UCMDB.
The TQL for the view is built as follows:
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
➤
SOA Rogue Services View
Includes all of the Web services that were discovered and stored in the
UCMDB and that are not registered in the UDDI registry. They also appear
in the SOA Web Services View.
The TQL for the view is built as follows:
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
➤
The SOA UDDI View
The SOA UDDI view represents information obtained by running the
Application - Web Services discovery process. The view includes the UDDI
registries, all the Web services discovered from the registries, their
operations, and WSDL. The Web service providers (represented by the
business unit) are also discovered and related to their respective Web
services.
Note: Nested WSDL files are mapped to Configuration File CIs. For details,
see “View Configuration File CI Details” on page 61.
The TQL for the view is built as follows:
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SOA Topology Discovered by SiteScope
The SOA UDDI view also includes the following topology, which is created
for the SiteScope Web Service monitor. The CIs are created only for the
monitored entities according to the counters that you selected. For details
on counter selection, see “Counter Selection in Monitor Templates” in Using
System Availability Management.
Note: The SiteScope Web Service Monitor CI replaces the legacy SiteScope
Monitor CI for the Web Service monitor instances when upgrading from
previous versions of SiteScope to SiteScope 9.50. During the upgrade, the
SiteScope Monitor CI is removed from the UCMDB. The removal causes the
CI to also be removed automatically from pattern, perspective, or template
views where it was included or from SLAs to which it was attached.
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Accessing Other Information
From the SOA views you can:
➤
Drill down to the HP Business Availability Center for SOA reports that
present detailed metrics information about the performance, availability,
and throughput over time of the selected CI. The reports also display the
total number of calls, the number of calls that are slow or end with a SOAP
fault, the least available Web services/operations, the slowest Web services/
operations, consumer information, server information, and so on. For
details on the reports, see “SOA Views and Reports User Interface” on
page 64.
➤
Use the context menu to access additional information; for example to
access the HP Diagnostics application. For details, see “Menu Options” in
Using Dashboard.
➤
Access User reports. User reports provide a list of all of the custom reports,
trend reports, and custom links that have been defined in the system, that
the current user has permissions to view. You can display the reports in
Excel format, create custom reports, trend reports, and so on. For details, see
“Report Manager Overview” in Reports.
HP Business Availability Center for SOA Reports
The HP Business Availability Center for SOA reports enable you to view and
analyze the health of Web services or operations access by proactively
monitoring:
➤
The availability, response time, and throughput of selected Web services or
operations, to selected consumers or servers.
➤
The number of calls, SOAP faults, and slow calls to selected Web services or
operations, by selected consumers or servers.
For details on working with HP Business Availability Center reports, see
“Reports User Interface” in Reports.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Business Availability Center for SOA Reports
The Business Availability Center for SOA tab includes the following reports:
➤
Health report. Displays health metrics for the selected Web services,
operations, consumers, or endpoints in a selected view. For details, see
“Health Report” on page 75.
➤
Top Metrics report. Displays the top metrics information about the traffic to
and from all of the monitored Web services or operations. For details, see
“Top Metrics Report” on page 100.
➤
Metrics Over Time report. Displays the performance, over time, measuring
access to selected Web services or operations, by an endpoint, or a
consumer. For details, see “Metrics Over Time Report” on page 89.
➤
Consumer Summary report. Displays specific metrics for all of the
consumers accessing the selected Web services or operations in a selected
view. For details, see “Consumer Summary Report” on page 69.
➤
Server and Endpoint Summary report. Displays a drillable summary of the
metrics for all of the servers on which the selected Web services or
operations of a selected view are running. For details, see “Server and
Endpoint Summary Report” on page 94.
Tasks
View SOA Data in Dashboard
This section describes how to view SOA in Dashboard.
This task includes the following steps:
60
➤
“View SOA Information in Business Availability Center” on page 61
➤
“View Configuration File CI Details” on page 61
➤
“View Changes Made to SOA CIs” on page 62
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
1 View SOA Information in Business Availability Center
Once your SOA monitoring environment is set up, you can view SOA
monitoring data in relevant views in Dashboard, in Service Level
Management, and the HP Business Availability Center for SOA application
using views and reports. For details, see “SOA Views and Their Components”
on page 52.
2 View Configuration File CI Details
Right-click a Configuration File CI in the SOA UDDI View, select Properties,
and click Show document content to display the contents of the
configuration file that includes the contents of the WSDL page
corresponding to the URL. For details, see “Configuration Item Properties
Dialog Box” in Model Management.
Note: Nested WSDL files are mapped to the Configuration File CIs.
Example
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Nested WSDL appear in View Explorer as a list of Configuration File CIs
under the main Configuration File CI. For example:
http://<server_name>/uddi/doc/wsdl/account.wsdl
http://<server_name>/uddi/doc/wsdl/account_binding.wsdl
http://<server_name>/uddi/doc/wsdl/account_portType.wsdl
3 View Changes Made to SOA CIs
Changes made to the properties of all types of CIs (changes of the SOA
infrastructure: hosts, application servers, and so on) and functional changes
of the Web services (changes to WSDL; for example if a new parameter or a
new operation were added or if an operation was removed) are discovered
by different types of discoveries. Those changes are displayed in the Change
report available as a context menu option for each one of the relevant CI
types.
For details on the Change report, see “Change Report Page” in Model
Management.
For details on the Application - Web Services, WebSphere, WebLogic, and IIS
discoveries, see “Discovery and Dependency Mapping Content” in Discovery
and Dependency Mapping Guide.
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Customize SOA Reports
You can customize SOA reports.
Note: All the steps in the task are optional and can be performed in any
order.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Customize the Number of Web Services or Operations Displayed in the
SOA Reports” on page 63
➤
“Customize the Number of Elements Displayed in the Top Metrics Reports”
on page 64
1 Customize the Number of Web Services or Operations
Displayed in the SOA Reports
You can customize the number of Web services or operations that can be
displayed in a SOA report. The default value is 20.
To customize the number of Web services or operations that can be
displayed in a SOA report, access the Admin > Platform > Setup and
Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings page, click choose Applications, select
BAC for SOA, locate the BAC for SOA - General Settings table, and set the
required value of the Max. number of selectable CIs in SOA reports
parameter.
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2 Customize the Number of Elements Displayed in the Top
Metrics Reports
You can customize the number of elements that can be displayed in a Top
Metrics report. The default value is 5.
To customize the number of elements that can be displayed in a Top Metrics
report, access the Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings page, click choose Applications, select BAC for SOA,
locate the BAC for SOA - General Settings table, and set the required value
of the Top Metrics Size parameter.
Reference
SOA Views and Reports User Interface
This section describes:
64
➤
Active Filter Dialog Box on page 65
➤
Consumer Summary Report on page 69
➤
Health Report on page 75
➤
Metrics Over Time Report on page 89
➤
Server and Endpoint Summary Report on page 94
➤
Top Metrics Report on page 100
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Active Filter Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to filter SOA reports. The Active Filter
includes the following tabs:
➤ Web Services/Operations
➤ Metrics when you access the dialog box from the
Metrics Over Time report.
➤ Endpoint/Consumers
➤ Views when you access the dialog box from the Top
Metrics report. The dialog box displays the Views
that you are allowed to see.
To Access: In the Health, Top Metrics, Metrics Over
Time, Consumer Summary, or Server and Endpoint
Summary reports, click Active Filters.
Important
Information
You can select items from each tab to create more
complex filters.
Web Service/Operations Tab
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Number of Selected
Operations
Indicates the number of Operation CIs that you have
selected.
Number of Selected
Web Services
Indicates the number of Web Service CI that you have
selected.
Search
Click the Search link to search for a specific CI in the
current view or in all views. For details, see “Search for
CIs in Search Mode” in Model Management.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Selected CIs
Select one of the following:
➤ Web Services. Displays a check box only for the Web
services CIs appearing in the view.
➤ Operations. Displays a check box only for the
operation CIs appearing in the view.
You can select up to 20 Web services or operations. This
number can be modified in the Infrastructure Settings.
For details, see “Customize the Number of Web Services
or Operations Displayed in the SOA Reports” on
page 63.
View
Select the appropriate view and select the relevant CIs
in the view. Only views for which the user has
permission and that have been assigned to SOA are
displayed in the list. For additional information on the
available views, see “SOA Views in Dashboard” on
page 54.
Metrics Tab
Important
Information
The Metrics tab is displayed when you click Active
Filter in the Metrics Over Time report.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Metrics>
Select the metrics you want to display in the report.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Endpoint/Consumer Tab
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Consumer
You can filter by consumer information, for consumers
registered in HP Diagnostics, by entering one of the
following:
➤ The consumer ID (it can be an IP address, IP
range, HTTP header, or payload in SOAP
requests).
➤ The consumer subunit name, which is the name
of the IP range where the customer is located.
➤ The consumer details taken from the payload; for
example Web Service http custom header value or
Web service SOAP payload value (soap-header/
soap-envelope/soap-body).
➤ <string>* to search for all the consumers whose
name starts with the string.
➤ Other to search for all non-registered consumers
that access the server or endpoint listed in the
Server IP or End Point box.
The consumer information can be any string, up to 100
characters, including wildcards.
Note: For performance reasons, the wildcard can be
located only on the right most side on the string.
For details, see HP Diagnostics Installation and
Configuration Guide.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Endpoint
Enter the monitored endpoint. The value depends on
the data source.
For HP Diagnostics, it is the application server instance
name (defined in HP Diagnostics).
For Business Process Monitor and SiteScope, it is the
port name/endpoint (depending on the WSDL version)
that the user select from the WSDL when creating the
script/monitor.
Server IP
Enter the server IP address to display information
about the consumers accessing specific servers.
You can also use a wildcard (*) as the end of the string.
Views
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Views>
Select a view.
The View box lists the views you are allowed to display.
This dialog box is displayed when you click Active
Filters in the Top Metrics report.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Consumer Summary Report
Description
Displays specific metrics for all of the consumers
accessing the selected Web services or operations in a
selected view.
To Access: Select Application > Business Availability
Center for SOA, click the Business Availability Center
for SOA tab, and select the Consumer Summary Report
option in the Business Availability Center for SOA tab.
Important
Information
When you select Real, the Consumer Summary Report
displays information only for the consumers that were
registered in the Diagnostics system. All other
consumers are aggregated and presented as Others.
Note: You can add this report as a portlet in My BSM.
For details, see “Add Portlets to <page_name>/Add
Portlets Dialog Box” in Using My BSM.
Included in Tasks
“View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60
Report Settings
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details, see “Common Report Elements” in Reports.
Active Filter
If relevant, click the Active Filter link to select the
appropriate conditions for the report. For details, see
“Active Filter Dialog Box” on page 65.
Real/Synthetic
Select one of the following:
➤ Real. To display data from the Diagnostics data
collector.
➤ Synthetic. To display data from the SiteScope and
Business Process monitors.
Note: When you generate a SOA report, the Data Type
selection is displayed in the top part of the report.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Consumer Summary Area
The following is an example of the Consumer Summary area.
Description
Displays the health metrics for all of the consumers
accessing the selected Web services or operations. If, in
the Active Filters, you also select specific consumer,
endpoint or server, the health metrics are further
filtered by these selections.
Important
Information
The Consumer Summary area is the same in the View
as Graph and View as Table tabs.
Useful Links
“Availability Calculation” on page 26
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Click to drill down to the Health Report for the
selected element. For details, see “Health Report” on
page 75.
# of Calls
The total number of calls accessed by the specific
consumer.
# of Errors
The total number of failed calls by the specific
consumer. A failed call is a call that was not performed
due to the unavailability of the Web services or
operations.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Slow Calls
The number of slow calls by the specific consumer. A
slow call is a call with a response time longer than the
predefined threshold.
Note: The value displayed by # of Slow Calls is different
from the value of the Total Threshold Violation in
HP Diagnostics. In HP Diagnostics the Total Threshold
Violation includes the overall number of violation from
all the calls and in HP Business Availability Center # of
Slow Calls includes only the violations of the successful
calls.
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in calls
by the specific consumer.
Availability
The availability of the selected Web services or
operations accessed by the specific consumer. The
availability is calculated as the number of successful
calls made by the specific consumer divided by the
total number of calls made by the specific consumer,
multiplied by 100.
The background is colored according to the
comparison between the Web service worst availability
and the threshold specified in the Availability KPI
definition. For details, see “How Dashboard KPIs Work”
in Using Dashboard.
Consumer
The consumer information. For details on the different
consumer details, see the Consumer description in the
End Point/Consumer Tab in “Active Filter Dialog Box”
on page 65.
Click the consumer name to drill down to the Health
Report for the selected element. For details, see “Health
Report” on page 75.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Response Time (sec.)
The average response time (in seconds) of the selected
Web services or operations accessed by the specific
consumer.
The background is colored according to the
comparison between the Web service worst response
time and the threshold specified in the Response Time
KPI definition. For details, see “How Dashboard KPIs
Work” in Using Dashboard.
Throughput (calls
per min.)
The number of calls, per minute by the specific
consumer.
The background is colored according to the
comparison between the Web service worst throughput
and the threshold specified in the Throughput KPI
definition. For details, see “How Dashboard KPIs Work”
in Using Dashboard.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Worst Consumer Area
The following is an example of the Worst Consumer area.
Description
Displays the successful and faulty calls of the worst five
consumers accessing the selected Web services,
operations, or servers.
Important
Information
The Worst Consumer displays the same information in
the View as Graph and View as Table tabs.
Each tab in the graph represents a different consumer
and displays the number of successful calls (in green)
and the number of failed calls (in purple).
Move the pointer over a tab in the graph to display a
tooltip that indicates the consumer, the number of
errors, succesfull calls, SOAP faults, and the number of
successful calls.
The X-axis displays the consumer information while
the Y-axis displays the number of calls.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Calls
The total number of calls accessed by the specific
consumer.
# of Errors
The total number of failed calls by the specific
consumer. A failed call is a call that was not performed
due to the unavailability of the Web services or
operations.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in calls
by the specific consumer.
# of Successful calls
The number of successful consumer calls.
<drill down>
Click a bar to access the Health report filtered for the
consumer.
Consumer
The consumer information. For details on the different
consumer details, see “Active Filter Dialog Box” on
page 65.
Click the consumer name to drill down to the Health
Report for the selected element. For details, see “Health
Report” on page 75.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Health Report
Description
Displays health metrics for the selected Web services,
operations, server, endpoint, or consumer in a selected
view.
To Access: Select:
➤ Applications > Dashboard, select a view in View
Explorer:
➤ In View Explorer, right-click a specific Web
Service or Operation CI, and select the Go to
Report > Health Report option. The Health
Report is filtered by the specific Web service or
operation. For details, see “Customize
Dashboard Display and Refresh Rate” in Using
Dashboard
➤ In the Console, or Filters tab, right-click a specific
Web Service or Operation CI, and select Go to
Report > Health Report. The Health Report is
filtered by the specific Web service or operation.
For details, see “Customize Dashboard
Display and Refresh Rate” in Using Dashboard
➤ Applications > Business Availability Center for SOA,
and select the Health Report option in the Business
Availability Center for SOA tab.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Important
Information
To enable you to find all available Web Services/
operations, the Health report automatically shows all
selected Web Services/operations even when they do
not have data. You can also check if the Web Service/
operation has only Synthetic data or no data at all
(Real or Synthetic) and decide to remove the Web
Service/operation from the list in the filter.
Note:
➤ You must configure the REST Web Services in the
HP Diagnostics application. Once configured, their
topology is sent by HP Diagnostics to the UCMDB.
REST Web Services are not SOAP Web Services,
therefore they provide errors and not SOAP faults.
Consequently, the Health report does not display
REST Web Services in the report areas that display
SOAP faults. The Health report displays how many
requests were made to the URL corresponding to the
REST Web Service and how many of those requests
failed.
➤ You can add this report as a portlet in My BSM. For
details, see “Add Portlets to <page_name>/Add
Portlets Dialog Box” in Using My BSM.
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Included in Tasks
“View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60
Useful Links
“Availability Calculation” on page 26
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Report Settings
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details, see “Common Report Elements” in Reports.
Active Filter
If relevant, click to select the appropriate conditions for
the report. For details, see “Active Filter Dialog Box” on
page 65.
Real/Synthetic
Select one of the following:
➤ Real. To display data from the Diagnostics data
collector.
➤ Synthetic. To display data from the SiteScope and
Business Process monitors.
Note: When you generate a SOA report, the Data Type
selection is displayed in the top part of the report.
When you select Real, each level of the report (except
for Endpoint) also displays data for Synthetic. When
you select Synthetic, the report displays only
information relevant to Synthetic.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Health Summary Area
When you select more than one service in the Active Filter, the report
displays the following data:
When you select one service in the Active Filter, the report displays the
following data:
Description
Depending on the selection you made in the Active
filter, the Health summary area can display:
➤ A list of same level items (Web services, operations,
endpoints, consumers).
➤ A tree (Web service/Operations, Operation/
Endpoints, Endpoints).
To display other metrics information, click the required
item. See the bullets above for details.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Important
Information
The Health Summary area is the same in the View as
Graph and View as Table tabs.
Click the required element in the Health Summary
report to access details on the health of the element’s
components. For details on the elements’ components,
see “Health Summary Area” on page 78.
Use the breadcrumbs to retreat to the levels from
which you drilled down.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Click to access the Consumer Summary report for the
selected element. For details, see “Consumer Summary
Report” on page 69.
Click to access the Metrics Over Time report for the
selected element. For details, see “Metrics Over Time
Report” on page 89.
Note: This drill down (Diagnostics Operations) is
available only for non-Web Service CIs.
Select a CI in the table, and click the button to access
the Diagnostics report relevant for the CI (for example
the Diagnostics Operations view for an Operation CI)
for the selected element. For details, see the
HP Diagnostics User’s Guide.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Note: This drill down (Diagnostics Web Service
Topology) is available only for Web Service CIs.
Select a Web Service CI, and click the button to access
the Diagnostics Service Topology view for the selected
Web Service CI. The graph displays the real-time
connections that exist between the selected Web
Service CI and other Web Service CIs, for the same
timeframe as the report. For details, see the
HP Diagnostics User’s Guide.
Click to access the HP SOA Systinet application,
focused on the relevant Web service. This option is
relevant only when there is an integration between
HP Business Availability Center and HP SOA Systinet.
For details on the integration with HP SOA Systinet, see
“Integration of HP SOA Systinet” on page 27.
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<Real> # of Calls
The total of calls to the specific item. This is a metric
taken from the Diagnostics sample.
<Real> # of Errors
The total number of failed calls based on the data from
the Diagnostics data collector. A failed call is a call that
was not performed due to availability problems of the
Web services operations. It can be a receiver SOAP fault
or an HTTP status code of 5xx-6xx if the call is to a
REST service. Note that not all REST services use HTTP
status code to indicate failure.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Real> # of SOAP
Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in calls
by the specific consumer based on the data from the
Diagnostics data collector.
<Real> Availability
The availability of the item based on the data from the
Diagnostics data collector. The background is colored
according to the thresholds specified in the Availability
KPI definition. The availability is calculated as the
number of successful calls to the item, divided by the
total number of calls to the item, and multiplied by
100.
<Real> Throughput
(Calls/Min.)
The number of calls to the item per minute based on
the data from the Diagnostics data collector. The
background is colored according to the thresholds
specified in the Throughput KPI definition. For details,
see “How Dashboard KPIs Work” in Using Dashboard.
<Real>
Response Time (sec.)
The response time (in seconds) of the item based on
the data from the Diagnostics data collector. The
background is colored according to the thresholds
specified in the Response Time KPI definition. For
details, see “How Dashboard KPIs Work” in Using
Dashboard.
<Synthetic>
Response Time (sec.)
The response time (in seconds) of the item based on
the data from the SiteScope or Business Process
monitors. The background is colored according to the
thresholds specified in the Response Time KPI
definition. For details, see “How Dashboard KPIs Work”
in Using Dashboard.
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Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Service
Operation
Service/Operations
Operation/Endpoint
Endpoint
The name of the item whose health metrics are
provided in the Health Summary.
Synthetic Availability
(%)
The availability of the item based on the data from the
SiteScope or Business Process monitors. The
background is colored according to the thresholds
specified in the Availability KPI definition. The
availability is calculated as the number of successful
calls to the item, divided by the total number of calls to
the item, and multiplied by 100.
Click the required element to access details on the
health of the element’s components.
Note: If you monitor the same Web Service with both
SiteScope and Business Process Monitor (not
recommended), the threshold defined in Business
Process Monitor is used to color the background.
Metrics Area
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Description
The Metrics area displays metrics information for the
item listed in the first row of the Health Summary area.
If multiple items were selected in the Active Filters, the
SOAP Faults area displays the average information for
all of the selected items.
Important
Information
You can drill down from each point in the graphs to
display more detailed information about the period of
time represented by that point. You can drill down to
the smallest unit of time (1 hour).
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Graph Format
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Availability (%)
The graph displays the availability of the item over the
selected time frame of the report in graph format. It
displays both real and synthetic data when the Real
Data Type is selected, or only synthetic data when the
Synthetic Data Type is selected. The legend indicates
what is displayed.
Note: The Availability of a service in a Real data source
does not always display the reality. For example, if the
server is down, the calls do not get to the Web service,
the Availability of a service in a Real data source
indicates that no one called the Web service while the
Availability of a service under Synthetic data source
indicates that the situation is bad.
Response Time (sec)
The graph displays the response time (in seconds) of
the item over the selected time frame of the report in
graph format.
The Response Time graph displays information about
the Average Response Time (sec.) (purple line), the
Max Response Time (sec.) (turquoise line), and the Min
Response Time (sec.) (orange line).
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Throughput
The graph displays the number of calls to the item per
minute, over the selected time frame of the report in
graph format.
The title line of the Metrics area includes the name of
the item whose metrics are displayed. If the Health
Summary area displays a tree of Operation/Servers the
title line of the Metrics area is Aggregated data for
selected operations.
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Table Format
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Calls
The total number of calls to the item, per time unit.
# of Errors
The total number of calls to the item, that failed due to
availability problems of the item, per time unit.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of calls to the item, that failed due to
a SOAP fault, per time unit.
Availability (%)
The availability of the item, based on the data from the
Diagnostics data collector, per time unit.
Max Response Time
(sec.)
The highest response time (in seconds) of the item, per
time unit.
Min Response Time
(sec.)
The lowest response time (in seconds) of the item, per
time unit.
Response Time (sec.)
The response time (in seconds) of the item, per time
unit.
Synthetic Availability
(%)
The availability of the item, based on the data from the
SiteScope monitors, per time unit.
Throughput (Calls/
Min)
The number of calls to the item per minute of the time
unit.
Time
The time units (hour) of the selected time period.
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SOAP Faults Area
Description
The SOAP Faults area displays information for the item
listed in the first row of the Health Summary area. If
multiple items were selected in the Active Filters, the
SOAP Faults area displays average information for all of
the selected items.
Important
Information
➤ If you have selected to display synthetic data, the
SOAP Faults area displays only the Worst Consumers
graph.
➤ If you have selected to display real data, the SOAP
Faults area displays all the graphs listed below.
Graph Format
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Errors
Shows the number of calls to the specific item that
ended in a SOAP fault over the selected time period.
The title line of the SOAP Faults area or of the SOAP
Faults table includes the name of the item whose
metrics are displayed. If the Health Summary area
displays a tree of Operation/Servers the title line of the
SOAP Faults area is Aggregated data for selected
operations.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Pie chart
Represents the faults distribution by type of SOAP fault
that occurred when accessing the item during the
specified time period. The types of error are:
VersionMismatch, MustUnderstand, Sender, Receiver,
and DataEncodingUnknown. The tooltip displays the
number of faults of the type represented by the slice.
The legend lists the SOAP Fault types.
Worst Consumers
Displays, for the five worst consumers (with the largest
number of faulty calls), the number of successful calls
(in orange) and the number of calls that ended in error
or SOAP faults (in purple) to the item.
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Table Format
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
SOAP Faults
Distribution
Shows the percentage of the occurrence of each type of
SOAP fault compared to the total number of SOAP
faults: VersionMismatch, MustUnderstand, Sender,
Receiver, or DataEncodingUnknown.
SOAP Faults and
Errors Overtime
Displays the total number of calls to the selected item
that ended in a SOAP fault and the total number of
calls to the selected item that ended in an error, over
the selected time period, per unit of time.
Worst Consumers
Displays the number of calls to the selected item that
ended in an error in the # of Errors column,the
number of calls to the selected item that ended in a
SOAP fault in the # of SOAP Faults column, the
number of successful calls to the selected item in the #
of Successful Calls column, and the total number of
calls in the # of Calls column, per consumer, for the
five worst consumers (with the largest number of faulty
calls).
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Metrics Over Time Report
Description
Displays the performance of selected metrics related to
a selected view and selected CIs, over time.
To Access: Select Applications > Business Availability
Center for SOA, and select the Metrics Over Time
Report option in the Business Availability Center for
SOA tab.
Important
Information
Move the pointer over a tab in the appropriate graphs
to display the tooltip that includes the information
listed in the table.
➤ For a Web service:
➤ For an operation:
The tooltip displays the following information:
➤ Namespace. The namespace of the Web service.
➤ Web Service/Operation. The name of the selected
Web service/operation.
➤ <metric>. The value of the metric at this point.
Note: You can add this report as a portlet in My BSM.
For details, see “Add Portlets to <page_name>/Add
Portlets Dialog Box” in Using My BSM.
Included in Tasks
“View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60
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Report Settings
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details, see “Common Report Elements” in Reports.
Active Filter
If relevant, click the Active Filter link to select the
appropriate conditions for the report. For details, see
“Active Filter Dialog Box” on page 65.
Real/Synthetic
Select one of the following:
➤ Real. To display data from the Diagnostics data
collector.
➤ Synthetic. To display data from the SiteScope and
Business Process monitors.
Note: When you generate a SOA report, the Data Type
selection is displayed in the top part of the report.
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Graph and Table Settings
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<graph details>
The View as Graph tab displays the selected metric
performance of the selected Web services, operations,
endpoints, or consumers, during the selected time
frame of the report.
The graph legend indicates the color used to display
the metric information of the Web services if Web
services were selected or operations if Operations were
selected in the Active Filters.
<right-click a point in
the graph>
To display the Available Drilldowns menu, and select:
➤ Drill Down to Health Report. To display the Health
report for the selected Web service or operation for
the selected time period. For details, see “Health
Report” on page 75.
➤ Time Range Drill Down. To display the metrics for
the selected Web service or operation for the
selected time period.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<table details>
The View as Table tab displays the selected Web
services, or operations performance of the selected
metric, during the selected time frame of the report.
The table displays the Web service and/or operation,
the namespace of the Web service, and the value of the
metric per time unit.
Generate
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Click the Generate button to generate the report.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Metrics
Select the metric whose performance during the
selected time period, you want to display. You can
select:
➤ Availability. The average availability (in percentage)
of the selected Web services or operations, running
on the selected servers, and accessed by the selected
consumer during the selected time frame of the
report.
➤ Throughput. The number of calls running on the
selected server, by the selected consumer, per
minute, during the selected time frame of the report.
➤ Avg. Response Time (sec.). The average response
time (in seconds) of the selected Web services or
operations, running on the selected server, by the
selected consumer during the selected time frame of
the report.
➤ # of Calls. The total number of calls, running on the
selected server, by the selected consumer, during the
selected time frame of the report.
➤ # of Errors. The total number of faulty calls, running
on the selected server, by the selected consumer,
during the selected time frame of the report. A faulty
call is a call that fails due to the unavailability of the
called item.
➤ # of Slow Calls. The total number of slow calls,
running on the selected server, by the selected
consumer, during the selected time frame of the
report. A slow call is a call with a response time that
is longer than the predefined threshold.
➤ # of SOAP Faults. The total number of SOAP faults
that occurred in calls by the specific consumer.
View as Graph tab
Click to display the report in graph format.
View as Table tab
Click to display the report in table format.
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Server and Endpoint Summary Report
Description
Displays a drillable summary of the metrics for all of
the servers or endpoints on which the selected Web
services or operations of a selected view are running.
To Access: Select Application > Business Availability
Center for SOA, click the Business Availability Center
for SOA tab, and select the Server and Endpoint
Summary Report option in the Business Availability
Center for SOA tab.
Important
Information
When you select Real, the report displays information
only for the consumers that were registered in the
Diagnostics system. All other consumers are aggregated
and presented as Others.
The report is available only if the Server IP field exists
in the sample.
Move the pointer over a tab in a graph to display a
tooltip that indicates the number of errors, successfull
calls, SOAP faults, and the total number of calls to the
selected server.
Note: You can add this report as a portlet in My BSM.
For details, see “Add Portlets to <page_name>/Add
Portlets Dialog Box” in Using My BSM.
Included in Tasks
“View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60
Report Settings
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details, see “Common Report Elements” in Reports.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Active Filter
If relevant, click the Active Filter link to select the
appropriate conditions for the report. For details, see
“Active Filter Dialog Box” on page 65.
Real/Synthetic
Select one of the following:
➤ Real. To display data from the Diagnostics data
collector.
➤ Synthetic. To display data from the SiteScope and
Business Process monitors.
Note: When you generate a SOA report, the Data Type
selection is displayed in the top part of the report.
Report Granularity
Select one of the following:
➤ Servers. To display the Server and Endpoint
Summary report with information about the servers.
➤ Endpoints. To display the Server and Endpoint
Summary report with information about the
endpoints.
Server/Endpoint Summary Area
The following is an example of the Server/Endpoint Summary area.
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Description
Displays the health metrics for all of the servers/
endpoints on which the selected Web services or
operations are running. If, in the Active Filters, you
also select specific endpoint or consumer, the health
metrics are further filtered by the selected endpoint or
consumer.
Important
Information
The Server Summary area is the same in the View as
Graph and View as Table tabs.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Select an elements and click the button to drill down to
the Health Report for the selected element. For details,
see “Health Report” on page 75.
# of Calls
The total number of calls to the server accessed by the
Web services, operations, or consumer.
# of Errors
The total number of errors that occurred in calls by the
specific consumer.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
# of Slow Calls
The number of slow calls that occurred in calls by the
specific consumer.
A slow call is a call with a response time that is longer
than a predefined threshold.
Note: The value displayed by # of Slow Calls is different
from the value of the Total Threshold Violation in
HP Diagnostics. In HP Diagnostics the Total Threshold
Violation includes the overall number of violation from
all the calls and in HP Business Availability Center # of
Slow Calls includes only the violations of the successful
calls.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in calls
by the specific consumer.
Availability (%)
The availability of the server accessed by the selected
Web services, operations, or consumer. The availability
is calculated as the number of successful calls made to
the server divided by the total number of calls made to
the server, multiplied by 100.
The background is colored according to the threshold
specified in the Availability KPI definition. For details,
see “How Dashboard KPIs Work” in Using Dashboard.
Endpoint
The name of the endpoint.
Note: This column is displayed only when you select
the Endpoints report granularity.
Click the endpoint to drill down to the Health Report
for the selected element. For details, see “Health
Report” on page 75.
Response Time (sec.)
The average response time (in seconds) of the server
accessed by the selected Web services, operations, or
consumer.
The background is colored according to the threshold
specified in the Response Time KPI definition. For
details, see “How Dashboard KPIs Work” in Using
Dashboard.
Server
The IP address of the server.
Click the gray arrow to the right of the server to display
drill down menu options where you can select the Drill
Down to Health Report or Drill Down to Endpoint
Summary Report options to access the relevant report
for the element.
Throughput (calls
per min.)
The number of calls, per minute, to the server by the
selected Web services, operations, or consumer.
The background is colored according to the threshold
specified in the Throughput KPI definition. For details,
see “How Dashboard KPIs Work” in Using Dashboard.
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Worst Server Area
The following is an example of the Worst Server area.
Description
Displays the successful and faulty calls of the worst five
servers/endpoints accessed by the selected Web
services, operations, or consumer.
Important
Information
The Worst Server area and the Worst Endpoint area
display the same information in the View as Graph and
View as Table tabs.
Each tab in the graph represents one of the five worst
servers or endpoints and displays the number of
successful calls (in red) and the number of faulty calls
(in purple).
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Calls
The total number of calls to the server accessed by the
Web services, operations, or consumer.
# of Errors
The number of calls to the server that ended with an
error.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the availability
can be configured in HP Diagnostics when the call is
monitored by HP Diagnostics.
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in calls
by the specific consumer.
# of Successful calls
The number of calls to the server that were successful.
Endpoint
The name of the worst endpoint.
Server
The IP address of the worst server.
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Top Metrics Report
Description
Displays the top metrics information about the traffic
to and from all of the monitored Web services or
operations in a specific view.
To Access: Select Applications > Business Availability
Center for SOA, and select the Top Metrics option in
the Business Availability Center for SOA tab.
Important
Information
Move the pointer over a tab in the appropriate graphs
to display the tooltip that includes the information
listed in the table.
Note: You can add this report as a portlet in My BSM.
For details, see “Add Portlets to <page_name>/Add
Portlets Dialog Box” in Using My BSM.
Included in Tasks
“View SOA Data in Dashboard” on page 60
Report Settings
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details, see “Common Report Elements” in Reports.
Active Filter
If relevant, click the Active Filter link to select the
appropriate conditions for the report. For details, see
“Active Filter Dialog Box” on page 65.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Real/Synthetic
Select one of the following:
➤ Real. To display data from the Diagnostics data
collector.
➤ Synthetic. To display data from the SiteScope and
Business Process monitors.
Note: When you generate a SOA report, the Data Type
selection is displayed in the top part of the report.
Top Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
From the View as Table tab, click the Health report drill
down button corresponding to:
➤ a specific Web service to open the Health Report of
the Web service’s operation in table format.
➤ a specific operation, to open the Health Report of
the operation’s servers in table format.
<bar in graph>
From the View as Graph tab, click the bar that
corresponds to:
➤ a specific Web service to open the Health Report of
the Web service’s operations in graph format.
➤ a specific operation to open the Health Report of the
operation’s servers in graph format.
Report Granularity
Select:
➤ Web services to display the top metrics information
for the selected Web services.
➤ Operations to display the top metrics information
for the selected operations.
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Web Services-Related Graphs
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Least Active Web
Services
Displays the five Web services that received the lowest
number of calls (that is, were least used), during the
selected time frame of the report. Each tab represents
the total number of calls to the Web service.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Least Available Web
Services
Displays the availability of the five Web services with
the lowest availability, during the selected time frame
of the report. The availability is calculated as the
number of successful calls to the Web service, divided
by the total number of calls to the Web service, and
multiplied by 100.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
Most Active Web
Services
Displays the five Web services with the highest number
of calls, during the selected time frame of the report.
Each tab represents the total number of calls to the
Web service.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Slowest Web Services
Displays the five slowest Web services in the selected
time frame of the report. A slow Web service is defined
as having the longest response time (no matter the
threshold value). Each tab represents the average of the
response times for the Web service during the time
frame of the report.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
Web Services with
Most Errors
Displays the five Web services with the largest number
of failed values, during the selected time frame of the
report. Each tab represents the total number of calls
that ended in errors, received by the Web service.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Web Services with
Most Slow Calls
Displays the five Web services with the highest number
of slow calls, in the selected time frame of the report. A
slow call is defined as a call that lasts longer than a
predefined threshold. Each tab represents the total
number of slow calls received by the Web service.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the Web
Services report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see “Web
Services-Related Table” on page 105.
Web Services-Related Table
The Least Active Web Services, Slowest Web Services, Web Services with
Most SOAP Faults, Web Services with Most Slow Calls, Most Active Web
Services, or Least Active Web Services table in the Top Metrics Report screen
includes the following elements:
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Calls
The total number of calls to the specific Web service
during the selected time frame of the report.
# of Errors
The number of calls to the specific Web service,
during the selected time frame of the report, that
failed due to the unavailability of the Web service.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the
availability can be configured in HP Diagnostics
when the call is monitored by HP Diagnostics.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Slow Calls
The number of slow calls to the specific Web service
during the selected time frame of the report. A slow
call is a call with a response time that is longer than
a predefined threshold.
Note: The value displayed by # of Slow Calls is
different from the value of the Total Threshold
Violation in HP Diagnostics. In HP Diagnostics the
Total Threshold Violation includes the overall
number of violation from all the calls and in
HP Business Availability Center # of Slow Calls
includes only the violations of the successful calls.
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# of SOAP Faults
The number of calls to the specific Web service,
during the selected time frame of the report, that
ended in SOAP faults.
Availability (%)
The average availability of the Web service during
the selected time frame of the report. The
availability is calculated as the number of successful
calls to the Web service, divided by the total
number of calls to the Web service, and multiplied
by 100.
Avg. Response Time (sec.)
The average response time (in seconds) of the Web
service during the selected time frame of the report.
Name
The name of the selected Web service.
NameSpace
The name space of the Web service.
Chapter 2 • HP Business Availability Center for SOA Views and Reports
Operations-Related Graphs
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Least Active
Operations
Displays the five operations that received the lowest
number of calls (that is, were least used), during the
selected time frame of the report. Each tab represents
the total number of calls to the operation.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Least Available
Operations
Displays the availability of the five operations with the
lowest availability, during the selected time frame of
the report. The availability is calculated as the number
of successful calls to the operation, divided by the total
number of calls to the operation, and multiplied by
100.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
Most Active
Operations
Displays the five operations with the highest number
of calls, during the selected time frame of the report.
Each tab represents the total number of calls to the
operation.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Operations with
Most Errors
Displays the five operations with the largest number of
calls with errors, during the selected time frame of the
report. Each tab represents the total number of errors
received by the operation.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
Operations with
Most Slow Calls
Displays the five operations with the highest number
of slow calls, in the selected time frame of the report.
A slow call is defined as a call that lasts longer than a
predefined threshold. Each tab represents the total
number of slow calls received by the operation.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Slowest Operations
The Slowest Operations graph displays the five slowest
operations in the selected time frame of the report. A
slow operation is defined as having the longest
response time (no matter the threshold value). Each
tab represents the average of the response times for the
operation during the time frame of the report.
This graph is displayed if you have selected the
Operations report granularity.
For details on the table columns, see
“Operations-Related Table” on page 111.
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Operations-Related Table
The Least Active Operations, Slowest Operations, Operations with Most
SOAP Faults, Operations with Most Slow Calls, Most Active Operations, or
Least Active Operations tables includes the following elements:
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
# of Calls
The total number of calls to the specific operation
during the selected time frame of the report.
# of Errors
The number of calls to the specific operation,
during the selected time frame of the report, that
failed due to the unavailability of the operation.
Configurable: The SOAP faults affecting the
availability can be configured in HP Diagnostics
when the call is monitored by HP Diagnostics.
# of Slow Calls
The number of slow calls to the specific operation
during the selected time frame of the report. A slow
call is a call with a response time that is longer than
a predefined threshold.
Note: The value displayed by # of Slow Calls is
different from the value of the Total Threshold
Violation in HP Diagnostics. In HP Diagnostics the
Total Threshold Violation includes the overall
number of violation from all the calls and in
HP Business Availability Center # of Slow Calls
includes only the violations of the successful calls.
# of SOAP Faults
The total number of SOAP faults that occurred in
calls by the specific consumer.
The column is displayed only when you select the
Real data type.
Availability (%)
The average availability of the operation during the
selected time frame of the report. The availability is
calculated as the number of successful calls to the
operation, divided by the total number of calls to
the operation, and multiplied by 100.
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112
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Avg. Response Time (sec.)
The average response time (in seconds) of the
operation during the selected time frame of the
report.
Name
The name of the operation.
NameSpace
The name space of the Web service that runs the
operation.
Web Service
The name of the Web service that runs the
operation.
Part II
HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications
114
3
HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications
This chapter includes information about deploying HP Business Availability
Center for SAP Applications solution.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications – Overview on page 116
➤
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications License on page 117
➤
Architecture on page 118
➤
SAP Service on page 119
➤
Collecting SAP System Information on page 120
Tasks
➤
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications on page 121
➤
Deploy the SAP CCMS Monitor to Retrieve Measurements from the SAP
System on page 124
➤
Activate the SAP Service on page 129
➤
Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications on page 130
➤
Create Monitors on page 134
➤
Use a Business Process Monitor Profile to Simulate SAP Users on page 135
Troubleshooting and Limitations on page 143
Concepts
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications –
Overview
The HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications enable you to gain
visibility and control over your SAP systems and applications.
The SAP solution provides:
➤
A single operation console consolidating all SAP monitoring information.
➤
Automatic discovery and modeling of SAP-related elements, as well as their
relations to other systems in the organization’s IT.
➤
Change discovery and notification, for quicker problem resolution.
➤
Display of transport deployment impact, for move-to-production risk
analysis.
➤
Proactive monitoring of end-user experience in SAP systems.
➤
A bridge between IT and line-of-business people using SAP Solution
Manager business processes hierarchy monitoring.
➤
The ability to distinguish between SAP-specific problems and general ones.
➤
Examination, over time, of SAP CCMS monitoring data.
➤
Service Level Management of SAP systems’ service level commitments.
In addition, you can create SLAs centered around your HP Business
Availability Center for SAP Applications SAP transaction CIs to gain
visibility into performance or availability issues that affect these SLAs. For
details on SLAs, see “Service Level Management - Overview” in Using Service
Level Management.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
License
The HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications license unlocks the
following functionality in HP Business Availability Center, helping to
shorten time-to-value and minimize MTTR:
➤
The SAP Systems pattern view, displaying a hierarchical view of SAP
applications and infrastructure.
➤
Automatic linkage of Business Process Monitor transactions to the SAP
transactions they are monitoring.
➤
Automatic linkage of SiteScope measurements to their respective SAP
infrastructure.
➤
SAP-specific KPIs that allow differentiation between SAP-related issues and
non-SAP ones.
➤
SAP Transport Changes and SAP Transaction Changes access from
Dashboard views for quick visualization of change impact. For details, see
“SAP Transport Changes” and “SAP Transaction Changes” in Using
Dashboard.
➤
SAP-specific change reports, summarizing the impact transports have on
transactions in the SAP system.
For details about the views and reports, see “Display SAP Information in
Dashboard” on page 157.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
Architecture
The architecture of HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications is
illustrated in the following diagram:
Most of the SAP CIs are created by automatic discovery. The configuration
for these CIs is saved into the UCMDB (Universal Configuration
Management database). Some of the relationships to Business Process
Monitor and SiteScope CIs are created by automatic mechanisms unique to
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
The architecture of HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
includes the following components:
➤
The DDM Probe discovers SAP-related entities and the general entities (such
as hosts) that are related to them using CCMS. The DDM Probe
communicates with the UCMDB using a Remote Function Call (RFC) with a
Java Connector (JCo).
➤
The SiteScope SAP CCMS Solution Set communicates with the SAP system
and retrieves CCMS monitoring data using a Remote Function Call (RFC)
with a Java Connector (JCo).
➤
The Business Process Monitor collects data on the performance and
availability of Business Process Monitor transactions carried out on the SAP
system.
➤
The HP Universal CMDB Server collects change information from the
UCMDB and stores it in the History database.
➤
The Dashboard tabs and reports are used as the central console for viewing
all of the data and performing analysis of the data. For details, see
“Introducing Dashboard” in Using Dashboard.
For details about the samples that include the data, see “Data Samples for
SiteScope” and “Data Samples for Business Process Monitor” in Reference
Information.
SAP Service
The SAP service is assigned to the Modeling Data Processing Server. It is a
configuration service that enables HP Business Availability Center to work
with data that is in SAP format.
For details on how to view a service status using the JMX Web console, see
“High Availability for the Data Processing Server” in the HP Business
Availability Center Deployment Guide PDF.
The SAP Service is responsible for the following advantages:
➤
Intelligent relation of monitoring information.
➤
Installation on the modeling processing server (5 server installation).
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
➤
Loading occurs after the UCMDB and Viewing System services are loaded.
➤
Registration on 3 TQLs and notification on every change in each one of
those TQLs.
➤
Check of the service activity in the JMX console. For details, see “Activate
the SAP Service” on page 129.
➤
Automatic linkage of SiteScope measurements or BPM scripts with
standardized names. For details, see “Attach Business Process Steps to a SAP
Transaction using the naming conventions for naming Business Process
steps” on page 139.
➤
Creation of the Business Process and Locations containers and connection
of the appropriate Business Process Steps to these containers. A Business
Process Step connected manually to the SAP transaction would also be
connected to these containers. For details, see “Attach Business Process Steps
to a SAP Transaction without Following the Naming Conventions” on
page 140.
➤
Works after the BPM source adapter and SiteScope source adapters (when
you are working with SiteScope 9.0) have been synchronized.
Collecting SAP System Information
The Automatic Discovery component discovers the actual SAP IT entities
and stores them as CIs in the UCMDB.
All configuration actions of SAP CIs are performed inside the UCMDB
Administration application. All SAP CIs appear in the SAP Systems view
under a root CI called SAP Systems.
All SAP system metrics are monitored by SiteScope monitors.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
SAP business processes/transactions are simulated using Business Process
Monitor pre-recorded VuGen scripts. Each script includes one or more
Business Process Steps and are executed from a specific location. All Business
Process Monitor-related CIs are stored in the UCMDB as non-SAP-related CIs
with links to the appropriate SAP-related CIs.
Similar to other information, information about the SAP System is available
in Dashboard in all of the relevant tabs.
The SAP Systems views includes information from the SAP IT entities, SAP
system metrics monitored by SiteScope monitors, and information about
the SAP business processes/transactions simulated by Business Process
Monitor scripts.
Tasks
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications
This section describes the processes to follow to display SAP information in
Dashboard.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Prerequisites” on page 122
➤
“Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications” on page 123
➤
“Run the SAP Discovery Process” on page 123
➤
“Create a Business Process Monitor Profile” on page 123
➤
“Create Monitors” on page 123
➤
“Modify SiteScope KPI Assignment Group” on page 123
➤
“Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on page 124
➤
“Add an Application Server to the SAP System” on page 124
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
1 Prerequisites
Ensure that the following software is installed before you install the SAP
solution:
➤
DDM Probe. Used to perform the discovery of SAP topology in your
organization. For details, see “Discovery and Dependency Mapping” in
Discovery and Dependency Mapping Guide.
➤
SiteScope. Used to integrate the SiteScope data collector into the
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications solution. For details,
see the HP SiteScope Deployment Guide PDF.
➤
Business Process Monitor. Used to integrate the Business Process Monitor
data into the HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications solution.
For details, see “Introducing Business Process Monitor” in HP Business
Process Monitor Administrator’s Guide.
Note: You must have a SAP license to view the SAP Systems view in
HP Business Availability Center.
Support Matrix:
SAP Version
Limitation
SAP R/3 4.6
No limitation.
SAP R/3 4.7
ERP 2004 (ECC 5.0)
The following reports are not supported:
ERP 2005 (ECC 6.0)
➤ Show Impacting SAP Transports
➤ Show SAP Transport Impact
➤ SAP Transaction Changes
➤ SAP Transport Changes
For details about the reports, see
“HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications User Interface” on page 165
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
2 Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications.
For details, see “Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications”
on page 130.
3 Run the SAP Discovery Process
You run the SAP discovery process to discover SAP elements and SAP
topology. For details, see “Application – SAP” in Discovery and Dependency
Mapping Guide.
4 Create a Business Process Monitor Profile
Business Process Monitor profiles are used to simulate SAP users to obtain
performance and availability information on the SAP transactions.
For details, see “Use a Business Process Monitor Profile to Simulate SAP
Users” on page 135.
5 Create Monitors
You can create a SAP CCMS monitor and general SiteScope monitors to get
the complete picture: Database Query Monitor, Ping Monitor, and so on. For
details, see “Create Monitors” on page 134.
Note: The SAP CCMS Monitor is an optional SiteScope feature whose license
is provided with the SAP solution.
6 Modify SiteScope KPI Assignment Group
If required, when you are working with SiteScope 9.50, you can modify the
existing SiteScope KPI assignments. For details, see “Assignment Groups
Page” in Using Dashboard.
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7 Display SAP Information in Dashboard
You can display SAP information in Dashboard in different views and
reports. For details, see “Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on
page 157.
8 Add an Application Server to the SAP System
When you add a new application server to the SAP System, you must clear
the Report SAP Topology to HP Business Availability Center option, save the
Monitor definition, and then select the option again and save the monitor
definition, so the monitor recognizes the new application server.
Deploy the SAP CCMS Monitor to Retrieve Measurements
from the SAP System
The SAP CCMS monitor retrieves and reports measurements from SAP's
centralized monitoring system CCMS. CCMS is used to monitor all servers,
components and resources in the SAP R/3® System from one single
centralized server, facilitating problem discovery and problem diagnosis. For
details, see “SAP CCMS Monitor Overview” in Using System Availability
Management.
Note: The SAP CCMS Monitor is an optional SiteScope feature whose license
is provided with the SAP solution.
This task includes the following steps:
124
➤
“Deploy a CCMS Monitor Using the SiteScope CCMS Solution Template” on
page 125
➤
“Attach SiteScope to HP Business Availability Center” on page 126
➤
“Check That the Monitor Is Set to Report All Monitors and Measurements”
on page 126
Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
➤
“Synchronize the SiteScope Source Adapter” on page 126
➤
“Connect the SAP CCMS Measurements to the Appropriate Elements of the
SAP Hierarchy” on page 127
➤
“Check/View the SiteScope Measurements in the SAP View” on page 129
1 Deploy a CCMS Monitor Using the SiteScope CCMS Solution
Template
The MonitorSetSSServer.mset solution template is the most effective way to
deploy a CCMS monitor.
To deploy a CCMS monitor using the SiteScope CCMS solution template:
a Access SiteScope using System Availability Management in HP Business
Availability Center or directly using the URL: http://
<SiteScope_server>:8080/<HP_BAC_web_application_context_name
(usually topaz)>/.
b Select Admin > System Availability Center.
c Right-click the appropriate SiteScope in the Enterprise tree, and select
New Group.
d Enter the name of the group in the Group Name box in the Main Settings
area.
e Click OK.
f Expand Solution Sets, right-click SAPR3Solution, and select Copy.
g Right-click the new group you have created, and select Paste.
h In the Main Settings area, enter the following information:
➤
The name of the SAP System in the TARGET_SERVER_NAME box.
➤
The user name in the USER_NAME box.
➤
The password in the Password box.
➤
The number of the SAP system in the SYSTEM_NUMBER box.
➤
The number of the client to which you connect SiteScope in the
CLIENT_NUMBER box.
i Click OK.
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2 Attach SiteScope to HP Business Availability Center
Make sure that SiteScope is attached to HP Business Availability Center. For
details, see “New SiteScope Page” in Using System Availability Management.
3 Check That the Monitor Is Set to Report All Monitors and
Measurements
To view SiteScope measurements, you must check that the monitor is set to
report all monitors and measurements information.
To check that the monitor is set to Report All Monitors and Measurements:
a Select Admin > System Availability Center.
b Double-click the appropriate CCMS monitor under the appropriate
group, select Properties, and expand the HP Business Availability Center
Login area.
c Check that the value of the Logging to HP Business Availability Center is
set to Report everything (all monitors and all measurements).
4 Synchronize the SiteScope Source Adapter
If you are working with SiteScope 9.0, you can synchronize the SiteScope
source adapter immediately or you can wait for the automatic
synchronization to take place. For details, see “Source Manager Page” in
Model Management.
If you are working with SiteScope version 9.50 and later, skip this step.
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5 Connect the SAP CCMS Measurements to the Appropriate
Elements of the SAP Hierarchy
The SAP CCMS measurements are connected to the appropriate elements of
the SAP hierarchy as follows:
a A SAP CCMS measurement can reside only under a System, R/3
Application Server, Work Process, or Database CIT.
b The linkage is performed based on the CCMS measurement's name that
includes the name of the appropriate CI.
A CCMS measurement name has the following syntax: <field1>/<field2>/
<field3>. If the fields in the CCMS name include the name of an R/3
Application Server, System ID, Work Process name, or Database name,
the CCMS measurement is attached to the appropriate CI as follows:
<field1>
<field2>
<field3>
Attached to CI
R/3 Application
Server name
System ID
Work Process
name
Attached to the
specified work process
R/3 Application
Server name
System ID
N/A
Attached to the
specified R/3
application server
System ID
N/A
N/A
Attached to the
specified SAP system
System ID
Database
name
N/A
Attached to the
specified database
For more details on the SAP hierarchy, see “Default CIs in the SAP
Systems View” on page 159.
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Example
If you have the following CCMS measurements, the first three CCMS
measurements are attached to the Background CI (Work Process) under the
Calderone_MI6_00 CI (R/3 Application Server), under the Infrastructure CI,
and the other group of measurements are attached to the Dialog CI under
the Calderone_MI6_00 (R/3 Application Server) under the Infrastructure CI.
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6 Check/View the SiteScope Measurements in the SAP View
SiteScope monitors are displayed in the SAP view only if they are connected
to hosts. To display them elsewhere in the hierarchy, advanced users must
modify the TQL of the SAP System. For details, see “SiteScope Measurements
in SAP Systems View” on page 155.
Note: If SiteScope measurements names are too long and are truncated in
Dashboard, you can change the CIT default label to RegExp(data_name,
(.*[/].*[/].*[/])(.*),2) instead of just data_name. Only the beginning of the
path and the last part of the measurement's name are displayed instead of
the entire measurement name (including the path). If you change the CIT
default label, you must also change all references in the code and in the TQL
layout from display_label to data_name.
Activate the SAP Service
Check that the SAP Service is activated (it is activated by default). If
necessary, activate it manually. For details, see “High Availability for the
Data Processing Server” in the HP Business Availability Center Deployment
Guide PDF.
To manually activate the SAP Service:
1 In the browser, enter (using JMX login credentials):
http://<HP Business Availability Center server name>
:8080/jmx-console/
2 Double-click service=Verticals External Enrichment Service listed under
Topaz.
3 The JMX MBean View for Verticals External Enrichment Service opens.
4 Specify:
➤
performLinkage. The customer ID and the relevant linkage used to
perform (CCMS/BPM AUTO/BPM manual.
➤
createTqlListeners. Use for debugging.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
➤
Start. Starts the service.
➤
Stop. Stops the service.
Install HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications
Deploying the SAP solution includes setting the appropriate licenses,
connecting SAP Java Connector on the SiteScope machine, and setting the
DDM Probe.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Set the License for the SAP Solution” on page 130
➤
“Check that the Jobs Are Deployed” on page 131
➤
“Install the SAP Java Connector on the SiteScope Machine” on page 131
➤
“Set the SiteScope License” on page 132
➤
“Perform the DDM Probe Post-Installation Procedure” on page 133
➤
“Restart the Discovery Agent” on page 133
1 Set the License for the SAP Solution
When setting the SAP solution license, verify that the license also contains
the Auto Discovery license (customers with HP Business Availability Center
for SAP license also receive the Auto Discovery license).
If the SAP solution license was set while installing HP Business Availability
Center, the SAP jobs are automatically deployed and added to the UCMDB.
To set the license for the SAP solution.
a Log in to HP Business Availability Center.
b Select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > License
Management.
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c Click New License Key to open the New License Key page, and enter a
valid license key in the License key box. The license key includes the SAP
solution.
d Click OK to save the change.
e Verify that the value of Business Availability Center for SAP in the
Applications area is Licensed.
f It is recommended to restart HP Business Availability Center at this
point.
2 Check that the Jobs Are Deployed
If the SAP solution license was set after installing HP Business Availability
Center, you must deploy the jobs manually or restart HP Business
Availability Center so the SAP jobs are deployed automatically (this is the
recommended procedure).
The SAP-related jobs: SAP.zip, SAP_discovery.zip, and SAP_monitoring.zip
are at the following location on the machine where UCMDB is installed:
<Discovery Probe root directory>\root\lib\packages.
Select Admin > Universal CMDB > Modeling > It Universe Manager and
check that the SAP views are listed in the View list in View Explorer.
3 Install the SAP Java Connector on the SiteScope Machine
Once SiteScope is installed, install SAP Java connector on the SiteScope
machine, as follows:
a Download the SAP JCo package from the Tools & Services window of SAP
JCo in SAP Service Marketplace:
https://websmp101.sap-ag.de/~form/
sapnet?_SHORTKEY=01100035870000463649
b Extract sapjco-ntintel-2.0.8.zip to a temporary directory (for example,
C:\temp) on the SiteScope machine.
c Copy sapjco.jar from the temporary directory to the <SiteScope root
directory>\SiteScope\WEB-INF\lib directory on the SiteScope machine.
d Copy sapjcorfc.dll from the temporary directory to the <SiteScope root
directory>\SiteScope\bin directory on the SiteScope machine.
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e Copy librfc32.dll from the temporary directory, in the SiteScope machine
to:
➤
the %winnt%\system32 directory
➤
the <SiteScope root directory>\SiteScope\bin directory
If there is an old version of the librfc32.dll file already in the
<SiteScope root directory>\bin or in the %winnt%\system32
directory, you should replace it.
f Restart SiteScope as follows: on the SiteScope machine, go to Start >
Programs > Administration Tools > Services, find SiteScope service and
restart it.
4 Set the SiteScope License
To set the SiteScope license appropriate for your system:
a Launch SiteScope by entering the following URL in a browser:
http://<SiS_machine_name>:8080
b Choose Preferences > General Preferences.
c Click Edit.
d Click Insert valid license keys.
e In the License Number box, enter a valid SiteScope license key.
f In the Option Licenses box, enter the SiteScope license keys appropriate
for the SAP solution.
Make sure to insert a license for: EMS monitors, SAP monitors, and the
SAP R/3 solution template.
g Click OK to approve the changes.
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5 Perform the DDM Probe Post-Installation Procedure
After installing the DDM Probe, perform the post-installation procedure (see
below) and restart the DDM Probe. If the DDM Probe is already running
before you perform the post-installation procedure, stop it and restart it
afterwards.
To perform the DDM Probe post-installation:
a Download the SAP JCo package from the Tools & Services window of SAP
JCo in SAP Service Marketplace:
https://websmp101.sap-ag.de/~form/
sapnet?_SHORTKEY=01100035870000463649
b Extract sapjco-ntintel-2.0.8.zip to a temporary directory (for example:
C:\temp) on the HP Business Availability Center machine.
c Create a new sap directory (in lowercase) in the
C:\hp\DDM\DiscoveryProbe\root\ext\ directory on the machine where
the DDM Probe is installed.
d Copy sapjco.jar from the temporary directory to the
C:\hp\DDM\DiscoveryProbe\root\ext\sap\ directory on the machine
where the DDM Probe is installed.
e Copy sapjcorfc.dll from the temporary directory to the
%winnt%\system32 directory on the machine where the DDM Probe is
installed. Also copy the file to the
C:\hp\DDM\DiscoveryProbe\root\ext\dll\ folder.
f Copy librfc32.dll from the temporary directory to the
%winnt%\system32 directory. Also copy the file to the
C:\hp\DDM\DiscoveryProbe\root\ext\dll\ folder.
g Verify that the MSVCR71.dll and MSVCP71.dll files are located in the
%winnt%\system32 directory.
6 Restart the Discovery Agent
Perform the following steps:
a On the DDM Probe machine, access: Start > Programs >
Business Availability Center > Administration > Discovery Agent
b This starts the DDM Probe and opens a CMD console.
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c Wait until the console displays the following line: Finished startup
sequence
Create Monitors
You create a SAP CCMS monitor and general SiteScope monitors to get the
complete picture of your system.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Create a SAP CCMS Monitor” on page 134
➤
“Create General Monitors” on page 135
1 Create a SAP CCMS Monitor
The SAP CCMS monitor retrieves and reports measurements using SAP
centralized monitoring system CCMS. CCMS is used to monitor all servers,
components, and resources in the SAP R/3® System from one single
centralized server facilitating problem discovery and problem diagnosis.
For details on creating a SAP CCMS Monitor, see “SAP CCMS Monitor
Overview” in Using System Availability Management.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
SAP CCMS Monitor solution template is the most effective way to deploy a
CCMS monitor. For details, see “Deploy a CCMS Monitor Using the
SiteScope CCMS Solution Template” on page 125.
2 Create General Monitors
You create general SiteScope monitors to get the complete picture of your
system.
For example, you could use the Database Query monitor to monitor the
availability and proper functioning of your database application, or the Ping
monitor to discover if your network connection is congested.
For details on the available monitors, see Using System Availability
Management.
Use a Business Process Monitor Profile to Simulate SAP
Users
Use Business Process Monitor profiles to simulate SAP users and obtain
performance and availability information on the SAP transactions.
You can view Business Process Steps under the SAP view to enable you to
analyze what happens in the SAP system.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Create a Business Process Monitor Profile” on page 136
➤
“Select the Appropriate Protocol” on page 136
➤
“Select the Appropriate Run-Time Settings” on page 136
➤
“Edit the Script” on page 137
➤
“Synchronize the Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter” on page 138
➤
“Attach Business Process Monitor Transactions to SAP Application
Components” on page 139
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
➤
“Delete Links Between SAP Transactions and Business Process Steps When
you Do Not Follow Naming Conventions” on page 141
➤
“Check/View the Business Process Monitor Measurements in the SAP
Systems View” on page 143
1 Create a Business Process Monitor Profile
You create a business process profile in End User Management. For details,
see “Creating Business Process Profiles and Monitors Overview” in Using End
User Management.
2 Select the Appropriate Protocol
In HP Virtual User Generator (VuGen), SAP scripts are recorded using the
SAPGUI protocol. You must select the SAPGUI protocol when you create a
new script. For details, see the HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
3 Select the Appropriate Run-Time Settings
In VuGen, open the Run-Time settings window, and select the
SAPGUI:General node. Select Show SAP client during replay and clear Take
Active screenshots during replay to give more accurate user experience
times. For details, see the HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
4 Edit the Script
You can edit the script to make sure the password is recorded properly and
to check and correct the script’s connection parameters.
To edit the script:
a Make sure the password is recorded correctly. Remove the stars and
replace with the required password.
b Check the script’s connection parameters and if necessary, delete the
string that appears after the system number in the first parameter.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
The result is as follows:
5 Synchronize the Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter
You can synchronize the Business Process Monitoring source adapter
immediately or you can wait for the automatic synchronization to take
place. For details, see “Source Manager Page” in Model Management.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
6 Attach Business Process Monitor Transactions to SAP
Application Components
To display Performance and Availability information, Business Process Steps
must be attached to SAP transactions.
You can connect BMP transactions to a SAP transaction in two different
ways:
➤
Attach Business Process Steps to a SAP Transaction using the naming
conventions for naming Business Process steps
Following the naming convention listed below logically connects Business
Process Steps to a SAP transaction.
Use the following format for the Business Process Step name:
<tran_name>_ _<sys_name>_ _<BPM_tran_name>
➤
tran_name. The name of the SAP transaction to which you want to
attach the Business Process Step.
➤
sys_name. The name of the SAP System on which the transaction is run
(for example, MI7).
➤
BPM_tran_name. The unique name of the Business Process Step.
Any set of alphanumeric and mixed case characters is supported (special
characters are not allowed). It is good practice to name the transaction so
that the name indicates what occurs in that set of dialog steps.
Note: You assign the appropriate name to a Business Process Step when you
record it. For details, see the HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
For example, the names of the Business Process Steps assigned to the SAP
transaction VA01 in the MI7 SAP System should start with: va01_ _mi7_
In the SAP Systems View, a Business Process Steps node that is displayed
under a specific SAP transaction is a container under which all relevant
transactions are located.
It is important to split a SAP transaction into a few Business Process Monitor
transactions so that you are able to pinpoint the problem. For example, if
each step of the SAP transaction is a separate Business Process Monitor
transaction, you can find the exact part of the SAP transaction where the
problem occurs.
➤
Attach Business Process Steps to a SAP Transaction without Following the
Naming Conventions
If you do not want to follow the naming conventions for the Business
Process Steps, you must manually link a Business Process Step to a SAP
transaction.
a Select Admin > End User Management, and build a Business Process
Monitor profile.
b To manually connect Business Process Steps with SAP transactions, select
Admin > Universal CMDB > Modeling > IT Universe Manager, and select
SAP View in the View list. Right-click the SAP transaction that you want
to monitor using the BPM profile and select Attach Related CI to open
the Insert Relationship dialog box. Select one of the monitor views
(System Monitors view or End User Monitors view) in the Views list.
Expand and select the Business Process Step to which you want to
connect the SAP transaction, and select the Monitored By for SAP
relationship type, as well as the Allow CI Update option.
For details, see “Insert Relationship Dialog Box” in Model Management.
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7 Delete Links Between SAP Transactions and Business Process
Steps When you Do Not Follow Naming Conventions
If you do not follow the naming conventions, be careful when deleting links
between SAP transactions and Business Process Steps. For details, see “Delete
Links Between SAP Transactions and Business Process Steps When you Do
Not Follow Naming Conventions” on page 141.
SiteScope measurements and Business Process Monitor transactions are
attached under the appropriate level of the SAP hierarchy. For details, see
“Default CIs in the SAP Systems View” on page 159.
A TQL runs in the background and returns:
➤
CCMS measurements that are not linked to SAP entities. Most of the CCMS
measurements’ names indicate to which SAP entities they should be
attached in the hierarchy.
➤
Business Process Monitor transactions that are not attached to a SAP and
follow the naming convention. The name of the Business Process Monitor
transaction indicates to which SAP entity it should be attached.
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Chapter 3 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications
➤
Business Process steps that are manually attached to a SAP transaction. A
Business Process Step is automatically attached to the Business Process
container that was created by the Business Process Step. The Business
Process Step is monitored by SAP. For details, see “Attach Business Process
Steps to a SAP Transaction without Following the Naming Conventions” on
page 140.
If the Business Process Monitor source adapter was assigned the Transaction/
Location option, a copy of the location information is attached to the
Locations container. For details on these types of hierarchy, see “New/Edit
Source Adapter Dialog Box” in Model Management.
If you delete a link between a SAP transaction and its child Business Process
Step transaction, then the following happens:
➤
If you followed the naming convention for the Business Process Step
transaction, the link between the SAP transaction and its child Business
Process Step is automatically recreated at the next synchronization.
➤
If you did not follow the naming convention and created a manual link
between the SAP transaction and a Business Process Step transaction, then
when you delete the link:
➤
If the Business Process Monitoring source adapter was assigned the
Transactions/locations option, the Location container is not deleted.
You can manually delete it. Delete the Location container only if the
deleted Business Process Step transaction is the only CI attached to this
location. If other Business Process Step transactions are attached to this
location, delete only the links between the Business Process Monitor
(BPM transaction from location) and the Location container.
➤
If the Business Process Monitoring source adapter was assigned the
Regular option, the Business Process container is not deleted. You must
manually delete the links between the Business Process container and the
detached Business Process Step transaction.
For details on the Transactions/locations or Regular options, see “New/Edit
Source Adapter Dialog Box” in Model Management.
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8 Check/View the Business Process Monitor Measurements in the
SAP Systems View
You can view the Business Process Measurement in the SAP Systems view in
different locations in the SAP hierarchy. For details, see “Business Process
Monitor CIs in SAP Systems View – Details” on page 152.
Troubleshooting and Limitations
This section provides information that can help troubleshoot problems that
may occur when working with HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“The SAP KPI Remains Not up to date” on page 143
➤
“CCMS Does Not Manage to Monitor a SAP System” on page 144
➤
“The Performance and Availability KPIs Remain Uninitialized” on page 144
➤
“SAP Business Process Monitor Scripts Do Not Execute” on page 145
➤
“Unable to Log Into HP Business Availability Center” on page 145
The SAP KPI Remains Not up to date
If the SAP KPI status remains Not up to date (indicated by this icon), check
the following solutions in the order listed below:
1 Make sure the SAP CCMS monitor is set to send samples to HP Business
Availability Center in the monitor’s Logging to HP Business Availability
Center property in System Availability Management.
2 Check the following file to ensure that the samples arrive to the Business
Logic Engine:
<HP Business Availability Center Gateway Server root directory>
\log\EJBContainer\TrinitySamples.log
3 Check that the samples arrive to the bus in the following file:
<HP Business Availability Center Gateway Server root directory>
\log\core\dispatcher_log.txt
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4 Check that the samples are sent in the following file:
<SiteScope root directory>\logs\topaz_all.log.1
5 If you see values in the measurements' KPIs with the Not up to date status,
check the threshold definition in System Availability Management.
6 Restart SiteScope, detach it, and re-attach it.
7 Check time synchronization between HP Business Availability Center and
its management database.
CCMS Does Not Manage to Monitor a SAP System
If CCMS does not manage to monitor a SAP System, check the following
solutions in the order listed below:
1 If you are able to connect to the SAP System using SAP Logon, run the rz20
transaction.
2 Open SAP CCMS Monitor Templates > Entire System, and check if a tree is
displayed.
➤
If there is no tree, there might be a problem with the job that is
collecting CCMS information. Contact your SAP administrator.
➤
If there is a tree, check that the names of the application server and of
the system match, in content and case, the ones used in SiteScope.
The Performance and Availability KPIs Remain
Uninitialized
If the Performance and Availability KPIs remain uninitialized, check the
following solutions in the order listed below:
1 Check that the samples arrive, in the file:
<HP Business Availability Center Gateway Server root directory>
\log\EJBContainer\TrinitySamples.log
2 Try and run Business Process Monitor as a specific user.
3 Check time synchronization between HP Business Availability Center and
its Management database.
4 Check the minute’s synchronization between Business Process Monitor and
HP Business Availability Center.
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SAP Business Process Monitor Scripts Do Not Execute
If the SAP Business Process Monitor scripts do not execute, check the
following solutions in the order listed below:
1 Verify that SAP Logon is installed on the Business Process Monitor server.
2 Check that the SAP Business Process Monitor scripts run in HP Virtual User
Generator (VuGen) and check the script’s connection parameters. For
details, see “Edit the Script” on page 137.
3 Register DLLs under <Business_Process_Monitor_install_directory>\bin, as
follows:
➤
regsvr32 SapGuiActiveScreen.dll
➤
regsvr32 SapGuiReplayEvents.dll
➤
regsvr32 ActiveScreen.dll
Unable to Log Into HP Business Availability Center
If you are unable to log into HP Business Availability Center, check the
following solutions in the order listed below:
1 Check that the last line in the following file:
<SiteScope root directory>\log\jboss_boot.log
displays the following information: Jboss .... started in ...
2 If you are able to connect using port 8080 explicitly, give the Read and
Execute permission to Everyone for the following DLLs in
<Windows installation directory>\System32:
➤
msvcr71.dll
➤
msvcp71.dll
➤
mfc71.dll
➤
atl71.dll
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3 If SiteScope is installed on the same machine as HP Business Availability
Center, check that HP Business Availability Center is already running before
you start SiteScope.
Note: It is not recommended to install HP Business Availability Center and
SiteScope on the same machine.
An existing Business Process Monitor machine can be leveraged for running
SAP scripts as well.
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4
HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications Reports and Views
This chapter includes information about HP Business Availability Center for
SAP Applications solution reports and views.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
SAP Systems View on page 148
➤
Business Process Monitor CIs in SAP Systems View – Details on page 152
➤
SiteScope Measurements in SAP Systems View on page 155
➤
CCMS Counters on page 156
Tasks
➤
Display SAP Information in Dashboard on page 157
Reference
➤
Default CIs in the SAP Systems View on page 159
➤
SAP-Related KPIs on page 164
➤
SAP-Related Menu Options on page 164
➤
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications User Interface
on page 165
Concepts
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Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
SAP Systems View
After configuring HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications, you
can view SAP information in the SAP Systems view in the Console tab and in
the Filters tab in Dashboard. For details on how to work with the Console
tab, see “Console Page” in Using Dashboard. For details on how to work with
the Filters tab, see “Dashboard Filters” in Using Dashboard.
For details on configuring HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications, see “Deploy HP Business Availability Center for SAP
Applications” on page 121.
The data displayed in the views is taken from the Business Process Monitor
samples and from the SiteScope samples. For details, see “Data Samples for
Business Process Monitor” and “Data Samples for SiteScope” in Reference
Information.
For additional information about views, see “View Components” in Using
Dashboard.
The SAP Systems view in View Explorer appears as follows:
To access SAP Systems TQL, select Admin > Universal CMDB > Modeling >
View Manager > Application > SAP > SAP Systems.
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The following graph describes the various layers and drill-downs available in
the topology of the SAP Systems view:
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Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
Topologies
In addition, the SAP Systems view includes the following topologies, which
are created by specific SiteScope monitors:
➤
SAP CCMS topology discovered by SiteScope:
SiteScope creates the following topology for the SiteScope SAP CCMS
monitor. The CIs are created only for the monitored entities according to
the counters that you selected.
Note: The Database CI is always a child of the Host CI that you specified in
the monitor definition even if it is actually running on another host.
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➤
SAP Work Processes topology discovered by SiteScope:
SiteScope creates the following topology for the SiteScope SAP Work
Processes monitor. The CIs are created only for the monitored entities
according to the counters that you selected.
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Business Process Monitor CIs in SAP Systems View –
Details
You can view the Business Process Measurement in the SAP Systems view in
different locations in the SAP hierarchy. This section describes the view’s
characteristics.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Structure” on page 152
➤
“Naming Convention and the Names of the SAP Transaction CIs” on
page 154
➤
“The Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy Structure and the Names of
the BPM Monitor CIs” on page 154
Structure
Whether you have used or not used the naming convention for the Business
Process Step, the view displays the following structure:
152
➤
The BPM Monitor (BPM transaction from location CIT) is displayed under a
Business Process Step CI, under a SAP Transaction CI, under several levels of
SAP Application Component CIs, under a SAP System CI, when you have set
the Hierarchy structure of the Business Process Monitoring source adapter to
Transaction/Location or to Regular.
➤
The BPM Monitor (BPM transaction from location CIT) is also displayed
under a Business Process Step CI under the Contained group CI (Business
Processes) when you have set the Hierarchy structure of the Business Process
Monitoring source adapter to Transaction/Location or to Regular.
➤
The BPM Monitor (BPM transaction from location CIT) is displayed under a
Contained Location CI itself under a Contained group CI (Locations) under
the SAP System CI when you have set the Hierarchy structure of the Business
Process Monitoring source adapter to Transaction/Location. When you set
the Hierarchy structure to Regular this structure is not displayed.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
The hierarchy is as follows:
For details on the types of hierarchy, see “New/Edit Source Adapter Dialog
Box” in Model Management.
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Naming Convention and the Names of the SAP
Transaction CIs
When you use the naming convention, the name of the SAP Transaction CI
is used as the beginning of the name of the BPM Monitor CI:
When you do not use the naming convetion, the name of the SAP
Transaction CI is not used as the beginning of the name of the BPM Monitor
CI:
The Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy Structure
and the Names of the BPM Monitor CIs
The only difference is at the level of the names of the BPM Monitor CIs, as
follows:
154
➤
The name of the CI is followed by the location when you use the
Transaction/Location hierarchy:
➤
Only the name of the CI is displayed when you use the Regular hierarchy:
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
SiteScope Measurements in SAP Systems View
➤
The SiteScope Measurement is displayed:
➤
Under a SAP Work Process CI, under SAP R/3 Application Server CI, under
an instance of a Contained Group CI, under a SAP System CI.
➤
Under a SAP R/3 Application Server CI, under an instance of a Contained
Group CI, under a SAP System CI.
For example:
➤
The SiteScope Measurement is displayed under a SAP System CI. For
example:
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Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
➤
The SiteScope Measurement is displayed under a Database CI, under an
instance of a Contained Group CI, under a SAP System CI. For example:
CCMS Counters
The CCMS Counters Dynamic Nodes collect the samples from SiteScope and
display them as CIs under the elements they are monitoring.
To view these CIs, select Applications > Dashboard, click Console, select SAP
Systems in the View list, and click the Background CI (under Infrastructure).
The Console page displays the samples from SiteScope.
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Move the pointer over the CI to display a tooltip that provides information
about the CI, its status, the rule that calculates the status of the SAP KPI, the
values returned by the monitor the last time it ran, the measurement names,
and the monitor type. The tooltips includes the following information:
➤
CI Name. The name of the CI.
➤
Status. The status of the CI (calculated according to one of the status
calculation methods). It may also display:
➤
Not up to date for decayed CIs, indicating that the CI has passed its
timeout period. (For a SiteScope CI, this status is displayed after a
SiteScope monitor is disabled.)
➤
Stopped when a Business Process profile is stopped.
➤
Business Rule. The name of the rule that calculates the KPI status or value.
➤
Held Status Since. The date and time since which this CI has held its current
operational status.
➤
Message. The values returned by the monitor the last time it ran, as
displayed in SiteScope. This may simply be the retrieval time and file size or
it may include specific parameters for a server component.
➤
Last Update. The date and time that the last update for the CI was received
by Dashboard. This information is not always displayed.
➤
Measurement. The name of the measurement from SiteScope. This
information is not always displayed.
➤
Monitor. The monitor type that the CI represents. This information is not
always displayed.
Tasks
Display SAP Information in Dashboard
You can display SAP information in Dashboard using one of the following
capabilities.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“View SAP Data in Dashboard” on page 158
➤
“View the CIs Affected by a Root Cause CI” on page 158
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➤
“View the Root Cause CIs” on page 158
➤
“View Changes Made to SAP System CIs” on page 158
➤
“Display Configuration File Information” on page 159
1 View SAP Data in Dashboard
You can view SAP data in the SAP Systems view in Dashboard. For details,
see “SAP Systems View” on page 148.
2 View the CIs Affected by a Root Cause CI
Select a CI, which is defined by a correlation rule as a root cause CI, to
display all of the CIs that are affected by it. For details, see “Show SAP
Transport Impact Report” on page 167.
3 View the Root Cause CIs
Retrieve root cause information for CIs that are affected by a chain of
correlation rules. For details, see “Troubleshooting and Limitations” on
page 143.
4 View Changes Made to SAP System CIs
Changes made to the properties of all types of CIs are discovered by
different types of discoveries. For details, see “Run the SAP Discovery
Process” on page 123. Those changes are displayed in the Change report
available as a right-click menu option for each one of the relevant CI types.
For details, see “Change Report Page” in Model Management.
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Some of the changes made to the SAP Transactions CIs are caused by the
corresponding Transport CIs. Those specific changes are processed by
correlation rules in discovery and are displayed in the SAP Transaction
Changes report and the SAP Transport Changes report:
➤
Display a SAP Transaction Changes report. The report displays and track
changes made to a SAP Transaction CI when a transport was discovered.
For details, see “SAP Transaction Changes Report” on page 169.
➤
Display a SAP Transport Changes report. The report includes the
transports discovered in the past week, the changes that are included in
each transport, and under each change the SAP transaction that is
impacted by this change. For details, see “SAP Transport Changes Report”
on page 172.
5 Display Configuration File Information
You can display additional information for the Configuration File CIs. For
details, see “Configuration File Page” on page 166.
You can also access this information by selecting Admin > Universal CMDB >
Modeling > IT Universe Manager > Properties. For details, see “Configuration
Item Properties Dialog Box” in Model Management.
Reference
Default CIs in the SAP Systems View
The SAP System CIs are listed in the following table:
CI Type (A-Z)
Description
Application Gateway
An Internet Transaction Server (ITS) component.
The CI establishes the connection to the R/3 System
and performs the processing of tasks that are required
to move data between R/3 applications and the
Internet.
BPM Monitor
Represents Business Process Monitor entities.
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160
CI Type (A-Z)
Description
Business Process Step
These CIs (BPM transactions inside a script) are
emulated SAP transactions executed on a Business
Process Monitor machine. They are used to supply
proactive monitoring of end user experience.
Business Processes
A logical container that contains all of the Business
Process steps attached to all of the SAP transactions.
CCMS Counters
These CIs (also called Measurements) are information
elements, relevant to SAP, retrieved from SAP CCMS
(Computer Center Management System).
Client
An organizational and legal CI in the SAP system. The
main objective of the client is to keep the data isolated.
The data in a client can only be visible within that
client; it cannot be displayed or changed by another
client. Each client on a system can represent a unique
working environment.
Configuration File
The system/servers configuration parameters.
Contained Locations
These CIs are created as part of the Business Process
Monitor hierarchy when working with the
Transactions/locations option.
Database
A database management system holding the data tier,
including all of the SAP elements: SAP transactions,
programs, work processes, and so on. This is not a
SAP-specific CI.
Hosts
A Host CI represents the physical machine on which a
server is installed. This is not a SAP-specific element.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
CI Type (A-Z)
Description
Locations
A logical unit, grouping together Contained Locations
CIs.
To separate the SAP Business Process steps locations
status from the Location CI (from the Business Process
Monitor), the Contained Locations CIs are created by
the SAP solution and are connected to the SAP Business
Process steps (identified by following the naming
convention or by manually linking them).
The regular Location CI is connected to all Business
Process steps both regular and SAP, but the Contained
Location CI is connected only to the SAP Business
Process steps.
The Locations information represents the locations
specified in Admin > Universal CMDB, select the CI and
click the Properties tab, locate the Location Name
property.
Monitor
SiteScope entities used to monitor the various CIs that
exist in the UCMDB. The monitors that are most likely
to appear in the SAP view are host monitors: CPU,
memory, disk space, and so on. These monitors appear
in the SAP view only if they are manually attached to
the Host CI.
R/3 Application
Server
SAP R/3 Application Server is SAP’s integrated software
solution for client/server and distributed open systems.
R/3 Application servers and databases are displayed
under Hosts. You can also have several levels of hosts
under the Hosts CI, SiteScope Monitor CIs, and CCMS
Monitor CIs.
SAP Application
Component
May include other SAP Application Components and
some SAP transactions with some common
denominator.
SAP Applications
A logical unit, grouping together Application
Components.
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162
CI Type (A-Z)
Description
SAP System
A logical unit, grouping together SAP-related CIs (and
possibly other CIs as well) into one homogeneous SAP
deployment.
SAP Transaction
Part of a business process defined in the SAP System. It
is comprised of request-response couples called dialog
steps. The end user uses SAP transactions to carry out
actions on the SAP System.
Solution Manager
Projects
Includes SAP Business Project CIs, SAP Scenario CIs,
SAP Business Process CIs, and SAP Business Process Step
CIs. Solution Manager Projects hierarchy is specified by
the user in SAP Solution Manager.
Transports
Represents packaged change requests that include the
changes that are to be deployed on the system.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
CI Type (A-Z)
Description
Web Gateway
An Internet Transaction Server (ITS) component. A web
server extension that establishes the connection
between ITS and the Web server and forwards user
requests to the Application Gateway.
Work Processes
A logical, single-instance representation of all of the
work processes of the same type existing on the R/3
server.
Several types of work processes are available:
➤ Dialog Work Process. Executes dialog programs
(ABAP).
➤ Update Work Process. Responsible for asynchronous
database changes (controlled by a COMMIT WORK
statement in a dialog work process).
➤ Update2 Work Process. Used for statistical,
non-critical updates (for example, result
calculations).
➤ Background Work Process. Executes time-dependent
or event-controlled background jobs.
➤ Enqueue Work Process. Executes locking operations
(if SAP transactions have to synchronize
themselves).
➤ Spool Work Process. Performs print formatting (to
printer, file, or database).
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SAP-Related KPIs
Different Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are displayed depending on the
selected CI. For details on the displayed KPIs, see “Default CIs in the SAP
Systems View” on page 159.
The following table lists the SAP-related KPIs displayed in the Console tab:
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Locations
At the group level, displays the worst status of all of the
child CIs.
At the monitor level, displays the worst status of the
Performance and Availability KPIs for the CI.
SAP
The SAP KPI indicates problems related to the SAP
infrastructure that are reported by CCMS.
Transactions
At the group level, displays the worst status of all of the
child CIs.
At the monitor level, displays the worst status of the
Performance and Availability KPIs for the CI.
The other KPIs displayed in the views are not SAP-related. For more details
on those KPIs, see “List of Dashboard KPIs” in Using Dashboard.
SAP-Related Menu Options
A list of all of the context menu options available in the SAP Systems view is
available in “Menu Options” in Using Dashboard.
Different menu options are available depending on the type of CIs:
164
➤
Show SAP Transport Impact. For details, see “Show SAP Transport Impact”
in Using Dashboard.
➤
Show Impacting SAP Transports. For details, see “Show Impacting SAP
Transports” in Using Dashboard.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
➤
SAP Transport Changes. For details, see “SAP Transport Changes” in Using
Dashboard.
➤
SAP Transaction Changes. For details, see “SAP Transaction Changes” in
Using Dashboard.
HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications User
Interface
This section describes:
➤
Configuration File Page on page 166
➤
Show SAP Transport Impact Report on page 167
➤
Show Impacting SAP Transports Report on page 168
➤
SAP Transaction Changes Report on page 169
➤
SAP Transport Changes Report on page 172
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Configuration File Page
The following is an example of the Configuration File page.
Description
Displays the contents of the configuration file. Details
on the SAP configuration file are provided in the SAP
product documentation.
To Access: Right-click a Configuration File CI in the
SAP Systems View, select Properties, and click Show
document content.
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Show SAP Transport Impact Report
The following is an example of the SAP Transport Impact report.
Description
Enables you to display all SAP transactions that are
impacted by the selected transport.
To Access: In Dashboard, access the SAP Systems view,
and in View Explorer, click the gray arrow
to the
right of the element, or right-click the appropriate CIs
and select Show SAP Transport Impact.
Important
Information
For details on correlation rules, see “Correlation
Manager” in Model Management.
Included in Tasks
“Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on page 157
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Show Impacting SAP Transports Report
The following is an example of the Impacting SAP Transports report.
Description
Enables you to display all of the selected CIs and their
child CIs that were affected by any SAP Transport CIs.
To Access: In Dashboard, access the SAP Systems view,
and in View Explorer, click the gray arrow
to the
right of the element, or right-click the appropriate CIs
and select Show Impacting SAP Transports. For details
about the appropriate CIs see Important Information.
Important
Information
“Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on page 157
This option is available for SAP-specific Transaction
and group CIs.
For Transaction CIs, it enables you to display the
transports that are impacting the selected Transaction
CI, with no historical limit to the information. For
details, see “Show Impacting SAP Transports Report”
on page 168.
Groups CIs represent the following CIs: SAP System
and SAP Application Component.
Included in Tasks
168
For details on correlation rules, see “Correlation
Manager” in Model Management.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
SAP Transaction Changes Report
The following is an example of the SAP Transaction Changes report.
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Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
Description
Enables you to display and track changes made to a
SAP Transaction CI when a transport was discovered.
The SAP Transaction Change report displays
information about the SAP systems with changed
transactions, and under each transaction the SAP
transports that have changed during the past week
(you can modify the default).
To Access: In Dashboard, access the SAP Systems view,
and in View Explorer, click the gray arrow to the
right of the CI, or right-click a SAP System CI or a SAP
Transaction CI and select Go to Report > SAP
Transaction Changes report.
For details, see “Customize Dashboard Display and
Refresh Rate” in Using Dashboard.
Included in Tasks
“Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on page 157
SAP System Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
170
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Name
The name of the SAP system with a new transaction.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
SAP Transaction Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Devclass
The development class that includes the transaction.
Name
The name of the SAP transaction that has changed.
Program
The name of the program that runs the transaction.
Program Version
The version of the program that runs the transaction.
Screen
The first screen that opens when you load the
transaction.
SAP Transport Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Creation Date
The date when the transport was created.
Description
The description of the transport.
Name
The name of the transport that has changed.
Target System
The target system for non-local transport.
User
The name of the user who created the transport.
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Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
SAP Transport Changes Report
The following is an example of the SAP Transport Changes report.
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Description
The table displays information about the SAP systems
with the transports discovered during the past week
(this default is configurable), for each transport the
changes that are included in the transport, and for
each change, the SAP transaction that is impacted by
this change.
To Access: In Dashboard, access the SAP Systems view,
and in View Explorer, click the gray arrow to the
right of the element, or right-click a SAP System CI or a
SAP Transaction CI and select Go to Report > SAP
Transaction Changes.
Important
Information
Customization:
➤ By default, transports that are older than a month
are automatically deleted from the UCMDB. To
modify the default, select Admin > Universal CMDB
> Modeling > Enrichment Manager, expand SAP,
select TQL, right-click SAP_Old_Transports in the
map, and select Node conditions. Access the
Attribute condition dialog box, assign the required
condition for the Actual Delete Time - (date)
attribute.
➤ You can configure the time period during which the
transport discovery takes place. Select Admin >
Universal CMDB > Modeling > Report Manager,
expand SAP, right-click SAP_Transports in the map,
and select Node conditions. Access the Attribute
condition dialog box, assign the required condition
for the Last Access Time - (date) attribute.
Included in Tasks
“Display SAP Information in Dashboard” on page 157
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SAP System Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Name
The name of the SAP system.
SAP Transport Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Creation Date
The date when the transport was created.
Description
The description of the transport.
Name
The name of the transport that has changed.
Target System
The target system for non-local transport.
User
The name of the user who created the transport.
SAP Transport Change Level Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
174
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Devclass
The development class that includes the transaction.
Name
The real name of the transaction.
Object Name
The change that was made.
Object Type
The object that changed.
Program
The name of the program that runs the transaction.
Program Version
The version of the program that runs the transaction.
Chapter 4 • HP Business Availability Center for SAP Applications Reports and Views
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Screen
The first screen that opens when you load the
transaction.
Title
The name of the transaction followed by (SAP
Transaction).
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176
Part III
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications
178
5
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications Administration
This chapter describes the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications solution.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications – Overview
on page 180
➤
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications License on page 182
➤
Architecture on page 183
➤
Working with Firewalls on page 184
➤
Siebel Monitors on page 185
➤
The Siebel Service on page 186
Tasks
➤
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications – Workflow
on page 187
➤
Configure HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
on page 203
➤
Verify Diagnostics-Related Settings on page 205
➤
Delete Links Between Siebel Applications and Business Process Steps
on page 208
➤
Deploy the SiteScope Siebel Monitors on page 209
➤
Check If the Siebel Service Is Active on page 212
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
➤
Customize HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
on page 213
Reference
➤
Siebel CIs Properties on page 216
➤
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration User
Interface on page 217
Troubleshooting and Limitations on page 223
Concepts
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications –
Overview
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications, integrating
SiteScope, Business Process Monitor, and HP Universal CMDB, enables you
to gain visibility and control over your mission-critical Siebel applications.
The Siebel solution provides:
➤
A single operation console consolidating all Siebel monitoring information.
➤
Automatic discovery and modeling of Siebel-related elements, as well as
their relationships to other systems in the organization’s Information
Technology (IT) department.
➤
Change discovery and notification for quicker problem resolution.
➤
Proactive monitoring of end-user experience in Siebel enterprises.
➤
The ability to distinguish between Siebel-specific problems and general
ones.
➤
Management of Siebel-related service level commitments.
Note: You must have an HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications license to view the Siebel Enterprises view in HP Business
Availability Center.
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HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications consolidates Siebel
components and business processes in the Siebel Enterprises view to gain
real-time visibility over the entire Siebel infrastructure from a business
perspective.
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications also monitors,
reports, and issues alerts on the performance and functionality of the Siebel
eBusiness applications and servers that comprise your Siebel Enterprise
business process infrastructure.
Using HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications, your IT
operation can analyze how each link in the Siebel Enterprise chain is
affecting the user experience of customers, partners, suppliers, and
employees. This enables your IT team to more accurately assess the resulting
impact on business performance. It also enables the IT team, Siebel
application support team, and Siebel Expert Services to take any steps that
might be necessary to maximize availability, performance, and service levels
to provide quality of service for all Siebel applications and end users.
The Siebel Enterprises view is available in the Dashboard. For details, see
“View Configuration File CI Details” on page 251.
Right-click the CIs in the Siebel Enterprises view to access additional
information and diagnostics tools. For details on the context menu, see
“Context Menu Options” on page 254. For details on the diagnostics tools,
see “Diagnostics Tools” on page 236.
In addition, you can create SLAs centered around your HP Business
Availability Center for Siebel Applications Siebel Application CIs to gain
visibility into performance or availability issues that affect these SLAs. For
details on SLAs, see “Service Level Management - Overview” in Using Service
Level Management.
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HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
License
The HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications license unlocks
the following functionality in HP Business Availability Center, helping to
shorten time-to-value and MTTR:
182
➤
The Siebel Enterprises pattern view, displaying a hierarchical view of Siebel
applications and infrastructure.
➤
Automatic linkage of Business Process Monitor transactions to the Siebel
transactions they are monitoring.
➤
Automatic linkage of SiteScope measurements to their respective Siebel
infrastructure.
➤
Siebel-specific KPIs that allow differentiation between Siebel-related issues
and non-Siebel ones.
➤
Siebel diagnostics – SARM, Database Breakdown, Tasks, Processes – for
in-depth, in-context data on the Siebel environment.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Architecture
The architecture of HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications is
illustrated in the following diagram:
Most of the Siebel CIs are created by automatic discovery. The configuration
for these CIs is saved into the UCMDB (Universal Configuration
Management database). Some of the relationships to Business Process
Monitor and SiteScope CIs are created by automatic mechanisms specific to
the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications.
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The architecture of the Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
solution includes the following components:
➤
The DDM Probe discovers Siebel-related CIs and other CIs (such as hosts)
that are related to them.
➤
The Real User Monitor Probe monitors real user traffic and sends it to the
Real User Monitor engine, that processes and stores it.
➤
SiteScope communicates with the Siebel Enterprise system and retrieves
system monitoring information using the srvrmgr CLI tool. It is also used as
a middleware for all of the Siebel diagnostics tools.
➤
Business Process Monitor collects data on the performance and availability
of the Siebel Enterprise by running transactions that correspond to Business
Process Steps. It is also used for Database Breakdown, and can be leveraged
in SARM; for example, user sessions can be correlated to the corresponding
Business Process Monitor transactions.
➤
Dashboard tabs and reports are used as the central console for viewing all of
the data and performing analysis of the data. For details, see “Using
Dashboard” in Using Dashboard.
Working with Firewalls
To work with firewalls, you must install a firewall with a Virtual Private
Network (VPN) between:
184
➤
HP Business Availability Center and the Business Process Monitor to view
Siebel Application Response Measurement (SARM) - user trace breakdown
and/or database breakdown information.
➤
HP Business Availability Center and SiteScope to view all diagnostics
information.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
The following diagram illustrates a possible deployment involving firewalls:
Siebel Monitors
The SiteScope monitors used to monitor Siebel are:
➤
Siebel Application Server. Uses Siebel Server Manager client to monitor all
aspects of Siebel application servers. For details on the monitor, see “Siebel
Application Server Monitor Overview” in Using System Availability
Management.
➤
Siebel Web Server. Watches Siebel server login session statistics and gauges
the performance of Siebel Server Object Managers and database. For details
on the monitor, see “Siebel Web Server Monitor Overview” in Using System
Availability Management.
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
➤
Siebel Log Monitor. Monitors the Siebel log files by searching for entries
containing a specific event type or subtype. For details on the monitor, see
“Siebel Log File Monitor Overview” in Using System Availability Management.
These monitors must be deployed. For details, see “Deploy the SiteScope
Siebel Monitors” on page 209.
The Siebel Service
The Siebel Service is a configuration service that provides the following
advantages:
➤
Automatic linkage of SiteScope measurements to the relevant CIs based on
measurement name.
➤
Automatic linkage of Business Process Steps with standardized names to the
application they are monitoring. For details, see “Specify a Transaction/
Location or Regular Hierarchy in the Business Process Monitor Source
Adapter” on page 199.
➤
Creation of a Business Process and Locations containers and connection of
the Business Process Steps monitoring Siebel, and their respective locations,
to these containers. For details, see “Specify a Transaction/Location or
Regular Hierarchy in the Business Process Monitor Source Adapter” on
page 199.
The Siebel Service starts working after Business Process Monitoring source
adapters have been synchronized.
For details on how to view a service status with the JMX Web console, see
“High Availability for the Data Processing Server” in the HP Business
Availability Center Deployment Guide PDF.
The Siebel Service must be activated. For details, see “Check If the Siebel
Service Is Active” on page 212.
Tasks
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Deploy HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications – Workflow
This section describes the processes to follow to view Siebel data in
Dashboard, and gives examples.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Prerequisites” on page 188
➤
“Check the Siebel License in HP Business Availability Center” on page 190
➤
“Check the Siebel License in SiteScope” on page 190
➤
“Deploy the Siebel Monitoring Package” on page 190
➤
“Copy the srvrmgr Tool to the DDM Probe Server” on page 191
➤
“Copy SARM Analyzer and srvrmgr Tool to the SiteScope Server” on
page 191
➤
“Run the Siebel Discovery Process” on page 191
➤
“Configure Specific Siebel CIs Manually” on page 191
➤
“Change the Business Process Monitor Hierarchy Structure to Transactions/
Locations” on page 191
➤
“Activate The Siebel Service” on page 192
➤
“Modify SiteScope KPI Assignment Group” on page 192
➤
“Configure HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications” on
page 192
➤
“Check That the Deployment Was Successful” on page 192
➤
“Display Siebel Information in Dashboard” on page 193
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
1 Prerequisites
Ensure that the following software is installed before you install the
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications:
➤
SiteScope. Used to integrate the SiteScope data collector into the
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications solution. For details,
see the HP SiteScope Deployment Guide PDF.
Note:
SiteScope monitors are not tested for SiteScope UNIX installation.
If the SiteScope machine is located outside the HP Business Availability
Center LAN, you must configure the Virtual Private Network (VPN) to
enable SiteScope to communicate with the HP Business Availability Center
Gateway Server.
➤
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Siebel. Install the applications you want to integrate into HP Business
Availability Center. For details, see the Siebel documentation.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Siebel is supported on the following environments:
Siebel Version
Solaris Operating
System Version (on the
Siebel Servers)
Windows
Operating System
Version (on the
Siebel Servers)
Siebel 7.5.3
Solaris 5.9
Windows 2000
Siebel 7.7
Solaris 9
Windows 2000
Siebel 7.8
Solaris 9
Windows 2000
Solaris 10
➤ Windows 2003
Other Operating System
Version (on the Siebel
Servers)
SARM is not supported in
mixed environments (the
Application servers work with
one platform and the Web
servers work on a different
platform)
(to work with
SARM you
must use
SARMAnalyzer
version 7.7)
Siebel 8.0
Enterprise
Edition
➤ Windows 2003
Datacenter
edition
➤ IBM AIX 5L version 5.3
➤ HP-UX 11i V2
➤ Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
➤ Oracle Enterprise Linux 4
➤ Novell SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server 9
➤
Siebel Server Manager. The Siebel Server Manager version that is
appropriate for the Siebel version you have installed.
➤
Siebel Application Response Measurement (SARM). The version of the
Siebel Application Response Measurement Analyzer (SARM) package that is
appropriate for the Siebel version you have installed. If you are working
with SARM in Siebel version 7.8, use SARM Analyzer for Siebel version 7.7.
➤
DDM Probe 6.5. Used to perform the discovery of Siebel topology in your
organization. For details, see Discovery and Dependency Mapping Guide.
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
➤
Business Process Monitor 4.5.2 or later. Used to integrate the Business
Process Monitor data collector into the HP Business Availability Center for
Siebel Applications. For details, see “Business Process Monitor
Administration” in Using End User Management.
➤
Optional - Real User Monitor. Required to integrate the Real User Monitor
Probe to monitor real user traffic and sends it to the RUM engine, that
processes and stores it. For details, see “Real User Monitor Administration”
in Using End User Management.
2 Check the Siebel License in HP Business Availability Center
Check that the appropriate Siebel licenses are set in HP Business Availability
Center:
➤
The license for running the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications.
➤
The license to enable the necessary amount of Business Process
transactions to run.
➤
The SiteScope license.
To check that the licenses are set properly or to update the licenses, select
Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > License Management.
3 Check the Siebel License in SiteScope
Check that the license that enables the definition of SiteScope Siebel
monitors and deployment of Siebel solution templates is set properly in
SiteScope. For details, see “Siebel Solution Templates” in Using System
Availability Management.
4 Deploy the Siebel Monitoring Package
Deploy the Siebel Monitoring package. For details, see “Package Manager” in
Model Management.
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5 Copy the srvrmgr Tool to the DDM Probe Server
The srvrmgr tool is used to extract data about the enterprise's structure from
Siebel. To copy the srvrmgr tool to the DDM Probe server, copy the srvrmgr
Command Line Interface (CLI) tool from the Siebel server to any folder on
the DDM Probe server. It is recommended to run the Siebel connection test
to validate the srvrmgr installation. For details, see “Copy the srvrmgr Tool
to the DDM Probe Server – Details” on page 193.
6 Copy SARM Analyzer and srvrmgr Tool to the SiteScope Server
On SiteScope, the srvrmgr tool is launched by the Siebel Application Server
monitor and is used to get the metrics.
SARM Analyzer is used for analyzing SARM data, so that it can be displayed
in Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications's SARM - User Trace
Breakdown tab.
For details, see “Copy the srvrmgr Tool and the SARM Analyzer Tool to the
SiteScope Server – Details” on page 194.
7 Run the Siebel Discovery Process
You run the Siebel discovery process to discover Siebel elements and Siebel
topology. For details, see “Application – Siebel” in Discovery and Dependency
Mapping Guide.
8 Configure Specific Siebel CIs Manually
When you run the Siebel discovery, the process creates CIs for the
discovered components in the UCMDB. In addition to the CI’s properties
that are automatically defined by the discovery process, you must manually
define some properties so the Monitor Deployment Wizard and the Siebel
diagnostics tools can run correctly. For details, see “Siebel CIs Properties” on
page 216.
9 Change the Business Process Monitor Hierarchy Structure to
Transactions/Locations
Click Admin > Universal CMDB > Source Manager, click the Edit button for
the Business Process source adapter, and change the hierarchy structure to
Transaction/Locations in the Hierarchy Structure parameter.
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10 Activate The Siebel Service
The Siebel Service starts working after Business Process Monitor source
adapters have been synchronized. The Siebel service is automatically
activated when you have entered the appropriate license for HP Business
Availability Center for Siebel solution. For additional information about the
Siebel Service, see “The Siebel Service” on page 186.
For details on how to view a service status with the JMX Web console, see
“High Availability for the Data Processing Server” in the HP Business
Availability Center Deployment Guide PDF. Check that the Siebel Service is
active (it is active only if you have a license). If necessary activate it
manually. For details, see “Check If the Siebel Service Is Active” on page 212.
11 Modify SiteScope KPI Assignment Group
If required, you can modify the existing SiteScope KPI assignments. For
details, see “Assignment Groups Page” in Using Dashboard.
12 Configure HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications
To monitor your Siebel eBusiness applications and servers using HP Business
Availability Center for Siebel Applications, you must first set up the Siebel
monitoring environment. For details, see “Configure HP Business
Availability Center for Siebel Applications” on page 203.
13 Check That the Deployment Was Successful
To check that the deployment was successful:
a Run the predefined tests that check that HP Business Availability Center
for Siebel Applications deployment was successful. For details, see “Siebel
Deployment Validator Page” on page 218.
b Fix the problems discovered by failed tests, and rerun the failed tests. For
a description of the existing tests and their parameters, see “List of
Predefined Tests for Siebel Deployment Validator” on page 220.
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c To change the default parameters, select Admin > Platform > Setup and
Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select Siebel,
and locate the Deployment Validator tests definitions entry in the Siebel
- Siebel Deployment Validator table. Modify the parameter values in the
XML file.
14 Display Siebel Information in Dashboard
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications is ready. After all
these steps are completed, you can view Siebel data in the Dashboard, use
diagnostic tools, and so on. For details, see “Display Siebel Information in
Dashboard” on page 249.
Copy the srvrmgr Tool to the DDM Probe Server –
Details
The srvrmgr tool is used to extract data about the enterprise's structure from
Siebel.
Note: If you are working with different versions of Siebel in your
organization, make sure you use a srvrmgr with a version that is appropriate
for the Siebel server.
To copy the srvrmgr tool to the DDM Probe server, proceed as follows:
1 Copy the srvrmgr Command Line Interface (CLI) tool from the Siebel server
to any folder on the DDM Probe server. It is recommended to run the Siebel
connection test to validate the srvrmgr installation.
2 To run the connection test, open the command line on the DDM Probe
server and change directory to the location of the srvrmgr.exe file. Run from
the command line:
>srvrmgr /e [site_name] /g [gateway_host] /u [username] /p [password]
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If the connection is established successfully, you must see the srvrmgr
prompt and the status message about the number of connected servers, as
follows:
Copy the srvrmgr Tool and the SARM Analyzer Tool to
the SiteScope Server – Details
Note: If you are working with different versions of Siebel in your
organization, make sure you use a srvrmgr and a SARM Analyzer with a
version that is appropriate for the SiteScope server. For details, see “Context
Menu Options” on page 254.
This section provides details on the processes used to copy the srvrmgr tool
and the SARM Analyzer tool to the SiteScope server.
This task includes the following steps:
194
➤
“Copy the srvrmgr Tool to the SiteScope Server” on page 195
➤
“Copy the SARM Analyzer Tool to the SiteScope Server” on page 196
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
➤
“Perform the Remote Connection from SiteScope to Siebel” on page 196
➤
“Run the SiteScope Service with a Domain User” on page 197
1 Copy the srvrmgr Tool to the SiteScope Server
This section describes how to copy the svrmgr tool to the SiteScope server.
a Copy the srvrmgr Command Line Interface (CLI) tool from the Siebel
server to any folder on the SiteScope server.
Note: It is recommended to run the Siebel connection test to validate the
srvrmgr installation.
b To run a connection test, open the command line on the SiteScope server
and change directory to the location of the srvrmgr.exe file.
c Run from the command line:
>srvrmgr /e [site_name] /g [gateway_host] /u [username] /p [password]
Note: For the connection to work properly you must check that the user
and password you are using have the correct permission for a remote
connection. For details, see “Perform the Remote Connection from
SiteScope to Siebel” on page 196.
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If the connection is established successfully, you should see the srvrmgr
prompt and the status message about the number of connected servers,
as follows:
2 Copy the SARM Analyzer Tool to the SiteScope Server
To copy the SARM Analyzer tool to the SiteScope server, copy the SARM
Analyzer tool from the Siebel server to a folder on the SiteScope server.
Note: If your site includes a large number of Web servers, it is better to use
multiple SiteScopes to distribute the work done by the SARM Analyzer tool
between these SiteScopes; you can copy SARM Analyzer to each SiteScope.
3 Perform the Remote Connection from SiteScope to Siebel
All Siebel servers (Windows and UNIX) must be defined as remote servers on
the SiteScope server. For details, see the “Microsoft Windows Remote Servers
Dialog Box” or “UNIX Remote Servers Dialog Box” in Using System
Availability Management.
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4 Run the SiteScope Service with a Domain User
SiteScope should run under a domain user who has permissions to run
server manager and SARMAnalyzer and also has read access to the log
folders on the Siebel servers (Web servers and application servers).
Use a Business Process Profile to Simulate Siebel Users
– Details
This section provides details on how to use Siebel transactions to simulate
Siebel users and obtain performance and availability information on the
Siebel application.
You can use Business Process profiles to group several transactions.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Prerequisites” on page 197
➤
“Select the Appropriate Protocol” on page 198
➤
“Create a Business Process Profile” on page 199
➤
“Synchronize the Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter to Enter
Business Process Monitor CIs in the UCMDB” on page 199
➤
“Specify a Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy in the Business Process
Monitor Source Adapter” on page 199
➤
“Deploy the SiteScope Siebel Monitors” on page 202
➤
“View SARM Data in Business Process Steps” on page 202
1 Prerequisites
In the HP Virtual User Generator (VuGen), check that:
➤
When recording scripts on VuGen for Siebel, you only use the Siebel-Web
protocol. For details see HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
➤
You record scripts with a special user created for monitoring/diagnostics
purposes on Siebel.
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
➤
You set a think time separator of 10 seconds for the script transactions used
for Siebel diagnostics. The VuGen script includes discrete transactions
(transactions that do not include lr_think_time() within them) and that it
uses the lr_think_time(…) functions to separate between the VuGen
transactions.
➤
The script must not be too long (recommended no more than five
transactions per script) since the Diagnostics tools need to run the whole
script every time you want to analyze a specific transaction. For example, if
a problematic transaction is located close to the end of the script, you would
have to run all the previous transactions to reach the problematic one. If
you need to record more transactions, record an additional script.
➤
Optionally, the Run-Time Settings should be configured for setting
appropriate values: Think-Time-Replay policy, Timeout values, logging
options, Proxy, Browser Emulation, and so on.
You can only use Vugen scripts with Siebel applications.
2 Select the Appropriate Protocol
You must select the Siebel-Web protocol when you create a new script,
because, in HP Virtual User Generator (VuGen), Siebel scripts are recorded
using the Siebel-Web protocol. For details, see HP Virtual User Generator User’s
Guide.
In HP Business Availability Center, you can attach Business Process Monitor
transactions to Siebel application components automatically or manually.
For details, see “Specify a Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy in the
Business Process Monitor Source Adapter” on page 199.
To select the appropriate protocol:
a In VuGen, select New to open the New Virtual User page.
b Select New Single Protocol Script.
c Select the Siebel-Web protocol.
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3 Create a Business Process Profile
You can create business process profiles in End User Management. For
details, see “Managing Business Process Profiles Overview” in Using End User
Management.
4 Synchronize the Business Process Monitoring Source Adapter
to Enter Business Process Monitor CIs in the UCMDB
To view data in the Siebel Enterprises view in Dashboard, the Business
Process Monitor source adapter must be synchronized.
You can synchronize the Business Process Monitoring source adapter
immediately or you can wait for the automatic synchronization to take
place.
For details, see the action buttons in “Source Manager Page” in Model
Management.
5 Specify a Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy in the
Business Process Monitor Source Adapter
To display location information in the Siebel views, select the Transaction/
Location type of hierarchy to the Business Process Monitor source adapter.
To hide location information, select the Regular type of hierarchy. For
details on the option, see “Template Elements” in Model Management.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Attach Business Process Monitor Transactions to Siebel Application
Components” on page 200
➤
“Automatically attach Business Process Steps to a Siebel Application CI by
Following the Naming Convention” on page 200
➤
“Attach Business Process Steps to a Siebel Application CI Without Following
the Naming Convention” on page 201
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Attach Business Process Monitor Transactions to Siebel
Application Components
To display Performance and Availability information on Siebel applications,
you must attach Business Process Step CIs to Siebel Application CIs.
If the Business Process Monitor source adapter was assigned the Transaction/
Location option a copy of the location information is attached to the
Locations container. For details on the option, see “Template Elements” in
Model Management.
You can connect Business Process Steps to a Siebel application in two ways:
➤
Follow the naming conventions for Siebel Business Process Steps names.
➤
Do not follow the naming conventions for the Business Process Steps
names. In this case, you must manually link a Business Process Step to a
Siebel application.
For details, see “Specify a Transaction/Location or Regular Hierarchy in the
Business Process Monitor Source Adapter” on page 199.
If you do not follow the naming conventions, be careful when deleting links
between Siebel applications and Business Process Steps. For details, see
“Delete Links Between Siebel Applications and Business Process Steps” on
page 208.
Automatically attach Business Process Steps to a Siebel
Application CI by Following the Naming Convention
To automatically connect Business Process Steps to a Siebel application, use
the following format for the Business Process Step names:
<app_name>_ _<ent_name>_ _<BPM_tran_name>
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➤
app_name. The name of the Siebel application to which you want to attach
the Business Process Step.
➤
ent_name. The name of the Siebel Enterprise on which the Siebel
application is run.
➤
BPM_tran_name. The unique name of the Business Process Step.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Any set of alphanumeric and mixed case characters is supported (special
characters are not allowed). It is good practice to name the transaction so
that the name indicates what occurs in it.
Make sure the double underscores do not have spaces between them.
Note: You assign the appropriate name to a Business Process Step when you
record it. For details, see HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
Attach Business Process Steps to a Siebel Application CI
Without Following the Naming Convention
After you have built a Business Process profile, you must manually connect
Business Process Steps with Siebel Application CIs. To attach Business
Process Steps to a Siebel Application CI without following the naming
convention:
a Select Admin > Universal CMDB > Modeling > IT Universe Manager.
b Select Siebel Enterprises in the View list.
c Right-click the Siebel Application CI that you want to monitor using the
BPM profile and select Attach Monitoring CI to open the Insert
Relationship dialog box. For details, see “Insert Relationship Dialog Box”
in Model Management.
d Select End User Monitors View in the Views list.
e Expand and select the Business Process Step to which you want to
connect the Siebel Application CI. You can select more than one.
f Click the right arrow to move the CI to the right-hand box.
g Click Next.
h In the Relationship Type list, select Monitoring By Siebel.
i Select Allow CI Update.
j Click Finish.
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6 Deploy the SiteScope Siebel Monitors
Deploy the SiteScope Siebel monitors. For details, see “Deploy the SiteScope
Siebel Monitors” on page 209.
7 View SARM Data in Business Process Steps
To view Siebel Application Response Measurement (SARM) data in Business
Process Steps in the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostics tool, you must select the Enable
Siebel Breakdown property for each Siebel transaction monitor in the
Business Process profile. When you do not select the property, the
Transactions tab is empty.
To see SARM data under Business Process Steps, select Admin > End User
Management, right-click the relevant transaction monitor and select Edit,
and in the Transaction Breakdown Settings area, select the Enable Siebel
Breakdown parameter.
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Configure HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications
This section describes the detailed steps used to configure the Siebel
monitoring environment.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Create Business Process Profiles That Emulate Siebel Application Users” on
page 203
➤
“Deploy SiteScope Monitors for the Siebel Templates Using the Monitor
Deployment Wizard” on page 203
➤
“Configure Specific CIs Manually” on page 204
➤
“Go Through the Diagnostics Checklist” on page 204
1 Create Business Process Profiles That Emulate Siebel
Application Users
You can use Siebel transactions to simulate Siebel users and obtain
performance and availability information on the Siebel application. You use
Business Process profiles to group several transactions.
For information on creating Business Profiles, see “Use a Business Process
Profile to Simulate Siebel Users – Details” on page 197.
2 Deploy SiteScope Monitors for the Siebel Templates Using the
Monitor Deployment Wizard
You can use SiteScope monitors to monitor Siebel. For more information
about the monitors, see “Siebel Monitors” on page 185.
For details on deploying the SiteScope Siebel monitors, see “Deploy the
SiteScope Siebel Monitors” on page 209.
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3 Configure Specific CIs Manually
When you run the Siebel discovery, the process creates CIs for the
discovered components in the UCMDB. In addition to the CI’s properties
that are automatically defined by the discovery process, you must manually
define some properties so the Monitor Deployment Wizard and the Siebel
diagnostics tools can run correctly. For details on the properties you must
enter manually, see “Default CITs in the Siebel View” on page 254.
You manually define properties in IT Universe Manager. For details on
defining properties for a CI, see “CI Properties” in IT Universe Manager
Administration.
Note: In addition, you must check that the connection parameters used to
connect to SiteScope monitors are the parameters that exist in the various
relevant CIs (Enterprise, Application Server, and so forth). For details, see
“Troubleshooting Diagnostics Tools” on page 227.
4 Go Through the Diagnostics Checklist
Check that the Diagnostics-related settings are correctly set up to ensure
that Diagnostics work properly.
For details, see “Verify Diagnostics-Related Settings” on page 205.
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Verify Diagnostics-Related Settings
This section provides details on the Diagnostics-related settings that ensure
that Diagnostics work properly.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Check the Diagnostics-Related Settings for Siebel” on page 205
➤
“Check the Diagnostics-Related Settings for SiteScope” on page 206
➤
“Diagnostics-Related Settings for HP Business Availability Center” on
page 206
1 Check the Diagnostics-Related Settings for Siebel
Check that:
➤
The SiteScope user has at least read-only access to the log directories of all
Web and Application Servers.
➤
The SiteScope user has administrative privileges on all Siebel servers or, if
this is not possible, give the permissions specified at the Microsoft Help and
Support site
(http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q300702).
➤
You have defined a special Siebel user to be used by Business Process
Monitor profiles. This user should be used only for that purpose.
➤
Siebel Breakdown is enabled for the script that monitors the Siebel
application. For details, see “Managing Business Process Profiles Overview”
in Using End User Management.
➤
Siebel Server Manager and SARM Analyzer. Check that:
➤
The srvrmgr package and SARM Analyzer package are installed on a
SiteScope machine (they are needed for running the Diagnostics tools).
You copy Siebel Server Manager and the SARM Analyzer to a SiteScope
machine (preferably) or, if this is not possible, to another machine where
it can be executed by a SiteScope user. For details, see “Copy the srvrmgr
Tool and the SARM Analyzer Tool to the SiteScope Server – Details” on
page 194.
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➤
The SiteScope user on Siebel Server Manager has execution permissions
when both SiteScope and Siebel are running on UNIX.
2 Check the Diagnostics-Related Settings for SiteScope
Check that:
➤
SiteScope service is running under a domain account (not a local system).
This domain account (SiteScope user) must have the permissions specified
in “Check the Diagnostics-Related Settings for Siebel” on page 205.
➤
Each Siebel Web and Application Server is defined as Remote NT or Remote
UNIX appropriately. Remote UNIX machines must be defined using the
Telnet protocol. Additionally, in the initialize shell environment field, enter
stty cols 1024; stty tabs; $SHELL.
➤
SiteScope has access permissions to the Siebel machines. Check that the
account SiteScope Service is running in Services (in Windows NT) or in the
process (on UNIX).
➤
The log and SARM log folders on Siebel Web Server and Application Server
are accessible from the SiteScope machine.
➤
SiteScope is attached to the Gateway Server.
➤
SiteScope has an additional license for Siebel Monitors.
3 Diagnostics-Related Settings for HP Business Availability
Center
Check that:
206
➤
All the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications configuration
parameters of the Enterprise, and Siebel Servers are spelled correctly, the
appropriate case is used, and there are no blank spaces at the end of the
parameter string.
➤
There is no inconsistency in the treatment of the SiteScope host name
between the SiteScope profile and System Availability Management (either
defined with domain or as an IP address). Also, check that SiteScope can
communicate with the Siebel server.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Diagnostics cannot access a SiteScope located in an outer LAN. The solution
is to define SiteScope in System Availability Management using the host
name provided by the SiteScope server. If the SiteScope server cannot be
accessed using such a host name from the Gateway Server the host name
must be defined in the hosts file in the operating system of all the Gateway
Servers (for Windows NT, the location is:
C:\WINNT\system32\drivers\etc\hosts; for some UNIX environments, the
location is: /etc/hosts; in other UNIX environments it is in the .rhosts file).
➤
The SiteScope you are using for diagnostics is attached (click
Admin > System Availability Management in HP Business Availability
Center).
➤
You are using a dedicated SiteScope for diagnostics purposes, when working
with medium to large Siebel deployments.
➤
The time zone and time definitions of the SiteScope server used for
diagnostic purposes (on which SARM Analyzer and srvrmgr are installed) are
synchronized with the Siebel server time zone and time definition.
➤
You have network access (without firewalls or through VPN) to the Business
Process Monitor servers (port 2696) you are going to use for diagnostics
purposes.
➤
For each Business Process Monitor server used for Diagnostics, you can open
the http://<BPM_server>:2696/ page from the Gateway Server.
➤
All paths you set in HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
configuration are relative to SiteScope; for example: if they are local on
SiteScope (Server Manager, SARM analyzer) use the local path, otherwise use
the complete network path.
➤
You have a license for Siebel on the Gateway Server (select Admin > Platform
> Setup and Maintenance > License Management to verify this).
➤
SiteScope data arrives to HP Business Availability Center.
Consult the dispatcher.txt log file with the appropriate log level to check
that information. You can update the log level of the dispatcher log in the
first line of the
<HP Business Availability Center Gateway server root directory>
\conf\core\DataService\DataService_logs.ini\dispatcher_log.cfg file.
Change the value of LogLevel to debug5. This causes the samples from
SiteScope to appear in the dispatcher.txt file.
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For details on SiteScope samples, see “Data Samples for SiteScope” in
Reference Information.
Note: It is recommended to increase the log level only for a short period, so
HP Business Availability Center performance is not affected.
➤
The user of your Siebel Application in HP Business Availability Center for
Siebel Applications Configuration has appropriate permissions in the Siebel
Site and the password is correct.
Delete Links Between Siebel Applications and Business
Process Steps
If you delete a link between a Siebel Application CI and its child Business
Process Step transaction, then the following happens:
➤
If you follow the naming convention for the Business Process Step
transaction, the link between the Siebel transaction and its child Business
Process Step is automatically recreated at the next synchronization.
➤
If you do not follow the naming convention and created a manual link
between the Siebel transaction and a Business Process Step transaction, then
when you delete the link:
➤
If the Business Process Monitoring source adapter was assigned the
Transactions/locations option, the Contained Location CI is not deleted.
Delete the Contained Location CI only if the deleted Business Process
Step transaction is the only CI attached to this location. If other Business
Process Step transactions are attached to this location, delete only the
links between the Business Process Monitor (BPM transaction from
location) and the Location container.
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➤
If the Business Process Monitoring source adapter was assigned the
Regular option, the link between the BP Step and the BP Steps container
is not automatically deleted, and you should delete it.
For details on the Transactions/locations or Regular options, see “Template
Elements” in Model Management.
Deploy the SiteScope Siebel Monitors
This section provides the detailed steps to use to deploy SiteScope Siebel
monitors.
You can deploy the Siebel monitors using the Monitor Deployment Wizard
or the Siebel solution templates.
Both techniques leverage the concept of solution sets. Solution sets
automate the creation of the monitors that should be used, and include
built-in threshold information. Essentially, they encompass monitoring best
practices.
The task includes the following steps:
➤
“Use the Monitor Deployment Wizard” on page 209
➤
“Using the Siebel Solution Templates” on page 211
➤
“Synchronize the SiteScope Source Adapter to Enter SiteScope CIs in the
UCMDB” on page 211
1 Use the Monitor Deployment Wizard
Use the Monitor Deployment Wizard to deploy Siebel monitors. For details,
see “Monitor Deployment Wizard” in Using System Availability Management.
In the Monitor Deployment wizard, in the left pane of the Select
Configuration Items to Monitor page, select the Siebel Enterprises view.
Select the CIs you would like monitored and move them to the right pane.
In the Select Templates to Apply page, the left pane lists all the available
templates in the wizard. The names of the Siebel-specific templates start
with Siebel. The child objects are the monitors that are deployed by the
template. The right pane lists the CI Types of all the CIs selected in the
previous page.
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If the wizard is able to match templates to the selected CI Types, the CI Type
is listed with the applicable template as a child object:
Note: When deploying monitors on Siebel objects, the CI Types appearing
in the right pane may be Siebel CI Types.
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2 Using the Siebel Solution Templates
To create a SiteScope monitor that can monitor a Siebel Enterprise, you can
run dedicated solution templates. Two kinds of solution templates are
available for each solution (one for UNIX and one for Windows):
Solution
Templates For
Unix
Solution
Templates For
Windows
Description
Siebel Appl Server
for UNIX
Siebel Appl
Server For
Windows
Deploy a set of monitors that test both
Siebel-specific and general statistics on
the Siebel Application servers.
Siebel Gateway
Server For UNIX
Siebel Gateway
Server For
Windows
Deploy a set of monitors that test
machine and OS-oriented statistics of
Siebel Gateway servers.
Siebel Web Server
For UNIX
Siebel Web Server
For Windows
Deploy a set of monitors that test both
Siebel-specific and general statistics on
Siebel Web servers installed.
For details on running the solution template, see “Siebel Solution
Templates” in Using System Availability Management.
3 Synchronize the SiteScope Source Adapter to Enter SiteScope
CIs in the UCMDB
If you are working with SiteScope version 9.50 and later, skip this step.
If you are working with SiteScope 9.0x and earlier, to view data in the Siebel
Enterprises view in Dashboard, the SiteScope source adapter must be
synchronized.
You can synchronize the SiteScope source adapter immediately or you can
wait for the automatic synchronization to take place.
For details, see the action buttons in “Source Manager Page” in Model
Management.
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Check If the Siebel Service Is Active
This section explains how to check if the Siebel Service is active.
The Siebel Service is a configuration service for automatic linkage. For
details, see “The Siebel Service” on page 186.
The Siebel Service starts working after BPM source adapter has been
synchronized. The Siebel service is automatically activated when you have
entered the appropriate license for HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications.
Check that the Siebel Service is activated (it is activated only if you have a
license). If necessary, activate it manually. For details on how to view a
service status with the JMX Web console, see “High Availability for the Data
Processing Server” in the HP Business Availability Center Deployment Guide
PDF.
Note: If you enter a new license in an old HP Business Availability Center
installation, you may need to restart the UCMDB server to activate the
service.
To check if the Siebel Service is active:
1 In the browser, enter, using JMX login credentials:
http://<HP Business Availability Center server name>
:8080/jmx-console/
2 Double-click service=hac-manager listed under Topaz.
3 In the JMX MBean View for hac-manager that opens, click the Invoke
button corresponding to the listAllAssignments parameter.
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Customize HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications
You can customize HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
using the capabilities listed in this section.
The task includes the following topics:
➤
“Save the Generated XML Files After Generating the SARM Report” on
page 213
➤
“Specify the Default SiteScope Monitors” on page 214
➤
“Specify the SiteScope Monitor Used to Execute Siebel Diagnostics Tools” on
page 214
➤
“Change the Default Timeout for the Execution of a SiteScope Monitor” on
page 214
➤
“Increase the Default Timeout for Either a SARM Task or a SARM Analyzer
Execution” on page 215
1 Save the Generated XML Files After Generating the SARM
Report
After the generation of the SARM report, the generated XML files are
automatically deleted from the SiteScope and HP Business Availability
Center.
To prevent the deletion and save the generated XML files after generating
the SARM report, select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select Siebel, and locate the
Siebel - Siebel SARM Breakdown area. Modify the following parameters:
➤
Remove SARM results temporary directory from BAC. If you give this
parameter the value false, then the XML files are saved in the
<HP Business Availability Center Gateway server>\AppServer\webapps
\site.war\Imgs\chartTemp\offline directory.
➤
Remove SARM results temporary directory from SiteScope. If you give this
parameter the value false, then the XML files are saved in the
<SiteScope installation directory>\cache\tempbyage\
<TimeStamp>_SIEBEL_SARM\<web_server>_<App_server> directory.
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2 Specify the Default SiteScope Monitors
Specify the default SiteScope monitors with which you want to work.
To specify the default SiteScope monitors, select Admin > Platform > Setup
and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select
Siebel, and locate the Default SiteScopes for SARM diagnostics entry in the
Siebel - Siebel SARM Breakdown table. Modify the value by entering one of
the following:
➤
The SiteScope monitor names separated by semicolons (for example:
rca3;rca4)
➤
ALL to use all attached SiteScope monitors
3 Specify the SiteScope Monitor Used to Execute Siebel
Diagnostics Tools
Specify the default SiteScope agent/profile used to execute Siebel diagnostics
tools when using the context menus options listed in the Go to Siebel
Diagnostics context menu. For details, see “Go to Siebel Diagnostics” in
“Menu Options” in Using Dashboard.
To specify the default SiteScope monitors, select Admin > Platform > Setup
and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select
Siebel, and locate the Default SiteScope for Diagnostic drilldown from the
Dashboard entry in the Siebel - General Settings table. Enter the name of the
default SiteScope that is being used from Dashboard to execute diagnostic
tools.
4 Change the Default Timeout for the Execution of a SiteScope
Monitor
If the Siebel.ejb.log, located on the Gateway server, indicates that an
execution of a SiteScope monitor timed-out, change the default timeout for
the execution of this monitor.
To change the default timeout for the execution of a SiteScope Monitor,
select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings,
choose Foundations, select Verticals, and locate the SiteScope monitor
timeout in seconds entry in the Vertical - SiteScope Remote Control Settings
table. Modify the parameters’s value. The parameter indicates the default
timeout for the execution of a SiteScope monitor.
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5 Increase the Default Timeout for Either a SARM Task or a SARM
Analyzer Execution
If the <SiteScope root directory>\tools\sarmDiagnostics\logSiteScope
\sarmanalyzer.log indicates that a SARM task or SARMAnalyzer execution
has been timed-out, increase the default timeout for either a SARM task or a
SARM analyzer execution.
To increase the default timeout for either a SARM task or a SARM analyzer
execution, select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications, select Siebel, and locate the
Siebel - Siebel SARM Breakdown table. Modify the following parameters:
➤
SARM task timeout in seconds. Indicates the default timeout for the
execution of a SARM task (analyzing Web Server file, analyzing Application
Server files, and so on).
➤
SarmAnalyzer command timeout in seconds. Indicates the default timeout
for the execution of sarmanalyzer.exe (used to generate CSV or XML files).
Reference
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Siebel CIs Properties
The following properties remain empty and must be entered manually.
216
CI Type
Properties
Description
Siebel
Enterprise
Admin user name
The name of the user used to login to
Server Manager.
Admin password
The password of the user used to login to
Server Manager.
SARM Script Path
The path to the location of the Siebel
Application Response Measurement
(SARM) Analyzer package on the SiteScope
server. The path is relative to the SiteScope
server.
Server Manager
Script Path
The path to the location of Server
Manager package on the SiteScope server.
The path is relative to the SiteScope server.
For details, see “Copy the SARM Analyzer
Tool to the SiteScope Server” on page 196.
Siebel
Application
Emulated
Transaction User
Name
The name of the user used in the script
that analyzes the application. It is the
default user name that appears when
configuring the Database Breakdown tool.
Siebel Web
Server
Extension
SARM Log Folder
The log folder to which SARM log files are
written on the Web Server Extension's
machine. The path is relative to the
SiteScope server. The folder should be
shared. The format should be:
\\<siebel_web_server_extension_name>\
<log_directory>
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
CI Type
Properties
Description
Siebel
Application
Server
SARM Log Folder
The log folder to which SARM files are
written on the Application Server
machine. The path is relative to the
SiteScope server. The folder should be
shared. The format should be:
\\<siebel_app_server_name>\<log_direct
ory>
Log Folder
The log folder to which Siebel general log
files are written on the Application Server
machine. The path is relative to the
SiteScope server. The folder should be
shared. The format should be:
\\<siebel_app_server_name>\<log_direct
ory>
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Administration User Interface
This section describes:
➤
Siebel Deployment Validator Page on page 218
➤
Siebel Deployment Validator Test Summary Dialog Box on page 222
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Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Siebel Deployment Validator Page
Description
Enables you to execute all or part of the predefined
tests that detect known problems that can occur while
deploying HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications.
To access: Click Admin > Business Availability Center
for Siebel Administration.
Included in Tasks
“Deploy HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications – Workflow” on page 187
Useful Links
“List of Predefined Tests for Siebel Deployment
Validator” on page 220
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Select a test and click the button to run the test.
Select a test and click the button to stop the test.
Click to display the Siebel Deployment Validator Test
Summary dialog box.
Click to display/hide the tests that ran successfully.
Displays the test execution progress:
➤ How many tests are running
➤ How many tests failed
➤ How many tests ended
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Category
The application related to the test: BAC, BPM, or Siebel.
Description
The test description.
Execution Time
The time and date when the test was last run.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Status
The status of the test.
Test Name
The name of the test. Predefined tests enable you to
detect known problems that may occur during HP
Business Availability for Siebel Applications
deployment. For a list of available tests and their
description, see “List of Predefined Tests for Siebel
Deployment Validator” on page 220.
A combination of parameter’s values is used to create
the appropriate test. The values can be:
➤ @[email protected] The test checks all the appropriate items
represented by the parameter (for example, the
Siebel Enterprises View Test checks that the Siebel
Enterprises view contains all the appropriate CIs for
all Siebel Enterprises sites).
➤ @[email protected] The test checks at least one appropriate
item represented by the parameter (for example, the
SiteScope Connection Test checks that at least one
SiteScope working with the Windows operating
system is attached to HP Business Availability
Center).
➤ @<value>@. Some of the parameters can only be set
to @[email protected] or to some specific value. For example,
the BPM Script Execution Test parameters creates the
following test: run at least one of the BPMScripts
(BPMScripts = @[email protected]) connected to the Siebel
Enterprise CI (Enterprises = @[email protected]) on all the
locations available (Locations = @[email protected]).
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List of Predefined Tests for Siebel Deployment
Validator
The predefined tests are listed below.
Test Name
(A - Z)
Checks That:
Category
Parameters
BPM
Adapter
Mode Test
The Siebel Enterprises view includes Business
Process Monitor Transaction from Location
CIs.
BAC
None
BPM
➤ Locations =
If the test fails, see “Errors That Occur when
Building the Siebel Enterprises View” on
page 224.
BPM
Transaction
Execution
Test
The BPM Transaction can be executed.
If the test fails, see “Errors That Occur when
Building the Siebel Enterprises View” on
page 224.
If the test fails, see “Error: Could Not Run BPM
Transaction” on page 232.
You can test one or more of the following
cases:
➤ Specific transactions. The test is successful
when all the specified transactions run
successfully in all locations and Enterprises.
This test configuration is recommended to
test the availability of specific transactions.
➤ Specific locations. The test is successful
when at least one transaction is successful
in all the specified locations and for all
Enterprises. This test configuration is
recommended to test the availability of
specific locations.
➤ All transactions, locations, and Enterprises.
The test is successful when at least one
transaction is successful in all locations and
Enterprises. This test configuration is
recommended to test the availability of all
transactions, locations, and Enterprises.
220
@[email protected]
➤ BPMTransactions
= @[email protected]
➤ Enterprises =
@[email protected]
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Test Name
(A - Z)
Siebel
Application
Server
Settings Test
Checks That:
Category
Parameters
The Log folder and SARM log folder are
defined for the Siebel Application Server, and
are accessible.
BAC
➤ Enterprises =
@[email protected]
➤ AppServers =
@[email protected]
➤ SiteScopes =
@[email protected]
Siebel
Application
Structure
Test
At least one Siebel Application is linked to the
selected Siebel Enterprise CI that has, at least,
one child BPM Transaction CI.
BAC
Enterprises = @[email protected]
Siebel
Enterprise
SARM
Analyzer
Setting Test
The sarmAnalyzer path is defined and the
folder is accessible from the Siebel Enterprise
application.
BAC
➤ Enterprises =
Siebel
Enterprise
Srvrmgr
Settings Test
The Admin user name, Admin password and
srvrmgr path are defined for the Siebel
Enterprise, and the srvrmgr can be launched.
Siebel
Enterprises
View Test
The Siebel Enterprises view contains Siebel
Enterprises CIs with child Siebel Application
Server, Siebel Web Server Extension, and
Siebel Gateway CIs.
BAC
Enterprises = @[email protected]
Siebel
Package
Deployment
Test
The Siebel_monitoring.zip package is
deployed on HP Universal CMDB.
BAC
None
Siebel Tasks
List
Command
Test
Checks the list tasks command of the Siebel
server manager.
Siebel
➤ Enterprises =
@[email protected]
➤ SiteScopes =
@[email protected]
BAC
➤ Enterprises =
@[email protected]
➤ SiteScopes =
@[email protected]
If the test fails, see “Siebel Enterprises View Is
Not Found” on page 226.
If the test fails, see “Errors That Occur when
Building the Siebel Enterprises View” on
page 224.
@[email protected]
➤ SiteScopes =
@[email protected]
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Test Name
(A - Z)
Siebel Web
Server
Extension
Settings Test
Checks That:
Category
Parameters
The SARM log folder is defined for the Siebel
Web Server Extension and is accessible.
BAC
➤ Enterprises =
@[email protected]
➤ WSE = @[email protected]
➤ SiteScopes =
@[email protected]
SiteScope
Connection
Test
The SiteScope working with the Windows
operating system is attached to HP Business
Availability Center.
BAC
SiteScopes = @[email protected]
If the test fails, see “Errors That Occur when
Building the Siebel Enterprises View” on
page 224.
Siebel Deployment Validator Test Summary Dialog Box
Description
Displays the results of the Siebel Deployment Validator
test run.
To access: Click Admin > Business Availability Center
for Siebel Administration, select a Deployment
Validator test, and click the Test Summary button
.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
222
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Category
The application related to the test: BAC, BPM, or Siebel.
Description
The test description.
Error details
The error message that explains why the test failed.
Last execution date
Date when the test was last run.
Last time test passed
Date when the test was last run successfully.
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Status
The status of the test.
Test Name
The name of the test.
Test Parameters
Click to open the area. The area lists the parameters
used to run the test and their values and indicates
where in the Infrastructure Settings you can modify the
test parameters, add new tests, or delete existing tests.
Troubleshooting and Limitations
This section includes troubleshooting for the HP Business Availability
Center for Siebel Applications.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Troubleshooting Errors in Logs” on page 224
➤
“Troubleshooting Siebel Enterprises View” on page 226
➤
“Troubleshooting Diagnostics Tools” on page 227
➤
“Troubleshooting SARM-Related Issues” on page 228
➤
“Troubleshooting Database Breakdown” on page 231
➤
“Troubleshooting Processes” on page 233
➤
“Troubleshooting Tasks” on page 233
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Troubleshooting Errors in Logs
Logs are available to help you debug problems with Siebel views and
problems that occur when using the Siebel diagnostics tools.
Problem
Solution
Errors That Occur when
Building the Siebel
Enterprises View
When this type of error occurs, run the following tests to pinpoint the
problem:
➤ SiteScope Connection Test
➤ BPM Adapter Mode Test
➤ Siebel Task List Command Test
➤ BPM Transaction Execution Test
For details on the tests, see “List of Predefined Tests for Siebel
Deployment Validator” on page 220.
You can also check the Siebel.ejb.log file (on the UCMDB server). It
includes information about all the automatic links between the
Business Process Monitor or SiteScope and the Siebel CIs whether
these links worked correctly or not. For details on the automatic links,
see “Use a Business Process Profile to Simulate Siebel Users – Details”
on page 197.
To debug the log:
1 Open the <Business Availability Center Data Processing server root
directory>\conf\core\Tools\log4j\EJB\topaz.properties file
2 In the line that follows, change ${loglevel} to debug. The lines
should be as follows: log4j.category.com.mercury.topaz.
vertical=debug, vertical.appender log4j.category.com.
mercury.am.bac.vertical.rules=debug, vertical.appender
3 Open the error log, located on the UCMDB server at the following
location: <Business Availability Center Data Processing server root
directory>\log \EJBContainer\Siebel.ejb.log
4 Locate the #define appender for vertical module line.
5 You can now analyze the log information.
6 After you complete the debugging tasks, make sure to change
debug back to ${loglevel} in the lines that follows #define
appender for vertical module. The lines should be as follows:
log4j.category.com.mercury.topaz.vertical=${loglevel}, vertical.
appenderlog4j.category.com.mercury.am.bac.vertical.rules=${logl
evel}, vertical.appender
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Problem
Solution
Errors That Occur when
Running One of the
Diagnostics Tools
The Siebel.ejb.log file (on the Gateway server) includes detailed
information about the operations that take place in the Siebel
Diagnostics tools.
For details on the Siebel Diagnostics tools, see “HP Business
Availability Center for Siebel Applications” on page 215.
To debug the log:
1 Open the
<Business Availability Center Data Processing server root
directory>\conf\core\Tools\log4j\EJB\topaz.properties file
2 In the line that follows, change ${loglevel} to debug. The line
should be as follows:
log4j.category.com.mercury.topaz.siebel=debug, siebel.appender
3 Open the error log, located on the Gateway server at the following
location:
<Business Availability Center Data Processing server root
directory>\log\EJBContainer\Siebel.ejb.log
4 Locate the #define appender for siebel line.
5 You can now analyze the log information.
6 After you have completed the debugging tasks, make sure to
change debug back to ${loglevel} in the line that follows #define
appender for siebel. The line should be as follows:
log4j.category.com.mercury.topaz.siebel=${loglevel},
siebel.appender
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Troubleshooting Siebel Enterprises View
This section describes issues related to the Siebel Enterprises View and how
to solve these problems.
Problem
Solution
Siebel Enterprises View Is
Not Found
If the "Siebel Enterprises" view is not found, or if the Siebel Package
Deployment Test fails, check that the Siebel Monitoring package
appears in the Package Manager. For details, see “Package Manager” in
Model Management.
For details on the Siebel Package Deployment Test, see “List of
Predefined Tests for Siebel Deployment Validator” on page 220.
Session Data Is Not
Available
If, in the view, the Sessions KPI is empty, it might be because the No.
of Running Sessions measurement is not monitored for an application
server/component in the relevant Siebel Application Server monitor.
Task Data Is Not
Available
If, in the view, the Tasks in Error KPI is empty, it might be because the
No. of Tasks in Error measurement is not monitored for an application
server/component in the relevant Siebel Application Server monitor.
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Troubleshooting Diagnostics Tools
This section describes issues related to the Diagnostics tools and how to
solve these problems.
Problem
Solution
Connection parameters
do not match
When one of the diagnostics tools is activated, a temporary SiteScope
monitor is created, run, and then erased. The connection parameters
used are the parameters that exist in the various relevant CIs
(Enterprise, Application Server, and so on).
You must check that the connection parameters (user name,
password, enterprise name, and gateway name) used in the CIs
conform to the parameters used in the permanent SiteScope monitors
monitoring the Siebel Enterprise. (If the connection parameters do
not match, then most diagnostics features do not work.) For example,
the same user name and password needs to be utilized in the Siebel
Enterprise configuration and in the permanent monitors defined in
SiteScope.
If a problem occurs, check the SiteScope error log (in SiteScope under
the logs directory) and the Siebel log and check the list of parameters
used to access SiteScope and Siebel. For details on the Siebel log, see
“Errors That Occur when Running One of the Diagnostics Tools” on
page 225.
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Troubleshooting SARM-Related Issues
This section describes issues related to Siebel Application Response
Measurement (SARM) and how to solve these problems.
SARM Parameters
The SARM parameters are as follows:
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Siebel Version
Name of SARM
Parameter in the Web
Server
Name of SARM
Parameter for
Application Server
Siebel 7.5.3
SIEBEL_SarmEnabled
SARMEnabled
Indicates whether
SARM is enabled or
disabled for a Siebel
Server Component.
The default value is
false. This parameter
can be set at the Siebel
Enterprise level, Siebel
Application Server
level, or Siebel
Component level.
SIEBEL_
SarmMaxMemory
SARMMaxMemory
The maximum size of
the SARM memory.
This parameter can be
set at the Siebel Server
or Siebel Server
Component level.
SIEBEL_
SarmMaxFileSize
SARMMaxFileSize
The maximum size of
a SARM file. SARM
continues to append
file segments to the
current file until the
maximum size is
reached. When the
limit is reached,
SARM starts a new
file. The default value
is 20,000,000
(~20 MB) and is
specified in bytes.
Description
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Siebel Version
Siebel 7.7 or 7.8
230
Name of SARM
Parameter in the Web
Server
Name of SARM
Parameter for
Application Server
SIEBEL_
SARMBufferSize
SARMBufferSize
The size of the SARM
buffer. The default
value is 5,000,000
bytes (~5MB).
SIEBEL_
SARMLevel
SARMLevel
The SARM granularity
level. The default
value is 0. This
parameter can be set
at the Siebel Server or
Siebel Server
Component level.
SIEBEL_
SARMFileSize
SARMFileSize
The maximum size of
a SARM data file. The
default value is
15,000,000 bytes
(~15MB).
SIEBEL_
SARMMaxFiles
SARMMaxFiles
The maximum
number of SARM files
determines how many
SARM files should be
saved for a session.
The recommended
value is 5.
SIEBEL_
SarmPeriod
SARMPeriod
The SARM period is
the time when SARM
outputs the stored
data to the SARM log
file regardless of the
Buffer size. The
default value is 3.
Description
Chapter 5 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Administration
Troubleshooting Database Breakdown
This section describes how to solve Database Breakdown-related issues.
Problem
Solution
Problem when searching
for a task using the
Siebel Database
Breakdown tool
If the Siebel Enterprise uses a gateway with an additional SSL that
supplies dynamic IDs for every user session, searching for the proper
tasks using the Siebel Database Breakdown tool may be problematic.
To solve the problem:
A possible solution is to find the correlation in the VuGen script and
to update the Siebel Application’s user in the Siebel Application
Configuration.
To do so, select Admin > Universal CMDB, select the Siebel Enterprises
view, select the appropriate Siebel Application CI in View Explorer,
and select the Properties tab. In the Other Properties area, enter the
appropriate user name in the Emulated Transaction User Name box,
and click OK.
Note: It is recommended to use a script with no more than five
transactions when using the Database Breakdown diagnostics.
Only the Total Database
Time Chart and not the
15 SQLs Chart is
displayed
When the Siebel Database SQL Breakdown pie chart displays only the
total database time chart and not the 15 SQLs chart, then there were
no significant SQL queries to display. The chart displays only the 15
SQL queries that were the most time consuming. If all SQLs were
under 1% of the total execution time of the transaction, then this
information is not displayed. For details, see “Siebel Database
Breakdown Analysis Report” on page 360.
Error: Cannot Raise Log
Level
The error message: Cannot raise log level is issued in one of the
following situations:
➤ A server manager has not been copied to the SiteScope server. For
details, see “Copy the srvrmgr Tool and the SARM Analyzer Tool to
the SiteScope Server – Details” on page 194.
➤ You did not configure the correct parameters for the Siebel
Enterprise CI. For details, see “Troubleshooting Diagnostics Tools”
on page 227.
➤ There is no license for Siebel in the SiteScope. For details, see
“Check the Siebel License in SiteScope” on page 190.
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Problem
Solution
Error: Could Not Retrieve
Log File
When the error message: Could not retrieve log file is issued, proceed
as follows:
1 Check the log folder of the server where the Siebel application is
located.
2 Ensure that it is shared and that there is access to it from SiteScope,
so the user can open the shared folder from the SiteScope and copy
files from it.
3 Check also that all the relevant Siebel servers have a remote
definition on the SiteScope. For details, see “Microsoft Windows
Remote Servers Dialog Box” in Using System Availability
Management.
Error: Could Not Run
BPM Transaction
When the error message: Could not run BPM transaction is issued or
when the BPM Transaction Execution Test fails, one of the following
situations may have occurred:
➤ The Business Process Monitor server is down.
➤ The connection from HP Business Availability Center to the
Business Process Monitor is problematic.
➤ There is a problem with the Business Process Monitor script.
To solve the problem, access the Business Process Monitor and run the
transaction manually to check if there is a problem with the Business
Process Monitor.
For details on the BPM Transaction Execution Test, see “List of
Predefined Tests for Siebel Deployment Validator” on page 220.
Error: Database
Breakdown Analysis Data
for the Transaction
Cannot Be Displayed
The error message: Database breakdown analysis data for the
transaction cannot be displayed. This might be because the analysis
filters currently set for the transaction exclude the existing data. is
displayed when the time zone and time definitions of the SiteScope
server or Business Process Monitor server used for the Database
Breakdown tool are not synchronized with the Siebel server time zone
and time definition.
A workaround is to synchronize the time zone and time definition of
the servers and if they are synchronized, to rerun the Database
Breakdown tool.
Limitation: the Siebel
Log Monitor Does not
work on a UNIX platform
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The SiteScope Siebel Log monitor does not work when logs are located
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Troubleshooting Processes
This section describes how to solve processes-related issues.
Problem
Solution
Processes tool does not
function or files do not
get through SiteScope
➤ Check that the SiteScope user has permission to log to the Siebel
machines.
➤ If another user is currently running SiteScope or ran SiteScope
when the SiteScope server had not been booted, restart the
SiteScope machine and the SiteScope service.
➤ Check that all Siebel servers are defined as remote servers on the
SiteScope server.
Troubleshooting Tasks
This section describes how to solve task-related issues.
Problem
Solution
The No. of tasks in error
counter reports all the
tasks that have exited
with error in the last
hour
In the advanced options of the SiteScope monitor, if you
configure the Siebel Tasks Time Window parameter to 0, the
No. of tasks in error counter displays all the tasks regardless of
their start time.
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234
6
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications Views and Reports
This chapter describes the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications solution.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Diagnostics Tools on page 236
➤
Siebel Views on page 240
Tasks
➤
Run the Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic Tool on page 243
➤
Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostics Tool – Details on page 244
➤
Define a Different Log Folder Per Siebel Component CI on page 248
➤
Display Siebel Information in Dashboard on page 249
Reference
➤
Context Menu Options on page 254
➤
Default CITs in the Siebel View on page 254
➤
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
User Interface on page 257
Concepts
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Diagnostics Tools
You access the HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
information from the Applications menu. The following diagnostics tools
are available:
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“SARM - User Trace Breakdown” on page 236
➤
“Database Breakdown Diagnostic” on page 238
➤
“Tasks Diagnostic Tool” on page 239
➤
“Siebel Processes Tool” on page 239
SARM - User Trace Breakdown
The Siebel SARM - User Trace Breakdown tool enables you to view Siebel real
user monitoring information. The diagnostic tool processes the data in the
User Session Trace output files produced by Siebel Application Response
Measurement (SARM) process.
This data can be retrieved for a specific user in a specific time frame. It can
also be retrieved for a specific transaction of a prerecorded script. For details,
see “SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics Tool) Page” on
page 261 and “SARM - User Trace Breakdown Dialog Box” on page 264 or
“Siebel Views” on page 240.
The tool records logs for each Siebel transaction activity in the Web server or
in the application server. It also records data about how long each
transaction remains in each tier of the Siebel enterprise: Network, Web
Server, Application Server, and Database. Siebel SARM tool logs Siebel real
user monitoring data into binary SARM files (with .sarm extension). The
transaction activity itself is written into the .sarm files.
HP Business Availability Center interacts with SARM Analyzer (a Siebel tool)
using remote API calls to SiteScope. These calls activate a batch file, which
copies files from Siebel, and then uses the SARM Analyzer to generate
user-readable files from the Siebel files. The user-readable files are then
copied using SiteScope remote API to HP Business Availability Center.
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The SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool is built over the Siebel's
SARM tool. It produces required CSV and XML files as part of the analysis
process, in which the Siebel SARM Analyzer package is utilized. The tool also
analyzes and displays a graphical view of the results. It retrieves the SARM
data for a specific user, in a specific time frame. It enables retrieving the
SARM data for a specific Business Process Monitor transaction that belongs
to a prerecorded script with Siebel breakdown enabled.
In the SARM - User Trace Breakdown tab, you can compare this breakdown
per user sessions, user transactions, or application servers to enable you to
identify the prime suspect for performance problems. You can also drill
down within these logs to determine which layer is responsible for the slow
response.
The SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool is activated on demand.
Note: The Virtual User Generator script must be recorded using the Siebel
Web protocol. Select the Enable Siebel Breakdown check box while
configuring the Business Process Monitor in System Availability
Management. For details, see “Edit Transaction Monitor Page” in Using End
User Management.
Details on how to use the SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostics tool are
provided in the “SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics Tool)
Page” on page 261.
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Database Breakdown Diagnostic
The Siebel Database Breakdown diagnostics tool enables you to determine
the cause of slow database response time by analyzing the database activity
carried out as a result of running a Business Process Step and to extract
comprehensive information regarding database time spent by various SQLs.
The database activity is logged into database logs created on the Siebel
application server.
You analyze Siebel database SQL activity by examining information in the
Siebel application server logs. These logs contain a record of SQLs carried
out as a result of Siebel components activity.
Logs are constantly created and updated on the Application Server.
However, most of the time they are only logging errors, and do not include
the extensive information that Database Breakdown can display. To log the
extensive database time distribution information, the log level needs to be
brought up.
When the user runs Database Breakdown, after defining the analysis' scope
(Siebel Enterprise, Application, Business Process Step, and so on, Business
Availability Center for Siebel Applications automatically increases (through
SiteScope) the database log level for the selected component (if a specific
component was selected).
Then, Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications instructs the
Business Process Monitor to run the transaction you selected. During the
transaction run, as a result of the higher log level, database-related
information is written into the application server log.
When the transaction has finished running, the database log level for the
selected component is returned to normal by HP Business Availability
Center for Siebel.
For details, see “Siebel Database Breakdown Configuration Report” on
page 284 and “Siebel Database Breakdown Analysis Report” on page 287.
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Tasks Diagnostic Tool
The Siebel tasks diagnostic tool enables you to view details of the Siebel
Application Server tasks, for each monitored Siebel Enterprise. For details,
see “Siebel Views” on page 240.
Using the Siebel Tasks Diagnostics tool, you can:
➤
Retrieve details of the Siebel Application Server tasks that are running, or
were run, on each Siebel Enterprise
➤
Choose to view details of all tasks, regardless of status, or details of only
those tasks with a specific status
➤
Choose to view task details for all components in all component groups on
all Siebel Application Servers, or for specific components in specific
component groups on specific Siebel Application Servers
For details, see “Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report” on page 289 and “Tasks
Diagnostics Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box” on page 292.
Siebel Processes Tool
The Siebel Processes Diagnostic tool enables you to view details of the
operating system processes running on the various Siebel Application
Servers, for each monitored Siebel Enterprise. For details, see “Siebel Views”
on page 240.
To ensure that Diagnostics tools work properly, check the
Diagnostics-related settings. For details, see “Verify Diagnostics-Related
Settings” on page 205.
Using SiteScope, you can retrieve details of the Siebel Application Server
processes that are running, or were run, on each Siebel Enterprise. You can
view the details of all processes, regardless of status, or you can view only
the processes with a specific status. Similarly, you can choose to view process
details for all components in all component groups on all Siebel Application
Servers, or for specific components in specific component groups on specific
Siebel Application Servers.
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When an application has performance/availability issues, you may use the
Siebel Processes tool to verify that all Siebel processes are up and running
and that none of the processes is using 100% CPU.
For details, see “Processes Report” on page 258 and “Processes Tool Advanced Filter Dialog Box” on page 260.
Siebel Views
The Siebel Enterprises view is enabled by default; the other Siebel views
must be enabled before they are displayed.
In Dashboard, access the Siebel Enterprises view to view information about
the Siebel IT entities, the Siebel enterprise metrics monitored by SiteScope
monitors, and information about the Siebel business processes/transactions
simulated by Business Process Monitor scripts.
For additional information about views, see “View Components” in Using
Dashboard.
The Siebel Enterprises view appears as follows:
To display the Siebel Enterprise TQL, select Admin > Universal CMDB >
Modeling > View Manager, expand Application > Siebel, and click Siebel
Enterprise.
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The following graph describes the various layers and drill-downs available in
the topology of the Siebel Enterprises view.
Note: The CIs, their hierarchy, and their KPIs are detailed in “Default CITs in
the Siebel View” on page 254.
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The Siebel Topology and Siebel Web Topology views are created when you
run the discovery job. They display the results of the Siebel discovery and
are intermediate views whose information is included in the Siebel
Enterprises view.
In addition, the Siebel Enterprises view includes the following topologies,
which are created by specific SiteScope monitors:
➤
Siebel Application Server topology discovered by SiteScope:
SiteScope creates the following topology for the SiteScope Siebel Application
Server monitor. The CIs are created only for the monitored entities
according to the counters that you selected.
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➤
Siebel Web Server topology discovered by SiteScope:
SiteScope creates the following topology for the SiteScope Siebel Web Server
monitor. The CIs are created only for the monitored entities according to
the counters that you selected.
Tasks
Run the Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic Tool
This section provides details on running the Siebel Database Breakdown
diagnostics tool.
When the user runs Database Breakdown, after defining the analysis scope
(Siebel Enterprise, Application, Business Process Step, and so on),
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications automatically
increases (through SiteScope) the database log level for the selected
component (if a specific component was selected).
Then, HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications instructs the
Business Process Monitor to run the transaction you selected. During the
transaction run, as a result of the higher log level, database-related
information is written into the application server log.
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When the transaction has finished running, the database log level for the
selected component is returned to normal by HP Business Availability
Center for Siebel Applications.
To configure the Database Breakdown Diagnostic tool:
1 To run the Database Breakdown tool, select Applications > Business
Availability Center for Siebel > Database Breakdown to open the Siebel
Database Breakdown Configuration page. For details, see “Siebel Database
Breakdown Configuration Report” on page 284.
2 You can also access this page filtered for the selected CI, when you
right-click the CI and select the Siebel Database Breakdown option. For
details, see “Customize Dashboard Display and Refresh Rate” in Using
Dashboard.
Note: You can specify a different log folder for each Siebel Component CI.
For details, see “Define a Different Log Folder Per Siebel Component CI” on
page 248.
Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostics Tool –
Details
This section describes how to run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown
diagnostics tool.
You can view data about the activity taking place in the Web servers and
application servers at a specific Siebel Enterprise and for a specific user, in a
specified period of time. HP Business Availability Center searches all of the
SARM files at the Siebel Enterprise, looks for the sessions of the specified
user, fetches the appropriate files, runs the SARM analyzer, and lists all of
the sessions used by the user.
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The task includes the following steps:
➤
“Configure the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Tool” on page 245
➤
“Use the SARM Logs for a Specific Web and Application Server” on page 247
➤
“Results” on page 248
1 Configure the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Tool
To configure the SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostics tool, select
Applications > Business Availability Center for Siebel > SARM - User Trace
Breakdown to open the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Tool
page. For details, see “SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics
Tool) Page” on page 261.
Example
Select the Siebel Enterprise for which you want to view SARM User Trace
Breakdown data, enter the name of the user whose activity you want to trace
in the User box, and click the linked date in From or To to open a calendar.
Select a new date and time to change the default date and time.
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After you configure the SARM, you can:
➤
Invoke a specific Business Process Monitor script. You can view data
about a Business Process Monitor transaction of a specific script running
in the Web servers and application servers at a specific Siebel Enterprise,
and in a specified period of time. HP Business Availability Center invokes
the Business Process Monitor transaction, and then analyzes the relevant
session. For details, see “Invoke Business Process Monitor Script” on
page 263.
➤
Specify where the files can be found:
➤
Automatically collected Web and application server logs. You can run
the SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool on automatically
collected Web and application server logs.
Note: You can specify a different SARM log folder for each Siebel
Component CI. For details, see “Define a Different Log Folder Per
Siebel Component CI” on page 248.
➤
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The SARM logs of a specific application server and Web server. You
can run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool on the
SARM logs of a specific application server and Web server.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
➤
An already generated user session trace XML file for a Siebel
Enterprise, a user, and a specific time frame. You can run the SARM User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool on an already generated user
session trace XML file for a site, a user, and a specific time frame.
HP Business Availability Center searches all of the SARM files at the
Siebel Enterprise, looks for the sessions of the specified user, fetches
the appropriate files, runs the SARM analyzer, and lists all of the
sessions used by the user that were active within the time frame.
For details, see “Advanced Options Area” on page 263.
➤
You can then run the diagnostic tool.
2 Use the SARM Logs for a Specific Web and Application Server
Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool. The SARM - User
Trace Breakdown page indicates the status of each step in the procedure. For
details, see “SARM - User Trace Breakdown Dialog Box” on page 264.
After the process is complete, the page closes and the diagnostic results are
displayed on the SARM - User Trace Breakdown - Analysis page.
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3 Results
The data is then displayed and you can generate different views and pie
charts to display the data in a user-friendly manner in the SARM - User Trace
Breakdown page. For details, see “Siebel Views” on page 240.
Define a Different Log Folder Per Siebel Component CI
By default, when you run the Database Breakdown tool or the SARM
Diagnostics tool, all the database-related information or SARM-related
information for the Siebel Application Server CI is kept in the default log
folder in HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications per Siebel
application.
You can also run the Database Breakdown tool or the SARM Diagnostics tool
for each Siebel application, using a different log folder for each Siebel
Component CI and for each tool.
You specify the path to the log folders to be assigned to the Siebel
Component CI as follows, select Admin > Universal CMDB > Modeling > IT
Universe Manager, select the Siebel Enterprises view, and right-click the
Siebel Component CI, and select Properties. The Log Folder attribute or the
SARM Log Folder attributes are listed in the Configuration Item Properties
dialog box. Enter the path to the folders in the Value box.
When you run the Database Breakdown tool or the SARM Diagnostics tool
and you have selected the Automatically collect file option in the SARM User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Tool page:
248
➤
If you have specified a path in the Log Folder and SARM Log Folder
attributes of the Siebel Component CI instance, the tools use the log files
taken from these folders.
➤
If you have not specified a path in the Log Folder and SARM Log Folder
attributes, the tools use the log file specified in the Log Folder attribute of
the Siebel Application Server CI.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
For details about the Automatically collect file option, see the Advanced
Options section in “SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics
Tool) Page” on page 261.
For details about the Database Breakdown logs, see “Run the Siebel Database
Breakdown Diagnostic Tool” on page 243. For details about the SARM
Diagnostics tool logs, see “Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown
Diagnostics Tool – Details” on page 244.
Display Siebel Information in Dashboard
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications is ready. After all
these steps are completed, you can view Siebel data in the Dashboard, use
diagnostic tools, and so on. You can display Siebel information in
Dashboard using one or more of the capabilities described in this section.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“View Siebel Information in the Siebel Views” on page 249
➤
“View the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Report” on page 250
➤
“View the Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic Report” on page 250
➤
“View the Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report” on page 250
➤
“View the Processes Tool Report” on page 250
➤
“View Changes Made to Siebel Enterprise CIs” on page 251
➤
“View Configuration File CI Details” on page 251
1 View Siebel Information in the Siebel Views
For details on the views, see “Siebel Views” on page 240.
To enable the other Siebel views, select Dashboard & Service Level
Management in the View Properties dialog box. For details, see “New View/
View Properties/Save As View Wizard” in Model Management.
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2 View the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic Report
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications SARM Diagnostics is
a user trace breakdown diagnostic tool that processes the data in the User
Session Trace output files produced by Siebel’s SARM process. This data can
be retrieved for a specific user in a specific time frame. It can also be
retrieved for a specific transaction of a prerecorded script.
For details on running the tool, see “Run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown
Diagnostics Tool – Details” on page 244.
For details on how to display the information, see “Siebel Views” on
page 240.
3 View the Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic Report
The Siebel Database Breakdown diagnostic tool enables you to analyze
database logs created on the Siebel application server, and extract
comprehensive information regarding database time spent by various SQLs.
For details on running the tool, see “Run the Siebel Database Breakdown
Diagnostic Tool” on page 243.
For details on how to display the information, see “Siebel Database
Breakdown Analysis Report” on page 287.
4 View the Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report
The Siebel tasks diagnostic tool enables you to view details of the Siebel
Application Server tasks, for each monitored Siebel Enterprise. For details,
see “Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report” on page 289.
5 View the Processes Tool Report
The Siebel Processes tool enables you to view details of the Siebel
Application Server processes, for each monitored Siebel Enterprise. For
details, see “Processes Report” on page 258.
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6 View Changes Made to Siebel Enterprise CIs
You can assign CIs to keep change information. For details on assigning CIs
to keep change information, see the HP Universal CMDB documentation.
When the discovery process discovers changes made to the properties of
these CIs, the changes are displayed in the Change report available as a
context menu option for each one of the relevant CI types. For details on
the Change report, see “Change Report Page” in Model Management.
7 View Configuration File CI Details
For details on viewing the Configuration File CI details, see “View
Configuration File CI – Details” on page 252.
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View Configuration File CI – Details
You can view configuration file details:
➤
252
siebel.cfg file. Right-click the relevant Siebel Application Server CI in the
Siebel Enterprises view, select Properties, and click Show document content
to display the details of the siebel.cfg file. The siebel.cfg configuration file
displays information taken from the Siebel application server installation.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
➤
parameters.cfg file. Right-click the relevant Configuration File CI in the
Siebel Enterprises view, select Properties, and click Show document content
to display details of the parameters.cfg file. The parameters.cfg. file
includes the output of the list parameters for component command using
srvrmgr.
You can also access this information by selecting Admin > Universal CMDB >
Modeling > IT Universe Manager > Properties. For details, see “Configuration
Item Properties Dialog Box” in Model Management.
Reference
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Context Menu Options
In the Siebel-related views, right click CIs to display a list of the context
menu options available in the Siebel Enterprises view. For details, see
“Customize Dashboard Display and Refresh Rate” in Using Dashboard.
The context menu options available from the Siebel-specific CITs are listed
in “Go to Siebel Diagnostics” in Using Dashboard. An additional context
menu option is SiteScope Cross-Performance Report accessed by using the
Siebel Cross-Performance option. For details, see “Go to Report” in Using
Dashboard.
Default CITs in the Siebel View
In Dashboard, access the Siebel Enterprises view to view information about
the Siebel IT entities, the Siebel enterprise metrics monitored by SiteScope
monitors, and information about the Siebel business processes/transactions
simulated by Business Process Monitor scripts.
The Siebel Enterprises view appears as follows:
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The CITs are as follows:
CIT (A-Z)
Icon
Description
BPM Transaction/
Location
The BPM Transaction/Location CIs represent
a BP Step/Location intersection (a specific
transaction running at a specific location).
Business Process Step
The Business Process Steps (BPM transactions
inside a script) CIs are emulated Siebel
transactions executed on a Business Process
Monitor machine. They are used to supply
proactive monitoring of end user experience.
Configuration File
The Configuration File CIs represent the
siebel.cfg configuration file that includes
information from the application server
installation or the parameters.cfg that
includes the output of the list parameters for
component command using srvrmgr.
Contained Group
The Group CI is a logical container. This is
not a Siebel-specific CI. The Siebel
Enterprises view includes the following
groups: Applications, Business Processes,
Hosts, and Locations.
Contained Location
The Contained Location CIs are created as
part of the Business Process Monitor
hierarchy when working with the
Transactions/locations option. They
represent the locations from which the BP
Steps monitoring Siebel are run.
Database
The Database CI represents the database that
is holding the data tier. This is not a
Siebel-specific CI.
Host
A Host CI represents the physical machine
on which a server is installed. This is not a
Siebel-specific element.
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CIT (A-Z)
256
Icon
Description
Siebel Application
The Siebel Application CI represents the
Siebel complete solution for an
organization’s needs in a certain area. For
example: marketing, call center, and so
forth.
Siebel Application
Server
The Siebel Application Server CI represents a
server running the business logic tier that
supports both back-end and interactive
processes for every Siebel client.
Siebel Component
The Component CI represents a process
running on the Siebel Application Server,
which encapsulates some Siebel application
functionality.
Siebel Component
Group
The Component Group CI represents an
administrative grouping of components
comprising an application running on the
Siebel Application Server.
Siebel Enterprise
The Siebel Enterprise CI represents the
logical grouping of Siebel Application Servers
that support the same group of users
accessing a common database server.
Siebel Gateway
The Siebel Gateway server is a coordinating
server that routes requests to the correct
component and provides enhanced
scalability, load balancing, and high
availability across the Siebel Enterprise.
Siebel Measurement
Group
The SiteScope Measurement Group CI
represents an administrative grouping the
metrics of a Siebel monitor.
Siebel Web
Application
The Siebel Web Application CI represents the
application URL as it exists on the Siebel
Web Server Extension.
Siebel Web Server
Extension
The Siebel Web Server Extension CI
represents the Siebel Web Server Extension
installed on the Web server.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
CIT (A-Z)
Icon
SiteScope
Measurement or
SiteScope Monitor
Description
The SiteScope Measurement/Monitor CI is
not a Siebel-specific CI. However, in the
Siebel Enterprises view, it usually represents
a metric of a Siebel monitor; for example,
the Siebel Application Server monitor.
Note: If SiteScope measurements names are
too long and are truncated in Dashboard,
you can change the CIT default label to be
RegExp(data_name, (.*[/].*[/].*[/])(.*),2)
instead of just data_name. Only the
beginning of the path and the last part of
the measurement's name are displayed
instead of the entire measurement name
(including the path). If you change the CIT
default label, you must also change all
references in the code and in the TQL layout
from display_label to data_name.
Web Server
The Web Server CI represents the Web server
that forwards requests to the Siebel
enterprise.
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications
Views and Reports User Interface
This section describes:
➤
Processes Report on page 258
➤
Processes Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box on page 260
➤
SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics Tool) Page on page 261
➤
SARM - User Trace Breakdown Dialog Box on page 264
➤
SARM - User Trace Breakdown - Analysis Report on page 266
➤
Siebel Database Breakdown Configuration Report on page 284
➤
Siebel Database Breakdown Analysis Report on page 287
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➤
Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report on page 289
➤
Tasks Diagnostics Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box on page 292
Processes Report
The following is an example of the Processes report.
Description
Enables you to view details of the Siebel Application
Server processes, for each monitored Siebel Enterprise.
To Access: Applications > Business Availability Center
for Siebel > Processes
You can also access this page filtered for a selected CI,
when you right-click the CI in Dashboard and select
the Show Processes option. For details, see “Go to
Siebel Diagnostics” in Using Dashboard.
Important
Information
➤ To sort the processes by a specific column, click the
column heading.
➤ To move between pages, use the First, Previous,
Next, and Last arrows
table.
Included in Tasks
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above the
“View Configuration File CI – Details” on page 252
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Advanced Options
If necessary, click to open the Processes Diagnostics
Tool - Advanced Filter page. For details, see “Processes
Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box” on page 260.
Apply
Click the Active Filter button to display the process
diagnostic information. The process information you
requested is retrieved from the Siebel Application
Servers and displayed on the Tasks Diagnostic Tool
page.
Component
The name of the component. If the process does not
have a task attached, then the Component column is
empty.
Component Group
Select the name of the component groups. Select All
component groups to display the process diagnostics
for all of the component groups.
Component Group
The name of the component group. If the process does
not have a task attached, then the Component Group
column is empty.
CPU (%)
The percentage of the host machine CPU that the
relevant process instance is currently using.
Enterprises
Select the name of the Siebel Enterprise.
Memory (KB)
The amount of memory (in KB) that the relevant
process instance is currently using.
Process ID
The process identifier.
Process Type
The name of the operating system process that deals
with the Siebel process.
Server
Select the name of the application server. Select All
servers to display the process diagnostics for all of the
application servers.
Server
The name of the server on which the process runs.
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Processes Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box
Description
Use the advanced filter to filter the list of processes you
want to display.
To Access: In the Processes Diagnostics Tool page, click
the Advanced Filter link.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
260
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Process Id
Enter the process ID.
Process Type
Select the type of process. Select All process types to
display the process diagnostics for all of the process
types.
Siebel Components
Select the Siebel component. Select All components to
display the process diagnostics for all of the Siebel
components.
Using SiteScope
Select the SiteScope machine you want to use to
retrieve process information.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the Diagnostics Tool)
Page
Description
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
Applications SARM Diagnostics is a user trace
breakdown diagnostic tool that processes the data in
the User Session Trace output files produced by Siebel’s
SARM process. This data can be retrieved for a specific
user in a specific time frame. It can also be retrieved for
a specific transaction of a prerecorded script.
You can then:
➤ Invoke a specific Business Process Monitor script.
For details, see “Invoke Business Process Monitor
Script” on page 263.
➤ Specify where the files can be found:
➤ Automatically collected Web and application
server logs.
➤ The SARM logs of a specific application server and
Web server.
➤ An already generated user session trace XML file
for a Siebel Enterprise, a user, and a specific time
frame.
To Access: Select Applications > Business Availability
Center for Siebel > SARM - User Trace Breakdown to
open the SARM - User Trace Breakdown Diagnostic
Tool page.
You can also access this page filtered for the selected CI,
when you right-click the CI and select the Siebel SARM
option. For details, see “Customize Dashboard Display
and Refresh Rate” in Using Dashboard.
Important
Information
HP Business Availability Center does not support
SiteScope 8.7 and earlier.
Included in Tasks
“View Configuration File CI – Details”
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Advanced Options
You can run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown
diagnostic tool on:
➤ automatically collected Web and application server
logs.
➤ the SARM logs of a specific application server and
Web server.
➤ an already generated user session trace XML file for a
site, a user, and a specific time frame. HP Business
Availability Center searches all of the SARM files at
the Siebel Enterprise, looks for the sessions of the
specified user, fetches the appropriate files, runs the
SARM analyzer, and lists all of the sessions used by
the user that were active within the time frame.
262
Enterprises
Select the Siebel Enterprise for which you want to view
SARM User Trace Breakdown data.
From ... To
Click the linked date in From or To to open a calendar
and select a new date and time to change the default
date and time.
Invoke Business
Process Monitor
Script area
You can view data about a Business Process Monitor
transaction of a specific script running in the Web
servers and application servers at a specific Siebel
Enterprise, and in a specified period of time.
HP Business Availability Center invokes the Business
Process Monitor transaction, and then analyzes the
relevant session. See below for details.
User
Enter the name of the user whose activity you want to
trace.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
Invoke Business Process Monitor Script
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Application
Select the application.
Host
Select the location of the Business Process Monitor
running the script.
Invoke Script
Click to invoke the script transaction.
Script
Select the script.
Advanced Options Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Automatically collect
files
Select to run SARM - User Trace Breakdown diagnostics
on all Web and application servers at the Siebel
Enterprise. Then select the SiteScopes used to collect
the data in the Using SiteScope list. This is the default.
For details about the folders that can be used for the
logs, see “Define a Different Log Folder Per Siebel
Component CI” on page 248.
Run
Click the Run button to run the diagnostics tool. The
resulting information is displayed in the SARM - User
Trace Breakdown - Analysis screen. For details, see
“Siebel Views” on page 240.
Specify a User
Session Trace File
Select Specify a User Session Trace File to work on an
already generated user session trace XML file.
In the User Session Trace File box, enter the path to the
trace file. The path is relative to the SiteScope machine.
Then select the SiteScopes used to collect the data in
the Using SiteScope list.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Specify the SARM
logs folders
Select Specify the SARM logs folders to run SARM User Trace Breakdown diagnostics only on the specified
Web and application servers for the Siebel Enterprise:
➤ In the Application Servers box, enter the path to the
SARM logs of the application servers.
➤ In the Web Servers box, enter the path to the SARM
logs of the Web servers.
The paths are relative to the SiteScope machine.
Then select the SiteScopes used to collect the data in
the Using SiteScope list. This is the default.
Using SiteScope
Enter the SiteScopes used to collect the data.
SARM - User Trace Breakdown Dialog Box
264
Description
When you run the SARM - User Trace Breakdown
diagnostic tool, the SARM - User Trace Breakdown page
indicates the status of each step in the procedure.
Important
Information
After the process is complete, the page closes and the
diagnostic results are displayed on the SARM - User
Trace Breakdown - Analysis page. For details, see “Siebel
Views” on page 240.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Analyze Results and
Prepare Charts
When the status indicator shows running stripes, the
final results are being analyzed and charts are prepared.
When the status indicator is complete, the loading has
completed.
Check SiteScopes
connectivity
When the status indicator shows running stripes, the
SiteScopes connectivity is being checked. When the
status indicator is complete, the operation has
completed.
Extract Application
Servers’ session data
When the status indicator shows running stripes, the
application server session data is being extracted.
When the status indicator is complete, the extraction
has completed.
Load Web Servers’
session data
When the status indicator shows running stripes, the
Web server session data is being loaded. When the
status indicator is complete, the loading has
completed.
Processing
The progress in the current step.
Total Progress
Indicates the total progress of the SARM - User Trace
Breakdown diagnostic tool.
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SARM - User Trace Breakdown - Analysis Report
The following is an example of the SARM - User Breakdown - Analysis page.
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Description
Enables you to view:
➤ Summary tab. A chart that displays the
segmentation between the average Application
Server time, Web Server time, Network time, and
Database time for all of the relevant requests that
were found in the files. For details, see “Summary
Tab” on page 268.
➤ Sessions tab. The time distribution of the various
sessions. For details, see “Sessions Tab” on page 271.
➤ Transaction tab. For each Business Process Monitor
transaction, the timestamp of the session it belongs
to, the session id, the application server name, the
average total time of all requests that belong to that
transaction, the number of request and the maximal
request time. For details, see “Transactions Tab” on
page 273.
➤ Application Server tab. A comparison between
application servers in terms of times' distribution.
For details, see “Application Servers” on page 276.
➤ Requests tab. For each request, the request detailed
information. For details, see “Requests Tab” on
page 278.
To Access: Run the user trace breakdown diagnostic
tool. For details, see “SARM - User Trace Breakdown
(Run the Diagnostics Tool) Page” on page 261.
Included in Tasks
“View Configuration File CI – Details”
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Summary Tab
The following is an example of the Summary page.
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Description
Enables you to view a chart that displays the
segmentation between the average Application Server
time, Web Server time, Network time, and Database
time for all of the relevant requests that were found in
the files. For details, see “SARM - User Trace Breakdown
- Analysis Report” on page 266.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<drill down>
Drilling down one of the segments in the chart
provides a pie chart that displays the segmentation
between the sub areas of that segment. If there is
another level of specification (available in Siebel 7.7),
you can then drill down to the sub area level.
You can then click segments of the Area Breakdown
chart to open the corresponding Sub Area Breakdown
chart (if it exists). For details, see below.
<pie chart>
The chart displays the segmentation between the
average Application Server time, Web Server time,
Network time, and Database time for all of the relevant
requests that were found in the files.
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The breakdown is as follows:
Layer Breakdown
Area Breakdown
Sub Area Breakdown
Web Server
N/A
N/A
Application Server
Application Manager
Request Receipt (sessID SeqID)
Object Manager
Session Re-Login
Communications Server
Services
Communications Client
Invoke Method
Communications Server
Invoke Method
Build Web Page
Build View Layout
Show Applet, Build View Data
Build Applet
Get View Layout
270
Database
Database Connector
N/A
Network
N/A
N/A
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
Sessions Tab
The following is an example of the Sessions page.
Description
Enables you to view the time distribution of the
various sessions. For details, see “SARM - User Trace
Breakdown - Analysis Report” on page 266.
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
272
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Application Server
The name of the application server that the session is
running on.
Avg. Request Time
(sec)
The average time the request spent in the session.
Date
The timestamp of the session.
Layer Breakdown
The breakdown of the layer into its areas relative to the
time spent by the session in each area: Web Server,
Application Server, Database, and Network. Tooltips
display the average time the session spent in each area.
Max Request Time
(sec)
The maximum time spent by a request in the session.
Scroll to the right to see the rest of the information.
No. of Requests
The number of requests that ran in the session.
Session Id
The ID of the session. You can drill the session ID to
display information about the session requests. For
details, see “Requests Tab” on page 278.
Summary
You can select one or more sessions and click Summary
to display a summary chart for the sessions you
selected. For details, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
Task ID
The ID of the task the request belongs to.
Web Server
The name of the Web server that the session is running
on.
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Transactions Tab
The following is an example of the Transactions page.
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Description
Enables you to view, for each Business Process Monitor
transaction, the timestamp of the session it belongs to,
the session id, the application server name, the average
total time of all requests that belong to that
transaction, the number of request and the maximal
request time. For details, see “SARM - User Trace
Breakdown - Analysis Report” on page 266.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
274
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<drill down a
transaction>
Displays all of the requests that belong to that
transaction. For details, see “Requests Tab” on
page 278.
<tooltip>
Click any part of the chart to get the tooltip that
indicates the time the transaction spent in the layer,
area, or sub area.
Application Server
The name of the application server on which the
transaction ran.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
BPM Time
This column displays the time the invoked transaction
ran in Business Process Monitor (only when the
transaction is invoked using Invoke Business Process
Monitor Script). This value is larger than the value in
the Total Time column as it includes client time,
network time, and so on.
Note: This is displayed only when the SARM User
Session Trace breakdown diagnostics has been run after
invoking a BPM script monitoring the Siebel
Application. Additional tuning of Siebel Application
and Web Server environment variables is required
because the flush ratio of SARM files is approximately
five times slower in the Web Server than in the
Application Server, and therefore running SARM with
the default value of SARM_MaxFileSize variable might
not be enough for the SARM User Trace Breakdown
diagnostic tool to return data. For details, see
“Troubleshooting SARM-Related Issues” on page 228.
Date
The date when the transaction ran.
Layer Breakdown
The breakdown of the layer into its areas relative to the
time spend by the transaction in each area: Web Server,
Application Server, Database, and Network. Tooltips
display the average time the transaction spent in each
area.
Max. Request Time
The maximum time spent by any of the requests in the
transaction.
No. of Requests
The number of transaction requests that ran in this
application server.
Session ID
The ID of the session.
Task ID
The ID of the task the transaction belongs to.
Total Time
The total time the transaction ran in Siebel.
Transaction Name
The name of the transaction.
Web Server
The name of the Web server on which the transaction
ran.
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Application Servers
The following is an example of the Application Servers page.
Description
276
Enables you to view a comparison between application
servers in terms of times' distribution. For details, see
“SARM - User Trace Breakdown - Analysis Report” on
page 266.
Chapter 6 • HP Business Availability Center for Siebel Applications Views and Reports
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<drill down an
application server>
Displays all of the requests that were executed on that
application server. For details, see “Requests Tab” on
page 278.
Application Server
The name of the application server. You can drill the
session ID to display information about the application
server. For details, see “Requests Tab” on page 278.
Avg. Request Time
The average time spent by a request executing in this
application server.
Layer Breakdown
The time consumption breakdown by layers into its
areas relative to the time spent by the request in each
area: Web Server, Application Server, Database, and
Network. Tooltips display the average time the request
spent in each area.
Max. Request Time
The maximum time a request spent in this application
server.
No. of Requests
The number of requests that ran in this application
server.
Summary
Select one or more application servers and click
Summary to display a summary chart for the
application servers you selected. For more details on
the summary chart, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
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Requests Tab
The following is an example of the Requests page.
Description
Enables you to view, for each request, the request
detailed information. For details, see “SARM - User
Trace Breakdown - Analysis Report” on page 266.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Application Server
The name of the application server on which the task
ran.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
BPM Time
Displays the time the invoked request ran in Business
Process Monitor (only when the request is invoked
using Invoke Business Process Monitor Script). This
value is larger than the value in the Total Time column
as it includes client time, network time, and so on.
Note: The BPM Time is displayed only when the SARM
User Session Trace breakdown diagnostics has been run
after invoking a BPM script monitoring the Siebel
Application. Some additional tuning of Siebel
Application\Web Server environment variables is
required. This is due to the fact that the flush ratio of
SARM files is approximately five times slower in the
Web Server than in the Application Server, and
therefore running SARM with the default value of
SARM_MaxFileSize variable might not be enough for
the SARM User Trace Breakdown diagnostic tool to
return data. For details, see “Troubleshooting
SARM-Related Issues” on page 228.
Date
The date when the request ran.
Layer Breakdown
The time consumption breakdown by layers into its
areas relative to the time the request spent in each area:
Web Server, Application Server, Database, and Network.
Tooltips display the average time the request spent in
each area.
Request ID
The ID of the request.
You can drill down the request ID to display
information about the area where the request ran. For
details, see “Area Details Area” on page 280.
Session ID
The ID of the session on which the request ran. Scroll
to the right to see the rest of the information.
Summary
Select one or more application servers and click
Summary to display a summary chart for the
application servers you selected. For more details on
the summary chart, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
Task ID
The ID of the task the request belongs to.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Total Time
The total time spent to execute a request.
Transaction Name
The name of the transaction the request belongs to.
Web Server
The name of the Web server on which the task ran.
Area Details Area
Description
To Access: In the Requests page, you can drill down a
request ID to display information about the area where
the request ran.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
280
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Area Name
The name of the area where the request ran. You can
drill downthe area name to display information about
its sub areas. For details, see “Sub Area Details Area” on
page 281.
Avg. Execution Time
The average time spent by the request executing in the
area.
Exclusive Memory
Max Allocated Sub
Area
The amount of memory used by requests that entered
only this area.
Max Execution Time
The maximum time spent by the request executing in
the area.
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 1
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 2
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
No. of Sub Areas
The number of sub areas in the area.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Non-Recursive
Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked
(non-recursive invocation) in the area.
Recursive Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked by other
requests (recursive invocation) in the area.
Summary
Select one or more application servers and click
Summary to display a summary chart for the
application servers you selected. For more details on
the summary chart, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
Total Execution Time
The total time spent by the request executing in the
area.
Sub Area Details Area
Description
To Access: In the Area Details page, click an area name
to display information about its sub areas.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Area Name
The name of the area where the sub area is located.
Avg. Execution Time
The average time spent by the request executing in the
sub area.
Exclusive Memory
Max Allocated
Instance
The amount of memory used by requests that entered
only this sub area.
Max Execution Time
The maximum time spent by the request executing in
the sub area.
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 1
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 2
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
No. of Instances
The number of instances of the request.
Non-Recursive
Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked
(non-recursive invocation) in the sub area. Scroll to the
right to see the rest of the information.
Recursive Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked by other
requests (recursive invocation) in the sub area.
Sub Area Name
The name of the sub area where the request ran. You
can drill down the sub area name to display
information about the session requests. For details, see
“Instance Details Area” on page 282.
Summary
Select one or more application servers and click
Summary to display a summary chart for the
application servers you selected. For more details on
the summary chart, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
Total Execution Time
The total time spent by the request executing in the
sub area.
Instance Details Area
Description
To Access: In the Sub Area Details page, click a sub area
name to display information about the session
requests.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
282
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Area Name
The name of the area where the request ran.
Avg. Execution Time
The average time spent by the request executing in the
instance.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Instance Name
The name of the instance where the request ran.
Max Execution Time
The maximum time spent by the request executing in
the instance.
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 1
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
Max Response Time
SARM node App
String 2
The name of the method invoked or workflow process
involved.
Non-Recursive
Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked
(non-recursive invocation) in the instance. Scroll to the
right to see the rest of the information.
Recursive Invocations
The number of times requests were invoked by other
requests (recursive invocation) in the instance.
Sub Area Name
The name of the sub area where the request ran.
Summary
Select one or more application servers and click
Summary to display a summary chart for the
application servers you selected. For more details on
the summary chart, see “Summary Tab” on page 268.
Total Execution Time
The total time spent by the request executing in the
instance.
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Siebel Database Breakdown Configuration Report
The following is an example of the Siebel Database Breakdown
Configuration report.
Description
Enables you to run the Database Breakdown tool.
To Access: Select Applications > Business Availability
Center for Siebel > Database Breakdown to open the
Siebel Database Breakdown Configuration page.
You can also access this page filtered for the selected CI,
when you right-click the CI and select the Siebel
Database Breakdown option. For details, see
“Customize Dashboard Display and Refresh Rate” in
Using Dashboard.
Included in Tasks
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“View Configuration File CI – Details” on page 252
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Selection Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Select an application
In the list, select the Siebel application for which you
want to analyze data.
Select an enterprise
In the list, select the Siebel Enterprise.
User Name
The value in the User Name box appears automatically
when you select the application. The appropriate user
name has been entered manually by your
administrator after discovery has taken place and the
monitoring script was recorded, but you can override
it. For details, see “Deploy the SiteScope Siebel
Monitors” on page 209.
Available Transactions Area
Description
Lists the transactions when you select a Siebel
Enterprise and an application in the top part of the
page. Click the Business Process Monitor transaction
whose activity you want to analyze. The list of
transactions includes only those for which you have
permissions.
Important
Information
For diagnostic purposes it is recommended to use a
script running a dedicated user. This enables you to
make sure diagnosis results refer to the Business Process
Monitor transaction intended to be analyzed.
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Advanced Options Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
286
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Analyze
Click the Analyze button to display the Siebel Tier
Breakdown and Siebel Database SQL Breakdown pie
charts. For details, see “Siebel Database Breakdown
Analysis Report” on page 287.
Select a server
Select a Siebel Application Server in the list. You can
also leave All servers selected.
Select a Siebel
component
Select a Siebel component in the list. Only the log level
for that component is brought up.
Using SiteScope
Select the SiteScope machine you want to use to
monitor the Siebel component in the list.
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Siebel Database Breakdown Analysis Report
An example of the report:
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An example of the detail of one segment of the pie chart:
Description
Analyze the Siebel database logs that you have created
to determine which of the component SQL operations,
or parts of operations, were responsible for slow
database response time.
To Access: Click Analyze on the Siebel Database
Breakdown: Configuration (Advanced Option) page.
Included in Tasks
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“View Configuration File CI – Details” on page 252
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Siebel Database SQL
Breakdown Pie Chart
Displays a breakdown of up to 15 of the most
time-consuming SQLs.
Siebel Tier
Breakdown Pie Chart
Shows the transaction’s database time relative to its
application time.
Specific SQL
Breakdown Pie Chart
Click, in the Siebel Database SQL Breakdown pie chart,
a section representing the required SQL, to view the
database-specific time distribution of that specific SQL.
For each SQL operation, you can view the various
database times: preparation time, execution time,
initial fetch time, total time, and write time (time
stamp). This enables you to isolate the exact segment
responsible for the delay in the database response time.
Underneath the Specific SQL Breakdown pie chart, you
can view the corresponding SQL statement.
Tasks Diagnostics Tool Report
The following is an example of the Task Diagnostics Tool report.
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Description
Enables you to view details of Siebel Application Server
tasks.
To Access: Select Applications > Business Availability
Center for Siebel > Tasks to open the Task Diagnostics
Tool page.
You can also access this page filtered for the selected CI,
when you right-click the CI and select the Show Tasks
in Error or Show Running Tasks option. For details, see
“Customize Dashboard Display and Refresh Rate” in
Using Dashboard.
Important
Information
➤ To sort the tasks by a specific column, click the
column heading.
➤ To move between pages, use the arrows
above the table.
Included in Tasks
“View Configuration File CI – Details” on page 252
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
290
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Advanced Filter
If necessary, click the link to filter the list of tasks. For
details, see “View Configuration File CI – Details” on
page 252.
Apply
When you click the Apply button, the task information
you requested is retrieved from the Siebel Application
Servers and displayed on the Tasks Diagnostic Tool
page.
CC_ALIAS
The name of the component the task belongs to.
CC_INCARN_NO
The number of times the task was restarted.
CC_RUNMODE
The mode used to execute the task: Interactive or
Batch.
CG_ALIAS
The name of the component group the task belongs to.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Enterprise
Select the Siebel site/enterprise for which you want to
view task data.
Status
Select the specific status—Running, Paused, Stopping,
Completed, Exited with Error, or Killed. Alternatively,
you can select to view tasks of all statuses.
SV_NAME
The name of the server on which the task is running.
TK_DISP_RUNSTATE
The state of the task: Running, Paused, Stopping,
Completed, Exited with Error, or Killed.
TK_END_TIME
The time when the task stopped executing.
TK_IDLE
For future use.
TK_LABEL
The name of the user who is running the tasks. Some
tasks (such as the ones belonging to the system
component group) do not have a user.
TK_PARENT_T
The task that caused this task to execute.
TK_PID
The operating system process ID that deals with the
task. One process can handle more than one task. This
column displays data only for tasks whose
TK_DISP_RUNSTATE is running.
TK_PING_TIM
For future use.
TK_START_TIME
The time when the task started to execute.
TK_STATUS
A description of the task—added by the task. If
TK_DISP_RUNSTATE is Exited with Error, TK_STATUS
displays the error message.
TK_TASKID
The ID of the task.
TK_TASKTYPE
The urgency of the task.
User
To focus on the tasks of a specific user, fill in the user
name in the User box.
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Tasks Diagnostics Tool - Advanced Filter Dialog Box
Description
Use the advanced filter to filter the list of tasks you
want to display.
To Access: In the Task Diagnostics Tool page, click the
Advanced Filter link to open the Tasks Diagnostics Tool
Advanced Filter page.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
292
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Component
Select the specific component for which you want to
view task data.
Component group
Select the specific component group for which you
want to view task data.
Server
Select the specific server whose task data you want to
view.
Using SiteScope
Select the SiteScope machine you want to use to
retrieve task data from the Siebel Application Server, if
you do not want HP Business Availability Center for
Siebel Applications to use the default SiteScope
machine.
Part IV
The HP Business Availability Center APIs
294
7
Introduction to APIs
This chapter lists the APIs that are included with HP Business Availability
Center.
Concepts
APIs Overview
The following APIs are included with HP Business Availability Center:
➤
Generic Reporting Engine API. Enables extraction of data from the Business
Availability Center database for use with third-party or custom tools. For
details, see “Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API” on page 297.
➤
UCMDB API. Enables writing configuration item definitions and topological
relations to the UCMDB (Universal Configuration Management database),
and querying the information with TQL and ad hoc queries. For details, see
“The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API” on page 321.
➤
UCMDB Java API. Explains how third-party or custom tools can use the Java
API to extract data and calculations and to write data to the UCMDB
(Universal Configuration Management database). For details, see “The
HP Universal CMDB Java API” on page 397.
➤
DDM Web Service. Explains how third-party or custom tools can use the
HP Discovery and Dependency Mapping Web Service to manage Discovery
and Dependency Mapping (DDM). For details, see “The HP Discovery and
Dependency Mapping Web Service API” in Discovery and Dependency
Mapping Guide.
➤
Dashboard API. Enables retrieving information about one or more views in
an HP Business Availability Center system through a URL-based query to the
database. For details, see “Working with the Dashboard API” on page 409.
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➤
296
Rules API. Enables creation of business rules using the Groovy dynamic
scripting language, in Dashboard and Service Level Management. For
details, see “Rules API” in Using Dashboard and “Rules API” in Using Service
Level Management.
8
Working with the Generic Reporting
Engine API
Note to HP Software-as-a-Service customers: For details on how to use the
Generic Reporting Engine API in an HP Software-as-a-Service environment,
contact HP Software-as-a-Service Support.
This chapter explains how to manually work with the Generic Reporting
Engine API to extract data from HP Business Availability Center for use with
third-party or custom tools.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Introducing the Generic Reporting Engine API on page 298
➤
Data Returned on page 300
➤
Querying with a Browser on page 301
➤
Using the Web Service on page 301
➤
Supported SQL Syntax on page 302
➤
Query Limitations on page 303
➤
Date-Time Values on page 304
➤
byTime Function on page 305
➤
Query Examples on page 306
➤
Legacy Queries on page 307
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Concepts
Introducing the Generic Reporting Engine API
The recommended method for creating API-level queries to the profile
database is building queries using the Custom Query Builder. The Custom
Query Builder enables the building of queries using a graphical user
interface, and facilitates the generation of reports, extraction of data in
different formats, and generation of query URLs that can be used with
third-party or custom tools. For details, see “Custom Query Builder” in
Reports.
The Generic Reporting Engine API also enables manual creation of queries
using the following methods:
➤
Web browser. The request is sent as an HTML query and the data is returned
as HTML or as a CSV (Comma Separated Values) file that can be opened with
Microsoft Excel or processed with a custom tool.
➤
Web Service. The return object contains the data in CSV format.
The remainder of this chapter describes how to create queries manually.
Prerequisite Knowledge
Users of the API should be familiar with SQL syntax and HP Business
Availability Center administration and applications. Users of the API via
Web Service should also be familiar with the SOAP specification and an
object-oriented programming language such as C++ or Java.
Permissions
For a query to access the data using the API query syntax described below,
the user and password parameters passed in the query must be those of a
user with either System Viewer or Superuser permissions. For details on
setting permissions in the Permissions Manager, see “Permissions Overview”
in Platform Administration.
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Configuration
You can configure the API options at Admin > Platform > Setup and
Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings > Foundations > Generic Data Engine
Open API. You can set the maximum number of data rows returned, as well
as disable use of the Generic Reporting Engine API.
Getting Metadata on the Samples
When building queries, you must know the data representation of the
sample. For information on commonly queried samples and descriptions of
their fields, see “Data Samples” in Reference Information.
Advanced Sample Retrieval
Users with special reporting needs can retrieve a list of all samples and their
fields using the MBean Inspector. Access the MBean Inspector page by
entering the following URL in your browser:
http://<server>[:port]/jmx-console/
HtmlAdaptor?action=inspectMBean&name=Topaz%3Aservice%3DMeta-Data+
Manager
The default port number is 8080. If this port is incorrect, consult your
system administrator for the correct port number.
On the MBean Inspector page, click the Invoke button next to the operation
showMetaDataDBMapping. The bean returns a list of fields in each sample.
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Data Returned
The same data is returned whether the request is made from a browser or
with the Web Service. With a browser, the data resides in the response body,
and for the Web Service, the data resides in the return object.
Web Browser Response Body
When the query is submitted from a browser, the response CSV or HTML
contains the data, or error code and message. If the number of rows to be
returned exceeds the maximum, the last row of the data is Returned X of Y
rows, where X is the number of rows returned and Y is the actual number of
rows that fulfil the conditions of the query. If there is an error at the engine
level, the HTTP success code is returned, but the body of the response is
<error code>, <error message>.
Web Service Return Object
The Web Service return object contains the following:
➤
retval. The data or an error message.
➤
errorCode. The error code (type int). Possible error codes are:
➤
300
➤
0 - Success
➤
100 - Authorization error
➤
101 - Processing error
➤
102 - Open API has been disabled
origRowCount. The actual number of rows the query should have returned
(type int). If the number of rows to be returned exceeds the maximum, the
origRowCount field is set to the actual number of rows that the query would
have returned had the maximum not been exceeded.
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
Querying with a Browser
When querying with a browser, the getData service is called with the URL:
http://<server>[:port]/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=<username>&password=<password>&qu
ery=<query>
or with the optional result type parameter:
http://<server>[:port]/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=<username>&password=<password>&qu
ery=<query>&resultType=csv
The port specification is only necessary for non-standard installations.
Consult your system administrator for the correct port number.
The default return type is HTML. If resultType=csv is specified, a comma
separated values file is returned.
Using the Web Service
The API Web Service enables submitting a query consisting of a username,
password, and an SQL-like select statement. The engine returns an error
description if it cannot parse the statement or if there is a problem running
the query. If there is no error, the results of the query are returned.
SOAP programmers can access the WSDL at:
http://<server>[:port]/topaz/gdeopenapi/services/GdeWsOpenAPI?wsdl
The port specification is only necessary for non-standard installations.
Consult your system administrator for the correct port number.
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Supported SQL Syntax
The language supported is a subset of SQL and supports these keywords,
modifiers, and operators:
302
➤
SELECT
➤
WHERE
➤
FROM
➤
TOP
➤
HAVING
➤
Aliasing with the AS keyword
➤
Logical operators OR , AND , NOT
➤
DISTINCT modifier
➤
IN operator. Inner selects can be used to return the values for the IN
operator.
➤
BETWEEN operator
➤
IS NULL (IS NOT NULL is not supported)
➤
LIKE. The wildcard character is the asterisk (*). Do not use the percent sign
(%). The asterisk can not be used by itself (LIKE *). It must be used with
other characters.
➤
Mathematical operators: +, -, *, /, (, )
➤
Comparators: =, IS, !=, <>, >, >=, <, <=
➤
Functions: MAX, MIN, SUM, COUNT, AVG, STDDEV, SUMOFSQR, LOG,
CEIL, FLOOR, MOD, SQRT, REPLACENULL (equivalent to Oracle’s NVL and
Microsoft SQL Server’s ISNULL), IF, and the “byTime Function” described on
page 305.
➤
ORDER BY and the ASC and DESC modifiers
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
Query Limitations
The following limitations apply to queries submitted to the service:
➤
Only one monitor type can be selected in a single query.
➤
The asterisk (*) is not supported as a wildcard character except in
combination with the LIKE operator. It is supported as the multiplication
operator.
➤
Inner selects and joins are not supported, with one exception: an inner
select can be used to return the values for an IN clause.
➤
The ORDER BY clause requires a column number, for example ORDER BY 1.
ORDER BY column name is not supported.
➤
The engine requires that queries contain a time limitation (that is, a
condition for the time_stamp field) in the WHERE clause.
➤
The GROUP BY clause is not supported. It is unnecessary because the engine
treats all fields that do not have an aggregate function as GROUP BY fields.
➤
When manually defining a filter that consists of strings containing white
space or special characters (for example, where bb_guid IN (a b, c)), you must
enclose the white space or special character string with quotes (for example,
where bb_guid IN (‘a b’, c)). When you create filters on the Filter Builder page,
HP Business Availability Center automatically adds the quotes. Special
characters are defined as any characters other than digits, letters, and the
following characters: "_", "$", "#".
➤
When defining a filter that consists of strings containing one or more single
quote characters, you must add a second single quote character beside each
instance. For example, change szTransactionName = ('Login_to_O'brien') to
szTransactionName = ('Login_to_O''brien').
➤
The columns in the returned data are labeled Column 0, Column 1, and so on.
To return meaningful column labels, use the SQL AS operator. For example,
Select time_stamp as TimeStamp. With this use of the AS operator, the
column label is TimeStamp.
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Date-Time Values
Time in queries and return data is specified in seconds since January 1, 1970.
You can use Microsoft Excel to understand the time values.
Time is most commonly used for time stamp fields.
To get a GMT time for use in a query, enter the date and time in a
Date-formatted cell and in another cell, formatted as General, enter the
formula:
=(<date cell> - 25569 ) * 86400
To correct for a local time zone, add the time zone offset times 3600 seconds
to the result. For example, for Central Europe (GMT + 2):
=(<date cell> - 25569 ) * 86400 + ( 2 * 3600 )
To view a time value from a query as a GMT date in Excel, use a Date format
for the cell and enter the formula:
=<time stamp> / 86400 + 25569
To correct for a local time zone, subtract the time zone offset times 3600
seconds from the time stamp. For example, for the Eastern United States,
standard time (GMT - 3):
=(<time stamp> - ( -3 * 3600 ) )/ 86400 + 25569
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byTime Function
The Generic Reporting Engine SQL supports the function byTime, which
returns data grouped by time periods. For example, if you build a query that
returns the average response time of a transaction for the past day, without
the byTime function one value would be returned; using the byTime
function, you could request to view the average response time of the
transaction for each hour of the past day, in which case a value would be
returned for each hour of the past 24 hours.
The function syntax is:
byTime(<timefield >, <step value>, <number of step>, <offset>)
Argument
Description
timefield
Usually a timestamp field
step value
One of:
10 - Second
20 - Minute
30 - Hour
40 - Day
50 - Week
60 - Month
70 - Quarter
80 - Year
number of step
The number of the units specified in step value to
group.
offset
Time zone offset from GMT in hours. Positive
numbers indicate time zones East of GMT. Negative
numbers indicate time zones West of GMT.
For example, to return one value for each 3 days, corrected to two hours East
of GMT:
byTime(time_stamp, 40, 3, 2)
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Query Examples
Below are several examples of query URLs that retrieve different types of
data from the database.
Example of ss_t Sample
This example illustrates retrieving the average value for SiteScope samples
on a given measurement and monitor.
http://myServer/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=admin&password=admin&query=select
szMeasurementName, szMonitorName, avg(dValue) from ss_t where
u_iStatus=1 and time_stamp > 123456 and szMeasurementName =
‘myMeasurmentName’ and szMonitorName = ‘myMonitorName’
Example of trans_t Sample
This example illustrates retrieving the average response time, grouped by
minutes and offset to GMT + 3 for Springfield_infra_ems_login transactions in
the Springfield_Location profile on for a given period from BPM data.
http://myServer/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=admin&password=admin&query=select
byTime(time_stamp, 20, 1, 3.0), profile_name as ProfileName,
szTransactionName as TransactionName, AVG(dResponseTime) from trans_t
where time_stamp>=1126594800.64 and time_stamp<1126596000.64 and
profile_name='Springfield_Location' and
szTransactionName='Springfield_infra_ems_login'
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Example of rum_server_t Sample
This example illustrates retrieving a list of all rum_server_t samples in a
given day that failed on a specified server:
http://myServer/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=admin&password=admin&query=select
time_stamp, engine_name, server_name from rum_server_t where
availability=0 and total_hits > 0 and time_stamp > 1041379200 and time_stamp
< 1136197020 and server_name = ‘myServerName’
Example of rum_page_t Sample
This example illustrates retrieving the total server time for each URL as
measured by RUM.
http://myServer/topaz/gdeopenapi/
GdeOpenApi?method=getData&user=admin&password=admin&query=select
page_url, sum(tot_server_time) from rum_page_t where time_stamp >
1041379200 and time_stamp < 1136197020 &resultType=csv
Legacy Queries
From HP Business Availability Center version 6.0, it is possible to write SQL
queries directly on samples, as described in the previous sections. Customers
who used the previous version of the data engine API can use the
information in this section to maintain older reports.
Structure of the Query
The query begins with the URL of the OpenAPI.jsp: http://<server_name>/
topaz/openapi/OpenAPI.jsp
Following this is a series of query parameter=value pairs. The pairs are
separated with an ampersand (&). You build the query using required and
optional parameters.
You can also add filter parameters. For details, see “Filter Parameters” on
page 318.
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
➤
Required Parameters. The following parameters are required:
username
The name of the HP Business Availability Center user
running the query.
password
The password of the HP Business Availability Center user
running the query.
function
The type of the data to receive. One of:
transactions – Business Process Monitor response time data
transactions_breakdown – Business Process Monitor
transaction breakdown data
sitescope – SiteScope measurement data
routings – WebTrace routing data
hops – WebTrace hop data
transactions_error – Business Process Monitor transaction
error data
alerts – Business Process Monitor alert data
components_breakdown – Business Process Monitor
component breakdown data
rowDataType
The type of aggregation to use. One of:
row – raw data
hour – hourly aggregated data
day – daily aggregated data
The type of aggregation cannot be a larger unit than the one
specified with the optional parameter, stepValueType.
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profileIds
The IDs of the profiles for which to get data. Separate
multiple IDs with a comma (,).
For example: profileIds=2,7,9
To extract a profile’s ID from the database:
1 Open the page http://<servername>:8080/jmx-console/
index.jsp in a Web browser, where <servername>
represents the name of the HP Business Availability
Center server.
2 In the Topaz list, click the link service=OAPI Services.
3 Invoke com.mercury.infra.db.tools.oapiservices.
ProfileMapping getProfiles() to retrieve the profile ID
information.
Time range
either
from and to
or
lastPeriod
Either use from and to to specify the start and end of the
period, or use lastPeriod to specify the period or periods
ending at the time the query is called.
The time format for from and to is: dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss
lastPeriod is one of:
hour
day
week
month
quarter
year
To specify more that one unit of lastPeriod, use the
parameter numStepUnit together with lastPeriod.
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➤
Optional Parameters. The following parameters are optional:
numStepUnit
Used with lastPeriod to indicate the number of periods
included in the data. For example, get data for the last two
days with: lastPeriod=day&numStepUnit=2
resultType
The output file format. One of:
html
xml
csv
The default is html.
stepValueType
The unit of time by which the data is grouped. One of:
minute
hour
day
week
month
Use stepValueType in conjunction with stepValue to see a
larger grouping than that specified with rowDataType.
stepValue
The number of the time units specified by stepValueType by
which to group. For example,
stepValueType=hour&stepValue=8 groups the data by 8-hour
periods.
The default is 1.
dateFormat
The format for date value output (that is, the way the date
and time are displayed in the report). For example,
MM/dd/yyyy%20HH:mm:ss
The %20 indicates a space. (A space is ASCII character
number 32, written 20 in hexadecimal.)
timeZone
310
A time zone specification in the form:
&timezone=<time zone value from below time zone list>
For example, &timezone=Europe/London
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
Time Zone List
ACT
Antarctica/McMurdo
Etc/GMT0
AET
Antarctica/Palmer
Etc/Greenwich
AGT
Antarctica/Rothera
Etc/UCT
ART
Antarctica/South_Pole
Etc/UTC
AST
Antarctica/Syowa
Etc/Universal
Africa/Abidjan
Antarctica/Vostok
Etc/Zulu
Africa/Accra
Arctic/Longyearbyen
Europe/Amsterdam
Africa/Addis_Ababa
Asia/Aden
Europe/Andorra
Africa/Algiers
Asia/Almaty
Europe/Athens
Africa/Asmera
Asia/Amman
Europe/Belfast
Africa/Bamako
Asia/Anadyr
Europe/Belgrade
Africa/Bangui
Asia/Aqtau
Europe/Berlin
Africa/Banjul
Asia/Aqtobe
Europe/Bratislava
Africa/Bissau
Asia/Ashgabat
Europe/Brussels
Africa/Blantyre
Asia/Ashkhabad
Europe/Bucharest
Africa/Brazzaville
Asia/Baghdad
Europe/Budapest
Africa/Bujumbura
Asia/Bahrain
Europe/Chisinau
Africa/Cairo
Asia/Baku
Europe/Copenhagen
Africa/Casablanca
Asia/Bangkok
Europe/Dublin
Africa/Ceuta
Asia/Beirut
Europe/Gibraltar
Africa/Conakry
Asia/Bishkek
Europe/Helsinki
Africa/Dakar
Asia/Brunei
Europe/Istanbul
Africa/Dar_es_Salaam
Asia/Calcutta
Europe/Kaliningrad
Africa/Djibouti
Asia/Choibalsan
Europe/Kiev
Africa/Douala
Asia/Chongqing
Europe/Lisbon
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
312
Africa/El_Aaiun
Asia/Chungking
Europe/Ljubljana
Africa/Freetown
Asia/Colombo
Europe/London
Africa/Gaborone
Asia/Dacca
Europe/Luxembourg
Africa/Harare
Asia/Damascus
Europe/Madrid
Africa/Johannesburg
Asia/Dhaka
Europe/Malta
Africa/Kampala
Asia/Dili
Europe/Minsk
Africa/Khartoum
Asia/Dubai
Europe/Monaco
Africa/Kigali
Asia/Dushanbe
Europe/Moscow
Africa/Kinshasa
Asia/Gaza
Europe/Nicosia
Africa/Lagos
Asia/Harbin
Europe/Oslo
Africa/Libreville
Asia/Hong_Kong
Europe/Paris
Africa/Lome
Asia/Hovd
Europe/Prague
Africa/Luanda
Asia/Irkutsk
Europe/Riga
Africa/Lubumbashi
Asia/Istanbul
Europe/Rome
Africa/Lusaka
Asia/Jakarta
Europe/Samara
Africa/Malabo
Asia/Jayapura
Europe/San_Marino
Africa/Maputo
Asia/Jerusalem
Europe/Sarajevo
Africa/Maseru
Asia/Kabul
Europe/Simferopol
Africa/Mbabane
Asia/Kamchatka
Europe/Skopje
Africa/Mogadishu
Asia/Karachi
Europe/Sofia
Africa/Monrovia
Asia/Kashgar
Europe/Stockholm
Africa/Nairobi
Asia/Katmandu
Europe/Tallinn
Africa/Ndjamena
Asia/Krasnoyarsk
Europe/Tirane
Africa/Niamey
Asia/Kuala_Lumpur
Europe/Tiraspol
Africa/Nouakchott
Asia/Kuching
Europe/Uzhgorod
Africa/Ouagadougou
Asia/Kuwait
Europe/Vaduz
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
Africa/Porto-Novo
Asia/Macao
Europe/Vatican
Africa/Sao_Tome
Asia/Macau
Europe/Vienna
Africa/Timbuktu
Asia/Magadan
Europe/Vilnius
Africa/Tripoli
Asia/Makassar
Europe/Warsaw
Africa/Tunis
Asia/Manila
Europe/Zagreb
Africa/Windhoek
Asia/Muscat
Europe/Zaporozhye
America/Adak
Asia/Nicosia
Europe/Zurich
America/Anchorage
Asia/Novosibirsk
GB
America/Anguilla
Asia/Omsk
GB-Eire
America/Antigua
Asia/Oral
GMT
America/Araguaina
Asia/Phnom_Penh
GMT0
America/Aruba
Asia/Pontianak
Greenwich
America/Asuncion
Asia/Pyongyang
HST
America/Atka
Asia/Qatar
Hongkong
America/Barbados
Asia/Qyzylorda
IET
America/Belem
Asia/Rangoon
IST
America/Belize
Asia/Riyadh
Iceland
America/Boa_Vista
Asia/Riyadh87
Indian/Antananarivo
America/Bogota
Asia/Riyadh88
Indian/Chagos
America/Boise
Asia/Riyadh89
Indian/Christmas
America/Buenos_Aires
Asia/Saigon
Indian/Cocos
America/Cambridge_Bay Asia/Sakhalin
Indian/Comoro
America/Cancun
Asia/Samarkand
Indian/Kerguelen
America/Caracas
Asia/Seoul
Indian/Mahe
America/Catamarca
Asia/Shanghai
Indian/Maldives
America/Cayenne
Asia/Singapore
Indian/Mauritius
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
314
America/Cayman
Asia/Taipei
Indian/Mayotte
America/Chicago
Asia/Tashkent
Indian/Reunion
America/Chihuahua
Asia/Tbilisi
Iran
America/Cordoba
Asia/Tehran
Israel
America/Costa_Rica
Asia/Tel_Aviv
JST
America/Cuiaba
Asia/Thimbu
Jamaica
America/Curacao
Asia/Thimphu
Japan
America/Danmarkshavn Asia/Tokyo
Kwajalein
America/Dawson
Libya
Asia/Ujung_Pandang
America/Dawson_Creek Asia/Ulaanbaatar
MET
America/Denver
Asia/Ulan_Bator
MIT
America/Detroit
Asia/Urumqi
MST
America/Dominica
Asia/Vientiane
MST7MDT
America/Edmonton
Asia/Vladivostok
Mexico/BajaNorte
America/Eirunepe
Asia/Yakutsk
Mexico/BajaSur
America/El_Salvador
Asia/Yekaterinburg
Mexico/General
America/Ensenada
Asia/Yerevan
Mideast/Riyadh87
America/Fort_Wayne
Atlantic/Azores
Mideast/Riyadh88
America/Fortaleza
Atlantic/Bermuda
Mideast/Riyadh89
America/Glace_Bay
Atlantic/Canary
NET
America/Godthab
Atlantic/Cape_Verde
NST
America/Goose_Bay
Atlantic/Faeroe
NZ
America/Grand_Turk
Atlantic/Jan_Mayen
NZ-CHAT
America/Grenada
Atlantic/Madeira
Navajo
America/Guadeloupe
Atlantic/Reykjavik
PLT
America/Guatemala
Atlantic/South_Georgia PNT
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
America/Guayaquil
Atlantic/St_Helena
PRC
America/Guyana
Atlantic/Stanley
PRT
America/Halifax
Australia/ACT
PST
America/Havana
Australia/Adelaide
PST8PDT
America/Hermosillo
Australia/Brisbane
Pacific/Apia
America/Indiana/
Indianapolis
Australia/Broken_Hill
Pacific/Auckland
America/Indiana/Knox
Australia/Canberra
Pacific/Chatham
America/Indiana/
Marengo
Australia/Darwin
Pacific/Easter
America/Indiana/Vevay Australia/Hobart
Pacific/Efate
America/Indianapolis
Australia/LHI
Pacific/Enderbury
America/Inuvik
Australia/Lindeman
Pacific/Fakaofo
America/Iqaluit
Australia/Lord_Howe
Pacific/Fiji
America/Jamaica
Australia/Melbourne
Pacific/Funafuti
America/Jujuy
Australia/NSW
Pacific/Galapagos
America/Juneau
Australia/North
Pacific/Gambier
America/Kentucky/
Louisville
Australia/Perth
Pacific/Guadalcanal
America/Kentucky/
Monticello
Australia/Queensland
Pacific/Guam
America/Knox_IN
Australia/South
Pacific/Honolulu
America/La_Paz
Australia/Sydney
Pacific/Johnston
America/Lima
Australia/Tasmania
Pacific/Kiritimati
America/Los_Angeles
Australia/Victoria
Pacific/Kosrae
America/Louisville
Australia/West
Pacific/Kwajalein
America/Maceio
Australia/Yancowinna
Pacific/Majuro
America/Managua
BET
Pacific/Marquesas
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
316
America/Manaus
BST
Pacific/Midway
America/Martinique
Brazil/Acre
Pacific/Nauru
America/Mazatlan
Brazil/DeNoronha
Pacific/Niue
America/Mendoza
Brazil/East
Pacific/Norfolk
America/Menominee
Brazil/West
Pacific/Noumea
America/Merida
CAT
Pacific/Pago_Pago
America/Mexico_City
CET
Pacific/Palau
America/Miquelon
CNT
Pacific/Pitcairn
America/Monterrey
CST
Pacific/Ponape
America/Montevideo
CST6CDT
Pacific/Port_Moresby
America/Montreal
CTT
Pacific/Rarotonga
America/Montserrat
Canada/Atlantic
Pacific/Saipan
America/Nassau
Canada/Central
Pacific/Samoa
America/New_York
Canada/
East-Saskatchewan
Pacific/Tahiti
America/Nipigon
Canada/Eastern
Pacific/Tarawa
America/Nome
Canada/Mountain
Pacific/Tongatapu
America/Noronha
Canada/Newfoundland Pacific/Truk
America/North_Dakota/ Canada/Pacific
Center
Pacific/Wake
America/Panama
Canada/Saskatchewan
Pacific/Wallis
America/Pangnirtung
Canada/Yukon
Pacific/Yap
America/Paramaribo
Chile/Continental
Poland
America/Phoenix
Chile/EasterIsland
Portugal
America/Port-au-Prince
Cuba
ROK
America/Port_of_Spain
EAT
SST
America/Porto_Acre
ECT
Singapore
Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
America/Porto_Velho
EET
SystemV/AST4
America/Puerto_Rico
EST
SystemV/AST4ADT
America/Rainy_River
EST5EDT
SystemV/CST6
America/Rankin_Inlet
Egypt
SystemV/CST6CDT
America/Recife
Eire
SystemV/EST5
America/Regina
Etc/GMT
SystemV/EST5EDT
America/Rio_Branco
Etc/GMT+0
SystemV/HST10
America/Rosario
Etc/GMT+1
SystemV/MST7
America/Santiago
Etc/GMT+10
SystemV/MST7MDT
America/Santo_DomingoEtc/GMT+11
SystemV/PST8
America/Sao_Paulo
Etc/GMT+12
SystemV/PST8PDT
America/Scoresbysund
Etc/GMT+2
SystemV/YST9
America/Shiprock
Etc/GMT+3
SystemV/YST9YDT
America/St_Johns
Etc/GMT+4
Turkey
America/St_Kitts
Etc/GMT+5
UCT
America/St_Lucia
Etc/GMT+6
US/Alaska
America/St_Thomas
Etc/GMT+7
US/Aleutian
America/St_Vincent
Etc/GMT+8
US/Arizona
America/Swift_Current
Etc/GMT+9
US/Central
America/Tegucigalpa
Etc/GMT-0
US/East-Indiana
America/Thule
Etc/GMT-1
US/Eastern
America/Thunder_Bay
Etc/GMT-10
US/Hawaii
America/Tijuana
Etc/GMT-11
US/Indiana-Starke
America/Tortola
Etc/GMT-12
US/Michigan
America/Vancouver
Etc/GMT-13
US/Mountain
America/Virgin
Etc/GMT-14
US/Pacific
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
America/Whitehorse
Etc/GMT-2
US/Pacific-New
America/Winnipeg
Etc/GMT-3
US/Samoa
America/Yakutat
Etc/GMT-4
UTC
America/Yellowknife
Etc/GMT-5
Universal
Antarctica/Casey
Etc/GMT-6
VST
Antarctica/Davis
Etc/GMT-7
W-SU
Antarctica/
DumontDUrville
Etc/GMT-8
WET
Antarctica/Mawson
Etc/GMT-9
Zulu
Filter Parameters
There can be one filters clause in the query. It is not required. If there is
more than one filter in the clause, the filters are separated by a semicolon (;).
A filter consists of a report column name, a filter type, the number of
patterns in the list, and a list of patterns. Each element in a filter is separated
by a semicolon (;).
For example:
filters=MonitorTitle;in;2;9,12;Measurement;in;1;18
means:
select where (MonitorTitle equals 9 or 12) and (Measurement equals 18)
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The following filter parameters are available:
General Filter Types
These types can be used with numerical or text columns.
in – Data is included in the report if it equals one of the
items in the list of patterns.
not_in – Data is included in the report if it does not equal
any item in the list of patterns.
Text Filter Types
This type can be used with text columns.
like – Data is included in the report if it matches the pattern.
When like is used, the number of patterns in the list must be
one (1).
The wildcard, asterisk (*), can be used with like.
For example:
filters=Host Name;like;1;ServerNum*
Numeric Filter Types
These types can be used with numerical columns.
bigger
smaller
equals
Query Examples
Example 1:
http://<server_name>/topaz/openapi/OpenAPI.jsp?
username=fitzwilliam&password=darcy&function=transactions&profileIds=33&
lastPeriod=hour&rowDataType=raw&dateFormat=MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss
Example 2:
http://<server_name>/topaz/openapi/OpenAPI.jsp?
username=fitzwilliam&password=darcy&function=transactions&profileIds=33&
from=10/12/2002 14:00:00&to=10/12/2002 15:00:00& rowDataType=raw&
dateFormat=MM/dd/yyyy%20HH:mm:ss
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Chapter 8 • Working with the Generic Reporting Engine API
Example 3:
http://<server_name>/topaz/openapi/
OpenAPI.jsp?username=fitzwilliam&password=darcy&function=sitescope&profileIds=3
5&lastPeriod=day&numStepUnit=2&&rowDataType=hour&dateFormat=MM/dd/
yyyy%20HH:mm:ss&filters=MonitorTitle;in;1;9;Measurement;in;1;18&stepValueType=h
our&stepValue=6
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9
The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Note to HP Software-as-a-Service customers: For details on how to use the
UCMDB Web Service API in an HP Software-as-a-Service environment,
contact HP Software-as-a-Service Support.
This chapter explains how third-party or custom tools can use the
HP Universal CMDB Web Service API to extract data and calculations and to
write data to the UCMDB (Universal Configuration Management database).
Use this chapter in conjunction with the UCMDB schema documentation,
available in the online Documentation Library.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Conventions on page 322
➤
Using the HP Universal CMDB Web Service API on page 322
➤
HP Universal CMDB Web Service API Reference on page 324
➤
Returning Unambiguous Topology Map Elements on page 325
Tasks
➤
Call the Web Service on page 328
➤
Query the UCMDB on page 328
➤
Update the UCMDB on page 333
➤
Query the UCMDB Class Model on page 335
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Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
➤
Query for Impact Analysis on page 337
Reference
➤
UCMDB Query Methods on page 337
➤
UCMDB Update Methods on page 352
➤
UCMDB Impact Analysis Methods on page 355
➤
Use Cases on page 357
➤
Examples on page 359
➤
UCMDB General Parameters on page 390
➤
UCMDB Output Parameters on page 394
Concepts
Conventions
This chapter uses the following conventions:
➤
UCMDB refers to the Universal Configuration Management database itself.
HP Universal CMDB refers to the application.
➤
UCMDB elements and method arguments are spelled in the case in which
they are specified in the schema. An element or argument to a method is
not capitalized. For example, a relation is an element of type Relation passed
to a method.
Using the HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API is used to integrate applications
with the Universal CMDB (UCMDB). The API provides methods to:
322
➤
add, remove, and update CIs and relations in the CMDB
➤
retrieve information about the class model
➤
retrieve impact analyses
➤
retrieve information about configuration items and relationships
Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Methods for retrieving information about configuration items and
relationships generally use the Topology Query Language (TQL). For details,
see “Topology Query Language” in Model Management.
Users of the HP Universal CMDB Web Service API should be familiar with:
➤
The SOAP specification
➤
An object-oriented programming language such as C++, C# or Java
➤
HP Universal CMDB
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Uses of the API” on page 323
➤
“Permissions” on page 324
Uses of the API
The API is used to fulfill a number of business requirements. For example:
➤
A third-party system can query the class model for information about
available configuration items (CIs).
➤
A third-party asset management tool can update the UCMDB with
information available only to that tool, thereby unifying its data with data
collected by HP applications.
➤
A number of third-party systems can populate the UCMDB to create a
central UCMDB that can track changes and perform impact analysis.
➤
A third-party system can create entities and relations according to its
business logic, and then write the data to the UCMDB to take advantage of
the UCMDB query capabilities.
➤
Other systems, such as the Change Control Management (CCM) system, can
use the Impact Analysis methods for change analysis.
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Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Permissions
The administrator provides login credentials for connecting with the Web
Service. The required credentials depend on whether you are using
HP Universal CMDB as a standalone application or from within HP Business
Availability Center:
➤
HP Universal CMDB standalone. Log in using the credentials of a DDM user
who has been granted permissions on the discovery resources.
For details, see the Model Management PDF.
➤
HP Universal CMDB embedded in HP Business Availability Center. Log in
using the credentials of a Business Availability Center user. The user must
have been granted the relevant permissions on the HP Universal CMDB
resource in Business Availability Center.
HP Universal CMDB Web Service API Reference
For full documentation on the request and response structures, refer to the
HP UCMDB Web Service API Reference. These files are located in the
following folder:
\\<HP Business Availability Center root directory>\AppServer\
webapps\site.war\amdocs\eng\doc_lib\Solutions_and_Integrations\
CMDB_Schema\webframe.html
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Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Returning Unambiguous Topology Map Elements
Query methods that return the data in topology or topologyMap elements
search the system for a match of a TQL query. The following diagrams
illustrate how the resulting topology and topologyMap structures are affected
by the use of unique labels in the query.
Labels are user-specified names in the query for relations and configuration
items in specific configurations. The labels specified in the query are used as
the node labels in the returned map. If no labels are specified, the CI or
Relation Type Name is used as the label in the resulting map. The following
example illustrates specifying labels IISHost and DBHost in place of the
default Host label, and labels ContainerIIS and ContainsDB in place of the
default Container Link label.
The following example represents a small IT universe model. There are three
hosts: H1, H2, H3, which host Web servers (WS) and database managers
(DB). WS1 resides on H1. DB1 and WS2 both reside on H2. DB2 resides on
H3.
This query is defined using the default labels:
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Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
The result of running this TQL query on the IT universe can be a Topology or
TopologyMap element.
Topology Response
CIs: H1, H2, H3, WS1, WS2, DB1, DB2
Relations: H1-WS1, H1-H2, H2-H3, WS2-H2, DB1-H2, DB2-H3
TopologyMap Response
CINode:
label: Host
CIs: H1, H2
CINode:
label: Host
CIs: H2, H3
CINode:
label: DB
CIs: DB1, DB2
CINode:
label: Webserver
CIs: IIS
relationNode:
label: talk
relations: H1-H2, H2-H3
relationNode:
label: Container Link
relations: WS1-H1, WS2-H2
relationNode:
label: Container Link
relations: DB2-H3, DB1-H2
In the above TopologyMap response, the first two CINodes contain identical
Host labels, corresponding to the two Host CIs in the query. Both of these
CINodes contain host H2, with no indication of why H2 is duplicated.
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Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
The last two relationNodes contain identical Contained labels, corresponding
to the two Container link relations in the query.
The duplications occur because no unique labels are specified in the query,
resulting in the use of default labels (the type names Host and Container) in
the map. To extract a more usable map, define queries with unique labels for
each configuration to be matched, as shown in the following query:
The topology result is identical to that of the TQL without unique labels. The
topologyMap result, however, is different: Each label is now unique.
CINode:
label: IISHOST
CIs: H1, H2
CINode:
label: DBHOST
CIs: H2, H3
...
relationNode:
label: ContainerIIS
relations: WS1-H1, WS2-H2
relationNode:
label: ContainerDB
relations: DB2-H3, DB1-H2
In this map, it is clear why H2 is returned twice. The unique labels indicate
that it is returned once as a Web server host and once as a database host.
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Tip: Wherever possible in the UCMDB, apply unique, user-defined labels to
specific configurations.
Tasks
Call the Web Service
You use standard SOAP programming techniques in the HP Universal CMDB
Web Service to enable calling server-side methods. If the statement cannot
be parsed or if there is a problem invoking the method, the API methods
throw a SoapFault exception. When a SoapFault exception is thrown, the
UCMDB populates one or more of the error message, error code, and
exception message fields. If there is no error, the results of the invocation are
returned.
SOAP programmers can access the WSDL at:
http://<server>[:port]/axis2/services/UcmdbService?wsdl
The port specification is only necessary for non-standard installations.
Consult your system administrator for the correct port number.
The URL for calling the service is:
http://<server>[:port]/axis2/services/UcmdbService
For examples of connecting to the UCMDB, see “Use Cases” on page 357.
Query the UCMDB
The UCMDB is queried using the APIs described in “UCMDB Query
Methods” on page 337.
The queries and the returned UCMDB elements always contain real
UCMDB IDs.
For examples of the use of the query methods, see “Query Example” on
page 363.
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This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Just In Time Response Calculation” on page 329
➤
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329
➤
“Specifying Properties to Return” on page 330
➤
“Concrete Properties” on page 331
➤
“Derived Properties” on page 331
➤
“Naming Properties” on page 332
➤
“Other Property Specification Elements” on page 332
Just In Time Response Calculation
For all query methods, the UCMDB server calculates the values requested by
the query method when the request is received, and returns results based on
the latest data. The result is always calculated at the time the request is
received, even if the TQL query is active and there exists a previously
calculated result. Therefore, the results of running a query returned to the
client application may be different to the results of the same query
displayed on the user interface.
Tip: If your application uses the results of a given query more than once and
the data is not expected to change significantly between uses of the result
data, you can improve performance by having the client application store
the data rather than repeatedly running the query.
Processing Large Responses
The response to a query always includes the structures for the data requested
by the query method, even if no actual data is being transmitted. For many
methods where the data is a collection or map, the response also includes
the ChunkInfo structure, comprised of chunksKey and numberOfChunks. The
numberOfChunks field indicates the number of chunks containing data that
must be retrieved.
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The maximum transmission size of data is set by the system administrator. If
the data returned from the query is larger than the maximum size, the data
structures in the first response contain no meaningful information, and the
value of the numberOfChunks field is 2 or greater. If the data is not larger
than the maximum, the numberOfChunks field is 0 (zero), and the data is
transmitted in the first response. Therefore, in processing a response, check
the numberOfChunks value first. If it is greater than 1, discard the data in the
transmission and request the chunks of data. Otherwise, use the data in the
response.
For information on handling chunked data, see “pullTopologyMapChunks”
on page 350 and “releaseChunks” on page 351.
Specifying Properties to Return
CIs and relations generally have many properties. Some methods that return
collections or graphs of these items accept input parameters that specify
which property values to return with each item that matches the query. The
UCMDB does not return empty properties. Therefore, the response to a
query may have fewer properties than requested in the query.
This section describes the types of sets used to specify the properties to
return.
Properties can be referenced in two ways:
➤
By their names
➤
By using names of predefined properties rules. Predefined properties rules
are used by the UCMDB to create a list of real property names.
When an application references properties by name, it passes a PropertiesList
element.
Tip: Whenever possible, use PropertiesList to specify the names of the
properties in which you are interested, rather than a rule-based set. The use
of predefined properties rules nearly always results in returning more
properties than needed, and bears a performance price.
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There are two types of predefined properties: qualifier properties and simple
properties.
➤
Qualifier properties. Use when the client application should pass a
QualifierProperties element (a list of qualifiers that can be applied to
properties). The UCMDB converts the list of qualifiers passed by the client
application to the list of the properties to which at least one of the qualifiers
applies. The values of these properties are returned with the CI or Relation
elements.
➤
Simple properties. To use simple rule-based properties, the client application
passes a SimplePredefinedProperty or SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty
element. These elements contain the name of the rule by which the UCMDB
generates the list of properties to return. The rules that can be specified in a
SimplePredefinedProperty or SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty element are
CONCRETE, DERIVED, and NAMING.
Concrete Properties
Concrete properties are the set of properties defined for the specified CIT.
The properties added by derived classes are not returned for instances of
those derived classes.
A collection of instances returned by a method may consist of instances of a
CIT specified in the method invocation and instances of CITs that inherit
from that CIT. The derived CITs inherit the properties of the specified CIT.
In addition, the derived CITs extend the parent CIT by adding properties.
Example of Concrete Properties
CIT T1 has properties P1 and P2. CIT T11 inherits from T1 and extends T1
with properties P21 and P22.
The collection of CIs of type T1 includes the instances of T1 and T11. The
concrete properties of all instances in this collection are P1 and P2.
Derived Properties
Derived properties are the set of properties defined for the specified CIT and,
for each derived CIT, the properties added by the derived CIT.
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Example of Derived Properties
Continuing the example from concrete properties, the derived properties of
instances of T1 are P1 and P2. The derived properties of instances of T11 are
P1, P2, P21, and P22.
Naming Properties
The naming properties are display_label and data_name.
Other Property Specification Elements
➤
PredefinedProperties
PredefinedProperties can contain a QualifierProperties element and a
SimplePredefinedProperty element for each of the other possible rules. A
PredefinedProperties set does not necessarily contain all types of lists.
➤
PredefinedTypedProperties
PredefinedTypedProperties is used to apply a different set of properties to
each CIT. PredefinedTypedProperties can contain a QualifierProperties
element and a SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty element for each of the other
applicable rules. Because PredefinedTypedProperties is applied to each CIT
individually, derived properties are not relevant. A PredefinedProperties set
does not necessarily contain all applicable types of lists.
➤
CustomProperties
CustomProperties can contain any combination of the basic PropertiesList
and the rule-based property lists. The properties filter is the union of all the
properties returned by all the lists.
➤
CustomTypedProperties
CustomTypedProperties can contain any combination of the basic
PropertiesList and the applicable rule-based property lists. The properties
filter is the union of all the properties returned by all the lists.
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➤
TypedProperties
TypedProperties is used to pass a different set of properties for each CIT.
TypedProperties is a collection of pairs composed of type names and
properties sets of all types. Each properties set is applied only to the
corresponding type.
Update the UCMDB
You update the UCMD with the update APIs. For details of the API methods,
see “UCMDB Update Methods” on page 352.
For examples of the use of the update methods, see “Update Example” on
page 380.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“UCMDB Update Parameters” on page 333
➤
“Use of ID Types with Update Methods” on page 334
UCMDB Update Parameters
This topic describes the parameters used only by the service’s update
methods. For details, see the schema documentation.
CIsAndRelationsUpdates
The CIsAndRelationsUpdates type consists of CIsForUpdate,
relationsForUpdate, referencedRelations, and referencedCIs. A
CIsAndRelationsUpdates instance does not necessarily include all three
elements.
CIsForUpdate is a CI collection. relationsForUpdate is a Relations collection.
The CI and relation elements in the collections have a props element. When
creating a CI or relation, properties that have either the required attribute or
the key attribute in the CI Type definition must be populated with values.
The items in these collections are updated or created by the method.
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referencedCIs and referencedRelations are collections of CIs that are already
defined in the UCMDB. The elements in the collection are identified with a
temporary ID in conjunction with all the key properties. These items are
used to resolve the identities of CIs and relations for update. They are never
created or updated by the method.
Each of the CI and relation elements in these collections has a properties
collection. New items are created with the property values in these
collections.
Use of ID Types with Update Methods
The following describes ID CITs, and CIs and relations. When the ID is not a
real UCMDB ID, the type and key attributes are required.
Deleting or Updating Configuration Items
A temporary or empty ID may be used by the client when calling a method
to delete or update an item. In this case, the CI type and the key attributes
that identify the CI must be set.
Deleting or Updating Relations
When deleting or updating relations, the relation ID can be empty,
temporary, or real.
If a CI’s ID is temporary, the CI must be passed in the referencedCIs
collection and its key attributes must be specified. For details, see
referencedCIs in the “CIsAndRelationsUpdates” on page 333.
Inserting New Configuration Items into the UCMDB
It is possible to use either an empty ID or a temporary ID to insert a new CI.
However, if the ID is empty, the server cannot return the real UCMDB ID in
the structure createIDsMap because there is no clientID. For details, see
“addCIsAndRelations” on page 352 and “UCMDB Query Methods” on
page 337.
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Inserting New Relations into the UCMDB
The relation ID can be either temporary or empty. However, if the relation is
new but the configuration items on either end of the relation are already
defined in the UCMDB, then those CIs that already exist must be identified
by a real UCMDB ID or be specified in a referencedCIs collection.
Query the UCMDB Class Model
The class model methods return information about CITs and relations. The
class model is configured using the CI Type Manager. For details, see “CI
Type Manager” in Model Management.
For examples of the use of the class model methods, see “Class Model
Example” on page 384.
This section provides information on the following methods that return
information about CITs and relations:
➤
“getClassAncestors” on page 335
➤
“getAllClassesHierarchy” on page 336
➤
“getCmdbClassDefinition” on page 336
getClassAncestors
The getClassAncestors method retrieves the path between the given CIT and
its root, including the root.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
className
The type name. For details, see “Type Name” on
page 392.
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Output
Parameter
Comment
classHierarchy
A collection of pairs of class names and parent class
name.
comments
For internal use only.
getAllClassesHierarchy
The getAllClassesHierarchy method retrieves the entire class model tree.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
Output
Parameter
Comment
classesHierarchy
A collection of pairs of class name and parent class
name.
comments
For internal use only.
getCmdbClassDefinition
The getCmdbClassDefinition method retrieves information about the
specified class.
If you use getCmdbClassDefinition to retrieve the key attributes, you must
also query the parent classes up to the base class. getCmdbClassDefinition
identifies as key attributes only those attributes with the ID_ATTRIBUTE set
in the class definition specified by className. Inherited key attributes are
not recognized as key attributes of the specified class. Therefore, the
complete list of key attributes for the specified class is the union of all the
keys of the class and of all its parents, up to the root.
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Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
className
The type name. For details, see “Type Name” on
page 392.
Output
Parameter
Comment
cmdbClass
The class definition, consisting of name, classType,
displayLabel, description, parentName, qualifiers, and
attributes.
comments
For internal use only.
Query for Impact Analysis
The Identifier in the impact analysis methods points to the service’s response
data. It is unique for the current response and is discarded from the server’s
memory cache after 10 minutes of non-use.
For examples of the use of the impact analysis methods, see “Impact
Analysis Example” on page 386.
Reference
UCMDB Query Methods
This section provides information on the following methods:
➤
“executeTopologyQueryByName” on page 338
➤
“executeTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters” on page 339
➤
“executeTopologyQueryWithParameters” on page 340
➤
“getChangedCIs” on page 340
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➤
“getCINeighbours” on page 341
➤
“getCIsByID” on page 342
➤
“getCIsByType” on page 343
➤
“getFilteredCIsByType” on page 344
➤
“getQueryNameOfView” on page 348
➤
“getTopologyQueryExistingResultByName” on page 349
➤
“getTopologyQueryResultCountByName” on page 349
➤
“pullTopologyMapChunks” on page 350
➤
“releaseChunks” on page 351
executeTopologyQueryByName
The executeTopologyQueryByName method retrieves the topology map that
matches the specified query.
Tip: The map contains more information and is easier to understand if the
label for each CINode and each relationNode in the TQL is unique. For
details, see “Returning Unambiguous Topology Map Elements” on page 325.
Input
338
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
queryName
The name of the TQL in the UCMDB with which to
retrieve the map.
queryTypedProperties
A collection of sets of properties to retrieve to items
of a specific Configuration Item Type.
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Output
Parameter
Comment
topologyMap
For details, see “TopologyMap” on page 395.
executeTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters
The executeTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters method retrieves a
topologyMap element that matches the specified parameterized query.
The values for the query parameters are passed in the parameterizedNodes
argument. The specified TQL must have unique labels defined for each
CINode and each relationNode or the method invocation fails.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
queryName
The name of the parameterized TQL in the UCMDB
for which to get the map.
parameterizedNodes
The conditions each node must meet to be included
in the query results.
queryTypedProperties
A collection of sets of properties to retrieve to items
of a specific Configuration Item Type.
Output
Parameter
Comment
topologyMap
For details, see “TopologyMap” on page 395.
chunkInfo
For details, see: “ChunkInfo” on page 395,
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
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executeTopologyQueryWithParameters
The executeTopologyQueryWithParameters method retrieves a topologyMap
element that matches the parameterized query.
The query is passed in the queryXML argument. The values for the query
parameters are passed in the parameterizedNodes argument. The TQL must
have unique labels defined for each CINode and each relationNode.
The executeTopologyQueryWithParameters method is used to pass ad-hoc
queries, rather than accessing a query defined in the UCMDB. You can use
this method when you do not have access to the UCMDB user interface to
define a query, or when you do not want to save the query to the database.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
queryXML
An XML representation of a TQL.
parameterizedNodes
The conditions each node must meet to be included
in the query results.
Output
Parameter
Comment
topologyMap
For details, see “TopologyMap” on page 395.
chunkInfo
For details, see “ChunkInfo” on page 395 and
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
getChangedCIs
The getChangedCIs method returns the change data for all CIs related to the
specified CIs.
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Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
ids
The list of the IDs of the root CIs whose related CIs
are checked for changes.
Only real UCMDB IDs are valid in this collection.
fromDate
The beginning of the period in which to check if CIs
changed.
toDate
The end of the period in which to check if CIs
changed.
Output
Parameter
Comment
changeDataInfo
Zero or more collections of ChangedDataInfo
elements.
getCINeighbours
The getCINeighbours method returns the immediate neighbors of the
specified CI.
For example, if the query is on the neighbors of CI A, and CI A contains CI B
which uses CI C, CI B is returned, but CI C is not. That is, only neighbors of
the specified type are returned.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
ID
The ID of the CI with which to retrieve the
neighbors. This must be a real UCMDB ID.
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Parameter
Comment
neighbourType
The CIT name of the neighbors to retrieve.
Neighbors of the specified type and of types derived
from that type are returned.
For details, see “Type Name” on page 392.
CIProperties
The data to be returned on each configuration item,
called the Query Layout in the user interface.
For details, see “TypedProperties” on page 333.
relationProperties
The data to be returned on each relation (called the
Query Layout in the user interface). For details, see
“TypedProperties” on page 333.
Output
Parameter
Comment
topology
For details, see “Topology” on page 394.
comments
For internal use only.
getCIsByID
The getCIsByID method retrieves configuration items by their UCMDB IDs.
Input
342
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
CIsTypedProperties
A typed properties collection. For details, see
“TypedProperties” on page 333.
IDs
Only real UCMDB IDs are valid in this collection.
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Output
Parameter
Comment
CIs
Collection of CI elements.
chunkInfo
For details, see: “ChunkInfo” on page 395,
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
getCIsByType
The getCIsByType method returns the collection of configuration items of
the specified type and of all types that inherit from the specified type.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
type
The class name. For details, see “Type Name” on
page 392.
properties
The data to be returned on each configuration item.
For details, see “CustomProperties” on page 332.
Output
Parameter
Comment
CIs
Collection of CI elements.
chunkInfo
For details, see: “ChunkInfo” on page 395,
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
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getFilteredCIsByType
The getFilteredCIsByType method retrieves the CIs of the specified type that
meet the conditions used by the method. A condition is comprised of:
➤
a name field containing the name of a property
➤
an operator field containing a comparison operator
➤
an optional value field containing a value or list of values
Together, they form a Boolean expression:
<item>.property.value [operator] <condition>.value
For example, if the condition name is root_actualdeletionperiod, the
condition value is 40 and the operator is Equal, the Boolean statement is:
<item>.root_actualdeletionperiod.value = = 40
The query returns all items whose root_actualdeletionperiod is 40, assuming
there are no other conditions.
If the conditionsLogicalOperator argument is AND, the query returns the
items that meet all conditions in the conditions collection. If
conditionsLogicalOperator is OR, the query returns the items that meet at
least one of the conditions in the conditions collection.
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The following table lists the comparison operators:
Operator
Type of Condition/Comments
ChangedDuring
Date
This is a range check. The condition value is
specified in hours. If the value of the date property
lies in the range of the time the method is invoked
plus or minus the condition value, the condition is
true.
For example, if the condition value is 24, the
condition is true if the value of the date property is
between yesterday at this time and tomorrow at this
time.
Note: The name ChangedDuring is kept to preserve
backward compatibility. In previous versions, the
operator was used only with create and modify time
properties.
Equal
String and numerical
EqualIgnoreCase
String
Greater
Numerical
GreaterEqual
Numerical
In
String, numerical, and list
The condition’s value is a list. The condition is true
if the value of the property is one of the values in
the list.
InList
List
The condition’s value and the property’s value are
lists.
The condition is true if all the values in the
condition's list also appear in the item's property
list. There can be more property values than
specified in the condition without affecting the
truth of the condition.
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Operator
Type of Condition/Comments
IsNull
String, numerical, and list
The item's property has no value. When operator
IsNull is used, the value of the condition is ignored,
and in some cases can be nil.
Less
Numerical
LessEqual
Numerical
Like
String
The condition’s value is a substring of the value of
the property’s value. The condition’s value must be
bracketed with percentage signs (%). For example,
%Bi% matches Bismark and Bay of Biscay, but not
biscuit.
LikeIgnoreCase
String
Use the LikeIgnoreCase operator as you use the Like
operator. The match, however is not case-sensitive.
Therefore, %Bi% matches biscuit.
NotEqual
String and numerical
UnchangedDuring
Date
This is a range check. The condition value is
specified in hours. If the value of the date property
is in the range of the time the method is invoked
plus or minus the condition value, the condition is
false. If it lies outside that range, the condition is
true.
For example, if the condition value is 24, the
condition is true if the value of the date property is
before yesterday at this time or after tomorrow at
this time.
Note: The name UnchangedDuring is kept to
preserve backward compatibility. In previous
versions, the operator was used only with create and
modify time properties.
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Example of setting up a condition:
FloatCondition fc = new FloatCondition();
FloatProp fp = new FloatProp();
fp.setName("attr_name");
fp.setValue(11);
fc.setCondition(fp);
fc.setFloatOperator(FloatCondition.floatOperatorEnum.Equal);
Example of querying for inherited properties.
The target CI is sample which has two attributes, name and size. sampleII
extends the CI with two attributes, level and grade. This example sets up a
query for the properties of sampleII that were inherited from sample by
specifying them by name.
GetFilteredCIsByType request = new GetFilteredCIsByType()
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext)
request.setType("sampleII")
CustomProperties customProperties = new CustomProperties();
PropertiesList propertiesList = new PropertiesList();
propertiesList.addPropertyName("name");
propertiesList.addPropertyName("size");
customProperties.setPropertiesList(propertiesList);
request.setProperties(customProperties)
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
type
The class name. For details, see “Type Name” on
page 392. The type can be any of the types defined
using the CI Type Manager. For details, see “CI Type
Manager” in Model Management.
properties
The data to be returned on each CI (Called the
Query Layout in the user interface).
For details, see “CustomProperties” on page 332.
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Parameter
Comment
conditions
A collection of name-value pairs and the operators
that relate one to the other. For example,
host_hostname like QA.
conditionsLogicalOperator
➤ AND. All the conditions must be met.
➤ OR. At least one of the conditions must be met.
Output
Parameter
Comment
CIs
Collection of CI elements.
chunkInfo
For details, see “ChunkInfo” on page 395 and
“Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
getQueryNameOfView
The getQueryNameOfView method retrieves the name of the TQL on which
the specified view is based.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
viewName
The name of a view, that is, a sub-set of the class
model in the UCMDB.
Output
348
Parameter
Comment
queryName
The name of the TQL in the UCMDB on which the
view is based.
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getTopologyQueryExistingResultByName
The getTopologyQueryExistingResultByName method retrieves the most
recent result of running the specifed TQL. The call does not run the TQL. If
there are no results from a previous run, nothing is returned.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
queryName
The name of a TQL.
queryTypedProperties
A collection of sets of properties to retrieve to items
of a specific Configuration Item Type.
Output
Parameter
Comment
queryName
The name of the TQL in the UCMDB on which the
view is based.
getTopologyQueryResultCountByName
The getTopologyQueryResultCountByName method retrieves the number of
instances of each node that matches the specified query.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
queryName
The name of a TQL.
countInvisible
If true, the output includes CIs defined as invisible
in the query.
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Output
Parameter
Comment
queryName
The name of the TQL in the UCMDB on which the
view is based.
pullTopologyMapChunks
The pullTopologyMapChunks method retrieves one of the chunks that
contain the response to a method.
Each chunk contains a topologyMap element that is part of the response. The
first chunk is numbered 1, so the retrieval loop counter iterates from 1 to
<response object>.getChunkInfo().getNumberOfChunks().
For details, see “ChunkInfo” on page 395 and “Query the UCMDB” on
page 328.
The client application must be able to handle the partial maps. See the
following example of handling a CI collection and the example of merging
chunks to a map in “Query Example” on page 363.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
ChunkRequest
The number of the chunk to retrieve and the
ChunkInfo that is returned by the query method.
Output
350
Parameter
Comment
topologyMap
For details, see “TopologyMap” on page 395.
comments
For internal use only.
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Example of Handling Chunks
GetCIsByType request =
new GetCIsByType(cmdbContext, typeName, customProperties);
GetCIsByTypeResponse response =
ucmdbService.getCIsByType(request);
ChunkRequest chunkRequest = new ChunkRequest();
chunkRequest.setChunkInfo(response.getChunkInfo());
for(int j=1 ; j < response.getChunkInfo().getNumberOfChunks() ; j++) {
chunkRequest.setChunkNumber(j);
PullTopologyMapChunks req = new PullTopologyMapChunks(cmdbContext,
chunkRequest);
PullTopologyMapChunksResponse res =
ucmdbService.pullTopologyMapChunks(req);
for(int m=0 ;
m < res.getTopologyMap().getCINodes().sizeCINodeList() ;
m++) {
CIs cis =
res.getTopologyMap().getCINodes().getCINode(m).getCIs();
for(int i=0 ; i < cis.sizeCIList() ; i++) {
// your code to process the CIs
}
}
}
releaseChunks
The releaseChunks method frees the memory of the chunks that contain the
data from the query.
Tip: The server discards the data after ten minutes. Calling this method to
discard the data as soon as it has been read conserves server resources.
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Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
chunksKey
The identifier of the data on the server that was
chunked. The key is an element of ChunkInfo.
UCMDB Update Methods
This section provides information on the following methods:
➤
“addCIsAndRelations” on page 352
➤
“deleteCIsAndRelations” on page 354
➤
“updateCIsAndRelations” on page 354
addCIsAndRelations
The addCIsAndRelations method adds or updates CIs and relations.
If the CIs or relations do not exist in UCMDB, they are added and their
properties are set according to the contents of the CIsAndRelationsUpdates
argument.
If the CIs or relations do exist in UCMDB, they are updated with the new
data, if updateExisting is true.
If updateExisting is false, CIsAndRelationsUpdates cannot reference existing
configuration items or relations. Any attempt to reference existing items
when updateExisting is false results in an exception.
If updateExisting is true, the add or update operation is performed without
validating the CIs, regardless of the value of ignoreValidation.
If updateExisiting is false and ignoreValidation is true, the add operation is
performed without validating the CIs.
If updateExisiting is false and ignoreValidation is false, the CIs are validated
before the add operation.
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Relations are never validated.
CreatedIDsMap is a map or dictionary of type ClientIDToCmdbID that
connects the client’s temporary IDs with the corresponding real
UCMDB IDs.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
updateExisting
Set to true to update items that already exist in the
UCMDB. Set to false to throw an exception if any
item already exists.
CIsAndRelationsUpdates
The items to update or create. For details, see
“CIsAndRelationsUpdates” on page 333.
ignoreValidation
If is true, no check is performed before updating the
uCMDB.
Output
Parameter
Comment
CreatedIDsMap
The map of client IDs to UCMDB IDs. For details,
see “addCIsAndRelations” on page 352.
comments
For internal use only.
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deleteCIsAndRelations
The deleteCIsAndRelations method removes the specified configuration
items and relations from the UCMDB.
When a CI is deleted and the CI is one end of one or more Relation items,
those Relation items are also deleted.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
CIsAndRelationsUpdates
The items to delete. For details, see
“CIsAndRelationsUpdates” on page 333
updateCIsAndRelations
The updateCIsAndRelations method updates the specified CIs and relations.
Update uses the property values from the CIsAndRelationsUpdates argument.
If any of the CIs or relations do not exist in the UCMDB, an exception is
thrown.
CreatedIDsMap is a map or dictionary of type ClientIDToCmdbID that
connects the client’s temporary IDs with the corresponding real
UCMDB IDs.
Input
354
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
CIsAndRelationsUpdates
The items to update. For details, see
“CIsAndRelationsUpdates” on page 333.
ignoreValidation
If true, no check is performed before updating the
uCMDB.
Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Output
Parameter
Comment
CreatedIDsMap
The map of client IDs to UCMDB IDs. For details,
see “addCIsAndRelations” on page 352.
UCMDB Impact Analysis Methods
This section provides information on the following methods:
➤
“calculateImpact” on page 355
➤
“getImpactPath” on page 356
➤
“getImpactRulesByNamePrefix” on page 357
calculateImpact
The calculateImpact method calculates which CIs are affected by a given CI
according to the rules defined in the UCMDB.
This shows the effect of an event triggering of the rule. The identifier output
of calculateImpact is used as input for getImpactPath.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
impactCategory
The type of event that would trigger the rule being
simulated.
IDs
A collection of ID elements.
impactRulesNames
A collection of ImpactRuleName elements.
severity
The severity of the triggering event.
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Output
Parameter
Comment
impactTopology
For details, see “Topology” on page 394.
identifier
The key to the server response.
getImpactPath
The getImpactPath method retrieves the topology graph of the path between
the affected CI and the CI that affects it.
The identifier output of calculateImpact is used as the identifier input
argument of getImpactPath.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
identifier
The key to the server response that was returned by
calculateImpact.
relation
A Relation based on one of the ShallowRelations
returned by calculateImpact in the impactTopology
element.
Output
Parameter
Comment
impactPathTopology
A CIs collection and an ImpactRelations collection.
comments
For internal use only.
An ImpactRelations element consists of an ID, type, end1ID, end2ID, a rule,
and an action.
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getImpactRulesByNamePrefix
The getImpactRulesByNamePrefix method retrieves rules using a prefix filter.
This method applies to impact rules that are named with a prefix that
indicates the context to which they apply, for example, SAP_myrule,
ORA_myrule, and so on. This method filters all impact rule names for those
beginning with the prefix specified by the ruleNamePrefixFilter argument.
Input
Parameter
Comment
cmdbContext
For details, see “CmdbContext” on page 390.
ruleNamePrefixFilter
A string containing the first letters of the rule names
to match.
Output
Parameter
Comment
impactRules
impactRules is composed of zero or more
impactRule. An impactRule, which specifies the
effect of a change, is composed of ruleName,
description, queryName, and isActive.
Use Cases
The following use cases assume two systems:
➤
HP Universal CMDB server
➤
A third-party system that contains a repository of configuration items
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Populating the UCMDB” on page 358
➤
“Querying the UCMDB” on page 358
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➤
“Querying the Class Model” on page 358
➤
“Analyzing Change Impact” on page 359
Populating the UCMDB
Use cases:
➤
A third-party asset management updates the UCMDB with information
available only in asset management.
➤
A number of third-party systems populate the UCMDB to create a central
CMDB that can track changes and perform impact analysis.
➤
A third-party system creates Configuration Items and Relations according to
third-party business logic to leverage the CMDB query capabilities.
Querying the UCMDB
Use cases:
➤
A third-party system gets the Configuration Items and Relations that
represent the SAP system by getting the results of the SAP TQL.
➤
A third-party system gets the list of Oracle servers that have been added or
changed in the last five hours.
➤
A third-party system gets the list of servers whose host name contains the
substring lab.
➤
A third-party system finds the elements related to a given CI by getting its
neighbors.
Querying the Class Model
Use cases:
358
➤
A third-party system enables users to specify the set of data to be retrieved
from the UCMDB. A user interface can be built over the class model to show
users the possible properties and prompt them for required data. The user
can then choose the information to be retrieved.
➤
A third-party system explores the class model when the user cannot access
the UCMDB user interface.
Chapter 9 • The HP Universal CMDB Web Service API
Analyzing Change Impact
Use case:
A third-party system outputs a list of the business services that could be
impacted by a change on a specified host.
Examples
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“The Example Base Class” on page 360
➤
“Query Example” on page 363
➤
“Update Example” on page 380
➤
“Class Model Example” on page 384
➤
“Impact Analysis Example” on page 386
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The Example Base Class
package com.hp.ucmdb.demo;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbService;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbServiceStub;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.CmdbContext;
import org.apache.axis2.AxisFault;
import org.apache.axis2.transport.http.HTTPConstants;
import org.apache.axis2.transport.http.HttpTransportProperties;
import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.net.URL;
/**
* User: hbarkai
* Date: Jul 12, 2007
*/
abstract class Demo {
UcmdbService stub;
CmdbContext context;
public void initDemo() {
try {
setStub(createUcmdbService("admin", "admin"));
setContext();
} catch (Exception e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public UcmdbService getStub() {
return stub;
}
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public void setStub(UcmdbService stub) {
this.stub = stub;
}
public CmdbContext getContext() {
return context;
}
public void setContext() {
CmdbContext context = new CmdbContext();
context.setCallerApplication("demo");
this.context = context;
}
//connection to service - for axis2/jibx client
private static final String PROTOCOL = "http";
private static final String HOST_NAME = "host_name";
private static final int PORT = 8080;
private static final String FILE = "/axis2/services/UcmdbService";
protected UcmdbService createUcmdbService
(String username, String password) throws Exception{
URL url;
UcmdbServiceStub serviceStub;
try {
url = new URL
(Demo.PROTOCOL, Demo.HOST_NAME,
Demo.PORT, Demo.FILE);
serviceStub = new UcmdbServiceStub(url.toString());
HttpTransportProperties.Authenticator auth =
new HttpTransportProperties.Authenticator();
auth.setUsername(username);
auth.setPassword(password);
serviceStub._getServiceClient().getOptions().setProperty
(HTTPConstants.AUTHENTICATE,auth);
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} catch (AxisFault axisFault) {
throw new Exception
("Failed to create SOAP adapter for "
+ Demo.HOST_NAME , axisFault);
} catch (MalformedURLException e) {
throw new Exception
("Failed to create SOAP adapter for "
+ Demo.HOST_NAME, e);
}
return serviceStub;
}
}
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Query Example
package com.hp.ucmdb.demo;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.query.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbFaultException;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbService;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.props.*;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
public class QueryDemo extends Demo{
UcmdbService stub;
CmdbContext context;
public void getCIsByTypeDemo() {
GetCIsByType request = new GetCIsByType();
//set cmdbcontext
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set CIs type
request.setType("anyType");
//set CIs propeties to be retrieved
CustomProperties customProperties = new CustomProperties();
PredefinedProperties predefinedProperties =
new PredefinedProperties();
SimplePredefinedProperty simplePredefinedProperty =
new SimplePredefinedProperty();
simplePredefinedProperty.setName
(SimplePredefinedProperty.nameEnum.DERIVED);
SimplePredefinedPropertyCollection
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection =
new SimplePredefinedPropertyCollection();
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simplePredefinedPropertyCollection.addSimplePredefinedProperty
(simplePredefinedProperty);
predefinedProperties.setSimplePredefinedProperties
(simplePredefinedPropertyCollection);
customProperties.setPredefinedProperties(predefinedProperties);
request.setProperties(customProperties);
try {
GetCIsByTypeResponse response =
getStub().getCIsByType(request);
TopologyMap map =
getTopologyMapResultFromCIs
(response.getCIs(), response.getChunkInfo());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getCIsByIdDemo() {
GetCIsById request = new GetCIsById();
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
//set cmdbcontext
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set ids
ID id1 = new ID();
id1.setBase("cmdbobjectidCIT1");
ID id2 = new ID();
id2.setBase("cmdbobjectidCIT2");
IDs ids = new IDs();
ids.addID(id1);
ids.addID(id2);
request.setIDs(ids);
//set CIs properties to be retrieved
TypedPropertiesCollection properties =
new TypedPropertiesCollection();
TypedProperties typedProperties1 =
new TypedProperties();
typedProperties1.setType("CIT1");
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CustomTypedProperties customProperties1 =
new CustomTypedProperties();
PredefinedTypedProperties predefinedProperties1 =
new PredefinedTypedProperties();
SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty simplePredefinedProperty1 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty();
simplePredefinedProperty1.setName
(SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty.nameEnum.CONCRETE);
SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection1 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection();
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection1
.addSimpleTypedPredefinedProperty
(simplePredefinedProperty1);
predefinedProperties1.
setSimpleTypedPredefinedProperties
(simplePredefinedPropertyCollection1);
customProperties1.
setPredefinedTypedProperties
(predefinedProperties1);
typedProperties1.setProperties(customProperties1);
properties.addTypedProperties(typedProperties1);
TypedProperties typedProperties2 =
new TypedProperties();
typedProperties2.setType("CIT2");
CustomTypedProperties customProperties2 =
new CustomTypedProperties();
PredefinedTypedProperties predefinedProperties2 =
new PredefinedTypedProperties();
SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty simplePredefinedProperty2 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty();
simplePredefinedProperty2.setName
(SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty.nameEnum.NAMING);
SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection();
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simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2.
addSimpleTypedPredefinedProperty
(simplePredefinedProperty2);
predefinedProperties2.setSimpleTypedPredefinedProperties
(simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2);
customProperties2.setPredefinedTypedProperties
(predefinedProperties2);
typedProperties2.setProperties(customProperties2);
properties.addTypedProperties(typedProperties2);
request.setCIsTypedProperties(properties);
try {
GetCIsByIdResponse response =
getStub().getCIsById(request);
CIs cis = response.getCIs();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getFilteredCIsByTypeDemo() {
GetFilteredCIsByType request = new GetFilteredCIsByType();
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
//set cmdbcontext
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set CIs type
request.setType("anyType");
//sets Filter conditions
Conditions conditions = new Conditions();
IntConditions intConditions = new IntConditions();
IntCondition intCondition = new IntCondition();
IntProp intProp = new IntProp();
intProp.setName("int_attr1");
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intProp.setValue(100);
intCondition.setCondition(intProp);
intCondition.setIntOperator
(IntCondition.intOperatorEnum.Greater);
intConditions.addIntCondition(intCondition);
conditions.setIntConditions(intConditions);
request.setConditions(conditions);
//set logical operator for conditions
request.setConditionsLogicalOperator
(GetFilteredCIsByType.conditionsLogicalOperatorEnum.AND);
//set CIs properties to be retrieved
CustomProperties customProperties =
new CustomProperties();
PredefinedProperties predefinedProperties =
new PredefinedProperties();
SimplePredefinedProperty simplePredefinedProperty =
new SimplePredefinedProperty();
simplePredefinedProperty.setName
(SimplePredefinedProperty.nameEnum.NAMING);
SimplePredefinedPropertyCollection
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection =
new SimplePredefinedPropertyCollection();
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection.
addSimplePredefinedProperty
(simplePredefinedProperty);
predefinedProperties.setSimplePredefinedProperties
(simplePredefinedPropertyCollection);
customProperties.setPredefinedProperties
(predefinedProperties);
request.setProperties(customProperties);
try {
GetFilteredCIsByTypeResponse response =
getStub().getFilteredCIsByType(request);
TopologyMap map =
getTopologyMapResultFromCIs
(response.getCIs(), response.getChunkInfo());
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} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void executeTopologyQueryByNameDemo() {
ExecuteTopologyQueryByName request = new
ExecuteTopologyQueryByName();
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
//set cmdbcontext
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set query name
request.setQueryName("queryName");
try {
ExecuteTopologyQueryByNameResponse response =
getStub().executeTopologyQueryByName(request);
TopologyMap map =
getTopologyMapResult
(response.getTopologyMap(), response.getChunkInfo());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
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// assume the follow query was defined at UCMDB
// Query Name: exampleQuery
// Query sketch:
//
Host
//
/ \
//
ip Disk
// Query Parameters:
//
Host//
host_os (like)
//
Disk//
disk_failures (equal)
public void executeTopologyQueryByNameWithParametersDemo() {
ExecuteTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters request =
new ExecuteTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters();
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
//set cmdbcontext
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set query name
request.setQueryName("queryName");
//set parameters
ParameterizedNode hostParametrizedNode =
new ParameterizedNode();
hostParametrizedNode.setNodeLabel("Host");
CIProperties parameters = new CIProperties();
StrProps strProps = new StrProps();
StrProp strProp = new StrProp();
strProp.setName("host_os");
strProp.setValue("%2000%");
strProps.addStrProp(strProp);
parameters.setStrProps(strProps);
hostParametrizedNode.setParameters(parameters);
request.addParameterizedNodes(hostParametrizedNode);
ParameterizedNode diskParametrizedNode =
new ParameterizedNode();
diskParametrizedNode.setNodeLabel("Disk");
CIProperties parameters1 = new CIProperties();
IntProps intProps = new IntProps();
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IntProp intProp = new IntProp();
intProp.setName("disk_failures");
intProp.setValue(30);
intProps.addIntProp(intProp);
parameters1.setIntProps(intProps);
diskParametrizedNode.setParameters(parameters1);
request.addParameterizedNodes(diskParametrizedNode);
try {
ExecuteTopologyQueryByNameWithParametersResponse
response =
getStub().executeTopologyQueryByNameWithParameters
(request);
TopologyMap map =
getTopologyMapResult
(response.getTopologyMap(), response.getChunkInfo());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
/// assume the follow query was defined at UCMDB
// Query Name: exampleQuery
// Query sketch:
//
Host
//
/ \
//
ip Disk
// Query Parameters:
//
Host//
host_os (like)
//
Disk//
disk_failures (equal)
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public void executeTopologyQueryWithParametersDemo() {
ExecuteTopologyQueryWithParameters request =
new ExecuteTopologyQueryWithParameters();
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
//set cmdbcontext
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
//set query definition
String queryXml = "<xml that represents the query above>";
request.setQueryXml(queryXml);
//set parameters
ParameterizedNode hostParametrizedNode =
new ParameterizedNode();
hostParametrizedNode.setNodeLabel("Host");
CIProperties parameters = new CIProperties();
StrProps strProps = new StrProps();
StrProp strProp = new StrProp();
strProp.setName("host_os");
strProp.setValue("%2000%");
strProps.addStrProp(strProp);
parameters.setStrProps(strProps);
hostParametrizedNode.setParameters(parameters);
request.addParameterizedNodes(hostParametrizedNode);
ParameterizedNode diskParametrizedNode =
new ParameterizedNode();
diskParametrizedNode.setNodeLabel("Disk");
CIProperties parameters1 = new CIProperties();
IntProps intProps = new IntProps();
IntProp intProp = new IntProp();
intProp.setName("disk_failures");
intProp.setValue(30);
intProps.addIntProp(intProp);
parameters1.setIntProps(intProps);
diskParametrizedNode.setParameters(parameters1);
request.addParameterizedNodes(diskParametrizedNode);
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try {
ExecuteTopologyQueryWithParametersResponse
response = getStub().executeTopologyQueryWithParameters
(request);
TopologyMap map =
getTopologyMapResult
(response.getTopologyMap(), response.getChunkInfo());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getCINeighboursDemo() {
GetCINeighbours request = new GetCINeighbours();
//set cmdbcontext
CmdbContext cmdbContext = getContext();
request.setCmdbContext(cmdbContext);
// set CI id
ID id = new ID();
id.setBase("cmdbobjectidCIT1");
request.setID(id);
//set neighbour type
request.setNeighbourType("neighbourType");
//set Neighbours CIs propeties to be retrieved
TypedPropertiesCollection properties =
new TypedPropertiesCollection();
TypedProperties typedProperties1 = new TypedProperties();
typedProperties1.setType("neighbourType");
CustomTypedProperties customProperties1 =
new CustomTypedProperties();
PredefinedTypedProperties predefinedProperties1 =
new PredefinedTypedProperties();
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QualifierProperties qualifierProperties =
new QualifierProperties();
qualifierProperties.addQualifierName("ID_ATTRIBUTE");
predefinedProperties1.setQualifierProperties(qualifierProperties);
customProperties1.setPredefinedTypedProperties
(predefinedProperties1);
typedProperties1.setProperties(customProperties1);
properties.addTypedProperties(typedProperties1);
request.setCIProperties(properties);
TypedPropertiesCollection relationsProperties =
new TypedPropertiesCollection();
TypedProperties typedProperties2 = new TypedProperties();
typedProperties2.setType("relationType");
CustomTypedProperties customProperties2 =
new CustomTypedProperties();
PredefinedTypedProperties predefinedProperties2 =
new PredefinedTypedProperties();
SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty simplePredefinedProperty2 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty();
simplePredefinedProperty2.setName
(SimpleTypedPredefinedProperty.nameEnum.CONCRETE);
SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2 =
new SimpleTypedPredefinedPropertyCollection();
simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2.
addSimpleTypedPredefinedProperty
(simplePredefinedProperty2);
predefinedProperties2.
setSimpleTypedPredefinedProperties
(simplePredefinedPropertyCollection2);
customProperties2.setPredefinedTypedProperties
(predefinedProperties2);
typedProperties2.setProperties(customProperties2);
relationsProperties.addTypedProperties(typedProperties2);
request.setRelationProperties(relationsProperties);
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try {
GetCINeighboursResponse response =
getStub().getCINeighbours(request);
Topology topology = response.getTopology();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
//get Topology Map for chunked/non-chunked result
private TopologyMap getTopologyMapResult(TopologyMap topologyMap,
ChunkInfo chunkInfo) {
if(chunkInfo.getNumberOfChunks() == 0) {
return topologyMap;
} else {
topologyMap = new TopologyMap();
for(int i=1 ; i <= chunkInfo.getNumberOfChunks() ; i++) {
ChunkRequest chunkRequest = new ChunkRequest();
chunkRequest.setChunkInfo(chunkInfo);
chunkRequest.setChunkNumber(i);
PullTopologyMapChunks req =
new PullTopologyMapChunks();
req.setChunkRequest(chunkRequest);
req.setCmdbContext(getContext());
PullTopologyMapChunksResponse res = null;
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try {
res = getStub().pullTopologyMapChunks(req);
TopologyMap map = res.getTopologyMap();
topologyMap = mergeMaps(topologyMap, map);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
}
return topologyMap;
}
private TopologyMap getTopologyMapResultFromCIs(CIs cis, ChunkInfo
chunkInfo) {
TopologyMap topologyMap = new TopologyMap();
if(chunkInfo.getNumberOfChunks() == 0) {
CINode ciNode = new CINode();
ciNode.setLabel("");
ciNode.setCIs(cis);
CINodes ciNodes = new CINodes();
ciNodes.addCINode(ciNode);
topologyMap.setCINodes(ciNodes);
} else {
for(int i=1 ; i <= chunkInfo.getNumberOfChunks() ; i++) {
ChunkRequest chunkRequest =
new ChunkRequest();
chunkRequest.setChunkInfo(chunkInfo);
chunkRequest.setChunkNumber(i);
PullTopologyMapChunks req =
new PullTopologyMapChunks();
req.setChunkRequest(chunkRequest);
req.setCmdbContext(getContext());
PullTopologyMapChunksResponse res = null;
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try {
res = getStub().pullTopologyMapChunks(req);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
TopologyMap map = res.getTopologyMap();
topologyMap = mergeMaps(topologyMap, map);
}
//release chunks
ReleaseChunks req = new ReleaseChunks();
req.setChunksKey(chunkInfo.getChunksKey());
req.setCmdbContext(getContext());
try {
getStub().releaseChunks(req);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
return topologyMap;
}
//===================================================
/* WARNING merge will be correct only if a each node is given
a unique name. This applies to both CI and Relation nodes .*/
//===================================================
private TopologyMap mergeMaps(TopologyMap topologyMap, TopologyMap
newMap) {
for(int i=0 ; i < newMap.getCINodes().sizeCINodeList() ; i++ ) {
CINode ciNode = newMap.getCINodes().getCINode(i);
boolean alreadyExist = false;
if(topologyMap.getCINodes() == null) {
topologyMap.setCINodes(new CINodes());
}
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for(int j=0 ; j < topologyMap.getCINodes().sizeCINodeList() ; j++) {
CINode ciNode2 = topologyMap.getCINodes().getCINode(j);
if(ciNode2.getLabel().equals(ciNode.getLabel())){
CIs cisTOAdd = ciNode.getCIs();
CIs cis =
mergeCIsGroups
(topologyMap.getCINodes().getCINode(j).getCIs(),
cisTOAdd);
topologyMap.getCINodes().getCINode(j).setCIs(cis);
alreadyExist = true;
}
}
if(!alreadyExist) {
topologyMap.getCINodes().addCINode(ciNode);
}
}
for(int i=0 ; i < newMap.getRelationNodes().sizeRelationNodeList() ; i++ ) {
RelationNode relationNode =
newMap.getRelationNodes().getRelationNode(i);
boolean alreadyExist = false;
if(topologyMap.getRelationNodes() == null) {
topologyMap.setRelationNodes(new RelationNodes());
}
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for(int j=0 ;
j < topologyMap.getRelationNodes().sizeRelationNodeList() ;
j++) {
RelationNode relationNode2 =
topologyMap.getRelationNodes().getRelationNode(j);
if(relationNode2.getLabel().equals(relationNode.getLabel())){
Relations relationsTOAdd = relationNode.getRelations();
Relations relations =
mergeRelationsGroups
(topologyMap.getRelationNodes().
getRelationNode(j).getRelations(),
relationsTOAdd);
topologyMap.getRelationNodes().
getRelationNode(j).setRelations(relations);
alreadyExist = true;
}
}
if(!alreadyExist) {
topologyMap.getRelationNodes().addRelationNode(relationNode);
}
}
return topologyMap;
}
private Relations mergeRelationsGroups(Relations relations1, Relations
relations2) {
for(int i=0 ; i < relations2.sizeRelationList() ; i++) {
relations1.addRelation(relations2.getRelation(i));
}
return relations2;
}
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private CIs mergeCIsGroups(CIs cis1, CIs cis2) {
for(int i=0 ; i < cis2.sizeCIList() ; i++) {
cis1.addCI(cis2.getCI(i));
}
return cis1;
}
}
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Update Example
package com.hp.ucmdb.demo;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.update.AddCIsAndRelations;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.update.AddCIsAndRelationsResponse;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.update.UpdateCIsAndRelations;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.update.DeleteCIsAndRelations;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbFaultException;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.update.CIsAndRelationsUpdates;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.update.ClientIDToCmdbID;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
public class UpdateDemo extends Demo{
public void getAddCIsAndRelationsDemo() {
AddCIsAndRelations request = new AddCIsAndRelations();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
request.setUpdateExisting(true);
CIsAndRelationsUpdates updates = new CIsAndRelationsUpdates();
CIs cis = new CIs();
CI ci = new CI();
ID id = new ID();
id.setBase("temp1");
id.setTemp(true);
ci.setID(id);
ci.setType("host");
CIProperties props = new CIProperties();
StrProps strProps = new StrProps();
StrProp strProp = new StrProp();
strProp.setName("host_key");
String value = "blabla";
strProp.setValue(value);
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strProps.addStrProp(strProp);
props.setStrProps(strProps);
ci.setProps(props);
cis.addCI(ci);
updates.setCIsForUpdate(cis);
request.setCIsAndRelationsUpdates(updates);
try {
AddCIsAndRelationsResponse response =
getStub().addCIsAndRelations(request);
for(int i = 0 ; i < response.sizeCreatedIDsMapList() ; i++) {
ClientIDToCmdbID idsMap = response.getCreatedIDsMap(i);
//do something
}
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getUpdateCIsAndRelationsDemo() {
UpdateCIsAndRelations request = new UpdateCIsAndRelations();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
CIsAndRelationsUpdates updates =
new CIsAndRelationsUpdates();
CIs cis = new CIs();
CI ci = new CI();
ID id = new ID();
id.setBase("temp1");
id.setTemp(true);
ci.setID(id);
ci.setType("host");
CIProperties props = new CIProperties();
StrProps strProps = new StrProps();
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StrProp hostKeyProp = new StrProp();
hostKeyProp.setName("host_key");
String hostKeyValue = "blabla";
hostKeyProp.setValue(hostKeyValue);
strProps.addStrProp(hostKeyProp);
StrProp hostOSProp = new StrProp();
hostOSProp.setName("host_os");
String hostOSValue = "winXP";
hostOSProp.setValue(hostOSValue);
strProps.addStrProp(hostOSProp);
StrProp hostDNSProp = new StrProp();
hostDNSProp.setName("host_dnsname");
String hostDNSValue = "dnsname";
hostDNSProp.setValue(hostDNSValue);
strProps.addStrProp(hostDNSProp);
props.setStrProps(strProps);
ci.setProps(props);
cis.addCI(ci);
updates.setCIsForUpdate(cis);
request.setCIsAndRelationsUpdates(updates);
try {
getStub().updateCIsAndRelations(request);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
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public void getDeleteCIsAndRelationsDemo() {
DeleteCIsAndRelations request =
new DeleteCIsAndRelations();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
CIsAndRelationsUpdates updates =
new CIsAndRelationsUpdates();
CIs cis = new CIs();
CI ci = new CI();
ID id = new ID();
id.setBase("stam");
id.setTemp(true);
ci.setID(id);
ci.setType("host");
CIProperties props = new CIProperties();
StrProps strProps = new StrProps();
StrProp strProp1 = new StrProp();
strProp1.setName("host_key");
String value1 = "for_delete";
strProp1.setValue(value1);
strProps.addStrProp(strProp1);
props.setStrProps(strProps);
ci.setProps(props);
cis.addCI(ci);
updates.setCIsForUpdate(cis);
request.setCIsAndRelationsUpdates(updates);
try {
getStub().deleteCIsAndRelations(request);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
}
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Class Model Example
package com.hp.ucmdb.demo;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.classmodel.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbFaultException;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.classmodel.UcmdbClassModelHierarchy;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.classmodel.UcmdbClass;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
public class ClassmodelDemo extends Demo{
public void getClassAncestorsDemo() {
GetClassAncestors request =
new GetClassAncestors();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
request.setClassName("className");
try {
GetClassAncestorsResponse response =
getStub().getClassAncestors(request);
UcmdbClassModelHierarchy hierarchy =
response.getClassHierarchy();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
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public void getAllClassesHierarchyDemo() {
GetAllClassesHierarchy request =
new GetAllClassesHierarchy();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
try {
GetAllClassesHierarchyResponse response =
getStub().getAllClassesHierarchy(request);
UcmdbClassModelHierarchy hierarchy =
response.getClassesHierarchy();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getCmdbClassDefinitionDemo() {
GetCmdbClassDefinition request =
new GetCmdbClassDefinition();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
request.setClassName("className");
try {
GetCmdbClassDefinitionResponse response =
getStub().getCmdbClassDefinition(request);
UcmdbClass ucmdbClass = response.getUcmdbClass();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
}
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Impact Analysis Example
package com.hp.ucmdb.demo;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.params.impact.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.services.UcmdbFaultException;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.*;
import com.hp.ucmdb.generated.types.impact.*;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
/**
* User: hbarkai
* Date: Jul 17, 2007
*/
public class ImpactDemo extends Demo{
//Impact Rule Name : impactExample
//Impact Query:
//
Network
//
|
//
Host
//
|
//
IP
//Impact Action: network affect on ip ;severity 100% ; category: change
//
public void calculateImpactAndGetImpactPathDemo() {
CalculateImpact request = new CalculateImpact();
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
//set root cause ids
IDs ids = new IDs();
ID id = new ID();
id.setBase("rootCauseCmdbID");
ids.addID(id);
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request.setIDs(ids);
//set impact category
request.setImpactCategory("change");
//set rule Names
ImpactRuleNames impactRuleNames = new ImpactRuleNames();
ImpactRuleName impactRuleName = new ImpactRuleName();
impactRuleName.setBase("impactExample");
impactRuleNames.addImpactRuleName(impactRuleName);
request.setImpactRuleNames(impactRuleNames);
//set severity
request.setSeverity(100);
CalculateImpactResponse response =
new CalculateImpactResponse();
request.setIDs(ids);
//set impact category
request.setImpactCategory("change");
//set rule Names
ImpactRuleNames impactRuleNames = new ImpactRuleNames();
ImpactRuleName impactRuleName = new ImpactRuleName();
impactRuleName.setBase("impactExample");
impactRuleNames.addImpactRuleName(impactRuleName);
request.setImpactRuleNames(impactRuleNames);
//set severity
request.setSeverity(100);
CalculateImpactResponse response =
new CalculateImpactResponse();
try {
response = getStub().calculateImpact(request);
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
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} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
Identifier identifier= response.getIdentifier();
Topology topology = response.getImpactTopology();
Relation relation = topology.getRelations().getRelation(0);
GetImpactPath request2 = new GetImpactPath();
//set cmdb context
request2.setCmdbContext(getContext());
//set impact identifier
request2.setIdentifier(identifier);
//set shallowRelation
ShallowRelation shallowRelation = new ShallowRelation();
shallowRelation.setID(relation.getID());
shallowRelation.setEnd1ID(relation.getEnd1ID());
shallowRelation.setEnd2ID(relation.getEnd2ID());
shallowRelation.setType(relation.getType());
request2.setRelation(shallowRelation);
try {
GetImpactPathResponse response2 =
getStub().getImpactPath(request2);
ImpactTopology impactTopology =
response2.getImpactPathTopology();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//To change body of catch statement
// use File | Settings | File Templates.
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//To change body of catch statement
// use File | Settings | File Templates.
e.printStackTrace();
}
}
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public void getImpactRulesByGroupName() {
GetImpactRulesByGroupName request =
new GetImpactRulesByGroupName();
//set cmdb context
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
//set group names list
request.addRuleGroupNameFilter("groupName1");
request.addRuleGroupNameFilter("groupName2");
try {
GetImpactRulesByGroupNameResponse response =
getStub().getImpactRulesByGroupName(request);
ImpactRules impactRules = response.getImpactRules();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
public void getImpactRulesByNamePrefix() {
GetImpactRulesByNamePrefix request =
new GetImpactRulesByNamePrefix();
//set cmdb context
request.setCmdbContext(getContext());
//set prefixes list
request.addRuleNamePrefixFilter("prefix1");
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try {
GetImpactRulesByNamePrefixResponse response =
getStub().getImpactRulesByNamePrefix(request);
ImpactRules impactRules = response.getImpactRules();
} catch (RemoteException e) {
//handle exception
} catch (UcmdbFaultException e) {
//handle exception
}
}
}
UCMDB General Parameters
This section describes the most common parameters of the service’s
methods. For details, refer to the schema documentation.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“CmdbContext” on page 390
➤
“ID” on page 391
➤
“Key Attributes” on page 391
➤
“ID Types” on page 391
➤
“CIProperties” on page 392
➤
“Type Name” on page 392
➤
“Configuration Item (CI)” on page 393
➤
“Relation” on page 393
CmdbContext
All UCMDB Web Service API service invocations require a CmdbContext
argument. CmdbContext is a callerApplication string that identifies the
application that invokes the service. CmdbContext is used for logging and
troubleshooting.
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ID
Every CI and Relation has an ID field. It consists of a case-sensitive ID string
and an optional temp flag, indicating whether the ID is temporary.
Key Attributes
For identifying a CI or Relation in some contexts, key attributes can be used
in place of a UCMDB ID. Key attributes are those attributes with the
ID_ATTRIBUTE set in the class definition.
In the user interface, the key attributes have a key icon next to them in the
list of Configuration Item Type attributes in the user interface. For details,
see “Add/Edit Attribute Dialog Box” in Model Management. For information
about identifying the key attributes from within the API client application,
see “getCmdbClassDefinition” on page 336.
ID Types
An ID element can contain a real ID, a temporary ID, or can be empty.
A real ID is a string assigned by the UCMDB that identifies an entity in the
database. A temporary ID can be any string that is unique in the current
request. An empty ID means no value is assigned.
A temporary ID can be assigned by the client and often represents the ID of
the CI as stored by the client. It does not necessarily represent an entity
already created in the UCMDB. When a temporary ID is passed by the client,
if the UCMDB can identify an existing data configuration item using the CI
key properties, that CI is used as appropriate for the context as though it
had been identified with a real ID.
The real ID of a CI is calculated by the UCMDB based on a combination of
the CI’s type and key properties. The real ID of a Relation is based on the
relations’s type, the IDs of the two CIs that are part of the relationship, and
the relation’s key properties. Therefore, key attribute values must be set
during CI or Relation creation. If the key properties values are not specified
when creating a CI, there are two possibilities:
➤
If the CIT includes a RANDOM_GENERATED_ID qualifier, the server
generates a unique ID.
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➤
If the CIT does not have a RANDOM_GENERATED_ID qualifier, an
exception is thrown.
For details, see “CI Type Manager” in Model Management.
CIProperties
A CIProperties element is composed of collections, each containing a
sequence of name-value elements that specify properties of the type
indicated by the collection name. None of the collections are required, so
the CIProperties element can contain any combination of collections.
CIProperties are used by CI and Relation elements. For details, see
“Configuration Item (CI)” on page 393 and “Relation” on page 393.
The properties collections are:
➤
dateProps - collection of DateProp elements
➤
doubleProps - collection of DoubleProp elements
➤
floatProps - collection of FloatProp elements
➤
intListProps - collection of intListProp elements
➤
intProps - collection of IntProp elements
➤
strProps - collection of StrProp elements
➤
strListProps - collection of StrListProp elements
➤
longProps - collection of LongProp elements
➤
bytesProps - collection of BytesProp elements
➤
xmlProps - collection of XmlProp elements
Type Name
The type name is the class name of a configuration item type or relation
type. The type name is used in code to refer to the class. It should not be
confused with the display name, which is seen on the user interface where
the class is mentioned, but which is meaningless in code.
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Configuration Item (CI)
A CI element is composed of an ID, a type, and a props collection.
When using UCMDB Update Methods to update a CI, the ID element can
contain a real UCMDB ID or a client-assigned temporary ID. If a temporary
ID is used, set the temp flag to true. When deleting an item, the ID can be
empty. UCMDB Query Methods take real IDs as input parameters and return
real IDs in the query results.
The type can be any type name defined in the CI Type Manager. For details,
see “CI Type Manager” in Model Management.
The props element is a CIProperties collection. For details, see “CIProperties”
on page 392.
Relation
A Relation is an entity that links two configuration items. A Relation element
is composed of an ID, a type, the identifiers of the two items being linked
(end1ID and end2ID), and a props collection.
When using UCMDB Update Methods to update a Relation, the value of the
Relation’s ID can be a real UCMBD ID or a temporary ID. When deleting an
item, the ID can be empty. UCMDB Query Methods take real IDs as input
parameters and return real IDs in the query results.
The relation type is the Type Name of the HP UCMDB class from which the
relation is instantiated. The type can be any of the relation types defined in
the UCMDB. For further information on classes or types, see “Query the
UCMDB Class Model” on page 335.
For details, see “CI Type Manager” in Model Management.
The two relation end IDs must not be empty IDs because they are used to
create the ID of the current relation. However, they both can have
temporary IDs assigned to them by the client.
The props element is a CIProperties collection. For details, see “CIProperties”
on page 392.
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UCMDB Output Parameters
This section describes the most common output parameters of the service
methods. For details, refer to the schema documentation.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“CIs” on page 394
➤
“ShallowRelation” on page 394
➤
“Topology” on page 394
➤
“CINode” on page 394
➤
“RelationNode” on page 395
➤
“TopologyMap” on page 395
➤
“ChunkInfo” on page 395
CIs
CIs is a collection of CI elements.
ShallowRelation
A ShallowRelation is an entity that links two configuration items, composed
of an ID, a type, and the identifiers of the two items being linked (end1ID
and end2ID). The relation type is the Type Name of the UCMDB class from
which the relation is instantiated. The type can be any of the relation types
defined in the UCMDB.
Topology
Topology is a graph of CI elements and relations. A Topology consists of a CIs
collection and a Relations collection containing one or more Relation
elements.
CINode
CINode is composed of a CIs collection with a label. The label in the CINode
is the label defined in the node of the TQL used in the query.
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RelationNode
RelationNode is a set of Relations collections with a label. The label in the
RelationNode is the label defined in the node of the TQL used in the query.
TopologyMap
TopologyMap is the output of a query calculation that matches a TQL query.
The labels in the TopologyMap are the node labels defined in the TQL used in
the query.
The data of TopologyMap is returned in the following form:
➤
CINodes. This is one or more CINode (see “CINode” on page 394).
➤
relationNodes. This is one or more RelationNode (see “RelationNode” on
page 395).
The labels in these two structures order the lists of configuration items and
relations.
ChunkInfo
When a query returns a large amount of data, the server stores the data,
divided into segments called chunks. The information the client uses to
retrieve the chunked data is located in the ChunkInfo structure returned by
the query. ChunkInfo is composed of the numberOfChunks that must be
retrieved and the chunksKey. The chunksKey is a unique identifier of the
data on the server for this specific query invocation.
For more information, see “Processing Large Responses” on page 329.
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396
10
The HP Universal CMDB Java API
This chapter explains how third-party or custom tools can use the
HP Universal CMDB Java API to extract data and calculations and to write
data to the UCMDB (Universal Configuration Management database).
Use this chapter in conjunction with the API Javadoc, available in the
online Documentation Library.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Conventions on page 398
➤
Using the HP Universal CMDB Java API on page 398
➤
General Structure of Application on page 399
Tasks
➤
Retrieve the API Jar File on page 400
➤
Create an Integration User on page 401
Reference
➤
HP Universal CMDB Java API Reference on page 402
➤
Use Cases on page 402
➤
Examples on page 404
Concepts
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Conventions
This chapter uses the following conventions:
➤
UCMDB refers to the Universal Configuration Management database itself.
HP Universal CMDB refers to the application.
➤
UCMDB elements and method arguments are spelled in the case in which
they are specified in the interfaces.
Using the HP Universal CMDB Java API
The HP Universal CMDB Java API is used to integrate applications with the
Universal CMDB (UCMDB). The API provides methods to:
➤
add, remove, and update CIs and relations in the CMDB
➤
retrieve information about the class model
➤
run what-if scenarios
➤
retrieve information about configuration items and relationships
Methods for retrieving information about configuration items and
relationships generally use the Topology Query Language (TQL). For details,
see “Topology Query Language” in Model Management.
Users of the HP Universal CMDB Java API should be familiar with:
➤
The Java programming language
➤
HP Universal CMDB
This section includes the following topics:
398
➤
“Uses of the API” on page 399
➤
“Permissions” on page 399
Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Uses of the API
The API is used to fulfill a number of business requirements. For example:
➤
A third-party system can query the class model for information about
available configuration items (CIs).
➤
A third-party asset management tool can update the UCMDB with
information available only to that tool, thereby unifying its data with data
collected by HP applications.
➤
A number of third-party systems can populate the UCMDB to create a
central UCMDB that can track changes and perform impact analysis.
➤
A third-party system can create entities and relations according to its
business logic, and then write the data to the UCMDB to take advantage of
the UCMDB query capabilities.
➤
Other systems can use the Impact Analysis methods for change analysis.
Permissions
The administrator provides login credentials for connecting with the API.
The API client needs the username and password of an integration user
defined in the UCMDB. These users do not represent human users of
UCMDB, but rather applications that connect to UCMDB.
For more information, see “Create an Integration User” on page 401.
General Structure of Application
There is only one static factory, the UcmdbServiceFactory. This factory is the
entry point for an application. The UcmdbServiceFactory exposes
getServiceProvider methods. These methods return an instance of
UcmdbServiceProvider interface. The client communicates with the server
over HTTP.
The client creates other objects using interface methods. For example, to
create a new query definition, the client:
1 retrieves the query service from the main UCMDB service object
2 retrieves a query factory object from the service object
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3 retrieves a new query definition from the factory
UcmdbServiceProvider provider =
UcmdbServiceFactory.getServiceProvider(HOST_NAME, PORT);
UcmdbService = provider.connect(provider.createCredentials(USERNAME,
PASSWORD), provider.createClientContext("Test"));
TopologyQueryService queryService = ucmdbService.getTopologyQueryService();
TopologyQueryFactory factory = queryService.getFactory();
QueryDefinition queryDefinition = factory.createQueryDefinition("Test Query");
queryDefinition.addNode("Node").ofType("host");
Topology topology = queryService.executeQuery(queryDefinition);
System.out.println("There are " + topology.getAllCIs().size() + " hosts in uCMDB");
The services available from UcmdbService are:
Service Methods
Use
getClassModelService
Information about types of CIs and Relations
getImpactAnalysisService
Analysing the effect of a change in the IT
universe
getTopologyQueryService
Getting information about the IT universe
getTopologyUpdateService
Changing the information in the IT universe
Tasks
Retrieve the API Jar File
Get the ucmdb-api.jar from a BAC or UCMDB server installation. Extract the
jar file from ucmdb-api.war, found in the AppServer\webapps directory on
the server. Inside the war archive, ucmdb-api.jar is located in
theWEB-INF\lib directory.
Compile and run your application with ucmdb-api.jar in the classpath.
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Create an Integration User
Applications written with this API set log on with an integration user.
To create an integration user:
1 Log on to the JMX Agent console.
a The URL is http://<UCMDB host>:8080/jmx-console.
b The default user and password are both "admin".
2 On the JMX Agent View page, locate the section labeled "MAM".
3 Click service=MAM Security Services.
4 On the JMX MBean View, locate "java.lang.String createIntegrationUser()"
a Fill in the userName and password fields.
b Click Invoke.
5 Either click Back to MBean View to create more users, or close the JMX
Agent Console.
6 Log on the the UCMDB as an administator.
7 From the Settings tab, run Package Manager.
8 Click the New icon.
9 Enter a name for the new package, and click Next.
10 In the Resource Selection tab, under Settings, click Integration Users.
11 Select a user or users that you created using the JMX Agent console.
12 Click Next and then Finish. Your new package appears in the Package Name
list in the Package Manager.
13 Deploy the package to the users who will run the API applications.
For details, see “Deploy a Package” on page 494.
Reference
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HP Universal CMDB Java API Reference
For full documentation on the available APIs, refer to the HP UCMDB Java
API Reference. These files are located in the following folder:
\\<HP Business Availability Center root directory>\AppServer\
webapps\site.war\amdocs\eng\doc_lib\Solutions_and_Integrations\
UCMDB_JavaAPI\index.html
Use Cases
The following use cases assume two systems:
➤
HP Universal CMDB server
➤
A third-party system that contains a repository of configuration items
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Populating the UCMDB” on page 402
➤
“Querying the UCMDB” on page 403
➤
“Querying the Class Model” on page 403
➤
“Analyzing Change Impact” on page 403
Populating the UCMDB
Use cases:
402
➤
A third-party asset management updates the UCMDB with information
available only in asset management.
➤
A number of third-party systems populate the UCMDB to create a central
CMDB that can track changes and perform impact analysis.
➤
A third-party system creates Configuration Items and Relations according to
third-party business logic to leverage the CMDB query capabilities.
Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Querying the UCMDB
Use cases:
➤
A third-party system gets the Configuration Items and Relations that
represent the SAP system by getting the results of the SAP TQL.
➤
A third-party system gets the list of Oracle servers that have been added or
changed in the last five hours.
➤
A third-party system gets the list of servers whose host name contains the
substring lab.
➤
A third-party system finds the elements related to a given CI by getting its
neighbors.
Querying the Class Model
Use cases:
➤
A third-party system enables users to specify the set of data to be retrieved
from the UCMDB. A user interface can be built over the class model to show
users the possible properties and prompt them for required data. The user
can then choose the information to be retrieved.
➤
A third-party system explores the class model when the user cannot access
the UCMDB user interface.
Analyzing Change Impact
Use case:
A third-party system outputs a list of the business services that could be
impacted by a change on a specified host.
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Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Examples
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Entry Point Example” on page 404
➤
“Query Examples” on page 404
➤
“Topology Query Example” on page 406
➤
“Topology Update Example” on page 407
➤
“Impact Analysis Example” on page 407
Entry Point Example
final String HOST_NAME = "localhost";
final int PORT = 8080;
UcmdbServiceProvider provider =
UcmdbServiceFactory.getServiceProvider(HOST_NAME, PORT);
final String USERNAME = "integration_user";
final String PASSWORD = "integration_password";
Credentials credentials =
provider.createCredentials(USERNAME, PASSWORD),
ClientContext clientContext = provider.createClientContext("Example");
UcmdbService ucmdbService = provider.connect(credentials, clientContext);
Query Examples
The following examples demonstate getting a single class definition and
getting a list of all CIT definitions and their attributes.
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Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Retrieving a Class Definition
ClassModelService classModelService
= ucmdbService.getClassModelService();
String typeName = "disk";
ClassDefinition def =
classModelService.getClassDefinition(typeName);
System.out.println("Type " + typeName + " is derived from type "
+ def.getParentClassName());
System.out.println("Has " + def.getChildClasses().size() +
" derived types");
System.out.println("Defined and inherited attributes:");
for (Attribute attr : def.getAllAttributes().values()) {
System.out.println("Attribute " + attr.getName() +
" of type " + attr.getType());
}
Retrieving the List of CIT Definitions and Attributes
This example queries the attributes for one CIT and prints their names and
types.
ClassModelService classModelService =
ucmdbService.getClassModelService();
for (ClassDefinition def : classModelService.getAllClasses()) {
System.out.println("Type " + def.getName() +
" (" + def.getDisplayName() + ") is derived from type "
+ def.getParentClassName());
System.out.println
("Has " + def.getChildClasses().size() + " derived types");
System.out.println
("Defined and inherited attributes:");
for (Attribute attr : def.getAllAttributes().values()) {
System.out.println
("Attribute " + attr.getName() +
" of type " + attr.getType());
}
}
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Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Topology Query Example
TopologyQueryService queryService =
ucmdbService.getTopologyQueryService();
TopologyQueryFactory queryFactory =
queryService.getFactory();
QueryDefinition queryDefinition =
queryFactory.createQueryDefinition
("Get hosts with more than one network interface");
String hostNodeName = "Host";
QueryNode hostNode =
queryDefinition.addNode(hostNodeName).ofType("host").queryProperty("display_l
abel");
QueryNode ipNode =
queryDefinition.addNode("IP").ofType("ip").queryProperty("ip_address");
hostNode.linkedTo(ipNode).withLinkOfType("contained").atLeast(2);
Topology topology = queryService.executeQuery(queryDefinition);
Collection<TopologyCI> hosts = topology.getCIsByName(hostNodeName);
for (TopologyCI host : hosts) {
System.out.println("Host " + host.getPropertyValue("display_label"));
for (TopologyRelation relation : host.getOutgoingRelations()) {
System.out.println
(" has IP " + relation.getEnd2CI().getPropertyValue("ip_address"));
}
}
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Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
Topology Update Example
TopologyUpdateService topologyUpdateService =
ucmdbService.getTopologyUpdateService();
TopologyUpdateFactory topologyUpdateFactory =
topologyUpdateService.getFactory();
TopologyModificationData topologyModificationData =
topologyUpdateFactory.createTopologyModificationData();
CI host = topologyModificationData.addCI("host");
host.setPropertyValue("host_key", "test1");
CI ip = topologyModificationData.addCI("ip");
ip.setPropertyValue("ip_address", "127.0.0.10");
ip.setPropertyValue("ip_domain", "DefaultDomain");
topologyModificationData.addRelation("contained", host, ip);
topologyUpdateService.create
(topologyModificationData, CreateMode.IGNORE_EXISTING);
Impact Analysis Example
ImpactAnalysisService impactAnalysisService =
ucmdbService.getImpactAnalysisService();
ImpactAnalysisFactory impactFactory =
impactAnalysisService.getFactory();
ImpactAnalysisDefinition definition =
impactFactory.createImpactAnalysisDefinition();
definition.addTriggerCI(disk).withSeverity
(impactFactory.getSeverityByName("Warning(2)"));
definition.useAllRules();
ImpactAnalysisResult impactResult =
impactAnalysisService.analyze(definition);
AffectedTopology affectedCIs =
impactResult.getAffectedCIs();
for (AffectedCI affectedCI : affectedCIs.getAllCIs()) {
System.out.println("Affected " +
affectedCI.getType() + " " + affectedCI.getId() +
" - severity " + affectedCI.getSeverity());
}
407
Chapter 10 • The HP Universal CMDB Java API
408
11
Working with the Dashboard API
This chapter describes how to retrieve a list of all available views in an
HP Business Availability Center system through a URL-based query to the
database.
This chapter includes:
➤
Building Queries on page 409
➤
Query Examples on page 412
Building Queries
You use the Dashboard API to query the database and return a list of views
in XML format.
Tip: You can use XSLT to convert the XML output into any other format
(commonly text or HTML). For example, using basic XSLT transformations,
you can produce HTML reports that are formatted to fit on mobile devices.
These reports can be served via a mobile portal to display critical Business
Availability Center views on users’ mobile phones.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Query Syntax” on page 410
➤
“Main Parameters Used in the Query” on page 410
409
Chapter 11 • Working with the Dashboard API
Query Syntax
The basic syntax of the query is as follows:
http://<Gateway Server>/topaz/bam/BAMOpenApi?customerId=<customer
ID>&userName=<user name>&password=<password>&command=<command
parameter>
Depending on the command parameter defined, additional parameters may
also be included.
Main Parameters Used in the Query
The following table lists the parameters that must be defined in the query.
Parameter
Description
customerID
HP Business Availability Center customers should
specify 1. HP Software-as-a-Service customers
should specify their unique customer ID.
userName
Specify a user name defined in HP Business
Availability Center. The query does not encrypt the
login credentials.
password
Specify the password for the user name provided.
The query does not encrypt the login credentials.
command
Specify one of the following values:
getViews – Specify to retrieve all views from the
CMDB. No other parameters are required.
getNodes – Specify to retrieve all child nodes of a
specified view (you must also specify the view for
which to retrieve child nodes in the viewName
parameter); if using this command parameter you
can also set the following parameters: showTooltip,
depth, layout, xsltURL, responseContentType
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Chapter 11 • Working with the Dashboard API
Parameter
Description
viewName
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
include this parameter in the query and specify the
view to retrieve. You can set the value to
ticker_all_views to retrieve all views and their
nodes.
showTooltip
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
you can include this parameter in the query to
specify whether to display Dashboard’s KPI tooltip
data, either true to display data or false to not. The
default value is false.
depth
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
you can include this parameter in the query to
specify the number of levels in the view to display.
The default value is 1.
layout
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
you can include this parameter in the query to
specify the layout for the query results, either
hierarchical or flat. In flat mode all nodes are
retrieved in a flat list, and in hierarchical mode
nodes are retrieved in the same hierarchy as in the
view. The default value is flat.
xsltURL
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
you can include this parameter in the query to
specify a URL to an .xslt file that transforms the
.xml-format result of the query.
responseContentType
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
and the xsltURL parameter is included in the query,
you can include this parameter in the query to
specify the response MIME type.
getObjectives
If the getNodes command parameter is defined,
you can include this parameter in the query with
the value true to retrieve KPI objective values for
returned KPIs. For details on KPI objectives, see “KPI
Objectives” in Using Dashboard.
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Chapter 11 • Working with the Dashboard API
Query Examples
Below are examples of queries and the data they return.
➤
The following query returns a flat list of all views in the CMDB:
http://myserver/topaz/bam/
BAMOpenApi?customerId=1&userName=admin&password=admin&command=getVie
ws
➤
The following query returns a hierarchical tree showing KPI status and
tooltip information for the Service Measurements view, to a depth of three
child nodes:
http://myserver/topaz/bam/
BAMOpenApi?customerId=1&userName=admin&password=admin&command=getNod
es&viewName=Service%20Measurements&showTooltip=true&depth=3&layout=hierarc
hical
412
Part V
EMS Integrations
414
12
EMS Integration Administration
This chapter describes how to administer the integration of HP Business
Availability Center with Enterprise Management Systems software.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Integration Administration Application Overview on page 416
➤
Understanding the Host, Host-Software Element, or Application-Host
Integration Adapters on page 417
➤
EMS Monitor CI on page 420
➤
Reconciliation of Hosts on page 420
Tasks
➤
Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data) into HP Business
Availability Center on page 422
Reference
➤
EMS Integration Administration User Interface on page 431
Concepts
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Integration Administration Application Overview
HP Business Availability Center has the ability to integrate with existing
EMS (Enterprise Management Systems) software and provides the capability
to build new integrations, use out-of-the-box integrations (for example: HP
OVO, HP Service Manager, or Netscout nGenius), or customize default
integrations (for example, Host or Host-Software Element).
Enterprise Management Systems integrations can integrate alerts generated
by HP Business Availability Center, Dashboard, and Service Level
Management into your Enterprise Management Systems program.
An EMS integration is used to display, in Dashboard, an overview of data
from other applications. It is not a run-time solution where you can see
events and errors as they occur.
The EMS Integrations application provides the following features:
➤
CIT relationships map. You can sketch a CIT relationship map of the
integration you are creating to help you formulate the data assignments that
are described below.
➤
SiteScope Integration Monitors. You can customize the Integration Monitor
configuration files. SiteScope Integration Monitors integrate measurements,
open incidents, alerts, and events generated by Enterprise Management
Systems software into HP Business Availability Center reports.
You access the System Availability Management Administration through a
window in the EMS Integrations application, where you can access a
SiteScope and deploy integration monitors to collect performance and
availability data from your EMS system. This data, which can represent CPU,
disk space, or other information, provides the global status of the EMS
Monitor CI.
➤
416
data assignments. You can create or customize a data assignment for each
integration CI type in the CIT relationship map you sketched previously. An
assignment rule includes a condition and a task. The condition describes
specific characteristics of a CI. The task describes the context menus, KPIs,
rules, rule parameters, and selectors that are to be assigned automatically to
the CI when the condition occurs, if the assignment is running. For details,
see “Assignment Mechanism” in Using Dashboard.
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Understanding the Host, Host-Software Element, or
Application-Host Integration Adapters
This section describes the main concepts of the Host, Application-Host, and
Host-Software Element default integration adapters.
The out-of-the-box Host, Application-Host, and Host-Software Element
integration adapters use out-of-the-box Jython scripts to create the
appropriate topology.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Application-Host Integration Adapter” on page 417
➤
“Host Integration Adapter” on page 418
➤
“Host-Software Element Integration Adapter” on page 418
➤
“Service Manager Integration Adapter” on page 419
Application-Host Integration Adapter
Note: This legacy integration should be used only with SiteScope versions
prior to version 9.5.x. When working with SiteScope 10.0, use the
Host-Software Element integration adapter. For details, see below.
The integration adapter performs the following tasks:
➤
Adds the EMS Monitor CI to the Application CI.
➤
Assigns the Application KPI to the Application CI.
➤
Adds the Host CI to the topology.
➤
Assigns the System KPI to the Host CI.
➤
Adds the Clear Events context menu item that enables you to clear an event.
All the host information (for example: CPU or disk space) available from the
sample provides status information to the EMS Monitor CI.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Note: The integration adapter automatically runs on all existing CIs and
applies to those CIs the topology changes described above.
The status of the Host CI in that topology is grey. To display the status of the
Host CI, set the flag to Host in Jython. By default the flag is set to
Application. For details, see “Topology Settings for Technology Integration
Monitors” in Using System Availability Management.
For details on the System KPI, see “System” in Using Dashboard.
For details on the Clear Events context menu item, see “Show Events” in
Using Dashboard.
Host Integration Adapter
The Host integration adapter performs the following tasks:
➤
Adds the EMS Monitor CI to the Host CI in the topology.
➤
Adds the System KPI to the Host CI.
➤
Adds the Clear Events context menu item that enables you to clear an event.
All the host information (for example, CPU or disk space), available from
the sample provides status information to the Host CI through the EMS
Monitor CI. The status of the Host CI represents the global status of the
host.
For details on the System KPI, see “System” in Using Dashboard.
For details on the Clear Events context menu item, see “Show Events” in
Using Dashboard.
Host-Software Element Integration Adapter
The integration adapter performs the following tasks:
418
➤
Adds the EMS Monitor CI to the Software Element CI.
➤
Assigns the System KPI to the Software Element CI.
➤
Adds the Host CI to the topology.
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
➤
Assigns the System KPI to the Host CI.
➤
Adds the EMS Measurement Menu context menu to the Host CI and to the
Software Element CI.
➤
All the host information (for example: CPU or disk space) available from the
sample provides status information to the EMS Monitor CI.
Note: The integration adapter automatically runs on all existing CIs and
applies to those CIs the topology changes described above.
The status of the Host CI in that topology is grey. To display the status of the
Host CI, set the flag to Host in Jython. By default the flag is set to
Application. For details, see “Topology Settings for Technology Integration
Monitors” in Using System Availability Management.
For details on the System KPI, see “System” in Using Dashboard.
For details on the EMS Measurement context menu, see “EMS Measurement
Menu” in Using Dashboard.
Service Manager Integration Adapter
The integration adapter performs the following tasks:
➤
Adds the EMS Monitor CI to the Business Service CI.
➤
Assigns the Number of Open Incidents KPI to the Business Service CI.
➤
Adds the HP SC Menu context menu to the Business Service CI.
➤
All the host information (for example: CPU or disk space) available from the
sample provides status information to the EMS Monitor CI.
Note: The integration adapter automatically runs on all existing CIs and
applies to those CIs the topology changes described above.
For details on the Number of Open Incidents KPI, see “Number of Open
Incidents” in Using Dashboard.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
For details on the HP SC Menu context menu, see “HP SC Menu” in Using
Dashboard.
EMS Monitor CI
When running the EMS integration generally only one EMS Monitor CI is
created per Host CI. In the process of the integration, if there is a problem
with identifying the DNS name of the host while creating the monitor, more
than one EMS Monitor CI can be created for the host. For example, one
monitor CI has the IP address and the other monitor CI has the DNS name.
When reporting status to the Host CI, only one monitor CI receives the data
and passes status onto the Host CI. The other CIs remain empty and
eventually disappear due to the Aging Mechanism. For details, see
“Removing Out of Date CIs Using the Aging Mechanism” in Model
Management.
Note: The integration adapter automatically runs on all existing CIs and
applies to those CIs the topology changes described above.
Reconciliation of Hosts
The UCMDB (Universal Configuration Management database)
reconciliation service is used to reconcile incomplete hosts with complete
hosts. Incomplete hosts are created in the UCMDB after they are discovered
by the discovery process (from Discovery and Dependency Mapping) or by
SiteScope (the Enable host topology reporting option is set by default).
Complete hosts are created in the UCMDB after they are discovered by the
discovery process.
A complete host is a host with the complete flag set. It is identified by its
MAC address.
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The UCMDB performs the following actions:
1 Copies each Depends on, System monitor, or Monitored by link that links
to an incomplete Host CI to the corresponding complete Host CI (linked to
the same IP), in the UCMDB. The default KPIs attached to the incomplete
Host CIs are also copied to the complete Host CI. If an incomplete Host CI is
part of an SLA, the SLA is copied to the corresponding complete Host CI.
2 Erases the incomplete Host CI from the UCMDB.
The CMDB_ID_MAPPING table in the Management database lists the pairs
of the CMDB IDs of incomplete hosts to the CMDB IDs of the complete
hosts that were processed by the service.
Limitations
The limitations of the reconciliation of hosts are as follows:
➤
After the reconciliation of hosts takes place, the historical reports of
reconciled Host CIs display data at the level of the complete Host CI, only
from the date and time when the reconciliation took place. Host CIs, which
do not need reconciliation, continue to display data.
➤
To restore data at the level of the Host CI, you can run an SLA recalculation
taking into account the recalculation limitations. For details, see
“Recalculation for Agreements” in Using Service Level Management.
➤
Manually modified properties of incomplete Host CIs are not copied to the
complete Host CI.
Tasks
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data) into
HP Business Availability Center
This section describes the processes for integrating data from third-party
sources (EMS data) into HP Business Availability Center, and gives examples.
The flowchart below describes the process required to integrate data from
third-party enterprise management systems (EMS data) into HP Business
Availability Center using SiteScope Integration Monitors.
x
422
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Plan EMS Strategy” on page 423
➤
“Configure the Integration” on page 423
➤
“Display Data in the Event Log” on page 430
➤
“Configure Measurement Filters” on page 430
➤
“Assign Group Permissions” on page 430
1 Plan EMS Strategy
Review the Integration Monitor types. Consider the type of information you
want to see in HP Business Availability Center from your EMS system.
Determine whether one of the specific Integration Monitors meets your
organization’s needs or whether a generic Integration Monitor (Technology
Log File, Database, SNMP Trap, Web Service) is required.
Review the Event and Metrics samples and fields to understand how the
incoming EMS metadata maps to HP Business Availability Center metadata.
For more information, see “Working with SiteScope Integration Monitors”
in Using System Availability Management.
2 Configure the Integration
In the EMS Integrations application, configure the integration as follows:
➤
Sketch a CIT relationship map of the integration you are creating to help
you formulate the data assignments that are described below and to
understand which topology to create.
➤
Open the System Availability Management Administration window where
you can access a SiteScope and deploy integration monitors to collect
performance and availability data from your EMS system. For details, see
“Working with SiteScope Integration Monitors” in Using System Availability
Management.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
➤
Create or customize a data assignment for each integration CI type in the
CIT relationship map you sketched previously. An assignment rule includes
a condition and a task. The condition describes specific characteristics of a
CI. The task describes the KPIs, rules, and context menus that are to be
assigned automatically to the CI when the condition occurs, if the
assignment is running. For details, see “Define Assignment Configuration
Dialog Box” in Using Dashboard.
Note: To change the logic, use one of the following options:
➤
➤
For a specific CI in a specific view, modify the logic for that CI in Admin
> Dashboard > KPIs.
➤
For all the appropriate instances of a CI, retroactively, modify the logic in
Admin > Integrations > EMS Integration Admin. This change is valid for
future instances of the CI.
You can then display the view that is created by the integration.
The view displays the following:
➤
EMS Monitor CIs that were created by the EMS integration.
➤
CIs that were created by the EMS integration and that have a relationship
to the above EMS Monitor CIs.
➤
All hosts with a relationship to either of the CIs mentioned above.
Note: Do not edit or change the view – parts of the view are hidden in
Dashboard. To view the integration topology in a different way, create
another view.
The HP OVO and HP ServiceCenter integrations are out-of-the-box
integrations that enable the user to view HP OVO and HP ServiceCenter
data in HP Business Availability Center.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Example – Create a Host <--> Software Element Integration
To create a Host-Software Element integration:
a Integrate HP Business Availability Center and the appropriate SiteScope.
To specify the name of the host, select Admin > System Availability
Management. Right-click Summary and select New SiteScope. In Main
Settings, enter the name of the host in the Display Name and Host Name
boxes.
b Select Admin > Integrations > EMS Integration Admin, and click to open
the Add Integration dialog box. Enter emsExample in the Data Source
box, select Host <--> Software Element in the Type list, and enter a
description in the Description box.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
c In the Integrations Implementation Test area, click 1. Define the CIT
relationships map to display the sketch of relationships for a typical
Host-Software Element integration.
d In the Integrations Implementation Test area, click 2. Retrieve data from
EMS system using BAC's System Availability Management Administration
(SAM Admin) to open the Summary page of System Availability
Management. In that page, perform the following:
426
➤
Right-click the SiteScope monitor you set up previously and select Edit.
➤
Create a new group EMS.
➤
Under new monitor, select Integration Monitor under Categories and
the Log File Integration under Technology Log File Integration (for
details about the Technology Log File Integration see “Example –
Create a Technology Log File Integration Monitor” on page 427.
➤
Enter content match and the log file path name.
➤
Click Load File.
➤
Click Test Script.
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
➤
In the Topology Settings, select Host-Software Element, Load, Test
Script, and click OK.
For additional information about the monitor, see “Technology Log File
Integration Monitor” in System Availability Management.
e In the Integrations Implementation Test area, under 3. Define the data
assignments rules, select the Host Monitor CIs assignment rule and then
click Start to run the assignment rule. Do the same for the Software
element Monitor CIs assignment rule.
f In the Integrations Implementation Test area, click 4. View the
integration results, to display the topology of the default view named
after the name you gave in the Data Source box in the steps above.
g Select Applications > Dashboard, select the Console tab, and click
emsExample. The topology of the new view is displayed with data.
The integration is complete.
Example – Create a Technology Log File Integration Monitor
To create the Technology Log File Integration monitor, access SiteScope and
create a new monitor. Select the Integration Monitor category, and click
Technology Log File Integration to open the New Technology Log File
Integration monitor page. Enter the following values:
➤
In Content Match, use the following example:
/(.*),(.*),(.*),(.*),(.*),(.*)/
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
➤
In Sample type, use the following example:
8,event8,1,espresso,emsLog,app
8,event8,1,espresso,emsLog,app
➤
In Fields mapping, enter the following example:
#####################################################################
#
EMS Integrations event config file
#
# Use this file to send events to Business Availability Center
#
#
#
# Refer to "Integration Monitor Configuration Files" in SiteScope #
#
documentation for more information.
#
#####################################################################
[$DEFAULT_PARAMETERS$]
################################################
# NOTE: the following parameters are mandatory #
################################################
# Time stamp in seconds since Jan 1st 1970 format.
# Use time() to get the sitescope host time or str_to_seconds() to read a value from the
input event
time_stamp:DOUBLE=time()
# Severity of event. Possible values are:
# SEVERITY_UNKNOWN , SEVERITY_INFORMATIONAL , SEVERITY_WARNING ,
SEVERITY_MINOR , SEVERITY_MAJOR, SEVERITY_CRITICAL
severity:INT=$group2
# The name of the host / device that caused this event. If the name cannot be
determined an IP address can be used instead
target_name=$group3
# Event status or type (e.g "OPEN", "ASSIGNED", "CLOSED")
status="OPEN"
# Subject of event (e.g. CPU , SAP application, Hard Disk ). Middle / High level of
hierarchy describing the event source
# The hierarchy describing an event is in the following format:
# monitor_group (optional) --> object (optional) --> subject --> instance
# More levels can be added above monitor_group by using logical_group, and attr1 - 5
subject=$group4
# Instance of subject that generated the event (e.g "D:\\" ). The lowest level of hierarchy
describing the event source.
# See Subject explanation above.
instance=$group4
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
# Event description. Up to 2000 characters.
description=$group1
# Application / Software from which this event was collected
data_source=$group4
###################################################
# NOTE: The following parameters are optional. #
# Remove comments from entries you wish to use #
###################################################
# IP of the host \ device that caused this event
#target_ip=
# Object of this event (e.g. OS, Network, etc). optional level in the hierarchy describing
the event source
# See Subject explanation above.
#object=
# A unique identifier for this event
event_id=$group0
# For logical grouping
# See Subject explanation above.
#logical_group=
# Monitor group that reported this event. optional level in the hierarchy describing the
event source
# See Subject explanation above.
#monitor_group=
# Severity name in integrated system terminology
#orig_severity_name=
# Operator who acknowledged this event
#acknowledged_by=
# Operator who owns this event
#owner=
# Use with any numeric values you wish to send to Business Availability Center
#value:DOUBLE=
# Additional attributes 1..5
attr1=$group5
#attr2=
#attr3=
#attr4=
# For long string values up to 2000 use attr5
#attr5=
[allRecords]
$MATCH=true
$ACTION=TOPAZ_BUS_POST(event)
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
➤
In Topology Settings, select the Host-Software Element topology.
Update the script.
Test the script by clicking Test Script to view the expected results of the
monitor.
For details, see “Technology Log File Integration Monitor” in System
Availability Management.
3 Display Data in the Event Log
After monitors are defined in System Availability Management
Administration, data can be seen in the Event Log and in Dashboard.
Depending on whether you configure Integration Monitors that use the
metrics data template or Integration Monitors that use the event data
template, you proceed differently to enable the data to be viewed in
HP Business Availability Center.
For the step-by-step process of setting up and using SiteScope monitors, see
“Collect Data on the Performance of an IT Resource” in Using System
Availability Management.
4 Configure Measurement Filters
If you configure a generic integration monitor with an Events sample script,
you must configure measurement filters to enable viewing Integration
Monitor event data in trend reports. In addition, each measurement filter
you create gets added to the UDX Measurement Filters view as a CI. These
CIs can be added to Dashboard views and SLAs. For more information, see
“Working with Measurement Filters” in Platform Administration.
5 Assign Group Permissions
If you configure a generic integration monitor with a Measurements sample
script, you must assign for each defined user, permissions to view SiteScope
groups and their subgroups in System Availability Management reports and
custom reports. For more information, see “Permissions Overview” in
Platform Administration.
Reference
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
EMS Integration Administration User Interface
This section describes:
➤
Add Integration Dialog Box on page 431
➤
Edit Integration Dialog Box on page 433
➤
CIT Relationships Map Dialog Box on page 438
➤
Define Assignment Configuration Dialog Box on page 438
➤
EMS Integrations Admin Page on page 440
Add Integration Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to create a new integration.
To access: Click the New Integration button
EMS Integrations page.
in the
Included in Tasks
“Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data)
into HP Business Availability Center” on page 422
Useful Links
“Integration Administration Application Overview” on
page 416
The initial dialog box includes the following elements:
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Data Source
Enter the name of the integration data source when
you create a custom integration.
Note:
➤ The same data source must be used in the mapping
fields and in the topology section in the integration
monitor. For details, see 2. Retrieve data from EMS
system using BAC’s System Availability Management
Administration (SAM Admin) in “Edit Integration
Dialog Box” on page 433.
➤ The sample must be part of the same data source.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Description
A description of the integration you are creating. The
description is displayed in the EMS Integrations page.
OK
Click the OK button to open the Edit Integration dialog
box.
Type
Select the type of integration you want to create. Select:
➤ Custom Integration. To create a custom integration.
➤ Host. To create a host integration that adds hosts or
reconciles the new hosts with existing hosts and
sends data into the hosts. For details, see
“Understanding the Host, Host-Software Element, or
Application-Host Integration Adapters” on
page 417.
➤ Host <--> Software Element. To create a
host-to-software-element integration. For details, see
“Understanding the Host, Host-Software Element, or
Application-Host Integration Adapters” on
page 417.
➤ Application <---> Host. Legacy integration. To create
an application-to-host integration. For details, see
“Reconciliation of Hosts” on page 420. When you
select Host or Application <---> Host, the integration
automatically runs the assignment rules on all the
existing CIs.
➤ Business Service. To create a business service
connected to EMS monitor entities. For details, see
“HP Service Manager Integration Overview” on
page 442.
Note: When you select Host, Host <--> Software
Element, or Application <---> Host, the integration
automatically runs the assignment rules on all the
existing CIs.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Edit Integration Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to edit an existing integration or to enter
the details of a new integration.
To access: In the EMS Integrations page, select an
integration and click the Edit Integration button
Important
Information
.
➤ Complete each step of the procedure before starting
on the next one.
➤ Do not remove the data source when editing an
integration.
➤ It is recommended to work as much as possible with
the out-of-the-box solutions:
➤ HP ServiceCenter. For details, see “HP Service
Manager Integration” on page 441.
➤ HP OVO. For details, see “HP Operations Manager
Integration” on page 477.
➤ Nescout. For details, see “NetScout nGenius
Integration” on page 487.
➤ Host, Host-Software Element, and Business
Service. For details, see “Understanding the Host,
Host-Software Element, or Application-Host
Integration Adapters” on page 417.
Limitation: For details, “Incident Ignored by EMS” on
page 476.
Included in Tasks
“Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data)
into HP Business Availability Center” on page 422
Useful Links
“Integration Administration Application Overview” on
page 416
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
General Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
HP OM URL
For Operations Manager integration only.
➤ The URL of the HP Operations Manager host.
➤ This field is not mandatory.
➤ This information is used to access the HP Operations
Manager application using the OVO Drill Down
context menu option. For details, see “OVO Drill
Down” in Using Dashboard. For details about the
format of the URL, see “Specify the Server Where HP
Operations Manager is Running” on page 483.
➤ To enter the HP OVO host automatically, select
Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations, select
Integrations with other application, and locate the
The OVO host entry in the Integrations with other
applications - OVO integration table. Modify the
value of the entry.
Limitation: See “OVO Drill Down Event” in Using
Dashboard.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
HP OM User Name
For Operations Manager integration only.
➤ The name of the HP OVO user.
➤ This field is not mandatory.
➤ This information is used to access the HP Operations
Manager application using the OVO Drill Down
context menu option. For details, see “OVO Drill
Down” in Using Dashboard.
➤ To enter the HP OVO user name automatically,
select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations, select
Integrations with other application, and locate the
User of the OVO entry in the Integrations with other
applications - OVO integration table. Modify the
value of the entry.
Limitation: See “OVO Drill Down Event” in Using
Dashboard.
HP OM User
Password
For HP Operations Manager integration only.
➤ This field is not mandatory.
➤ The password of the HP Operations Manager user.
➤ This information is used to access the HP Operations
Manager application using the OVO Drill Down
context menu option. For details, see “OVO Drill
Down” in Using Dashboard.
➤ To enter the HP OVO user password automatically,
select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations, select
Integrations with other application, and locate the
User password of the OVO entry in the Integrations
with other applications - OVO integration table.
Modify the value of the entry.
Limitation: See “OVO Drill Down Event” in Using
Dashboard.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
Integration Implementation Steps Area
Description
Enables you to specify and implement the integration.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Click to create a data assignment rule in the Define
Assignment Configuration dialog box.
Select a data assignment rule and click to edit the rule
in the Define Assignment Configuration dialog box.
Select a data assignment rule and click to delete.
Not applicable.
Select a data assignment rule and click to synchronize
the selected rule.
Select a data assignment rule and click to start the
assignment of the rule to existing and new CIs.
Select a data assignment rule and click to stop the
assignment of the rule.
1. Define the CIT
relationships map
436
Click the link to open the CIT relationship map dialog
box where you can sketch the relationship map for the
integration. This schema is useful to help you draw
which CI types are created and where the EMS
monitors are located so assignment rules can run on
those EMS monitors. For details, see “CIT Relationships
Map Dialog Box” on page 438.
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
2. Retrieve data from
EMS system using
BAC’s System
Availability
Management
Administration (SAM
Admin)
Click the link to open the System Availability
Management application. For details, see “System
Availability Management Administration” in Using
System Availability Management.
Select from where the data is extracted (for example:
Database) and which type of data (measurements,
events or open incidents) is needed.
To set up the HP OVO Event Monitor, see “HP OM
Event Monitor” in Using System Availability
Management.
To set up the HP Service Center Monitor, see “HP
Service Manager Monitor” in Using System Availability
Management.
To set up the Netscout Event Monitor, see “NetScout
Event Monitor” in Using System Availability
Management.
Limitation: If you have previously defined a SiteScope
using this option and you reopen System Availability
Management, the application does not display the
SiteScope you have previously defined.
3. Define the data
assignements rules
Lists the existing data assignment rules for the current
EMS integration adapter.
One rule should be defined per EMS Monitor CI.
Use the available buttons to create, edit, activate or
deactivate rules that map between fields and create the
topology.
Note: It is important to validate the data assignment
rule assignment and if you create a custom assignment
to select the Run on existing CIs option in the Define
Assignment Configuration dialog box.
4. View the
integration results
Click the link to display the view that corresponds to
the integration you have created with all the CIs that
were created by the integration.
Description
The description of the assignment.
Name
The name of the assignment.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Status
The status:
➤ Running. The assignment is running on the
appropriate CIs.
➤ Stopped. The assignment is not running.
CIT Relationships Map Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to add elements and relationships to the
CIT relationships map.
To access: Click Define the CIT relationships map in
the Add Integration Dialog Box.
Important
Information
Sketch the relationships map to help you when you
define the data assignment rules in 1. Define the CIT
relationships map in “Edit Integration Dialog Box” on
page 433.
For details on how to work with the relationships map,
see “Topology Map Overview” in Model Management.
Define Assignment Configuration Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to configure an assignment.
To Access: Click the
page.
438
button in the Edit Integration
Important
Information
After you have created an assignment you cannot
modify the condition. A workaround is to delete the
assignment and to recreate it with a new condition.
Included in Tasks
“Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data)
into HP Business Availability Center” on page 422
Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Condition
The condition is written in XML. It uses parameters to
specify the criteria used to trigger the Task. For details
on the parameters, see “Assignment – Condition” on
page 453.
Description
The description of the assignment.
Name
The name of the assignment.
This field is mandatory.
Run on existing CIs
Set to retroactively run the assignment on existing CIs.
When you select this option, and click OK, the
assignment is run retroactively on the appropriate CIs
with the appropriate conditions.
Note: Selecting this option does not change the status
of the data assignment itself.
Status
It can be:
➤ Assignment Configuration will be stopped after
creation when you are creating a new assignment.
After you configure the assignment the status of the
assignment is automatically set in Stopped status in
the Edit Group page if you are using assignments in
Dashboard or in the Add Integration page if you are
using data assignments in the EMS Integration.
➤ Stopped or Running depending on the status of the
assignment you are editing.
Task
The task is written in XML. It uses parameters to define
the tasks used to assign the KPIs, rules, and context
menus to the selected CI are listed in the following
table. The task that is performed after the assignment is
triggered. For details, see “Assignment – Task” on
page 456.
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Chapter 12 • EMS Integration Administration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Validate
Click the Validate button to validate the XML code in
both the Condition and Task areas and to perform the
indentation of the code.
EMS Integrations Admin Page
Description
Lists existing EMS integrations, and enables you to
define new integrations or edit existing ones.
To access: Select Admin > Integrations > EMS
Integrations Admin
Important
Information
This dialog box also enables you to access the HP OVO
and HP ServiceCenter predefined integrations to
integrate HP OVO or HP ServiceCenter data into
HP Business Availability Center.
Included in Tasks
“Integrate Data from Third-Party Sources (EMS Data)
into HP Business Availability Center” on page 422
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Click to create a new integration. The Add Integration
dialog box opens.
Select an integration and click to edit. The Add
Integration dialog box opens.
Select an integration and click to delete.
440
Description
The description of the integration.
Name
The name of the integration.
13
HP Service Manager Integration
This chapter describes the HP Service Manager/HP ServiceCenter
integration.
Note: HP Business Availability Center integrates with both HP ServiceCenter
and HP Service Manager though only HP Service Manager is mentioned in
this chapter. For details about the supported versions, see “HP Service
Manager Integration Overview” on page 442.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
HP Service Manager Integration Overview on page 442
Tasks
➤
Set Up the Integration of HP Service Manager Data with HP Business
Availability Center Components - Workflow on page 447
➤
View HP Service Manager Data in HP Business Availability Center - Scenario
on page 450
➤
View HP Service Manager Data in Dashboard and Service Level Management
on page 452
➤
Before you Upgrade HP Service Manager From Previous Versions on page 473
Troubleshooting and Limitations on page 474
Concepts
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
HP Service Manager Integration Overview
This section describes the main concepts of the HP Service Manager
integration with HP Business Availability Center.
HP Service Manager software is a comprehensive and fully integrated IT
service management suite that helps you decrease the time it takes to resolve
problems. ITIL-based best practices and a highly scalable service-oriented
architecture let you deploy consistent, integrated processes throughout your
IT organization. HP Service Manager provides the following capabilities:
➤
Automate service management processes for incident, problem, change,
configuration, availability, release, contract, catalog-based requests and
service level management.
➤
Use built-in workflows to document, route and escalate issues for IT service
management processes.
➤
Gain access to comprehensive configuration data through a powerful
Universal CMDB (Universal Configuration Management database).
➤
Deploy solution easily across heterogeneous environments using an open
architecture and web-based framework.
The support matrix is as follows:
Integration Matrix
Integration Type
HP Business Availability Center 8.01
HP Service
Manager 7.1
Incident submission
Yes (with CI Alert Retrieval Service)
Problem Isolation
Yes
EMS (Dashboard, Service Level
Management)
Yes (SiteScope 10.00)
Incident submission
Yes (with CI Alert Retrieval Service)
Problem Isolation
Yes
EMS (Dashboard, Service Level
Management)
Yes (SiteScope 10.00)
HP Service
Manager 7.02
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Integration Matrix
Integration Type
HP Business Availability Center 8.01
HP Service
Manager 7.01
Incident submission
Yes (with legacy URL)
Problem Isolation
No
EMS (Dashboard, Service Level
Management)
Yes (SiteScope 10.00)
Incident submission
Yes (with legacy URL)
Problem Isolation
Yes
EMS (Dashboard, Service Level
Management)
Yes (SiteScope 10.00)
HP ServiceCenter
6.26
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“HP Service Manager Integration with HP Business Availability Center
Components” on page 443
➤
“View Elements Created by the Integration with HP Service Manager” on
page 446
HP Service Manager Integration with HP Business
Availability Center Components
You can integrate separately HP Service Manager with several components
of HP Business Availability Center:
➤
Dashboard
➤
Service Level Management
➤
Alerts
➤
Problem Isolation
For details about how to perform the integration with the HP Business
Availability Center components listed above, see “Set Up the Integration of
HP Service Manager Data with HP Business Availability Center Components
- Workflow” on page 447.
The integration enables the import of CIs from HP Service Manager into the
UCMDB.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Integration With Dashboard
The architecture of the integration of Dashboard and Service Level
Management with HP Service Manager is as follows:
You can view the Number of Open Incidents KPI (based on data from
HP Service Manager) at the business service level in the Dashboard views
and reports. For details about the views, see “View Components” in Using
Dashboard. For example: the Operator/Application support can get visibility
and alerts based on the Number of Open Incidents in HP Business
Availability Center Dashboard alongside operational KPIs.
You can drill down from Dashboard views at the EMS monitor level to
HP Service Manager to view the details of the related incidents. For details
about the available drill downs, see “Menu Options” in Using Dashboard. For
example: the support person can drill down to HP Service Manager to view
the details on the open incidents of the selected service. Based on the
number of incidents and their details, the support person can prioritize the
issues that are the most important.
The assignment of the ServiceCenter EMS integration enriches the relevant
CIs with the appropriate KPIs, rules, and context menus that are to be
assigned automatically to the CIs when the condition occurs, and the
assignment is running.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Integration With Service Level Management
You can define SLAs based on serviceability KPIs (MTTR, MTBF, or MTBSI
KPIs) that are calculated based on incidents that come from HP Service
Manager. For details, see “Agreements in Service Level Management” in
Using Service Level Management.
For example: the HP Service Manager manages SLAs with operational KPIs
(Availability, Performance, or other KPIs) and serviceability KPIs (MTTR,
MTBF, or MTBSI KPIs) using HP Business Availability Center Service Level
Management. The HP Service Manager can review the SLAs statuses
according to the service Availability, Performance, MTTR and MTBF
side-by-side.
Integration With Alerts (Incident Submission)
HP Service Manager retrieves information, using the CI Alert Retrieval
Service, about CI Status alerts triggered in HP Business Availability Center
and automatically manages (open, update, or close) a corresponding
incident in HP Service Manager.
For details, see “Open Incidents Using the CI Alert Retrieval Service” or
“Open an Incident in HP Service Manager Using the Legacy URL” in Alerts.
Integration With Problem Isolation
You can:
➤
Attach a problem in Problem Isolation to an existing or new incident or
problem in HP Service Manager.
➤
Attach a problem snapshot to the incident in HP Service Manager.
➤
Drill down from the incident context in HP Service Manager to the
appropriate problem in Problem Isolation.
➤
Proactively manage problems using the correlation of incidents and requests
for change in HP Service Manager with the operational matrix like
Availability or Performance that are integrated from different sources like
End User Management, into Problem Isolation.
For details on Problem Isolation, see “Problem Isolation and HP Service
Manager Integration” in Using Problem Isolation.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
View Elements Created by the Integration with HP Service
Manager
The HP Service Manager integration creates:
Element
Dashboard
Service Level Management
CIs
EMS Monitor CIs for the monitored HP Service Manager system,
based on the samples sent by the SiteScope HP Service Manager
Monitor.
Status for these CIs can be viewed in Dashboard in the Business
Services, ServiceCenter, and the Service Measurements views, and the
CIs are available to add to SLAs in Service Level Management.
KPIs
“Number of Open Incidents”
KPIs in Using Dashboard
“MTTR (Mean Time to Repair)”,
“MTBF (Mean Time Between
Failures)”, and “MTBSI (Mean Time
Between System Incidents)” KPIs in
Using Service Level Management
Rules
The Number of Open
Incidents KPI (attached to an
EMS Monitor CI) uses the
Number of Open Incidents
monitor rule in Dashboard.
The rule handles the samples
sent to HP Business
Availability Center by the EMS
system.
Each HP Service Manager KPI
(attached to an EMS Monitor CI)
uses its own monitor rule.
For details on the rules, see “List of
Service Level Management Business
Rules” in Using Dashboard
For details on the rule, see
“Number of Open Incidents”
in Using Dashboard.
Tasks
446
Context
Menu
“HP SC Menu” in Using
Dashboard
N/A
Context
Menu
Item
“HP Service Manager” in Using
Dashboard.
N/A
Tooltip
“Number of Open Incidents
Sentence” in Using Dashboard
N/A
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Set Up the Integration of HP Service Manager Data with
HP Business Availability Center Components - Workflow
You can integrate HP Service Manager with Dashboard, Service Level
Management, Problem Isolation, and Alerts to provide the following
capabilities:
➤
Collect information on open incidents for business services in HP Service
Manager and present the information in the Dashboard and the Service
Level Management applications and enable the import of CIs from
HP Service Manager into the UCMDB.
➤
Open incidents in HP Service Manager when an alert is triggered in
HP Business Availability Center.
➤
Integrate Problem Isolation with HP Service Manager to link isolation data
(from Problem Isolation) with incident or problem data (from
HP ServiceCenter), to create a complete problem management lifecycle.
Each integration can be performed separately.
For more information about the integration with HP Business Availability
Center components, see “HP Service Manager Integration Overview” on
page 442.
Note: Each step in the following workflow is optional.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
The flowchart is as follows:
For details about A, see “View HP Service Manager Data in Dashboard and
Service Level Management” on page 452.
For details about B, see “Open Incidents Using the CI Alert Retrieval Service”
or “Open an Incident in HP Service Manager Using the Legacy URL” in
Alerts.
For details about C, see “Configure Problem Isolation and HP Service
Manager Integration” in Using Problem Isolation.
This task includes the following steps:
448
➤
“Configure the Dashboard, Service Level Management and HP Service
Manager Integration” on page 449
➤
“Configure HP Service Manager to Open an Incident When a CI Status Alert
is Triggered in HP Business Availability Center” on page 449
➤
“Configure the Problem Isolation and HP Service Manager Integration” on
page 449
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
➤
“Results” on page 449
1 Configure the Dashboard, Service Level Management and
HP Service Manager Integration
You can collect data from an existing HP Service Manager Server and view
the data in Dashboard and Service Level Management applications.
For details, see “View HP Service Manager Data in Dashboard and Service
Level Management” on page 452.
2 Configure HP Service Manager to Open an Incident When a CI
Status Alert is Triggered in HP Business Availability Center
You can set up HP Service Manager to retrieve information about CI Status
alerts triggered in HP Business Availability Center.
For details, depending on the HP ServiceCenter, HP Service Manager, and
HP Business Availability Center versions you are working with, see “Open
Incidents Using the CI Alert Retrieval Service” or “Open an Incident in
HP Service Manager Using the Legacy URL” in Alerts.
3 Configure the Problem Isolation and HP Service Manager
Integration
You can integrate Problem Isolation with HP Service Manager to link
isolation data (from Problem Isolation) with incident or problem data (from
HP ServiceCenter), to create a complete problem management lifecycle. For
details, see “Configure Problem Isolation and HP Service Manager
Integration” in Using Problem Isolation.
4 Results
The integration of HP Service Manager with HP Business Availability Center
CI Status alerts, Problem Isolation, Universal CMDB, Dashboard, and Service
Level Management enables you to:
➤
View HP Service Manager data in Dashboard and Service Level Management.
➤
Open incidents in HP Service Manager when alerts are triggered in
HP Business Availability Center.
➤
Isolate the problem in Problem Isolation.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
➤
Open an incident or a problem from Problem Isolation.
➤
Attach an isolation to an existing incident/problem.
For a detailed scenario of the complete integration, see “View HP Service
Manager Data in HP Business Availability Center - Scenario” on page 450.
View HP Service Manager Data in HP Business
Availability Center - Scenario
This section provides a scenario for the complete integration of HP Service
Manager with Alerts, Dashboard, Problem Isolation, and Universal CMDB.
1 The CRM application owner asks the HP Business Availability Center
administrator to configure two alerts for the CI representing her application,
as follows:
➤
The first alert is configured to trigger when the status of the Performance
KPI attached to the CI worsens.
➤
The second alert is configured to trigger when the status of the
Performance KPI changes to OK and remains OK for more than 20
minutes.
➤
The CRM application owner is the alert recipient.
Both alerts are configured to open incidents in HP Service Manager when
they are triggered.
2 Some time after the alerts are put in production, the status of the CI’s KPI
changes to Warning and the first alert is triggered.
3 When HP Service Manager invokes the CI Alert Retrieval Service (in the next
cycle), an incident is created for the application CI with a low urgency.
4 A few minutes later, the status of the Performance KPI attached to the CI
changes to Critical. The CRM application owner received a notification that
the first alert was triggered.
5 When HP Service Manager invokes the Alert Retrieval Service (in the next
cycle), the incident severity is updated to Critical and all of the alert details
are appended to the incident.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
6 The Tier 1 support looks at the opened incidents in HP Service Manager, and
detects that a new incident was submitted. When he reviews the incident
details, he understands that the CRM business service has a critical
performance issue that was triggered recently. He also notices that the
incident was automatically submitted by HP Business Availability Center.
7 The Tier 1 support takes ownership of the incident and decides to triage it.
Using HP Service Manager, he launches the Problem Isolation application
directly in the context of the CRM application. The isolation of the problem
starts at the relevant CI as the CI ID is part of the data sent by HP Business
Availability Center to HP Service Manager when the alert was triggered and
is associated with the incident.
8 Using the isolation process, the Tier 1 support finds that the problem resides
in the Database. He decides to send the incident to the DBAs. The Tier 1
support generates a Snapshot report with all the isolation details and
attaches it to the incident, so the DBAs have all the required information for
further analysis.
9 The DBAs solve the issue.
10 The status of the Performance KPI attached to the CI representing the CRM
application changes to OK and a follow-up alert is triggered. The CRM
application owner receives a notification.
11 The triggered alert opens an incident in HP Service Manager with the same
identity but with the OK status. The incident is updated with the new data,
which overrides the existing data, and its status changes to Close.
12 The CRM application owner views the CRM business service health through
the HP Business Availability Center Dashboard. She can view, in real time,
the status of the availability and performance of the CRM application as
well as the number of open incidents.
13 As she reviews the status of the CRM application, she notices that the
number of open incidents is increasing. Using Dashboard, she can review
the incident’s details to better understand the situation and take appropriate
action.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
View HP Service Manager Data in Dashboard and Service
Level Management
You can collect data from an existing HP Service Manager Server and view
the data in Dashboard and Service Level Management applications.
Note: Complete each step before beginning the next step.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
The flowchart is as follows:
For details about K, see “Configure the Service Manager Adapter When
Integrating Dashboard and Problem Isolation with HP Service Manager” in
Model Management.
For details about Complete integration, see “Set Up the Integration of
HP Service Manager Data with HP Business Availability Center Components
- Workflow” on page 447.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
This task includes the following steps:
454
➤
“Prerequisites” on page 455
➤
“Enable the servlet and the listener for connect-it” on page 455
➤
“Modify the web.xml File” on page 456
➤
“Configure the Symphony Adapter for HP Service Manager” on page 458
➤
“Modify the application-context.xml File” on page 461
➤
“Modify the web.xml File in the Web Client Deployment to Enable LW-SSO”
on page 463
➤
“Initialize the Sample Event in HP Service Manager” on page 464
➤
“Set Up and Configure Connect-IT” on page 465
➤
“Define HP Service Manager Tables for External Access to the Clocks” on
page 465
➤
“Correct the Clocks WSDL” on page 466
➤
“Add the Type Field to the logical.name Link Line” on page 467
➤
“Create a Corresponding HP Service Manager User” on page 468
➤
“Federate HP Business Availability Center and HP Service Manager Data” on
page 468
➤
“Configure the HP Service Manager Monitor in SiteScope” on page 468
➤
“Specify the HP Service Manager URL in the Infrastructure Settings” on
page 469
➤
“Configure the HP Service Manager Integration Adapter” on page 470
➤
“Enable Accessing HP Service Manager From Within Dashboard” on
page 471
➤
“Specify the State and Severity of Open Incidents to Be Displayed” on
page 472
➤
“Include Service Center CIs in Service Level Management Agreements” on
page 472
➤
“Results” on page 473
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
1 Prerequisites
➤
The HP Service Manager server, Web tier, and Windows client components
must be installed. For details, see HP Service Manager Installation guide.
➤
Optional. If you want HP Service Manager to use the SSL-based Trusted
Sign-on protocol, configure it according to the instructions in the
HP Service Manager online help.
Note: Plan to put both the HP Service Manager Web tier and the Symphony
Adapter webapp in the same container, so you can use the same certificate
for both.
2 Enable the servlet and the listener for connect-it
Note: Perform this step if you use HP ServiceCenter 6.26. Skip this step if
you use other versions.
Once the server is installed, you can start and stop it using the Windows
services utility, or using the net start and net stop commands. It is
recommended that you do the following immediately upon completion of
the installation and configuration dialogs:
a In HP Service Manager, stop the server using the net stop ServiceCenter
command.
b Edit the sc.cfg file found in the RUN folder of the server installation
folder. Typically the location of this folder is
c:\Program Files\Peregrine Systems\ServiceCenter 6.2\Server\RUN.
c Enable the servlet and the listener for connect-it on port 12670. The
other parameters should be commented out to disable unnecessary
processes that might slow down startup and shutdown and to avoid
cluttering the sc.log file with lots of unnecessary messages.
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Make sure that the bolded lines in the modified sc.cfg file are as follows
(the line scenter -listener:<listener_port> should provide the port of the
listener):
#
# ServiceCenter Server Configuration File
#
# Used by ServiceCenter service to start the ServiceCenter processes.
#
####################################################################
#
# Copyright 1994-2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
# All Rights Reserved
#
####################################################################
#
# start a J2EE/servlet listener for HTTP clients: Windows, web, SOAP-API
#
scenter -servletcontainer -httpPort:13080 -httpsPort:13443
#
# Start a listener for Get-It, Connect-It, ODBC driver
#
scenter -listener
#
# start a listener for SCAuto
#
scenter -listener:12670
#
# start background schedulers
#
#scenter system.start
3 Modify the web.xml File
This step is needed for the integration of HP Service Manager and
HP Business Availability Center.
After installing and configuring LW-SSO, you must modify the web.xml file.
a In HP Service Manager, access the web.xml file and change the value of
<param-value> to false for the for sc.querysecurity for HP ServiceCenter
or querysecurity for HP Service Manager in the <param-name>.
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For example, the web.xml file can be located at:
Integration with
Location
HP ServiceCenter 6.2x
\Apache Software Foundation\Tomcat 5.5\webapps\sc\
WEB-INF.
HP Service Manager 7.01
\Apache Software Foundation\Tomcat 5.5\webapps\sm7\
WEB-INF
HP Service Manager 7.02
HP Service Manager 7.10
Example: for HP ServiceCenter see the text in bold in the code below.
<!-- Enables submission of form when the user presses the ENTER key. -->
<init-param>
<param-name>sc.autosubmit</param-name>
<param-value>true</param-value>
</init-param>
<!-- Change value (e.g. 1, or 2) to increase horizontal spacing, useful for avoiding
clipping problems with localized versions -->
<init-param>
<param-name>sc.hscale</param-name>
<param-value>0</param-value>
</init-param>
<!-********************************************************
The following parameters cannot be supplied in the URL: they can only be changed
in web.xml
********************************************************
-->
<init-param>
<param-name>sc.querysecurity</param-name>
<param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
<!-- Control the encryption of network communication between the application server
and the ServiceCenter server -->
<init-param>
<param-name>sc.ssl</param-name>
<param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
b Restart the Tomcat container using the Net stop tomcat and Net start
tomcat commands.
4 Configure the Symphony Adapter for HP Service Manager
This step is performed for both the integration of Dashboard and Service
Level Management with HP Service Manager and the integration of Problem
Isolation with HP Service Manager. Do not perform this step for the
integration of HP Service Manager with Dashboard and Service Level
Management if you already performed it for the integration of HP Service
Manager with Problem Isolation.
Note: Perform this step if you use LW-SSO. Skip this step if you do not use
LW-SSO.
This section describes how to configure the Symphony Adapter for
HP Service Manager:
a In HP Service Manager, locate the web-inf\classes folder for the
SymphonyAdapter webapp.
b Copy the cacerts file and client keystore file you created using the
makeadaptercert script into the web-inf\classes folder of the
SymphonyAdapter webapp. For details, see the HP Service Manager
online help.
c Edit the SymphonyAdapter.properties file to correct these settings for
your installation:
458
➤
servicecenter.ws.targetLocationURL. Edit the host and port of the server
where HP Service Manager is installed as appropriate for your
installation. You should use the fully qualified domain name to specify
the host, because this information is going to be used to rewrite the URL.
➤
servicecenter.webtier.URL. Update this property to correctly represent
the hostname and port for the current Tomcat container. You must
provide the fully qualified domain name, because this information is
going to be used to rewrite URLs, which is sent back to HP Business
Availability Center with a 307 redirect.
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Important: Do not specify localhost. If you do, HP Business Availability
Center tries to launch the HP Service Manager web user interface locally,
which does not work.
➤
clientcerts.keystore. Update this parameter to point to the client keystore
you created using makeadaptercert. You must use a full path name
starting from the C: drive and using double slashes, for example:
D:\\Program Files\\Apache Software Foundation\\Tomcat
5.5\\webapps\\SymphonyAdapter\\WEB-INF\\classes\\<machine
name>.client.keystore
➤
clientcerts.keystore.password. Specify the correct pass-phrase for the
client keystore specified above.
➤
truststore. Specify the full path to the updated cacerts file you created.
➤
truststore.password. Specify the pass-phrase for the cacerts file. If you
did not change it, it should still be changeit.
Note: If a single sign-on technology is configured (LW-SSO or
SiteMinder), the HP Service Manager login panel is not displayed.
d In the Acegi configuration in the HP Service Manager web tier or
Symphony Adapter for LW-SSO, edit the lwssofmconf.xml file in
WEB-INF/classes directory of the location where the HP Service Manager
webtier was deployed.
➤
Locate the <domain> element under <web-lwsso>:
<web-lwsso>
<lwsso startLWSSO="enabled">
<domain>my.domain.com</domain>
<crypto cipherType="symmetricBlockCipher"
engineName="AES" paddingModeName="CBC" keySize="256"
encodingMode="Base64Url"initString="password">
</crypto>
<expirationPeriod>60</expirationPeriod>
</lwsso>
➤
Replace the bolded strings in the file with the fully qualified domain to
which the web tier servers belong and where those servers are sharing
authentication credentials via LW-SSO.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
➤
In addition, replace the bolded password string with the password to
the server where the HP Service Manager webtier was deployed; it has
to match between the systems that are sharing credentials using
LW-SSO in their respective config files. For example, if your HP Service
Manager web tier is installed on sc.mydomain.com and HP Business
Availability Center is set up on bac.mydomain.com, the domain you
would use in this configuration file is mydomain.com (both in the
<lwsso><domain>mydomain.com</domain> part and under the
<protectedDomains><url>mydomain.com</url></
protectedDomains>) below.
➤
Add your domains to the <protectedDomains> element as follows:
<protectedDomains>
<url>fully_qualified_domain</url>
<url>fully_qualified_domain</url>
<url>fully_qualified_domain</url>
</protectedDomains>
➤
460
Save changes.
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
5 Modify the application-context.xml File
This step is performed for both the integration of Dashboard and Service
Level Management with HP Service Manager and the integration of Problem
Isolation with HP Service Manager. Do not perform this step for the
integration of HP Service Manager with Dashboard and Service Level
Management if you already performed it for the integration of HP Service
Manager with Problem Isolation.
Note: Perform this step if you use LW-SSO. Skip this step if you do not use
LW-SSO.
This section describes how to modify the application-context.xml file:
a In HP Service Manager, you must modify the application-context.xml file
in WEB-INF/classes directory of the HP Service Manager webtier. Make
sure that the filterChainProxy bean definition contains the lwSsoFilter
string as shown in the sample:
<bean id="filterChainProxy" class="net.sf.acegisecurity.util.FilterChainProxy">
<property name="filterInvocationDefinitionSource">
<value>
CONVERT_URL_TO_LOWERCASE_BEFORE_COMPARISON
PATTERN_TYPE_APACHE_ANT
/**=httpSessionContextIntegrationFilter,lwSsoFilter,anonymousProcessingFilter
</value>
</property>
</bean>
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b Make sure that the following lines are available (uncommented) at the
bottom of the application-context.xml:
<bean id="lwSsoFilter"
class="com.peregrine.eclipse.web.lwsso.LwSsoPreAuthenticationFilter">
<property name="authenticationManager">
<ref bean="authenticationManager"/>
</property>
<property name="defaultRole">
<value>ROLE_PRE</value>
</property>
</bean>
<bean id="lwSsoIntegrationBean"
class="com.peregrine.eclipse.web.lwsso.LwSsoIntegration"/> </bean>
For detailed instructions on configuring LWSSO refer to the LWSSO
documentation. Save changes.
c Restart the Tomcat container using Net stop tomcat and Net start tomcat
commands.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
6 Modify the web.xml File in the Web Client Deployment to
Enable LW-SSO
Note: Perform this step if you use LW-SSO. Skip this step if you do not use
LW-SSO.
Perform the following changes:
a In HP Service Manager, locate and uncomment the LWSSO filter and
filter-mapping elements in the web.xml file:
<!--LWSSO filter for integrations using HP lightweight single sign-on
PLEASE NOTE: This filter REQUIRES Java 1.5 and will cause this web
application to fail if enabled on a Java 1.4 JVM. Uncomment this
filter and the associated filter-mapping, and see application-context.xml
for additional configuration needed for LWSSO. -->
<filter>
<filter-name>LWSSO</filter-name>
<filter-class>com.hp.sw.bto.ast.security.lwsso.LWSSOFilter</filter-class>
</filter>
<filter-mapping>
<filter-name>LWSSO</filter-name>
<url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>
b Locate the isCustomAuthenticationUsed context-param element in the
web.xml file. Set the param-value element to false as follows:
<context-param>
<param-name>isCustomAuthenticationUsed</param-name>
<param-value>false</param-value>
</context-param>
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
7 Initialize the Sample Event in HP Service Manager
Note: Perform this step if you work with HP ServiceCenter 6.26 or
HP Service Manager 7.0x. Skip this step if you work with other versions.
Open the HP Service Manager application and perform the following steps:
a From the System Navigator, select Menu Navigation > Tailoring >
Database Manager.
b Select the Administrative Mode option.
c Enter apm.global.list.entry in the Form box.
d Click Search to open a blank record from the globallists file.
e Click Search to display a list of lists.
f Click the List Options button and select the Mass Update option. A blank
update screen opens. This form is identical in appearance to the lister
record, but contains different options.
g Click Expiration. Set the date in the Expiration box to any date in the
past, for example, 01/01/90 and click Next.
h Click Simple Update to reset the expiration date of all the lists in the
globallists file.
i Return to the home menu.
j Enter *aapm.server.initer in the command line and click Enter.
k Log out of HP Service Manager and log in again.
All the lists in the system are regenerated and HP Service Manager
processes all the current records.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
8 Set Up and Configure Connect-IT
Note: Perform this step if you use HP ServiceCenter 6.26. Skip this step if
you use other versions.
You must set up and configure Connect-IT for the integration with
HP Business Availability Center if you want to automatically open tickets in
HP ServiceCenter when relevant alerts are triggered in HP Business
Availability Center. For details, see the BAC KPI Monitoring to Incident
Management Integration guide.
9 Define HP Service Manager Tables for External Access to the
Clocks
To enable the integration, you must load the appropriate .unl to provide
external access to the clocks table in HP Service Manager. This step enables
the display of the Number of Incidents KPI in Dashboard. This can be done
as follows (note that the probsummary table is accessed by default without
.unl):
➤
In HP Service Manager, manually within HP Service Manager if the tables
are used for other external internal integrations. For details, refer to the HP
Service Manager documentation.
➤
Using the configuration file supplied with HP Business Availability Center to
enable external access to the clocks:
a Locate the appropriate configuration file and copy it to a local directory.
Integration with
File on the HP Business Availability Center DVD:
HP ServiceCenter 6.26
Ticketing_Integration_extaccess_def.unl
HP Service Manager 7.01
Clocks_extaccess_sm702_10Nov08.unl available in the
Setup\SM_Unloads\SM7.1 directory.
HP Service Manager 7.02
HP Service Manager 7.10
b Open the HP Service Manager client that is attached to the server used
for the integration.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
c Select Toolkit > Database Manager.
d In the menu on the upper right side of the Database Manager, select
Import/Load.
e Select the configuration file you copied to the local directory in the first
step.
f Click the Load FG button.
g Verify that the clocks table has the values described below. If the values
do not match, edit the clocks table in HP Service Manager so that the
values are the same as in the below table.
Field
Caption
Type
events[start]
start
DateTimeType
events[stop]
stop
DateTimeType
name
name
StringType
Key.char
clockId
StringType
sysmodtime
sysmodtime
DateTimeType
Type
type
StringType
Key.numeric
clockKey
DecimalType
10 Correct the Clocks WSDL
You must correct the clocks WSDL. This step enables the display of the
Number of Incidents KPI in Dashboard.
Note: Perform the following steps if you are working with HP Service
Manager 7.0x and 7.10. Skip this step if you are working with other versions.
a In the HP Service Manager client, select Menu Navigation > Tailoring >
Web Services > WSDL Configuration, enter Clocks in the Service Name
field, and click Search.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
b Click the Field tab, make a modification (and remember the
modification) and click Save.
c Enter Clocks in the Service Name field, and click Search.
d Click the Field tab, undo the modification and click Save and OK.
11 Add the Type Field to the logical.name Link Line
This step enables EMS to count incidents that were manually opened in
HP Service Manager and to display of the Number of Incidents KPI in
Dashboard.
Note:
➤
Perform this step only if you use HP Service Manager 7.10 . For new
HP Service Manager 7.10 customers, EMS calculates ONLY incidents that
were opened after the tailoring process was applied. For existing
customers, the previous HP Service Manager version is populating these
fields and the integration works even after you upgrade to HP Service
Manager to 7.10. Skip this step if you use other versions.
➤
You must perform this step before you configure the SiteScope HP Service
Manager Monitor accessed in Business Availability Center by clicking
Admin > Integrations > EMS Integration Admin. For details, see
“Configure the HP Service Manager Integration Adapter” on page 470.
Only incidents that were opened after this step is displayed in Business
Availability Center Dashboard.
Add the Type field to the logical.name link line in the probsummary link
record.
a In HP Service Manager, login with a System Administrator user (for
example, falcon).
b Select Menu Navigation > Tailoring > Tailoring Tools > Links.
c Enter probsummary in the Name field and click Search.
d Set the cursor on the first line that includes logical.name in the Source
Field Name field (line 14).
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
e Select Line in the Options menu.
f Add type below company in both the Source field To/Post From columns
and in the Target field From/Post To columns.
g Click Save, Back, and then OK.
12 Create a Corresponding HP Service Manager User
You must create a dedicated user in HP Service Manager. The user should be
used solely for the purposes of the HP Business Availability Center/SiteScope
integration. This step enables the display of the Number of Incidents KPI in
Dashboard.
The HP Service Manager machine and the SiteScope machine must share the
same time zone. They must also use the same date format (SiteScope date
format): dd/mm/yy.
Use the value for the Username and Password fields when configuring the
monitor that you created in HP Service Manager.
13 Federate HP Business Availability Center and HP Service
Manager Data
This step is performed for the integration of Dashboard with HP Service
Manager and the integration of Problem Isolation with HP Service Manager.
Do not perform this step for the integration of HP Service Manager with
Dashboard if you already performed it for the integration of HP Service
Manager with Problem Isolation. This step enables the display of incidents
and changes in the Console tab. For details, see “Changes and Incidents
Tab” in Using Dashboard.
You must configure the HP ServiceCenter/Service Manager Adapter to
federate Universal CMDB data with HP Service Manager CMDB data. For
details on this topic, see “Configure the Service Manager Adapter When
Integrating Dashboard and Problem Isolation with HP Service Manager” in
Model Management.
14 Configure the HP Service Manager Monitor in SiteScope
Do the following:
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
a You must synchronize HP Service Manager and SiteScope so their time
zones are the same. You must match their System Time in the Windows
or Unix operating system.
b You must make sure that the user you are using in SiteScope is the user
you defined in “Create a Corresponding HP Service Manager User” on
page 468. For details about the user, see “Create a Corresponding HP
Service Manager User” on page 468.
c In Business Availability Center, you must configure the HP Service
Manager monitor. For details, see “HP Service Manager Integration –
Workflow” in Using System Availability Management.
15 Specify the HP Service Manager URL in the Infrastructure
Settings
The HP Service Manager URL is used when drilling down from Business
Availability Center to HP Service Manager using the HP SC Menu context
menu item.
To specify the HP Service Manager URL, in Business Availability Center,
select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings,
select Foundations, select Integrations with other applications, and, in the
Integrations with other applications - HP ServiceCenter - Ticketing
Integration table, enter the appropriate URL in the ServiceCenter/Service
Manager web tier URL entry, using the following format: <protocol>://
<host_name>:<port>/<web_app_name>/ where host_name is the name of
the HP Service Manager server, port is the port number of the HP Service
Manager server, and web_app_name is the name of the application.
For example, the URL of HP Service Manager is:
Integration with
URL:
HP ServiceCenter 6.2x
<protocol>://<host_name>:<port>/sm62/).
For example, http://fando:8080/sm62/.
HP Service Manager 7.01
<protocol>://<host_name>:<port>/sm70/).
For example, http://fando:8080/sm70/.
HP Service Manager 7.02
and 7.10
<protocol>://<host_name>:<port>/sm7/).
For example, http://fando:8080/sm7/.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
16 Configure the HP Service Manager Integration Adapter
The HP Service Manager integration adapter is predefined. You must
configure it and make sure that the assignment rule is running.
The HP Service Manager integration adapter is predefined.
In Business Availability Center, select Admin > Integrations > EMS
Integration Admin, select ServiceCenter and click Edit. In the Edit
Integration dialog box:
a Configure the HP Service Manager Monitor. The monitor is used to
retrieve data from the EMS system using System Availability
Management Administration. You add the HP Service Manager Monitor
to a SiteScope monitor group created for this monitor and other
Integration Monitor types. It is recommended that you configure
Integrations Monitors only after a connection between the SiteScope and
HP Business Availability Center is established. For details, see “HP Service
Manager Integration – Workflow” in Using System Availability
Management.
Note: SiteScope cannot be deployed behind a firewall. SiteScope and the
monitored system must be on the same LAN or special firewall
configuration might be required.
b Activate the data assignment rule. Make sure that the assignment rule is
running.
When the EMS monitor sample includes open incidents in its data
source, the Number of Open Incidents KPI (2600), the Number of Open
Incidents rule (2600), the HP SC Menu context menu (hpsc), the
HP Service Manager context menu item, and the HP Open Incidents
tooltip (2600) are assigned to the EMS Monitor CI.
You can use the EMS Integrations application to customize an HP Service
Manager integration. The integration forwards the retrieved data
captured from the HP Service Manager system by the SiteScope
HP Service Manager monitor to HP Business Availability Center, and
creates the appropriate topology that is used to display the data in
Dashboard. For details on the possible customizations, see “Define
Assignment Configuration Dialog Box” on page 438.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
17 Enable Accessing HP Service Manager From Within Dashboard
You must disable the query security of the HP Service Manager application
to enable accessing the application, through the right-click HP Service
Manager menu option in Dashboard. You still have the necessary
capabilities to properly secure your system without the query hash.
In HP Service Manager, to enable accessing HP Service Manager from within
Dashboard:
a Edit the web.xml file. The location of the file depends on the type of web
application server the web tier is deployed on. It is usually located in the
HP Service Manager home directory under the Apache home directory.
b In the file, locate the <!-- Specify the ServiceCenter server host and port
location --> section.
c Add the following strings into the section:
Integration with
URL:
HP ServiceCenter 6.2x
<context-param>
<param-name>sc.querysecurity</param-name>
<param-value>false</param-value>
</context-param>
HP Service Manager 7.01
<init-param>
<param-name>querySecurity</param-name>
<param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
HP Service Manager 7.02
HP Service Manager 7.10
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
18 Specify the State and Severity of Open Incidents to Be
Displayed
To specify the state and severity of the open incidents to be displayed, you
can edit the parameters of the Number of Open Incidents rule parameters:
➤
For the Number of Open Incidents KPIs attached to a specific EMS Monitor
CI. In Business Availability Center, select Admin > Dashboard > KPIs, select
the view and the EMS Monitor CI, edit the Number of Open Incidents rule,
and edit the Initial State, Final State, and Severity parameters.
➤
Globally, for all KPIs defined with the Number of Open Incidents rule. In
Business Availability Center, select Admin > Dashboard > Repositories >
Business Rules, clone or override the Number of Open Incidents rule, and
edit the Initial State, Final State, and Severity parameters.
For details on the parameters, see “Number of Open Incidents” in Using
Dashboard.
Note: The values available for the Initial State, Final State, and Severity
parameters reflect the values defined in HP Service Manager.
19 Include Service Center CIs in Service Level Management
Agreements
You can include Service Center EMS Monitor CIs in your agreements in
Service Level Management. Service Level Management contains KPIs and
rules specifically configured for Service Center EMS Monitor CIs. The MTTR,
MTBF, and MTBSI KPIs and the MTTR, MTBF, and MTBSI rules are dedicated
for this integration.
You must also configure the incident initial and final state in those rules. For
details, see “Incident State and Severity Values” in Using Service Level
Management.
For details on the integration, see “Integration with HP Service Manager Overview” in Using Service Level Management.
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
20 Results
After the task is performed, HP Service Manager data is integrated into
HP Business Availability Center. You can:
➤
View HP Service Manager data in Dashboard and Service Level
Management:
SiteScope automatically creates the appropriate topology when HP Service
Manager data is integrated into HP Business Availability Center. HP Business
Availability Center adds the data to the Business Services, ServiceCenter, and
Service Measurement views, and you can display these views in Dashboard
and Service Level Management.
➤
Drill down to HP Service Manager from Dashboard views:
In Dashboard, in the Business Services, ServiceCenter, and Service
Measurement views, use the HP ServiceCenter option available for
HP Service Manager CIs to access the relevant incident in the HP Service
Manager application. For information about the HP Service Manager
application, consult the HP ServiceCenter documentation.
Before you Upgrade HP Service Manager From Previous
Versions
It is recommended to back up the following files before performing the
upgrade procedure to HP Service Manager 7.02. For details on the upgrade
see HP Service Manager documentation.
➤
ServiceCenter Server
➤
<ServiceCenter Server Home>/RUN/sc.ini
➤
<ServiceCenter Server Home>/RUN/cacerts
➤
<ServiceCenter Server Home>/RUN/trustedclients.jks
➤
<ServiceCenter Server Home>/RUN/hostname.devlab.ad.keystore (this
filename varies by machine)
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Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
➤
➤
ServiceCenter Webtier
➤
<SC.WAR DIR>/WEB_INF/cacerts
➤
<SC.WAR DIR>/WEB_INF/ hostname.devlab.ad.client.keystore (this
filename varies by machine)
➤
<SC.WAR DIR>/WEB_INF/web.xml
➤
<SC.WAR DIR>/WEB_INF/classes/application-context.xml
➤
<SC.WAR DIR>/WEB_INF/classes/lwssofmconf.xml
Symphony Adapter
➤
< SymphonyAdapter.war DIR>/WEB_INF/classes/
hostname.devlab.ad.client.keystore (this filename varies by machine)
➤
< SymphonyAdapter.war DIR>/WEB_INF/classes/cacerts
➤
< SymphonyAdapter.war DIR>/WEB_INF/classes/lwssofmconf.xml
➤
< SymphonyAdapter.war DIR> /WEB_INF/classes/
SymphonyAdapter.properties
The Data files are not overwritten. To start with clean data, you need to
delete the Data folder. After you reapply the BAC_PA_62_v1.unl you must
reconfigure the two URL settings.
Troubleshooting and Limitations
This section includes the following topics:
474
➤
“Severity Change in an Incident” on page 475
➤
“Changes to the Thresholds of the Number of Open Incidents KPI” on
page 475
➤
“Inaccurate Forecast Results” on page 476
➤
“Incident Ignored by EMS” on page 476
Chapter 13 • HP Service Manager Integration
Severity Change in an Incident
An incident in HP Service Manager that changes its severity from low to
high is not included in the Number of Tickets KPI in Business Availability
Center. To include the incident, you must re-synchronize the SiteScope
monitor in the EMS Integration administration.
Changes to the Thresholds of the Number of Open
Incidents KPI
If you modify the thresholds of the Number of Open Incidents KPI in
Dashboard administration, the value displayed by the Number of Open
Incidents KPI in Dashboard views is 0 as the number of incidents is reset.
Problem
All the SiteScope samples that are sent to Business Availability Center
provide the number of changes that were added after SiteScope ran the last
time before you modified the threshold.
Solution
Enable the Sync flag of the SiteScope monitors – after you have changed the
threshold – to re-import all the changes that happened before you changed
the threshold.
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Inaccurate Forecast Results
The Forecast information for SLAs, which include Ticketing KPIs whose
status is imported from HP Service Manager using the HP Service Manager
monitor, is not correct.
Incident Ignored by EMS
Note: This section is relevant when integrating with HP Service Manager
7.xx.
When opening an incident in HP Service Manager, if you manually enter
the name of the affected CI in the Affected CI box instead of using the Fill
button, the incident is ignored by EMS.
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14
HP Operations Manager Integration
This chapter describes the integration of HP Operations Manager with
HP Business Availability Center.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Understanding the HP Operations Manager Integration on page 477
Tasks
➤
Use the EMS Integration Tool for HP Operations Manager Server Events
on page 481
Concepts
Understanding the HP Operations Manager Integration
The HP Operations Manager Integration with HP Business Availability
Center enables connecting to the HP Operations Manager message
infrastructure, receiving events from the HP Operations Manager server, and
forwarding these events to the SiteScope machine.
This section describes the main concepts of the HP Operations Manager
integration adapter. For details on creating an HP Operations Manager
integration, see “Use the EMS Integration Tool for HP Operations Manager
Server Events” on page 481.
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Chapter 14 • HP Operations Manager Integration
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Overview of HP Operations Manager” on page 478
➤
“HP OVO EMS Integration” on page 478
➤
“HP Operations Manager Hierarchies” on page 479
➤
“CIs and KPIs for HP Operations Manager” on page 479
➤
“HP Operations Manager Rules” on page 480
➤
“HP Operations Manager Context Menus, Context Menu Items, and
Tooltips in Dashboard” on page 480
➤
“Open Events in HP Operations Manager For Triggered Alerts” on page 481
Overview of HP Operations Manager
HP Operations Manager is a suite of software applications, which allow
large-scale system and network management of your organization's IT
assets.
HP OVO EMS Integration
The assignments of the HP OVO EMS integration enriches the monitor-level
Application Monitor CIs and the Host Monitor CIs with the appropriate
KPIs, rules, and context menus that are to be assigned automatically to the
CIs when the assignment condition occurs, and the assignments are
running.
Note: The Application Monitor CIs KPI assignment is used only when the
machine, on which HP Operations Manager is installed, is monitored using
SiteScope version 10.0 and earlier.
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HP Operations Manager Hierarchies
When you select this integration adapter and enable the corresponding data
assignment, the relevant CIs, hierarchy, and pattern view are created in the
UCMDB (Universal Configuration Management database). You can then
view the hierarchy in the OVO Hosts and Applications view in the View
Manager tab in Universal CMDB Administration. To display HP Operations
Manager data, select the OVO Hosts and Applications view in the
Dashboard tabs.
CIs and KPIs for HP Operations Manager
EMS Monitor CIs for the monitored Operations Manager system are created
in the UCMDB, based on the samples sent by the SiteScope HP OVO Event
monitor. The HP OVO data assignment adds KPIs, rules, context menus,
context menu items, and tooltips to those CIs. Status for these CIs can be
viewed in Dashboard in the OVO Hosts and Applications view, and the CIs
are available to add to SLAs in Service Level Management.
Service Level Management has its own sets of KPIs and rules that are
attached to CIs within agreements.
For details on SiteScope samples, see “Data Samples for SiteScope” in
Reference Information.
Note: Host CIs created in the UCMDB by the discovery process and Host CIs
created by SiteScope must be reconciliated. For details, see “Reconciliation
of Hosts” on page 420.
The following KPIs are preconfigured to work with OVO EMS Monitor CIs in
Dashboard and in Service Level Management: Application, Network,
Security, and System. For details, see “Use the EMS Integration Tool for HP
Operations Manager Server Events” on page 481.
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Note: When multiple KPIs are assigned to an EMS Monitor CI, the status of a
KPI that did not correspond to a sample is Not up to date. The date
displayed in the Held status since field displays the date and time
corresponding to the first time the rule was activated by a sample. The Not
up to date status persists until the rule is activated by a sample that
corresponds to the KPI.
HP Operations Manager Rules
The rules are as follows:
➤
Dashboard rules for HP Operations Manager: In Dashboard, each OVO KPI
(attached to an EMS Monitor CI) uses the SiteScope EMS Multiple Events
monitor rule. The rule handles the samples sent to HP Business Availability
Center by the EMS system. It aggregates all the samples received from a
specified CI. The rule saves up to ten events. If there are more than ten
events, the rule discards samples with the lowest severity (critical is highest)
and then the oldest samples.
For details, see “List of Dashboard Business Rules” in Using Dashboard.
➤
Service Level Management rules for HP Operations Manager: In Service
Level Management, each OVO KPI (attached to an EMS Monitor CI) uses its
own monitor rule. For details, see “List of Service Level Management
Business Rules” in Using Dashboard.
HP Operations Manager Context Menus, Context Menu
Items, and Tooltips in Dashboard
The EMS Clear Event context menu, Clear Event context menu item, and
SiteScope EMS Rule tooltip are preconfigured to work with OVO EMS
Monitor CIs in Dashboard.
For details on the context menu, see “EMS Show Events” in Using Dashboard.
For details on the context menu item, see “Show Events” in Using
Dashboard.
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For details on the tooltip, see “SiteScope EMS Rule” in Using Dashboard.
The OVO Drill Down event enables you to access the HP Operations
Manager application. For details on the context menu, see “OVO Drill Down
Event” in Using Dashboard.
Open Events in HP Operations Manager For Triggered
Alerts
You can configure the opening of events in HP Operations Manager (OM)
when alerts are triggered in HP Business Availability Center. For details, see
“Open an Event in Operations Manager When an Alert is Triggered” in
Alerts.
Tasks
Use the EMS Integration Tool for HP Operations Manager
Server Events
You can collect performance and availability data from an existing HP
Operations Manager Server and view the events in HP Business Availability
Center applications.
Note: Complete each step before starting on the next step.
For additional information about EMS integration, see “Integration
Administration Application Overview” on page 416.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Install HP OVO Integration Add-on” on page 482
➤
“Specify the Server Where HP Operations Manager is Running” on page 483
➤
“Configure the HP OM Event Monitor” on page 483
➤
“Customize the Integration – Optional” on page 484
➤
“Modify the Time Out Default – Optional” on page 484
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Chapter 14 • HP Operations Manager Integration
➤
“Activate the Data Assignment Rules” on page 484
➤
“Display the HP OVO View” on page 485
➤
“Activate OVO Hosts and Applications View” on page 485
➤
“Customize Automated Mapping Between OVO Event Fields and KPIs –
Optional” on page 485
➤
“Assign the OVO EMS Monitor CI to SLAs and Add Optional KPIs” on
page 485
➤
“Open Events in HP Operations Manager For Triggered Alerts – Optional” on
page 486
➤
“Results” on page 486
1 Install HP OVO Integration Add-on
The HP OVO Integration Add-on enables connecting to the HP Operations
Manager message infrastructure, receiving events from the HP Operations
Manager server, and forwarding these events to the SiteScope machine. For
details, see “HP OM Event Monitor” in Using System Availability Management.
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2 Specify the Server Where HP Operations Manager is Running
This information is used to drill down from HP Business Availability Center
to HP Operations Manager using the OVO Drill Down context menu option
in Dashboard from the HP OVO view. To specify the server information, use
one of the following options:
➤
Select Admin > Integrations > EMS Integration Admin, select HP OVO
and click Edit. In the Edit Integration dialog box, enter the Host and User
information. For details, see “Edit Integration Dialog Box” on page 433.
➤
Select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure
Settings, choose Foundations, select Integrations with other
applications, and in the Integrations with other applications – HP OVO
table, use one of the following options:
➤
Enter the appropriate information in HP OM URL, HP OM User Name,
and HP OM User Password entries.
➤
Enter the URL of the server where HP Operations Manager is running
in the HP OM URL field in the HP OM Drill Down settings area. Use
one of the following formats:
http://OVOHostExample:3443/OvCgi/ito_op_applet_cgi.ovpl?
gui.dftlayout=true&gui.msgbrw.brwpane=true&https=true when HP
Operations Manager in running with the Unix Operating System
OR
http://<SERVER_NAME>/OVOWeb/default.asp? when HP Operations
Manager is running with the Windows Operating System.
This information is reflected in the Add Integration dialog box for HP
Operations Manager.
3 Configure the HP OM Event Monitor
The monitor is used to retrieve data from the HP Operations Manager server
using System Availability Management Administration. You add the HP
OVO Event Monitor to a SiteScope monitor group created for this monitor
and other Integration Monitor types. It is recommended that you configure
Integrations Monitors only after a connection between the SiteScope and
HP Business Availability Center is established. For details, see “HP OM Event
Monitor” in System Availability Management.
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Note: SiteScope cannot be deployed behind a firewall. SiteScope and the
monitored system must be on the same LAN or special firewall
configuration might be required.
4 Customize the Integration – Optional
You can use the EMS Integrations application to customize an HP
Operations Manager integration. The integration forwards the retrieved data
captured from the HP Operations Manager system by the SiteScope HP OM
Event monitor to HP Business Availability Center, and creates the
appropriate topology (host and application CIs). For details on the available
customizations, see “Define Assignment Configuration Dialog Box” on
page 438.
5 Modify the Time Out Default – Optional
Any time an event is updated in HP Operations Manager, another sample is
sent to HP Business Availability Center and the status of the relevant CI is
updated. This includes events that cause a status change and a Clear Event
that changes the current status back to green. The period of time from the
time the last sample was received for a KPI until the KPI is timed out (and its
status changes to grey) is defined in the KPI’s No data timeout rule
parameter.
To modify the time out default in Admin > Dashboard > KPIs or for the
individual KPI, in the rule definition (global change) in Admin > Dashboard
> Repositories > Business Rules.
6 Activate the Data Assignment Rules
By default, HP OVO data Assignment rules are stopped.
To activate the data assignment rules, select Admin > Integrations > EMS
Integration Admin, select HP OVO, click Edit, select the assignment rule,
and click Activate.
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7 Display the HP OVO View
This view is similar to the OVO Hosts and Applications view. It is
automatically activated. The topology of the HP Operations Manager
integration is displayed in this view and in the OVO Hosts and Applications
View.
8 Activate OVO Hosts and Applications View
This view is mainly used for backward compatibility. To see the topology in
this view, you must activate the view and assign the view to the required
Business Availability Center applications. For details on activating the view,
see Activate/Deactivate View in “View Manager Window” in Model
Management.
9 Customize Automated Mapping Between OVO Event Fields and
KPIs – Optional
The HP Operations Manager integration is configured to automatically map
the events retrieved from the HP Operations Manager system to the
appropriate KPIs for the corresponding EMS Monitor CIs. The appropriate
KPIs, rule, context menu items, and tooltips are used to display the retrieved
data.
Use the Clear Event context menu item to clear events in Dashboard only.
Use the OVO Drill Down context menu items to open the HP OVO
application. For details, see “Understanding the HP Operations Manager
Integration” on page 477.
After you begin working with the data, you can optionally customize these
mappings. For details, see “HP OM Event Monitor” in System Availability
Management.
10 Assign the OVO EMS Monitor CI to SLAs and Add Optional KPIs
You can include OVO EMS Monitor CIs in your SLAs in Service Level
Management. Service Level Management contains KPIs and rules specifically
configured for OVO EMS Monitor CIs, including optional KPIs for network
and security. For details, see “Integration with HP Operations Manager” in
Using Service Level Management.
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11 Open Events in HP Operations Manager For Triggered Alerts –
Optional
You can configure the opening of events in HP Operations Manager (OM)
when alerts are triggered in HP Business Availability Center. For details, see
“Open an Event in Operations Manager When an Alert is Triggered” in
Alerts.
12 Results
After the task is performed, HP Operations Manager data is integrated into
HP Business Availability Center as described in this section.
➤
View HP Operations Manager Events in Dashboard and Service Level
Manager Views
SiteScope automatically creates the appropriate topology when HP
Operations Manager events are integrated into HP Business Availability
Center. HP Business Availability Center adds the data to the views in
Dashboard and Service Level Management.
In both Dashboard and Service Level Management, the Application, System,
Network, and Security KPIs are defined as default KPIs for the OVO EMS
Monitor CIs. For details on the KPIs, see “KPI Repository” in Using
Dashboard.
➤
Drill Down to HP Operations Manager from the Dashboard and Service
Level Manager Views
Use the right-click menu option: OVO Drill Down for the appropriate CIs in
the Dashboard and Service Level Management views to access the HP
Operations Manager application.
Note: If the drill down option does not work, check that you are using
LW-SSO. For details on LW-SSO, see “Lightweight Single Sign-On Strategy”
in Platform Administration.
486
15
NetScout nGenius Integration
This chapter describes the NetScout nGenius integration.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
NetScout Integration Overview on page 487
Tasks
➤
Use the EMS Integration Tool for NetScout Data on page 490
Concepts
NetScout Integration Overview
This section provides an overview of NetScout and describes the main
concepts of the NetScout integration.
This section includes the following topics:
➤
“Overview of NetScout” on page 488
➤
“Netscout EMS Integration” on page 488
➤
“NetScout View and Topology” on page 488
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Chapter 15 • NetScout nGenius Integration
Overview of NetScout
NetScout nGenius monitors network traffic and reports performance metrics
about applications routing through that network. NetScout integration
shows NetScout alarms in HP Business Availability Center Dashboard.
NetScout sends SNMP traps containing information about the alerting
instances that could map to existing CI types in the UCMDB (Universal
Configuration Management database).
Netscout EMS Integration
The assignment of the Netscout EMS integration enriches the monitor-level
Application Monitor CIs with the appropriate KPIs, rules, and context
menus that are to be assigned automatically to the CIs when the condition
occurs, and the assignment is running.
Note: The Application Monitor CIs assignment is used only when the
machine, on which NetScout nGenius is installed, is monitored using
SiteScope version 10.0 and earlier.
NetScout View and Topology
NetScout analyzes packets that include information about the applications
running through specific routers or switches. When there is a problem, the
packets can send in alarms with information about the problematic
application.
The application alarms SNMP trap reports about problems discovered in an
application using information analyzed from packets. The application
information is not linked to the router information as the routing path is
not constant and may vary depending on network traffic decisions.
The NetScout integration creates the NetScout view. The NetScout view
includes CIs that represent the application alarms.
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Chapter 15 • NetScout nGenius Integration
The NetScout view includes the Application CI, the EMS Monitor CI, and
their relationship.
For details on integrating NetScout data in HP Business Availability Center,
see “Use the EMS Integration Tool for NetScout Data” on page 490.
All the sample information sent by NetScout is displayed by the Application
KPIs attached to the Application Monitor CIs. The SiteScope EMS Multiple
Events Rule calculates the statuses of those KPIs based on data obtained from
NetScout samples.
The EMS Show Event context menu, Show Events context menu item, and
the SiteScope EMS Rule tooltip corresponding to the SiteScope EMS
Multiple Events Rule, are preconfigured to provide the appropriate
infrastructure to work with the NetScout-related CIs in Dashboard. For
details on the Application KPI, see “Application” in Using Dashboard.
For details on:
➤
The SiteScope EMS Multiple Events Rule, see “SiteScope EMS Multiple
Events Rule” in Using Dashboard.
➤
The EMS Show Event context menu, see “EMS Show Events” in Using
Dashboard.
➤
The Show Events context menu item, see “Show Events” in Using Dashboard.
➤
The SiteScope EMS Rule tooltip, see “SiteScope EMS Rule” in Using
Dashboard.
Tasks
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Chapter 15 • NetScout nGenius Integration
Use the EMS Integration Tool for NetScout Data
NetScout data can be displayed in HP Business Availability Center using the
EMS Integration tool.
For additional information about EMS integration, see “Integration
Administration Application Overview” on page 416.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Prerequisite” on page 490
➤
“Configure the Integration” on page 490
➤
“Customize the Integration – Optional” on page 491
➤
“View NetScout Data in the NetScout View and Enrich the View” on
page 491
➤
“Access the NetScout Application from HP Business Availability Center” on
page 492
1 Prerequisite
In the NetScout nGenius server, select Device > Global settings, and enter, in
the Server IP Addresses box, the SiteScope Server IP address of the SiteScope
that reports to HP Business Availability Center.
2 Configure the Integration
The NetScout integration is predefined. The integration retrieves the
samples provided by the NetScout nGenius system, creates the appropriate
topology in HP Business Availability Center (application CIs), creates a view,
assigns the appropriate KPIs, rules, context menus, context menu items, and
tooltips depending on the type of sample and displays the information
using the created view.
To configure the NetScout integration, select Admin > Integrations > EMS
Integration Admin, select NetScout and click Edit. In the Edit Integration
dialog box:
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Chapter 15 • NetScout nGenius Integration
a Add the NetScout Event Monitor to a SiteScope monitor group created
for this monitor and other Integration Monitor types in Step 2. Retrieve
data from EMS system using System Availability Management. The
monitor is used to retrieve data from the NetScout server using System
Availability Management Administration. It is recommended that you
configure Integrations Monitors only after a connection between the
SiteScope and HP Business Availability Center is established. For details,
see “NetScout Integration – Workflow” in System Availability Management.
b Activate the Application Monitor CIs data assignment rule in Step 3.
Define the data assignments rules. The data assignment rule is
automatically deactivated, by default. The data assignment rule includes
the assignment rules to create the topology for the Application Monitor
CIs.
For details on the assignment rules, see “Edit Integration Dialog Box” on
page 433.
Note: SiteScope cannot be deployed behind a firewall. SiteScope and the
monitored system must be on the same LAN or special firewall
configuration might be required.
3 Customize the Integration – Optional
You can use the EMS Integrations application to customize a NetScout
integration. The integration forwards the retrieved data captured from the
NetScout system by the SiteScope NetScout Event Monitor to HP Business
Availability Center, and creates the appropriate topology (Application CIs).
For details on the available customization, see “Define Assignment
Configuration Dialog Box” on page 438.
4 View NetScout Data in the NetScout View and Enrich the View
You can view NetScout application alarms in the NetScout view. For details,
see “NetScout View and Topology” on page 488.
To enrich the view, attach IT Universe CIs to the appropriate Application
Monitor CIs. For details on attaching CIs, see “Insert Relationship Dialog
Box” in Model Management.
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5 Access the NetScout Application from HP Business Availability
Center
From the NetScout view in Dashboard, you can connect to the NetScout
application using the Show Event right-click menu option on the NetScout
EMS monitor CIs. The context menu uses the NetScout server URL included
in the samples to perform the drilldown to the NetScout server.
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Part VI
HP Operations Orchestration Integration
494
16
HP Business Availability Center and
HP Operations Orchestration Integration
This section describes the HP Operations Orchestration integration.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
HP Operations Orchestration Integration Overview on page 496
Tasks
➤
Integrate HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration –
Workflow on page 496
➤
Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to HP Business
Availability Center – Workflow for Windows on page 499
➤
Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to HP Business
Availability Center – Workflow for Solaris on page 500
Reference
➤
Predefined Mappings on page 501
➤
HP Operations Orchestration Integration User Interface on page 503
Concepts
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Chapter 16 • HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration Integration
HP Operations Orchestration Integration Overview
HP Business Availability Center has the capability of integrating with
HP Operations Orchestration (OO). This integration enables you to map
Business Availability Center CI types to OO run books. For details on
configuring the integration, see “Configure the Link Between Business
Availability Center and Operations Orchestration” on page 497. For details
on mapping CI types to run books, see “Run Book Mapping Configuration
Wizard” on page 505.
Once you create such mappings, you can run the mapped OO run books on
CIs in Business Availability Center. For example, in Problem Isolation you
can run the mapped OO run books on suspect CIs to help you solve a
problem. For details on running run books on suspect CIs, see “Suspects
Page” in Using Problem Isolation.
Business Availability Center provides a number of predefined mappings
between CIs and OO run books. For details on this topic, see “Predefined
Mappings” on page 501.
Tasks
Integrate HP Business Availability Center and
HP Operations Orchestration – Workflow
This task describes the working order required to integrate HP Business
Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration (OO).
This task includes the following steps:
496
➤
“Prerequisites” on page 497
➤
“Configure the Link Between Business Availability Center and Operations
Orchestration” on page 497
➤
“Configure Lightweight Single Sign-On (LW-SSO) Authentication” on
page 497
➤
“Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to HP Business
Availability Center” on page 498
➤
“Grant Permissions” on page 498
Chapter 16 • HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration Integration
➤
“Map Run Books to CI Types” on page 498
➤
“Use Operations Orchestration Functionality From Business Availability
Center Applications” on page 498
1 Prerequisites
To integrate Business Availability Center and OO, you must be using the
following versions:
➤
Business Availability Center version 8.00 or later
➤
Operations Orchestration version 7.50 or later
2 Configure the Link Between Business Availability Center and
Operations Orchestration
To configure the integration between Business Availability Center and OO,
in Business Availability Center select Admin > Platform > Setup and
Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations, select
Integrations with other applications, and locate the Operation
Orchestration application URL entry in the HP Operation Orchestration
table. Modify the setting to the URL used to access the OO application. For
example, https://<fully qualified server name>:8443.
3 Configure Lightweight Single Sign-On (LW-SSO)
Authentication
Configure Lightweight Single Sign-On (LW-SSO) authentication between
Business Availability Center and OO. You must configure LW-SSO in both
Business Availability Center and OO.
For details on configuring LW-SSO in Business Availability Center, see
“Authentication Wizard - Introduction Page” in Platform Administration.
For details on configuring LW-SSO in OO, see the Operations Orchestration
documentation.
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4 Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to
HP Business Availability Center
Import the server certificate from the OO server to the Business Availability
Center Gateway Server so that the two systems can communicate with each
other securely.
For details on how to perform this task in a Windows environment, see
“Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to HP Business
Availability Center – Workflow for Windows” on page 499.
For details on how to perform this task in a Solaris environment, see
“Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates to HP Business
Availability Center – Workflow for Solaris” on page 500.
5 Grant Permissions
Grant permissions so that users can create, view, and modify the mapping
between Business Availability Center CI types and OO run books, and
invoke OO run books from Business Availability Center. For details on this
topic, see “Permissions Overview” in Platform Administration.
6 Map Run Books to CI Types
Map OO run books to Business Availability Center CI types. For details on
the user interface, see “Run Books Configuration Page” on page 503.
7 Use Operations Orchestration Functionality From Business
Availability Center Applications
You can now run OO run books on CIs in Business Availability Center. For
example, in Problem Isolation, you can run OO run books on suspect CIs.
For details on the user interface, see “Suspects Page” in Problem Isolation.
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Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates
to HP Business Availability Center – Workflow for Windows
This task describes how to export server certificates from HP Operations
Orchestration (OO) and import them into Business Availability Center in a
Windows environment. You use the keytool utility, which is included in Sun
JRE, to export and import certificates.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Export the OO Server Certificate” on page 499
➤
“Import the Server Certificate to Business Availability Center” on page 499
1 Export the OO Server Certificate
To export the OO server certificate, on the OO server enter:
C:\> "%JAVA_HOME%\jre\bin\keytool" -keystore
"%ICONCLUDE_HOME%\Central\conf\rc_keystore" -export -alias pas -file "C:\
<Operations Orchestration server fully qualified host name>.cer"
Note: If your %JAVA_HOME% environment variable points to the JRE
directory instead of the JDK directory, remove jre from the keystore path
(C:\> "%JAVA_HOME%\bin\keytool" -keystore) in the command.
2 Import the Server Certificate to Business Availability Center
To import the server certificate you exported from OO to the Business
Availability Center cacerts keystores, on the Business Availability Center
Gateway Server enter:
a C:\> "%JAVA_HOME%\jre\bin\keytool" -keystore
"%TOPAZ_HOME%\JRE\lib\security\cacerts" -import -alias "<Operations
Orchestration fully qualified host name>" -file "<Operations
Orchestration fully qualified host name>.cer"
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b C:\> "%JAVA_HOME%\jre\bin\keytool" -keystore
"%TOPAZ_HOME%\JRE64\lib\security\cacerts" -import -alias
"<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>" -file "<Operations
Orchestration fully qualified host name>.cer"
c Restart Business Availability Center on the Gateway server.
Note: If your %JAVA_HOME% environment variable points to the JRE
directory instead of the JDK directory, remove jre from the keystore path
(C:\> "%JAVA_HOME%\bin\keytool" -keystore) in the commands.
Import HP Operations Orchestration Server Certificates
to HP Business Availability Center – Workflow for Solaris
This task describes how to export server certificates from HP Operations
Orchestration (OO) and import them into Business Availability Center in a
Solaris environment. You use the keytool utility, which is included in the
Sun Solaris /usr/bin directory, to export and import certificates.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Export the OO Server Certificate” on page 499
➤
“Import the Server Certificate to Business Availability Center” on page 499
1 Export the OO Server Certificate
To export the OO server certificate, on the OO server enter:
Keytool -keystore "$ICONCLUDE_HOME/Central/conf/rc_keystore" -export
-alias pas -file "<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>.cer"
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2 Import the Server Certificate to Business Availability Center
To import the server certificate you exported from OO to the Business
Availability Center cacerts keystores, on the Business Availability Center
Gateway Server enter:
a keytool -keystore "$TOPAZ_HOME/JRE/lib/security/cacerts" -import
-alias "<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>" -file
"<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>.cer"
b keytool -keystore "$TOPAZ_HOME/JRE64/lib/security/cacerts" -import
-alias "<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>" -file
"<Operations Orchestration fully qualified host name>.cer"
c Restart Business Availability Center on the Gateway server.
Reference
Predefined Mappings
HP Business Availability Center provides a number of predefined mappings
between CI types and HP Operations Orchestration (OO) run books. The
following table lists the CI types and the OO run books that are mapped to
them:
HP Business Availability
Center CI
HP Operations Orchestration Run Books
IIS
Soft Reset IIS
Weblogic AS
Restart Server
Websphere AS
Restart Server
Windows
Restart Windows Server, Restart Windows Server
with Wait, Start Automatic Services
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Note: In the predefined mapping, the Restart Server run book runs
successfully only for Weblogic and Websphere applications that are
discovered by Discovery and Dependency Mapping. For Weblogic and
Websphere applications discovered by SiteScope, application credentials are
not reported and the run book is unable to run successfully, unless you
manually configure the credentials as default parameters in the Run Book
Mapping Configuration wizard, manually change them for a specific
invocation of a run book, or enter them when prompted during a run book
invocation. For details on the Run Book Mapping Configuration wizard user
interface, see “Configure Parameters Page” on page 508. For details on
manually changing parameters for a specific invocation, see “Run Book
Parameters Dialog Box” in Using Problem Isolation.
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HP Operations Orchestration Integration User Interface
This section describes:
➤
Run Books Configuration Page on page 503
➤
Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard on page 505
➤
Select Topology Dialog Box on page 510
Run Books Configuration Page
Description
Displays the mappings between HP Business Availability
Center CI types and HP Operations Orchestration (OO)
run books, and enables you to create new mappings or
edit existing ones.
To access: Select Admin > Integrations > Operations
Orchestration tab
Important
Information
➤ To work with OO from Business Availability Center,
the two systems must be integrated. For details on
how to perform this task, see “Integrate HP Business
Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration –
Workflow” on page 496.
➤ Click a row in the table to select an existing mapping
for editing or deletion.
➤ Business Availability Center provides a number of
predefined mappings between CIs and OO run books.
For details on this topic, see “Predefined Mappings”
on page 501.
Included in Tasks
“Integrate HP Business Availability Center and
HP Operations Orchestration – Workflow” on page 496
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
New button. Click to open the Run Book Mapping
Configuration wizard, where you configure the mapping
between a CI type and OO run books. For details on the
user interface, see “Run Book Mapping Configuration
Wizard” on page 505.
Edit button. Click to edit an existing, selected mapping.
The Select CI Type page of the Run Book Mapping
Configuration wizard opens. For details on the user
interface, see “Select CI Type Page” on page 506.
Delete button. Click to delete an existing, selected
mapping.
504
CI Type
Displays the CI types to which OO run books are already
mapped.
Operation
Orchestration Flows
Displays the OO run books that are mapped to each CI
type.
Chapter 16 • HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration Integration
Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard
Description
Enables you to create mappings between HP Business
Availability Center CI types and HP Operations
Orchestration (OO) run books, and to configure the
parameters required for the run books.
To access:
➤ To create a new mapping, select Admin > Integrations
> Operations Orchestration tab, and click the New
button.
➤ To edit an existing mapping, select Admin >
Integrations > Operations Orchestration tab, select the
existing mapping, and click the Edit
button.
Important
Information
When using the Run Book Mapping Configuration
wizard to edit a previously configured mapping:
➤ the Welcome and Summary pages of the wizard are
not displayed.
➤ you do not have to access the wizard pages in a
specific order. Click a wizard page name on the left
to go directly to that page.
➤ from any of the wizard pages, click the OK button
to save the mapping configuration and exit the
wizard.
Included in Tasks
“Integrate HP Business Availability Center and
HP Operations Orchestration – Workflow” on page 496
Wizard Map
The Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard contains:
Welcome page > Select CI Type Page > Select Run Books
Page > Configure Parameters Page > Summary
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Select CI Type Page
Description
Enables you to select a CI type to which to map
HP Operations Orchestration (OO) run books.
Wizard Map
The Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard contains:
Welcome page > Select CI Type Page > Select Run Books
Page > Configure Parameters Page > Summary
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<CI type tree>
Displays a list of CI types from which you select the
required CI type to which to map OO run books. Click a
CI type to select it.
Note:
➤ CI types that already have run books mapped to them
appear in the tree, but are disabled.
➤ When you edit an existing mapping, only the
configured CI type is displayed and you cannot edit it.
<Search string>
You can search for CI types with names containing a
specific string that you enter in this field. Click the
Search button to run the search. Only matching results
are displayed in the tree.
Note:
➤ The search is not case sensitive.
➤ You can use the asterisk (*) wildcard in your string to
match one or more words of text.
506
Clear
Click the Clear button to clear the current search string
and display all CI types.
Search
Click the Search button to display only CI types that
match the search string.
Chapter 16 • HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration Integration
Select Run Books Page
Description
Enables you to select the HP Operations Orchestration
(OO) run books to map to the selected CI type.
Wizard Map
The Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard contains:
Welcome page > Select CI Type Page > Select Run Books
Page > Configure Parameters Page > Summary
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Select a run book in the Flow Library area and click the
forward arrow to add it to the list in the Selected Run
Books area.
Select a run book in the Selected Run Books area and
click the back arrow to remove it from the list.
Flow Library
Displays a tree of the available run books in the OO flow
library. Click a run book to highlight it for selection.
Run Book Description
Displays the description of a highlighted run book.
Selected Run Books
Displays the run books you select for mapping to the CI
type and their path in the OO flow library. Click a run
book to highlight it for removal from the list.
Note:
➤ A run book that is included in an existing mapping,
but that is not found in OO, is denoted by the
icon. Remove the run book from the mapping.
➤ A run book included in an existing mapping that
contains different parameters than those defined in
the mapping (that is, additional or deleted
parameters), is denoted by the
icon.
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Configure Parameters Page
Description
Enables you to configure the settings and default values
of the parameters used by the selected HP Operations
Orchestration (OO) run books.
Wizard Map
The Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard contains:
Welcome page > Select CI Type Page > Select Run Books
Page > Configure Parameters Page > Summary
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
CI
Displays the default CI from the selected CI type
topology to use as the source for the required run book
parameter. Click the arrow to open a drop-down list of all
the CIs included in the CI type topology. Select a
different CI if required.
Note: If there is no configured topology for the selected
CI type, the CI for the selected CI type itself is the only
available option.
508
CI Attribute
Displays the default CI attribute, of the selected CI, to use
as the source for the required run book parameter. Click
the arrow to open a drop-down list of all the attributes
for the selected CI. Select a different attribute if required.
Default Value
Enter a default value to be used for the CI attribute, if
required.
Chapter 16 • HP Business Availability Center and HP Operations Orchestration Integration
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Run Book/Parameter
Name
Displays a hierarchical list of the selected run books and
the parameters they require.
Note:
➤ Only parameters that are configured as flow input
parameters for run books are included. For example, a
parameter that is included in an operation configured
in a run book is not displayed and cannot be mapped.
➤ Mandatory parameters for which settings are required
are denoted by a red asterisk.
➤ A parameter included in an existing mapping, but that
is not found in a run book, is denoted by the
icon.
➤ A parameter found in a run book, but not included in
an existing mapping, is denoted by the
icon.
➤ Additional and deleted parameters are automatically
added to, or removed from the mapping when you
click the OK button on the wizard page.
To choose an
attribute that is not
part of the selected
CI click here
Click the link to open the Select Topology dialog box,
where you can select a CI from a related CI topology to
use as the source for the required run book parameter. For
details on the user interface, see “Select Topology Dialog
Box” on page 510.
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Select Topology Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to select a different CI type or node CI from
a topology related to the CI type selected in the Run Book
Mapping Configuration wizard. This CI is used as the
source for a required run book parameter for the CI type
selected in the wizard.
To access: Click the Select Related CIs link in the
Configure Parameters page in the Run Book Mapping
Configuration wizard. For details on the user interface,
see “Configure Parameters Page” on page 508.
Useful Links
“Run Book Mapping Configuration Wizard” on page 505
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<Topology map>
Displays a map of the selected CI topology.
Select the node to
which the run books
are mapped
Select a specific node from the selected topology to use as
the source for a required run book parameter for the CI
type selected in the Run Book Mapping Configuration
wizard. Available nodes are those applicable for the CI
type selected in the wizard, and their descendants.
Select topology
Select a topology from the drop-down list of topologies
that are related to the CI type selected in the Run Book
Mapping Configuration wizard. Related topologies are
those topologies in the Run Book folder in Query
Manager that include a node for the CI type selected in
the wizard.
Note:
➤ Topology names in the Run Book folder in Query
Manager cannot contain spaces.
➤ You can create topologies using Query Manager
(Admin > Universal CMDB > Modelling > Query
Manager). For details on the user interface, see “Query
Manager Window” in Model Management.
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Part VII
Diagnostics Integration
512
17
HP Diagnostics and HP Business
Availability Center Integration
This chapter provides information on the HP Diagnostics and HP Business
Availability Center integration.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center Integration Overview
on page 514
Tasks
➤
View HP Diagnostics Data in HP Business Availability Center on page 515
➤
Access Online Help for HP Diagnostics in HP Business Availability Center
on page 516
Troubleshooting and Limitations on page 517
Concepts
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Chapter 17 • HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center Integration
HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center
Integration Overview
HP Diagnostics is a composite application triage and diagnostics solution
that is designed to help you improve the performance of your J2EE, .NET,
and ERP/CRM enterprise applications throughout the application lifecycle.
HP Diagnostics is integrated with HP Business Availability Center, allowing
you to monitor the availability and performance of your production
enterprise application. This integration enables you to significantly reduce
the Mean Time To Resolution of problems and thus increase the availability
and value of the business applications.
From within HP Business Availability Center, you can track the performance
status of your applications that are being monitored by HP Diagnostics.
The Diagnostics integration with Business Availability Center allows you to
drill down to Diagnostics data from specific Business Availability Center
configuration items and reports. You can also generate high level reports in
HP Business Availability Center about the performance of applications and
Business Process Monitor (BPM) transactions that are monitored by
Diagnostics.
Tasks
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Chapter 17 • HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability Center Integration
View HP Diagnostics Data in HP Business Availability
Center
To view HP Diagnostics data in HP Business Availability Center, you must
register the HP Diagnostics server machine in HP Business Availability
Center.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Register HP Diagnostics” on page 515
➤
“Proceed with Setting Up HP Business Availability Center to Work with
Diagnostics” on page 516
➤
“View HP Diagnostics Data in HP Business Availability Center” on page 516
➤
“Access HP Diagnostics from HP Business Availability Center” on page 516
1 Register HP Diagnostics
a Access Admin > Diagnostics, to open the HP Diagnostics Server Details
page. Enter the details of the server as follows:
➤
Diagnostics server host name. Enter the name of the machine that is
host to the HP Diagnostics Server.
Even when the Diagnostics Server is installed on the same system as
HP Business Availability Center you must enter the actual name of the
host in the box. Do not enter localhost.
➤
Diagnostics server port number. Accept the default port number (2006)
or enter the port number through which HP Diagnostics listens to server
traffic.
➤
Diagnostics server protocol. Select the communication protocol (HTTP
or HTTPS) through which HP Business Availability Center connects to
HP Diagnostics.
If you select HTTPS, additional configuration steps are required. For
details, see HP Diagnostics Installation and Configuration Guide.
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b Click Submit to register the server with HP Business Availability Center.
The Diagnostics Server details are saved in HP Business Availability
Center and HP Business Availability Center server details are
automatically registered on the HP Diagnostics machine.
If the server name is incorrect or the server is unavailable, an error
message is displayed.
If the user name with which you logged in does not have permissions for
making changes on the HP Diagnostics server, a message is displayed
instead of the HP Diagnostics page.
2 Proceed with Setting Up HP Business Availability Center to
Work with Diagnostics
For help with the remainder of this procedure for registering the server, see
the HP Diagnostics Installation and Configuration Guide (select Help >
Diagnostics HP Diagnostics Installation and Configuration Guide).
3 View HP Diagnostics Data in HP Business Availability Center
To view relevant Diagnostics information, select Application > Dashboard,
select the Diagnostics View in View Explorer and click the appropriate tab.
For information on the HP Diagnostics data displayed in HP Business
Availability Center, see the HP Diagnostics User’s Guide (select Help >
Diagnostics Help > HP Diagnostics User’s Guide).
4 Access HP Diagnostics from HP Business Availability Center
You can access HP Diagnostics from HP Business Availability Center using
right-click options in views and drill-downs from some reports.
Access Online Help for HP Diagnostics in HP Business
Availability Center
Click Help > Diagnostics Help to access the online HP Diagnostics
Documentation Library, for the Diagnostics application or for Diagnostics
administration in HP Business Availability Center.
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Troubleshooting and Limitations
Problem: After connecting HP Business Availability Center to the
HP Diagnostics server, a message is displayed: "Session does not exist."
Solution: Check that Internet Explorer is set up to allow the browser to
submit cookies to the HP Diagnostics server.
To set up Internet Explorer to allow the browser to submit cookies:
1 In Internet Explorer (version 6.0), select Tools > Internet Options > Privacy.
2 In the Web Sites section, click the Edit button.
3 In the Per Site Privacy Actions dialog box, enter the HP Diagnostics server
DNS domain name.
4 Click Allow, OK, and OK.
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Part VIII
Performance and Availability Lifecycle
520
18
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Production Analysis Reports
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Production Analysis reports are
designed to integrate between HP Business Availability Center and HP
Performance Center or HP LoadRunner, enabling you to construct load tests
based on real-user transaction data collected by the Real User Monitor.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Production Analysis Reports Overview on page 522
➤
Analyzing Production Analysis Reports on page 522
Tasks
➤
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow on page 526
➤
Generate a Script Template on page 529
➤
Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario on page 530
➤
Refine Your Script Template in VuGen on page 533
➤
Configure and Run a Load Test on page 537
➤
Work with the Central Repository Service (CRS) on page 542
Reference
➤
Production Analysis Reports User Interface on page 546
Concepts
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Production Analysis Reports Overview
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Production Analysis reports enable
quality assurance engineers to design load tests based on data leveraged
from a production environment, rather than a testing environment. Using
Production Analysis reports, the QA engineer can construct load tests that
are based on real-user transaction data and are therefore a more accurate
simulation of load than standard Performance Center or LoadRunner load
tests. The Production Analysis reports thus increases the effectiveness of
load tests and provides the QA team with more accurate test results.
To achieve this goal, the Production Analysis reports provide the following:
➤
Reports from which the QA engineer can extract real-user transaction data
to be used in Performance Center load tests
➤
The ability to create Virtual User Generator (VuGen) script templates, based
on real-user activity. The VuGen scripts can also be used in Business Process
Monitor.
Analyzing Production Analysis Reports
Use Performance and Availability Lifecycle Production Analysis reports to
pinpoint data that you want to use in building your load test.
This section includes the following topics:
522
➤
“Business Process Distribution Report” on page 523
➤
“Typical Transaction Load Report” on page 523
➤
“Location Load Analysis Report” on page 524
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
Business Process Distribution Report
You use the Business Process Distribution report to pinpoint the Real User
Monitor transactions with the greatest number of runs and the highest
session popularity. You then drill down in this report to view the individual
sessions in which these transactions were run. You can also use the Business
Process Distribution report to pinpoint the transactions that were
problematic in terms of response time and availability and drill down so
that you can isolate the problematic sessions and the problematic pages
within the sessions.
You select a session—either one that was popular and contained a large
number of transaction runs, or one that was problematic in terms of
response time or availability—as the basis for your VuGen script template.
Alternatively, you can select transactions from the Business Process
Distribution report and instruct Performance and Availability Lifecycle to
automatically select a session for each transaction and generate a VuGen
script template based on this session. For each transaction, Performance and
Availability Lifecycle selects the session with a combination of the greatest
number of runs, the shortest duration, and the least number of errors.
Note: You can use this report in conjunction with the Typical Transaction
Load report to ensure that the transactions you select reflect typical
transaction behavior during the selected time period. For details of a case
scenario describing the use of the Business Process Distribution report in
conjunction with the Typical Transaction Load report, see “Use Production
Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario” on page 530.
For details on the Business Process Distribution report user interface, see
“Business Process Distribution Page” on page 547.
Typical Transaction Load Report
You use the Typical Transaction Load report to view the average transaction
load during a typical week, day, or hour. In general, you use the Typical
Transaction Load report, and the ability to drill down within this report, to
pinpoint the time frame you want to use for your load test.
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For example, you can view a typical week during the past month to
determine the day with the greatest number of transaction runs, and then
choose to run your load test on that day. By drilling down to the specific
day, you can see the typical load for each hour during the day to find the
time range with the greatest load. You then use this time range for your load
test. You can also drill down to view the minutes during which transaction
load was typically at its peak, however this data is less relevant for the
construction of a load test than the typical daily and hourly data.
Note: You can also use this report in conjunction with the Business Process
Distribution report to determine whether a large number of runs displayed
for a transaction in the Business Process Distribution report is typical of the
transaction’s behavior during the selected time period. If the Typical
Transaction Load report indicates that the transaction load displayed in the
Business Process Distribution report is typical of the transaction’s load
during the selected time period, it is recommended that you use the
transaction for your VuGen script. For details of a case scenario describing
the use of the Business Process Distribution report in conjunction with the
Typical Transaction Load report, see “Use Production Analysis Reports – A
Case Scenario” on page 530.
For details on the Typical Transaction Load report user interface, see
“Typical Transaction Load Report” on page 568.
Location Load Analysis Report
You use the Location Load Analysis report to view the distribution of Real
User Monitor transaction runs among end-user locations, as well as the bit
rate of each transaction at each location. You then use the location data in
selecting load generators, the transaction run data in distributing Vusers
among load generators, and the bit rate data in configuring each script’s
network speed simulation settings.
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For example, if you selected to view location data for four transactions—
PAL_BuyTx, PAL_MyAccountTx, PAL_SearchTx, and PAL_MyOrdersTx—
during the past month, the Location Load Analysis report may display the
following data:
Based on this report, you may choose to select load generators from one or
more of the above locations when configuring your load test. Your
distribution of Vusers among the load generators would most likely be based
on the distribution of transaction load (that is, the number of transaction
runs being run) among the above locations. For an explanation of
configuring load tests based on Production Analysis report data, see
“Configure and Run a Load Test” on page 537.
In addition, you would use the bit rate data in this report in configuring the
Network: Speed Simulation VuGen run-time settings of the Performance
and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts that you are using for your load
test. For example, if you generated a script based on the PAL_SearchTx
transaction and planned to run this script from two load generators—one
located in Los Angeles and the other in San Francisco—you would do the
following:
➤
create two copies of the script;
➤
set the custom bandwidth for the script being run from Los Angeles at
182,127,139 bits per second;
➤
set the custom bandwidth for the script being run from San Francisco at
231,718,670 bits per second.
For details on configuring Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated
scripts based on data from the Location Load Analysis report, see the Set the
Speed Simulation step in “Refine Your Script Template in VuGen” on
page 533.
For details on the Location Load Analysis report user interface, see “Location
Load Analysis Report” on page 555.
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Tasks
Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow
Working with Performance and Availability Lifecycle involves performing
the following procedures:
➤
“Configure Real User Monitor Transactions and Schedule the Snapshot
Collection” on page 526
➤
“Analyze Production Analysis Reports” on page 526
➤
“Refine Script Templates” on page 528
➤
“Setup and Run a Load Test or Scenario That Includes the Scripts” on
page 529
1 Configure Real User Monitor Transactions and Schedule the
Snapshot Collection
Ensure that Real User Monitor transactions are defined and that a
transaction snapshot collection schedule is configured.
For details on configuring Real User Monitor transactions, see “New/Edit
Transaction Page” in Using End User Management. For details on configuring
a transaction snapshot collection schedule, see “New/Edit Web or SOAP
Application Page” in Using End User Management.
2 Analyze Production Analysis Reports
In the Production Analysis reports, analyze production performance data,
export the data you want to use when building a load test, select the
real-user transactions and sessions you want to use in your VuGen scripts,
and generate script templates.
For details on the user interface, see “Production Analysis Reports User
Interface” on page 685.
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Example
a Access the Business Process Distribution report, select a transaction,
based on the total number of runs for the transaction as well as the
transaction’s session popularity (or response time/availability data), and
click the View Sessions button to open the Sessions page. It displays data
for each session in which the selected transaction was run and a
transaction snapshot was collected, as well as certain key statistic
averages of all the displayed sessions. For details on the user interface, see
“Sessions Page” on page 565.
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b Select the session you want to use for your VuGen script, based on page
hit and error data, and click the View Session Details button. The Session
Details page opens, displaying general session and event information, as
well a list of all the pages accessed as part of the session and the events
and response time for each page. The pages that were included in the
selected transaction’s definition are highlighted. For details on the user
interface, see “Session Details Page” on page 562.
Note: Event data is displayed only if you configured events for the
application associated with the transaction you are viewing. For
information on the events you can configure for an application, see “Set up
Real User Monitors – Workflow” in Using End User Management.
3 Refine Script Templates
In VuGen, adjust the scripts generated by Performance and Availability
Lifecycle for use in a load test.
For details on how to perform this task, see “Refine Your Script Template in
VuGen” on page 533.
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4 Setup and Run a Load Test or Scenario That Includes the Scripts
In Performance Center or LoadRunner, set up and run a load test or scenario
that incorporates the scripts you created and refined and emulates the
real-user behavior displayed in the Production Analysis reports.
For details on how to perform this task, see “Configure and Run a Load Test”
on page 537.
Generate a Script Template
From the Session Details page, you click Generate Script Template to
generate a template for your VuGen script that includes the pages in the
current session. If you have enabled the Central Repository Service (CRS) on
the Infrastructure Settings Manager page, you are prompted to save the
script template in the repository. For details on enabling the CRS and saving
scripts in the repository, see “Save a Script Template or Scenario Package in
the CRS” on page 543. If the CRS is not enabled, you are prompted to save
the script template in your regular directory structure.
You should generate a script template for each transaction you would like to
include in your Performance Center load test.
Tip: Save all your script templates in the same directory so that they are all
easily accessible when constructing a Performance Center load test.
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Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario
This section describes a typical case scenario in which a user works with all
three Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports to obtain the
information he requires to construct a Performance Center load test.
Initially, the user accesses the Business Process Distribution report to view
data for the five transactions with the greatest number of run instances
during the period of a week, from January 26, 2006 to February 2, 2006. The
Business Process Distribution report shows that PAL_SearchTx was the
transaction with the greatest number of runs—a total of 4,114 transaction
runs—as well the most popular transaction (run in 18% of the sessions).
To verify that this data reflects the typical transaction load for the
PAL_SearchTx transaction during this time period, the user accesses the
Typical Transaction Load report and views data for a typical week during the
monthly period of January 2, 2006 to February 2, 2006. The Typical
Transaction Load report shows that the average transaction load for the
PAL_SearchTx transaction was indeed significant during this period of time.
The user then drills down further in the Typical Transaction Load report to
discover the specific hours on Wednesday (the day with the greatest number
of transaction runs) during which transaction load was typically at its peak.
The drilldown shows that the load was typically greatest at 9:00 AM, so the
user decides that he will later run his load test at this hour. To be able to use
this data as well as the average transaction run data later on, when
configuring a load test, the user saves the report in .pdf format.
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Having received confirmation of the significance of the PAL_SearchTx
transaction, the user returns to the Business Process Distribution report to
generate a VuGen script of a session in which the PAL_SearchTx transaction
was run. To view the sessions in which PAL_SearchTx was run and a
transaction snapshot was collected, the user clicks the View Sessions button.
After viewing error and page hit data for each displayed session, the user
selects to view details of a session with 1 application error, 1 HTTP error, and
13 page hits.
The user then clicks the View Session Details button to view details of the
end user that ran the selected session, as well as the pages that were accessed
as part of the session (with those included in the transaction highlighted).
After viewing all of this data, the Performance and Availability Lifecycle user
decides to use this session as the basis for a VuGen script and clicks
Generate Script Template on the Session Details page for Performance and
Availability Lifecycle to create a script template from the session. The user
saves the generated script to the (CRS).
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To prepare additional data for the configuration of his load test, the user
accesses the Location Load Analysis report and selects to view location data
for the PAL_SearchTx transaction. The Location Load Analysis report shows
that end users at three locations—Los Angeles, San Diego, and San
Francisco—ran the PAL_SearchTx transaction.
To be able to use this data for his Performance Center load test, the user
saves the Location Load Analysis report in .PDF format.
Based on this report, the user decides to run the script he generates from
three different load generators, each located at one of the above locations.
To do so, the user creates three different copies of the script and sets the
Network: Speed Simulation VuGen run-time settings for each script
according to the bit rate for the location from which the script is going to be
run (for details, see “Set the Speed Simulation” on page 536). The user also
bases his distribution of Vusers among the load generators on the
distribution of total runs among the above locations. (For details on
configuring load tests, see “Configure and Run a Load Test” on page 537.)
Note: The above case scenario describes the generation of one script, based
on one transaction, however a true use case typically includes several scripts,
based on several different transactions.
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Refine Your Script Template in VuGen
To use Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts in a
Performance Center load test, you must first customize them using VuGen.
For detailed instructions on working in VuGen, see HP Virtual User Generator
User’s Guide.
Note: If you exported the script templates you created in Performance and
Availability Lifecycle to the Central Repository Service (CRS), see “Open a
Script Saved in the CRS” on page 544 for details on how to open the script
templates in VuGen.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Parameterize Recorded Values” on page 534
➤
“Correlate Recorded Values” on page 535
➤
“Set the Speed Simulation” on page 536
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1 Parameterize Recorded Values
When you generate a script using Performance and Availability Lifecycle,
the script contains the actual end-user values that the Real User Monitor
recorded. To perform the script’s actions (query, submit, and so on) using
different values from those recorded by the Real User Monitor, you must
replace the values with parameters.
Example
Suppose you generated a script containing the following statement that
searches a library’s database for the title UNIX:
web_submit_form("db2net.exe",
ITEMDATA,
"name=library.TITLE",
"value=UNIX",
ENDITEM,
"name=library.AUTHOR",
"value=",
ENDITEM,
"name=library.SUBJECT",
"value=",
ENDITEM,
LAST);
;
When you run this script in a Performance Center load test, you do not
want to repeatedly use the same value, UNIX. You therefore replace the
constant value with a parameter:
web_submit_form("db2net.exe",
ITEMDATA,
"name=library.TITLE",
"value={Book_Title}",
ENDITEM,
"name=library.AUTHOR",
"value=",
ENDITEM,
"name=library.SUBJECT",
"value=",
ENDITEM,
LAST);
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When you run a load test using a parameterized script, Vusers substitute the
parameter with different values from a data source that you specify. The
data source can be either a file or internally generated variables.
Notes:
➤
You can parameterize complete strings or parts of strings.
➤
You can define more than one parameter for functions with multiple
arguments (such as URLs, server names, and IP addresses).
2 Correlate Recorded Values
In addition to parameterizing the script you generated using Performance
and Availability Lifecycle, you may need to correlate certain statements
within the script. Correlation allows you to link statements by using the
results of one statement as input for another.
You correlate statements for one or both of the following reasons:
➤
to generate dynamic data – For example, if the Real User Monitor session
from which you generated your script was identified by the date and time,
when you try to replay a script of this session, it fails because the current
time is different from the original recorded time. Only if you correlate the
date and time can you save it as dynamic data and use it throughout the
load test or session step run.
➤
to accommodate unique data records – For example, if the Real User
Monitor recorded a session requiring the use of unique values, such as the
process of opening a new bank account, replaying a script of the session fails
because the recorded value already exists and cannot be recreated.
Correlating the value enables you to create additional unique values—based
on the recorded value—to be used throughout the load test or session step
run.
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3 Set the Speed Simulation
You set the speed simulation for your Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated script based on data contained in the Location Load
Analysis report.
To set the speed simulation for a script:
a In VuGen, select Vuser > Run-Time Settings or click the Run-Time
Settings button on the toolbar to open the Run-Time Settings dialog box.
b In the Run-Time Settings tree, select the Network: Speed Simulation
node.
c Select Use custom bandwidth and specify the bit rate of the location
from which you want to run the script, according to the bit rate
displayed for this location (for the transaction upon which the script is
based) in the Location Load Analysis report. For example, if the
transaction upon which your script is based was run by a significant
number of users in Los Angeles, California, you would specify the bit rate
displayed for Los Angeles in the Location Load Analysis report’s
Transaction Bit Rate Per Location graph.
Note: To run the same script from several different locations, you can
save several copies of the script and assign each copy a custom
bandwidth reflecting the bit rate of a specific location. For details on
assigning load generators to each copy of the script, see “Configure and
Run a Load Test” on page 537.
d Click OK to apply the updated speed simulation settings.
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Configure and Run a Load Test
This section describes how to configure and run Performance Center and
LoadRunner load tests that incorporate the scripts you created using
Performance and Availability Lifecycle and emulate the real-user behavior
displayed in the Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Configure and Run a Load Test in Performance Center” on page 537
➤
“Configure and Run a Scenario in LoadRunner” on page 539
1 Configure and Run a Load Test in Performance Center
After you have refined your Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated scripts using VuGen, you can create a load test in
Performance Center that incorporates these scripts and emulates the
real-user behavior displayed in the Performance and Availability Lifecycle
reports.
This section describes how to incorporate the Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated scripts and Production Analysis report data in designing
a load test. For detailed instructions on creating a load test, see the
HP Performance Center User’s Guide.
To incorporate Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts in a
load test:
Connect VuGen to the Performance Center Web server and either upload
your script files directly to the Performance Center Web server or save them
in the file system. For detailed instructions, see HP Virtual User Generator
User’s Guide.
If you saved the Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts in
the Central Repository Service (CRS), see “Upload Scripts from the CRS to
Performance Center” on page 545 for details on uploading the scripts to the
Performance Center Web server.
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To incorporate the Production Analysis report data in a load test:
a Access the Business Process Distribution, Typical Transaction Load, and
Location Load Analysis reports that you printed, emailed, or saved while
working with the Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports. For
details on retrieving a report from the CRS, see “Retrieve a Report Saved
in the CRS” on page 545.
b In Performance Center, select Load Tests > Create/Edit from the left
menu to open the Load Tests page.
c Click New Load Test to create a new load test.
d In the Design Groups tab, select the scripts you generated using
Performance and Availability Lifecycle and customized in VuGen. Select
one or more load generators to run each script, based on the location
data in the Location Load Analysis report. For example, if the transaction
upon which one of your scripts is based was run from Los Angeles,
California, you would select one or more load generators located in Los
Angeles to run this particular script.
Note: Ensure that the Network: Speed Simulation run-time settings of
each script are set to match the bit rate specified in the Location Load
Analysis report for the location from which the script is being run. For
details on configuring Network: Speed Simulation run-time settings, see
“Set the Speed Simulation” on page 536.
e Distribute the Vusers among the Vuser groups based on the distribution
of transaction load among the locations displayed in the Location Load
Analysis report, represented by the load generators you selected for each
group. For example, if the transactions upon which your scripts are based
were run from three locations and each location ran approximately one
third of the transactions, you would distribute the Vusers evenly among
the Vuser groups.
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f The overall number of Vusers for your load test should be based on the
average transaction run data in the Typical Transaction Load report. In
specifying the number of Vusers to run, however, ensure that you take
into account the difference in scaling between load test and production
environments.
g In the Scheduler tab, configure the Ramp Up and Ramp Down of Vusers
based on data in the Typical Transaction Load report. For example, if the
Typical Transaction Load report showed that an average of 100
transactions were run at the beginning of the time period you selected to
use for your load test and 80 transactions were run at the end of this time
period, you might configure your load test to start 100 Vusers every hour
and stop 80 Vusers every hour. Note, however, that you must take into
account the difference in scaling between load test and production
environments.
h Complete your load test configuration and run the load test from the
Load Tests Configuration page by clicking Start, or from the Load Tests
page by clicking the Run Test icon in the row of the load test that you
want to run. For details on configuring and running a load test, see the
HP Performance Center User’s Guide.
2 Configure and Run a Scenario in LoadRunner
After you have refined your Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated scripts using VuGen, you can create a manual scenario
in the LoadRunner Controller that incorporates these scripts and emulates
the real-user behavior displayed in the Performance and Availability
Lifecycle reports.
This section describes how to incorporate the Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated scripts and Production Analysis report data in designing
a manual scenario. For detailed instructions on creating a manual scenario,
see the HP LoadRunner Controller User’s Guide.
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To incorporate Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts in a
scenario:
a In the New Scenario dialog box, choose Manual Scenario. Do not select
the Use the Percentage Mode check box.
b Click Browse, navigate to the directory in which you saved the
Performance and Availability Lifecycle-generated scripts that you
modified using VuGen, and select the scripts.
c If these scripts are saved in the Central Repository Service (CRS), see
“Open a Script Saved in the CRS” on page 544 for details on selecting
them.
d Click Add to add the scripts to your scenario.
To incorporate the Production Analysis report data in a scenario:
a Access the Business Process Distribution, Typical Transaction Load, and
Location Load Analysis reports that you printed, emailed, or saved while
working with the Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports. For
details on retrieving a report from the CRS, see “Retrieve a Report Saved
in the CRS” on page 545.
b In LoadRunner, to the right of the Scenario Groups pane, click the Add
Group button. Select a script you generated using Performance and
Availability Lifecycle and customized in VuGen. Select one or more load
generators to run the script, based on the Location Load Analysis report’s
location data for the transaction upon which the script is based. For
example, if the transaction upon which a script is based was run from Los
Angeles, California, you would select one or more load generators located
in Los Angeles to run this script.
Note: Ensure that the Network: Speed Simulation run-time settings of the
script are set to match the bit rate specified in the Location Load Analysis
report for the location from which the script is being run. For details on
configuring Network: Speed Simulation run-time settings, see “Set the
Speed Simulation” on page 536.
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Select a quantity of Vusers for the group. Vusers should be distributed
among Vuser groups based on the distribution of transaction load among
the locations displayed in the Location Load Analysis report, represented
by the load generators you selected for each group. For example, if the
transactions upon which your scripts are based were run from three
locations and each location ran approximately one third of the
transactions, you would distribute the Vusers evenly among the Vuser
groups.
The overall number of Vusers for your scenario should be based on the
average transaction run data in the Typical Transaction Load report. In
specifying the number of Vusers, however, ensure that you take into
account the difference in scaling between load test and production
environments.
Note: You use the Add Group dialog box to add each Performance and
Availability Lifecycle-generated script you want to include in your
scenario. Since each location requires specific script network run-time
settings, each location requires its own unique script. For details on
preparing a script to be run from each location, see “Set the Speed
Simulation” on page 536.
c In the Schedule Builder, configure the Ramp Up and Ramp Down of
Vusers based on data in the Typical Transaction Load report. For
example, if the Typical Transaction Load report showed that an average
of 100 transactions were run at the beginning of the time period you
selected to use for your load test and 80 transactions were run at the end
of this time period, you might configure your load test to start 100 Vusers
every hour and stop 80 Vusers every hour. Note, however, that you must
take into account the difference in scaling between load test and
production environments.
d Complete your scenario configuration and run the scenario from the Run
tab of the Controller. For details on configuring and running a scenario,
see the HP LoadRunner Controller User’s Guide.
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Work with the Central Repository Service (CRS)
This section describes how to export Performance and Availability Lifecycle
reports to the CRS, generate a script template or scenario package and save it
in the CRS, open scripts saved in the CRS, retrieve reports saved in the CRS,
and upload scripts saved in the CRS to Performance Center.
When working with the Central Repository Service, you are only able to see
the folders in the Central Repository Service for which you, the logged-in
user, have permissions to view. For details on setting permissions for the
Central Repository Service, see “Central Repository Service Permissions” in
Platform Administration.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Export a Report to the CRS” on page 542
➤
“Save a Script Template or Scenario Package in the CRS” on page 543
➤
“Open a Script Saved in the CRS” on page 544
➤
“Retrieve a Report Saved in the CRS” on page 545
➤
“Upload Scripts from the CRS to Performance Center” on page 545
1 Export a Report to the CRS
By default, the CRS is enabled on the Infrastructure Settings Manager page
and you can export the Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports to the
CRS.
Note: If the CRS is disabled, re-enable it by selecting Admin > Platform >
Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations,
select Production Analysis, and locate the CRS Enabled entry in the
Production Analysis - Central Repository Service table. Modify the value to
true.
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To export a report to the CRS:
a From the toolbar at the top right-hand corner of the report, select
Export > Central Repository Service. A new browser window opens,
displaying Report under Type.
b In the Name text box, enter the name under which you want to save the
report in the repository.
c In the Description text box, enter a description of the report. This field is
optional.
d Browse the Root directory tree to select the folder in which you want to
save the report. The files that are currently stored in the selected folder
are displayed in the Folder Content table on the right.
e Click Save. If the save process has been completed successfully, Report
saved to repository is displayed at the top of the browser window.
f Click Close to close the browser window and return to the report you
were viewing.
Note: For details on the Central Repository Service user interface, see
“Central Repository Service User Interface” in Platform Administration.
2 Save a Script Template or Scenario Package in the CRS
By default, the CRS is enabled on the Infrastructure Settings Manager page
and you can save your generated script templates or a scenario package in
the CRS.
Note: If the CRS is disabled, re-enable it by selecting Admin > Platform >
Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations,
select Production Analysis, and locate the CRS Enabled entry in the
Production Analysis - Central Repository Service table. Modify the value to
true.
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To save a scenario package or script template in the CRS:
a Click the Generate Scenario Package button in the Business Process
Distribution report, or the Generate Script Template button at the top of
the Session details page. A new browser window opens, displaying
Scenario Package or VuGen Script under Type.
b In the Name text box, enter the name under which you want to save the
scenario package or script template in the repository.
c In the Description text box, enter a description of the scenario package or
script template. This field is optional.
d Browse the Root directory tree to select the folder in which you want to
save the scenario package or script template. The files that are currently
stored in the selected folder are displayed in the Folder Content table on
the right.
e Click Generate. If the generation process has been completed
successfully, Scenario package saved to repository or VuGen script
template saved to repository is displayed at the top of the browser
window.
f Click Close to close the browser window and return to main page or
Session Details page of the Business Process Distribution report.
Note: For details on the Central Repository Service user interface, see
“Central Repository Service User Interface” in Platform Administration.
3 Open a Script Saved in the CRS
You can open scripts saved in the CRS from both VuGen and the
LoadRunner Controller.
To open a script saved in the CRS:
a In the main VuGen window, select Tools > Quality Center Connection.
b In the LoadRunner Controller’s New Scenario dialog box, click the
Quality Center button.
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c In the Quality Center Connection dialog box, enter the CRS URL, http://
<HP Business Availability Center server machine>:8080/qcbin, and click
Connect.
d Click Browse in the Controller, or select File > Open in VuGen, to select
the scripts you saved in the CRS. If the scripts were automatically
generated by Performance and Availability Lifecycle, they are located in a
zip file within the scenario package file you created.
Note: When you save your scripts after editing them in VuGen, they are
automatically saved in the CRS.
4 Retrieve a Report Saved in the CRS
You can retrieve a report saved in the CRS to incorporate its data in your
Performance Center load test or LoadRunner scenario.
To retrieve a report saved in the CRS:
a Access the CRS URL (http://<HP Business Availability Center server
machine>:8080/qcbin).
b Download the report PDF saved in the CRS by clicking the Download
button. If the report is a Summary report that is part of a scenario
package, it can be downloaded from the scenario package zip file.
5 Upload Scripts from the CRS to Performance Center
To incorporate scripts saved in the CRS in your Performance Center load
test, you must upload the scripts to the Performance Center Web server.
To upload scripts from the CRS to Performance Center:
a In the main VuGen window, select Tools > Quality Center Connection
and open the scripts you saved in the CRS as described in “Open a Script
Saved in the CRS” on page 544.
b Connect VuGen to the Performance Center Web server as described in HP
Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
c Upload the script files to the Performance Center Web server as described
in HP Virtual User Generator User’s Guide.
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Reference
Production Analysis Reports User Interface
This section describes:
546
➤
Business Process Distribution Page on page 547
➤
Location Load Analysis Report on page 555
➤
Scenario Package Generation Dialog Box on page 559
➤
Select Locations Dialog Box on page 560
➤
Select Transactions Dialog Box on page 561
➤
Session Details Page on page 562
➤
Sessions Page on page 565
➤
Typical Transaction Load Report on page 568
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
Business Process Distribution Page
Description
Enables you to:
➤ View transaction run and transaction response time
data over time for configured transactions
monitored by the Real User Monitor.
➤ Create VuGen script templates that can be used in a
Performance Center load test. You can create a
VuGen script template in one of two ways:
➤ by instructing Performance and Availability
Lifecycle to automatically generate a script
template based on a session it selects
➤ by manually selecting the specific session you
want to include in your script template
To Access:
➤ Select Applications > Performance and Availability
Lifecycle > Production Analysis > Business Process
Distribution
➤ Select Applications > End User Management > Real
User > Business Process Distribution
Important
Information
➤ You can drill down in this report to view data for
each session in which the displayed transactions
were run.
➤ You can generate Vugen script templates from the
report only when you access the report from the
Performance and Availability Lifecycle application.
Included in Tasks
“Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario”
on page 530
Useful Links
“Analyzing Production Analysis Reports” on page 522
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Report Settings
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details on the user interface, see “Common Report
Elements” in Reports.Note: If you already selected a
time range in one of the other Performance and
Availability Lifecycle reports, the time range you
previously selected is automatically displayed in the
Business Process Distribution report.
Show <nn>
transactions
<condition> from
<application>
Select and specify:
➤ <nn>. The number of real-user transactions you
want the report to display.
➤ <condition>. Select one of the following:
➤ with the greatest number of runs. To display the
real-user transactions that experienced the
highest total number of run instances.
➤ with the worst response times. To display the
real-user transactions that experienced the
greatest overall transaction time.
➤ with the highest session popularity. To display
the real-user transactions that were most popular
among the sessions. Popularity is determined by
dividing the number of unique sessions running a
transaction by the total number of sessions.
➤ with the lowest availability. To display the
real-user transactions that experienced the lowest
transaction availability.
➤ <application>. Select to display the transactions
from all monitored applications (All applications)
that meet the selected criteria, or only transactions
that were defined for a specific application.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Transaction Selection
Select this option and click Transaction Selection to
open the Select Transaction dialog box, where you
select the transactions to include in the report. For
details on the user interface, see “Select Transactions
Dialog Box” on page 561.
Note:
➤ If you already selected transactions in one of the
other Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports,
these transactions are automatically selected in the
Business Process Distribution report.
➤ You can select a maximum of 20 transactions.
Summary Table
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Select a transaction, based on the total number of runs
for the transaction as well as the transaction’s session
popularity (or response time/availability data), and
click the button.
The Sessions page opens, displaying data for each
session in which the selected transaction was run and a
transaction snapshot was collected, as well as certain
key statistic averages of all the displayed sessions.
For additional information on the Sessions page, see
“Session Analyzer Report” in Using End User
Management.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Application
The application with which the transaction is
associated.
Application Response
Time (seconds)
Displays the net time, in seconds, of the transaction
(that is, server time + network time + client time of all
the pages included in the transaction).
Availability
The transaction’s availability.
Note: The color-coding of the column is based on the
transaction’s availability in relation to the transaction
availability threshold you defined in End User
Management Administration.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Generate Scenario
Package
Select one or more transactions (by selecting the check
box next to the application name) and click the button
to instruct Performance and Availability Lifecycle to
automatically select a session for each transaction and
generate a VuGen script template based on this session.
For each transaction, Performance and Availability
Lifecycle selects the session with a combination of the
greatest number of runs, the shortest duration, and the
least number of errors. Performance and Availability
Lifecycle then generates a VuGen script template based
on each session, as well as a Summary report
containing the Business Process Distribution report,
the Typical Transaction Load report, and the Location
Load Analysis report for the selected transactions.
If you have enabled the Central Repository Service on
the Infrastructure Settings Manager page the Scenario
Package Generation dialog box opens, where you are
prompted to save the scenario package in the Central
Repository Service. For details on the user interface, see
“Scenario Package Generation Dialog Box” on
page 559. If the Central Repository Service is not
enabled, you are prompted to save the scenario
package in your regular directory structure.
To enable or disable the Central Repository Service,
select Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance >
Infrastructure Settings, choose Foundations, select
Production Analysis, and locate the CRS Enabled entry
in the Production Analysis - Central Repository Service
table. Modify the value to true to enable the Central
Repository Service, or false to disable it.
Note: This option is available only when you access the
Business Process Distribution report from the
Performance and Availability Lifecycle application.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Popularity
The percentage of unique sessions in which the
transaction was run over the last day.
Total Runs
The total number of run instances for the transaction.
Transaction
The transaction name.
Transaction Runs Over Time Graph
The following is an example of the Transaction Runs Over Time graph.
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Data points>
Displays for each period of time on the Time axis, the
number of transaction runs for the configured
transactions monitored by the Real User Monitor.
Tooltip: The transaction name and the number of
transaction runs.
<Legend>
Describes the color coding used in the graph.
Runs <y-axis>
Displays the number of transaction runs.
Time <x-axis>
Displays the time division units for the time range that
you defined when generating the report.
Transaction Response Time Over Time Graph
The following is an example of the Transaction Response Time Over Time
graph.
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The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Data points>
Displays for each period of time on the Time axis, the
transaction response time data for the configured
transactions monitored by the Real User Monitor.
Tooltip: The transaction name and response time.
554
<Legend>
Describes the color coding used in the graph.
Response Time (sec)
<y-axis>
Displays the transaction response time in seconds.
Time <x-axis>
Displays the time division units for the time range that
you defined when generating the report.
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
Location Load Analysis Report
The following is an example of the Location Load Analysis report.
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Description
Enables you to view the transaction load (the number
of Real User Monitor transaction runs) and bit rate (bits
per second) per end-user location.
Use the data in this report in configuring Vusers and
load generators for your Performance Center load test,
as well as the run-time settings for your Performance
and Availability Lifecycle-generated VuGen script.
To Access: Select Application > Performance and
Availability Lifecycle > Production Analysis > Location
Load Analysis
Included in Tasks
“Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario”
on page 530
Useful Links
“Analyzing Production Analysis Reports” on page 522
Report Settings
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
556
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details on the user interface, see “Common Report
Elements” in Reports.Note: If you already selected a
time range in one of the other Performance and
Availability Lifecycle reports, the time range you
previously selected is automatically displayed in the
Location Load Analysis report.
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Location Selection
To select locations to be displayed in the Location Load
Analysis report, click the link to open the Select
Locations dialog box.
Transaction Selection
If you already selected transactions in one of the other
Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports, by
default the Location Load Analysis report displays data
for the previously selected transactions.
If the Location Load Analysis report is the first
Production Analysis report you are accessing, or to
display data for a different group of transactions, click
the link to open the Select Transaction dialog box. For
details on the user interface, see “Select Transactions
Dialog Box” on page 561.
Report Content Viewed as a Graph
The View as Graph tab includes the following graphs:
Runs per Location
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Bars>
Display the total number of transaction runs for each
location at which the selected transactions were run.
Tooltip: The number of transaction runs.
<Legend>
Describes the color coding used in the graph.
Location <x-axis>
Displays the locations.
Total Runs <y-axis>
Displays the number of transaction runs.
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Bitrate
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Bars>
Display the transaction bit rate (bits per second) for
each location at which the selected transactions were
run.
Tooltip: The transaction bit rate (bits per second).
<Legend>
Describes the color coding used in the graph.
Bitrate (Bits/sec)
<y-axis>
Displays the transaction bit rate (bits per second).
Location <x-axis>
Displays the locations.
Report Content Viewed as a Table
Description
Displays the following:
➤ The bit rate (bits/second) and total number of runs
for each transaction at each location.
➤ An average of the bit rates and total runs of all the
transactions at a location.
➤ An average of the bit rates and total runs for each
transaction across all locations.
➤ An overall average bit rate and total run calculation
for all transactions across all locations.
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Scenario Package Generation Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to generate and save a scenario package or
Vugen script from the Performance and Availability
Lifecycle reports.
To access: Click the Generate Scenario Package button in
the Business Process Distribution report, or the Generate
Script Template button at the top of the Session Details
page.
Included in Tasks
➤ “Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow” on
page 526
➤ “Generate a Script Template” on page 529
Useful Links
“Central Repository Service User Interface” in Platform
Administration.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
<CRS root directory
tree>
Displays the Central Repository Service directory tree.
Browse the tree to select the folder in which you want to
save the scenario package or script template. The files
that are currently stored in the selected folder are
displayed in the Folder Content pane on the right.
Description
Enter a description of the scenario package or script
template.
Note: This field is optional.
Folder
Displays the selected folder in which to store the scenario
package or script template.
Folder Content Pane
Displays the files that are currently stored in the selected
folder.
Generate
Click the Generate button to generate the scenario or
template and save it in the Central Repository Service.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Name
Enter the name under which you want to save the
scenario package or script template in the repository.
Type
Displays the type of scenario you are generating, which is
either Scenario Package or VuGen Script.
Select Locations Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to select the locations on which you want
to run the Location Load Analysis report.
To access: Click Location Selection in the Location
Load Analysis report.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Locations in the
report
Use the first left-pointing arrow to move the
appropriate locations from this area to the Locations
not in the report area to exclude them from the report.
Use the second left-pointing arrow to move all the
locations from this area.
Locations not in the
report
By default, the Select Locations dialog box displays the
locations associated with the transactions you selected.
Select the locations for which you want to view data,
and click the first right-pointing arrow to move them
to the Locations in the report area to include them in
the report. To view data for all the locations listed,
click the second right-pointing arrow.
Use unknown
locations
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Select this check box to view data for locations that
have not been assigned names.
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Select Transactions Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to select the transactions on which you
want to run the Business Process Distribution report.
To access: Click Transaction Selection in the Business
Process Distribution report or the Location Load
Analysis report.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Application
Select All applications to display the transactions from
all monitored applications, or choose a specific
application to display only transactions that were
defined for that application. Select the transactions for
which you want to view data, and click the first arrow.
To view data for all the transactions listed, click the
second arrow. Click OK to close the dialog box and
save your settings.
Transactions in the
report
Use the first left-pointing arrow to move selected
transactions from this area to the Transactions not in
the report area to exclude them from the report. Use
the second left-pointing arrow to move all the
transactions.
Transactions not in
the report
Use the first right-pointing arrow to move selected
transactions from this area to the Transactions in the
report area to include them in the report. Use the
second right-pointing arrow to move all the
transactions.
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Session Details Page
The following is an example of the Session Details page.
Description
Displays a list of the pages included in a selected Real
User Monitor session.
To access: Click the View Session Details
selected session in the Sessions page.
Included in Tasks
button for a
➤ “Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow” on
page 526
➤ “Generate a Script Template” on page 529
➤ “Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario”
on page 530
Useful Links
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“Analyzing Production Analysis Reports” on page 522
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Properties
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Session Property
Name>
The names of all the session properties configured for
the application are listed.
<Session Property
Value>
The value of each of the listed session properties is
displayed.
Note: There are five static place holders for session
properties in the profile database, whether you actually
define session properties or not. If you change the
definition of an existing session property, the values
for the previous definition still exist and appear as
values for the new definition.
Arrived From
Displays the page from which the end user reached the
session.
Browser
Displays the browser used by the end user to initiate
the session.
Client IP
Displays the IP address of the end user who initiated
the session.
Computer Name
Displays the host name of the machine of the end user
who initiated the session.
Duration
Displays the total time that the session was open.
End User Group
Displays the end-user group to which the end user who
initiated the session belongs, as configured by you in
End User Management Administration.
Hits
Displays the number of frame unit hits for the selected
application.
Location
Displays the name of the location of the end user who
initiated the session.
Operating System
Displays the operating system of the machine on
which the end user initiated the session.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Overall Traffic
Displays the total number of kilobytes sent from and
received by the session.
Server IP
Displays the IP address of the server (or load balancer)
reached by the end-user.
Start Time
Displays the date and time the session was started.
User Name
Displays the name of the end user who initiated the
session.
Pages
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Events
Displays an icon and the name of events that occurred
on the page, based on the events you defined for the
page in End User Management Administration. If there
are multiple events on a page, the icon of the most severe
event is displayed and the string "Multiple events" is
displayed instead of the event name.
Note: The order of severity of event types is HTTP errors,
application errors, and informational events.
Tooltip: For single errors, the event type is displayed and
for multiple errors, the event names are displayed.
Generate Script
Template
Click the Generate Script Template button to open the
Scenario Package Generation dialog box, where you can
generate and save a scenario package or Vugen script. For
details on the user interface, see “Scenario Package
Generation Dialog Box” on page 559.
Page
Displays the name of the page that was hit, as defined by
you in End User Management Administration, or its URL
if no name is defined.
Tooltip: The URL of the page.
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Response time
(seconds)
Displays the amount of time, in seconds, it took for the
page to download.
Session Replay
Click the Session Replay button to open the Session
Viewer page, where you can view a session flow page by
page. For details on the user interface, see “Session
Viewer Page” in Using End User Management.
Start time
Displays the date and time the page was hit.
Sessions Page
The following is an example of the Sessions page.
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Description
Displays a list of sessions that include the selected Real
User Monitor transactions.
To access: Click the View Sessions
Business Process Distribution report.
Included in Tasks
button in the
➤ “Performance and Availability Lifecycle Workflow” on
page 526
➤ “Generate a Script Template” on page 529
➤ “Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario”
on page 530
Useful Links
“Analyzing Production Analysis Reports” on page 522
Session Statistics - Averages Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
Application errors
The average number of applications errors for all the
sessions included in the report.
HTTP errors
The average number of HTTP errors for all the sessions
included in the report.
Session duration
The average session duration—in hours, minutes, and
seconds—for all the sessions included in the report.
Total pages
The average total number of pages for all the sessions
included in the report.
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
Sessions Containing Snapshots for All Pages - Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A-Z)
Description
View Session Details button. Click to open the Session
Details page, where you can view property, event, and
page data for the session.
For details on the Session Details page, see “Session
Details Page” on page 562.
Application errors
Displays the number of application errors encountered
during the session, based on the application error events
you defined for the application in End User Management
Administration.
If the number of application errors is greater than 0, it is
displayed in red.
HTTP errors
Displays the number of HTTP errors encountered during
the session, based on the global HTTP error events you
defined in End User Management Administration.
If the number of HTTP errors is greater than 0, it is
displayed in red.
Session duration
Displays the length of time that the session was active.
Start time
Displays the date and time the session was started.
Total pages
Displays the total number of page hits generated during
each session.
User name
Displays the end-user group to which the end user who
initiated the session belongs, as configured in End User
Management Administration.
Tooltip: The group’s name, IP range, and location.
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Typical Transaction Load Report
The following is an example of the Typical Transaction Load report.
Description
Enables you to view the average transaction load (the
number of Real User Monitor transaction runs) during
a typical hour, day, or week within a larger time frame
that you select.
Use the data in this report to:
➤ View the typical load on your system during specific
time frames, which can assist you in determining
the time frame you want to use for your
Performance Center load test.
➤ Assist you, together with the data in the Business
Process Distribution report, in selecting the
transactions to include in your VuGen script
templates.
To Access: Select Application > Performance and
Availability Lifecycle > Production Analysis > Typical
Transaction Load
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Included in Tasks
“Use Production Analysis Reports – A Case Scenario”
on page 530
Useful Links
“Analyzing Production Analysis Reports” on page 522
Report Settings
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Common report
elements>
For details on the user interface, see “Common Report
Elements” in Reports.
Note: If you already selected a time range in one of the
other Performance and Availability Lifecycle reports,
the time range you previously selected is automatically
displayed in the Typical Transaction Load report.
Transaction Selection
By default, the Typical Transaction Load report displays
data for the transactions you previously selected in the
Business Process Distribution report. If the Typical
Transaction Load report is the first Production Analysis
report you are accessing, or to display data for a
different group of transactions, click the Transaction
Selection link to open the Select Transactions dialog
box. For details on the user interface, see “Select
Transactions Dialog Box” on page 561.
View a typical...
Select Hour, Day, or Week.
Working Days
Click the Working Days link to open the Working Days
dialog box, where you select the days of the week for
which data is included in the report.
Note: This link is only available when viewing a typical
day or hour.
Working Hours
Click the Working Hours link to open the Working
Hours dialog box, where you select the hours of the
day for which data is included in the report.
Note: This link is only available when viewing a typical
hour.
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Report Content Viewed as a Graph
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Bars>
Display the average number of transaction runs for the
selected transactions during a typical hour, day, or
week within the time frame you specified.
Note:
➤ Click a bar to drill down to a component of the time
period you selected in the View a typical field in
report settings. For example, if you have selected a
typical week, click on a day in the week to display
the data for a typical day.
➤ The transaction runs for each subunit of time are an
average of the transaction runs for all the
occurrences of that subunit of time during the
specified time frame. For example, if you choose to
view a typical week during the period of a month,
the average number of each of the selected
transactions for each day in the week are displayed.
The transaction runs listed for a specific transaction
on Tuesday are an average of all that transaction’s
runs on Tuesdays over the course of the specified
month.
Tooltip: The average number of transaction runs.
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<Legend>
Describes the color coding used in the graph.
<Time period>
<x-axis>
Displays the subunits of time for the unit selected in
the View a typical field in report settings. For example,
if you choose to view a typical week, the individual
days of the week are displayed on the Time period axis.
Runs <y-axis>
Displays the number of transaction runs.
Chapter 18 • Performance and Availability Lifecycle - Production Analysis Reports
Report Content Viewed as a Table
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Subunit of time>
The average number of transaction runs for each
subunit of time (day, hour or minute), for each selected
transaction.
Average <column>
The average number of transaction runs for all subunits
of time for each transaction.
Average <row>
The average number of transaction runs for all the
transactions for each subunit of time.
Transaction
The transaction name.
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19
Business Process Recognition
This chapter describes the Business Process Recognition (BPR) application.
This chapter includes:
Concepts
➤
Business Process Recognition Application – Overview on page 573
➤
Business Process Recognition Architecture on page 575
Tasks
➤
Convert Real User Monitor Data into Business Process Recognition Data
on page 576
➤
Deploy Business Process Recognition and Analyze the Results on page 577
➤
Customize Business Process Recognition on page 579
Reference
➤
Business Process Recognition User Interface on page 580
Concepts
Business Process Recognition Application – Overview
Use the Business Process Recognition (BPR) application to discover business
processes that can help you monitor what really matters.
The application uses a Web mining algorithm to discover frequently
occurring process/transaction patterns in the use of Web (HTTP)
applications. Such patterns could indicate business processes.
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The Business Process Recognition application is part of the PAL
(Performance and Availability Lifecycle) package. As part of Performance
and Availability Lifecycle it extends the abilities of the Real User Monitor
solution. Business Process Recognition works on Real User Monitor raw data
(session click streams kept in the Real User Monitor MySQL database). This
data is first processed into Business Process Recognition format and then can
be used as an input to the Business Process Recognition reports applet that
discovers business processes and other useful information.
Both the administration applet and the reports applet work in the context of
specific Real User Monitor defined applications.
The user selects to run the discovery on specific pages that are Business
Critical Pages, on all pages (by giving them a new unique Id), or on both
types of pages. Business Critical Pages are the pages you configure for an
application in End User Management Administration.
You can discover business processes day by day up to a maximum of 40
days. When you want to run the discovery on additional days above the
maximum, you must remove the equivalent number of days from the
planned discovery. Data is accumulated using a scheduled process, around
midnight on the scheduled day. To configure the maximum number of
processing days, see “Modify the Maximum Number of Processing Days per
Application” on page 579.
You can also perform emergency import of data. After the data is gathered
from the Real User Monitor engine files, the discovery is run on all files that
include data. One applet is used for configuration and one applet for
reports. The process may take a while, and can also lower Real User Monitor
performance during business hours.
On the days you analyze the data, you can tune the discovery as follows:
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➤
Specify the minimum session length (minimum number of pages in the
session).
➤
Remove duplicate pages (automatically refreshed pages for example).
➤
Ignore meaningless pages. For example, if your application pings the server
regularly, the ping page has no business meaning and can be ignored.
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
➤
Include sessions that contain specific pages. For example, if you would like
to find out why users leave the site after a certain page, filter only sessions
that include this page, so BPR can find the most common business processes
which lead to leaving the application though this page.
Before generating the report, you must schedule the import and conversion
of data from the Real User Monitor. After you generate the report, the
discovery is run on the imported data. The HPWebAlgorithm.exe process
(the data mining/analysis process) takes place on the client machine and
might have an impact on the CPU.
While running, the report is saved in the temporary memory/file, which is
erased at the end of the session. You can save the report or export it to a
recipient who can then open the file in the Business Process Recognition
application.
Business Process Recognition Architecture
The Business Process Recognition process retrieves data from the Real User
Monitor database at night. The data is then converted to reduce the data
size.
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Once Real User Monitor sessions are exported into small size format you can
start to filter/manipulate the data. From this point, you can run the
algorithm over and over again with no effect on the Real User Monitor
engine and database.
You can filter the data by the number of pages in the session. You can
remove duplicate consecutive pages, ignore pages, include sessions that
include specific pages, and so on.
Tasks
Convert Real User Monitor Data into Business Process
Recognition Data
This section describes the processes used to convert the Real User Monitor
data into Business Process Recognition data.
To convert Real User Monitor data into Business Process Recognition data,
click Application > Performance and Availability Lifecycle > Business Process
Recognition > Business Process Recognition Settings and specify how to
process Real User Monitor sessions data into Business Process Recognition
format, and schedule the dates on which to process the data.
Note: Business Process Recognition tasks automatically stop after two hours
of processing, whether or not they have completed, to avoid placing a heavy
load on Real User Monitor resources. Tasks stopped before completion are
marked as successful and are available for analysis, but only contain the Real
User Monitor traffic up to the time they stopped and not for the entire date
as configured.
For details on the user interface, see “Business Process Recognition Settings
Page” on page 582.
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Deploy Business Process Recognition and Analyze the
Results
This task describes how to run the Business Process Recognition tool and
analyze the resulting data.
This task includes the following steps:
➤
“Set Up Business Process Recognition” on page 577
➤
“Customize Business Process Recognition” on page 577
➤
“Generate and Analyze the Report” on page 578
1 Set Up Business Process Recognition
Once Business Process Recognition data is available, create a report by
clicking Applications > Performance and Availability Lifecycle > Business Process
Recognition > Business Process Recognition Tool, select the date range, and filter
the pages on which you want to run the Business Process Recognition tool.
For details on the user interface, see “Business Process Recognition Tool
Page” on page 584.
2 Customize Business Process Recognition
You can modify:
➤
the default threshold settings for brownouts.
➤
the maximum number of exported days for each application.
➤
the maximum size of the results.
For details on how to perform these tasks, see “Customize Business Process
Recognition” on page 579.
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3 Generate and Analyze the Report
In the Business Process Recognition tool (to access, select Applications >
Performance and Availability Lifecycle > Business Process Recognition > Business
Process Recognition Tool), select the application, select the report data, and
click the Generate button. The applet downloads the Business Process
Recognition data in the requested time range, filters the data to find
business processes, and runs the data mining algorithm to find the business
processes. Use the different filters to tune the data you want to display and
use the buttons in the report to configure the graph. You can then analyze
the displayed data.
For details on the user interface, see “Business Process Recognition Tool
Page” on page 584.
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Customize Business Process Recognition
You can customize Business Process Recognition using the following
options:
1 Modify the Threshold Defaults for Brownouts
To modify the default threshold settings for brownouts, select Admin >
Platform > Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose
Applications, select Business Process Recognition, and locate the Critical
threshold, Major threshold, Minor threshold, and Warning threshold
entries in the Business Process Recognition - Brownout Settings table.
Modify the value of those thresholds.
2 Modify the Maximum Number of Processing Days per
Application
To modify the maximum number of processing days per application, select
Admin > Platform > Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings,
choose Applications, select Business Process Recognition, and locate the
Maximum export days entry in the Business Process Recognition Parameter Settings table. Modify the value of this entry.
3 Modify the Number of Business Processes That Can be
Displayed in the Main View
To modify the number of Business Processes that can be displayed in the
main view of the Business Process Recognition Tool, select Admin > Platform
> Setup and Maintenance > Infrastructure Settings, choose Applications,
select Business Process Recognition, and locate the Maximum results size
entry in the Business Process Recognition - Parameter Settings table.
Modify the value of this entry. Default is 100.
Reference
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Business Process Recognition User Interface
This section describes:
➤
Advanced Algorithm Setting Dialog Box on page 580
➤
Business Process Recognition Settings Page on page 582
➤
Business Process Recognition Tool Page on page 584
➤
Data Selection Dialog Box on page 594
➤
Raw Data Information Page on page 596
➤
Select Pages Dialog Box on page 597
➤
Unique ID Settings Dialog Box on page 598
Advanced Algorithm Setting Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to specify if you want to find Business
Processes, by their popularity level, automatically using
an algorithm or manually.
To Access: Click Advanced Algorithm Settings in the
Data Selection dialog box.
Important
Information
The quality of a Business Process is characterized by its
length (number of pages) and its popularity. The
popularity is defined by percentage of sessions where
the sequence of pages that represents the Business
Process is included.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Business Process
length
Specify the minimum and maximum number of pages
in the Business Process.
Business Process
minimal length
Specify the minimum number of pages in the Business
Process.
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Business Process
popularity initial
level
Select the popularity level that interests you the most.
Manual mode
Select to manually set the algorithm parameters.
Popularity level
Select the minimum and maximum popularity levels.
Smart mode
Select to make the Web mining algorithm run in smart
mode.
Smart mode automatically runs the algorithm with a
high popularity level. It then checks the results and
decides one of the following:
➤ lower the popularity level and run the algorithm
again.
➤ stop the process (when more than 20 results have
been discovered) and return the results to the user.
This enables you to display the most popular
Business Processes.
You can define the initial popularity level to shorten
the running time needed for getting the result. For
example, if you know (from prior runs) that the
maximum popularity level is 25%, set the default at
25% and avoid waiting till the smart mode processes
down to this range.
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Business Process Recognition Settings Page
Description
Enables you to manage the processing task and to
configure how exactly to process Real User Monitor
sessions data.
To access: Click Application > Performance and
Availability Lifecycle > Business Process Recognition >
Business Process Recognition Settings
Important
Information
Limitation: For each application you can process only
40 days. The current status appears in the upper right
corner of the month view (for example: 20 out of 40
export days in use). When reaching the quota of 40
days, clean some of existing dates to enable defining
more dates. This value is customizable. For details, see
“Modify the Maximum Number of Processing Days per
Application” on page 579.
Included in Tasks
“Convert Real User Monitor Data into Business Process
Recognition Data” on page 576
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Cancels the processing tasks that were assigned to the
selected dates.
Clears the processed data that exists for the selected
dates. This date becomes available for reprocessing.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Activates the processing tasks immediately.
Note:
➤ The task processes each date one day at a time. The
processing task takes time and depends on the
amount of session click streams for the selected data
and on the availability of the Real User Monitor
engine.
➤ This operation is not recommended for day to day
use, except for testing or troubleshooting purposes.
It is recommended, instead, to use the Process
Selected Date option.
Note: The process may take a while, and can also lower
Real User Monitor performance during business hours.
Click to schedule a processing task for the dates you
selected. You can select a range of dates and apply the
selected schedule for the range.
Note: This operation only schedules a future task for
the Real User Monitor engine.
<Legend>
The legend describes the meaning of the possible colors
of the cells in the calendar.
Application
Select the Real User Monitor application.
Clear downloaded
data from local Client
machine
Select to remove the data downloaded from the Real
User Monitor server from the local Client machine.
Next Month with
Data
Click to display the next month, if it includes data. If
the next month does not include data, the month after
that is displayed, if it includes data, and so forth.
Previous Month with
Data
Click to display the previous month, if it includes data.
If the previous month does not include data, the
month before that is displayed, if it includes data, and
so forth.
Clear the option to save the data downloaded from the
Real User Monitor server on the local Client machine
after you close the session.
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GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Refresh
Updates the calendar view to show when the operation
started at the time you clicked the button for the
immediate activation of processing tasks
.
UID Setting
Click to open the Unique ID Settings dialog box. For
details on the user interface, see “Unique ID Settings
Dialog Box” on page 598.
Business Process Recognition Tool Page
Description
Helps you discover frequently used processes/
transactions patterns that might represent Business
Processes. Also generates and displays multiple reports
that provide data about the discovered Business
Processes, simultaneously. Each tab on the application
displays a different business process report.
To access: Click Application > Performance and
Availability Lifecycle > Business Process Recognition >
Business Process Recognition Tool
Important
Information
➤ You can close a tab (report), print it, save it, rename
it, and create a new tab.
➤ Only the first 100 Business Processes are displayed.
➤ For more information about the Business Process
Recognition, see “Business Process Recognition
Application – Overview” on page 573.
Customization: You can customize the number of
Business Processes that can be displayed. For details,
see “Modify the Number of Business Processes That
Can be Displayed in the Main View” on page 579.
Included in Tasks
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Results” on page 577
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Click to create a new Business Process Recognition
report.
A new tab is created in the page.
Click to open an existing Business Process Recognition
report. For example, use this option to open a report
that was sent to you.
Click to print the report.
Click to save the changes.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Business Process Recognition Filter Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Tabs>
Each discovered business process report is displayed on
a separate tab. A new tab is created with a default name
when you click New. Right-click the tab to display the
following options:
➤ Rename. Opens the Rename dialog box where you
can change the name of the tab.
➤ Close. Closes the current tab.
➤ Close All Other Tabs. Closes all tabs except the
current one.
➤ Close All. Closes all the tabs.
➤ New. Creates a new tab.
Applications
Select the Real User Monitor application.
Information about the date and the size of the data
that was imported when you generated the report is
displayed on the right of the Applications box. For
example:
586
Generate
Click to generate a report.
Select Report Data
Click to open the Data Selection dialog box where you
can select the data on which the report is based. For
details, see “Data Selection Dialog Box” on page 594.
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Results Area
Description
By default, in each tab the business processes are
grouped into one presentation layer. Initially, every
page that appears in several business processes, appears
only once in the generated report.
You can then filter the pages, group or ungroup pages,
and select buttons to display different aspects of the
data.
Important
Information
Using the buttons and options available on this panel,
you modify how you display the report (without
changing the actual contents).
You can adjust the business process display so that each
business process is displayed separately even if it has a
shared page with other business processes.
You can also select to display business processes that
include specific pages.
You can:
➤ show only business processes with specified pages.
➤ group pages (aggregate business processes to find the
common paths between them).
➤ ungroup pages (view each business processes
separately).
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Click to return the graph to the original layout. The
layout displays the percentage of participation of a
page compared to the total number of sessions of the
Business Process.
Display the current report raw data information
(sessions include, average sessions size and more). For
details, see “Raw Data Information Page” on page 596.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Select a page and click the button to open the Define
Page dialog box in End User Management
Administration, where you can create a Business
Critical Page corresponding to the selected Real User
Monitor page. The page is saved in End User
Management as a Business Critical page. For details, see
“Define Page Dialog Box” in Using End User
Management.
Select one or more pages that you defined as Business
Critical Pages and click the button to open the Define
Transaction dialog box, where you can create a
transaction that is saved in End User Management.
Note: If you select a page that is not defined as a
Business Critical Page, the transaction creation fails.
Fit the complete view in the window. If, for example,
you have enlarged the view in such a way that it does
not fit in the window, click the button, to shrink the
graph so that it fits in the window.
To move pages, click the button, select pages and drag
them to the required location. To curve a link, click the
button, click the link where you want to give it a curve,
and drag until you obtain the right curve.
Click the button. A small window opens. Drag the
rectangle in that window to magnify the
corresponding area in the main view.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Click the button and click and drag the graph to shift
the location of the complete graph in the main view.
Click the button, click the graph in the main view,
move the cursor up to shrink the graph, and move the
cursor down to enlarge the graph.
Click to toggle the display of the minimum and
maximum number of flows that include the page.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Click to display the percentage of brown-out for the
pages (a page is brownout when the incoming traffic is
larger than the outgoing traffic, for example, the
incoming traffic is 75% while the outgoing traffic is
35%).
The colors of the brown-out levels are as follows:
➤ Green. 0%-25% (Normal)
➤ Yellow. 25% - 35% (Minor)
➤ Light olive. 35% - 55% (Warning)
➤ Orange. 55% - 75% (Major)
➤ Red. 75% - 100% (Critical)
Customization: You can change the threshold values.
For details, see “Customize Business Process
Recognition” on page 577.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Toggle to display the diagram with:
➤ Percentage values:
➤ Accurate values:
Note: The diagram is initially displayed with
percentage values.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Group by:
Select:
➤ Identical linked pages. Superimposes identical pages
that have links to identical pages and superimposes
the links.
➤ Identical pages. Creates a separate path for each link
to a different page or when the percentage of links
to the same page is different for different Business
Processes. Similar pages are displayed one under the
other so you can see each link separately.
➤ Do not group. Shows each Business Process
individually.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
View Business
Processes Containing
Page
Select to open the Select Pages dialog box where you
can select the pages you want to display. The dialog
box displays all the pages that are displayed in the
graph in the Results area. For details on the user
interface, see “Select Pages Dialog Box” on page 597.
Displayed Business Process Pages Area
Description
Shows details on all the pages that where discovered
during the Business Process Recognition process and
that appear in the graph.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Max Popularity
Displays the highest number of times the page was
included in any of the discovered Business Processes.
Min Popularity
Displays the least number of times the page was
included in any of the discovered Business Processes.
Nbr. of Business
Processes Using the
Page
The number of discovered Business Processes in which
this page is included.
Page Name
The unique page ID or the name of the page.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Data Selection Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to select the data on which the Business
Process is to be discovered.
To Access: Click Select Report Data in the Business
Process Recognition Reports page.
Included in Tasks
“Convert Real User Monitor Data into Business Process
Recognition Data” on page 576
Pages Filter Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
594
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Ignore selected
pages
Lists the pages that you selected to filter out in the
Select Pages dialog box.
Remove consecutive
duplicate pages
Select to ignore multiple consecutive instances of the
same page (leave only one instance). For example, if
the session includes the following sequence of hits:
login, choose package, choose package, choose package,
submit, it is reduced to: login, choose package, submit.
Select Pages
Click to open the Select Pages dialog box. You can
filter out pages that are common and that have no
impact on the business (for example, Welcome page).
For details on the user interface, see “Select Pages
Dialog Box” on page 597.
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Sessions Filter Area
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Include only sessions
that contain the
following page
Lists the pages that must be included in the session. For
example, sessions that include the log out page.
Include only sessions
that have more than
<min> or less than
<max> number of
pages
Specify the minimum and maximum number of pages
of the session. Helps you ignore sessions that are too
short or too long.
Select Pages
Click to open the Select Pages dialog box. For details
on the user interface, see “Select Pages Dialog Box” on
page 597.
Default value: Minimum 5 and maximum 200.
Date Filter Area
Description
Enables you to select which date you want to analyze
(remember that first you have to process a date’s data
into BPR format using the administration applet).
Important
Information
The colors of the cells in the date table indicate
whether the date has been selected, there is data
available for processing for that date, and the current
date.
595
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<Legend>
The legend describes the meaning of the possible colors
of the cells in the calendar.
Advanced algorithm
setting
Click to open the Advanced Algorithm Setting dialog
box. For details on the user interface, see “Advanced
Algorithm Setting Dialog Box” on page 580.
Clear All
Click to clear the dates you selected for the month.
Next Month with
Data
Click to display the next month, if it includes data. If
the next month does not include data, the month after
that is displayed, if it includes data, and so forth.
Previous Month with
Data
Click to display the previous month, if it includes data.
If the previous month does not include data, the
month before that is displayed, if it includes data, and
so forth.
Selected Date
Summary
Click to display the selected dates. The legend below
the monthly calendar indicates the selected dates, the
days that have data assigned to them, and the
non-selectable data.
View Selected Date
Click to display the dates you selected.
Raw Data Information Page
Description
Displays raw data information about the report and
about the algorithm parameters that were used to run
the report.
To access: Click the
button in the Business Process
Recognition Tool page.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Select Pages Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to select the pages that are to be ignored
when running Business Process Recognition.
To Access: Click Edit in the Pages filter area of the
Select Report Data dialog box.
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
<arrows>
Click the single arrows to select/unselect the selected
elements. Click the double arrows to select/unselect all
the elements at a time.
Filter
Enter a string to help you filter the list below.
The string behaves as if it is preceded and followed by
an asterisk (*) wildcard - you do not need to enter those
characters.
You can also insert an asterisk (*) wildcard anywhere in
the string.
Selected pages
Select the pages and click the arrows to move the
selection back to the Unselected pages box.
Unselected pages
Lists the available pages. Select them using the filter or
select the pages and click the arrows to move the
selection to the Selected pages box.
597
Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
Unique ID Settings Dialog Box
Description
Enables you to specify the export method and the URL
ID setting.
To Access: Click the URL Unique ID Setting button in
the Business Process Recognition Settings dialog box.
Important
Information
The first step in analyzing a web application depends
on the ability to identify its pages. Since the same page
in a Web application probably has different URLs due
to different session ID, end users, and other
parameters, it is important to configure how to identify
the same page across all sessions. To do so, you must
supply the Business Process Recognition application
with a configuration that helps it to identify pages.
The unique ID can rely on existing naming methods
(Business Critical Pages and the meaningful names
feature).
The following elements are included (unlabeled GUI elements are shown in
angle brackets):
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Add/Remove
Use to add or remove specific parameters.
Export method
Select one of the following:
➤ Use only named hits (Business Critical Pages and
named pages). To use the business critical pages that
are defined in End User Management
Administration and pages to which meaningful
names were given.
➤ Create unique ID for all hits. To use all pages in the
click stream and assign a unique Business Process
Recognition ID to each one of them.
➤ Both. To provide a unique ID to all pages in the click
stream that do not have a name or are not Business
Critical Pages. The named pages retain their original
name.
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
GUI Element (A–Z)
Description
Include URI in
Unique ID
Select to specify which components of the URL are
used in the generated unique ID. You can select
whether to include the URI and a set of parameters
(GET/POST) that are to be included in the unique ID.
Parameters
Enter the URL parameters. The pages whose URL
includes those parameters, which should be referred to
for page identification, are included in the export
operation.
For example, if the source URL is:
http://micrm.hp.com/callcenter_enu/
start.swe?SWECmd=GotoPageTab&SWEBID=-1&SWEV
iew=All Service Request List
view&SWEC=2&SWETS=&SWEScreen=Service Request
Screen&SWEVST=-1&SWEStrCCnt=372&SWECacheId=
1&SWEJFN=top._swe._swejssview.s00
and you enter the SWECmd and SWEView parameters
to identify this page, the result is:
SWECmd=GotoPageTab&SWEView=All Service
Request List view
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Chapter 19 • Business Process Recognition
600
Index
A
Active Filter dialog box 65
Add Inrtegration dialog box 431
API 295, 297
byTime function 305
configuration 299
Dashboard 409
data returned 300
example queries 306
metadata for samples 299
permissions 298
queries, legacy data 307
query limitations 303
SQL syntax supported 302
time formats 304
UCMDB Java
UCMDB Java API 397
UCMDB webservice 321
Web browser response body 300
Web Service 301
APIs
included with HP Business
Availability Center 295
Application - Webservices module 22
Application CI 256
Application Server CI 256
application servers page 276
Application-Host
integration adapter 417
Availability dimension
uninitialized 144
Availability KPI
no color 144
B
bit rate, using in configuring script 536
BPM measurements
SAP Systems view 152
BPM profile 135, 197
BPM steps CI 255
BPM Transaction/Location CI 255
BPM transactions
attaching to SAP Application
components 139, 200
Business Availability Center for Siebel 236
configuration 203
Business Process Distribution report 547
Business Process Insight
overview of application 487
Business Process Monitor 199
creating profile for SAP 136, 199
invoking a script 263
profile 135, 197
Business Process Monitor Measurements
in SAP Systems view 143
Business Process Monitor profile
creating for SAP 123
Business Process Monitor transactions for
SOA
run 48
Business Process Monitoring
synchronizing source adapter 138,
199, 211
Business Process Monitot measurements
SAP Systems view 152
Business Process profile
create 33
Business Process Recognition 573
architecture 575
deploy and analyze 577
overview 573
settings 576
user interface 580
601
Index
Business Process transactions
record for Siebel 197
C
CCMS
for SAP 134
CCMS Counters CIs 156
Central Repository Service (CRS) 542
Change report
SAP 251
SOA 62
CI Operations Orchestration Flows
Configuration page 503
CIs
log folder for Siebel Component CI
248
SAP 159
SOA 53
CIT Relationships Map dialog box 438
Configuration File 159
details 61
page 166
Configuration File CI 255
details 251, 252
configuration type
UCMDB webservice API 392
Configure Parameters page 508
configuring
Business Availability Center for Siebel
203
connection parameters
SiteScope 227
Consumer Summary report 69
Contained Group CI 255
Contained Location CI 255
correlation
showing impact 158
correlation, for Performance and Availability
Lifecycle-generated scripts 535
D
Dashboard API
query examples 412
Dashboard APIs 409
602
building queries 409
data aggregation 21
data API 297
data collection process
EMS 422
third-party data 422
Database Breakdown
solving issues 231
Database CI 255
default SiteScope monitor
specify for Siebel 214
Define Assignment Configuration
dialog box 438
deployment
HP Business Availability for Siebel 187
derived properties 331
diagnostic tool
Siebel Database Breakdown
Diagnostic 243, 250
Diagnostics
integrating for SOA solution 25
diagnostics settings
checklist 205
diagnostics tools
errors occurring while running 225
Siebel 236
troubleshooting 227
dialog box
Select Location 560
Select Transaction 557
discovery 22
running SAP discovery 123
Discovery Agent
restart 133
Discovery and Dependency Mapping 31
Discovery Probe
post-installation procedure 133
E
Edit Integration dialog box 433
Edit Run Book Mapping Configuration
wizard 505
EMS
process flowchart 422
EMS Integration Admin page 440
Index
EMS integration application
overview 416
EMS integration tool
HP Business Process Insight 490
HP OVO 481
Enterprise Management Systems
integration 415
overview 416
error
Cannot Raise Log Level 231
Could Not Retrieve Log File 232
Could Not Run BPM Transaction 232
Database Breakdown Analysis Data for
the Transaction Cannot Be
Displayed 232
errors
troubleshooting in logs 224
F
filtering reports 557, 569
firewalls
working with Siebel 184
for SOA 22
G
generate SARM report
save generated XML files 213
graphs
Transaction Runs per Location 557
H
Health report 75
Host
integration adapter 417
Host CI 255
hosts reconciliation 420
Host-Software Element
integration adapter 417
HP Business Availability Center
integration with HP Service Manager
and HP Service Center 441
unable to log on 145
HP Business Availability Center for SAP
deploying 130
deployment workflow 121
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
architecture 183
license 182
HP Business Availability Center for Siebel
solution 179, 235
HP Business Availability Center for SOA
architecture 19
reports 59
views 52
HP Business Availability for SAP
architecture 118
overview 116
HP Business Availability for SAP application
115
reports and views 147
HP Business Availability for SAP Applications
license 117
HP Business Availability for Siebel
deploying 187
HP Business Availability for Siebel
Applications
overview 180
HP Business Process Insight
access from HP Business Availability
Center 492
integration using EMS integration
tool 490
HP Diagnostics
integrating for SOA solution 25
integration with Business Availability
Center 513
HP Diagnostics and HP Business Availability
Center integration
overview 514
HP Diagnostics data
view in HP Business Availlability
Center 515
HP Diagnostics Integration
enable 32
HP Diagnostics probes
deploy 32
HP OpenView Operations
integration with HP Business
Availability Center 477
603
Index
HP Operations Orchestration
integration with Business Availability
Center 495
HP Operations Orchestration Central and HP
Business Availability Center
integration
overview 496
HP Operations Orchestration integration
user interface 503
HP Operations Orchestration integration
workflow 496
HP OVO
activate view 485
add optional KPIs 485
assign CIs to SLAs 485
customize integration adapter 484,
490
customize mapping 485
install HP OVO integration add-on
482
integration using EMS integration
tool 481
view data in views 486
HP OVO integration
overview 477
HP Service Manager
complete integration 447
integration overview 442
integration scenario 450
integration with HP Business
Availability Center 441
upgrade 473
view data in Dashboard 452
HP ServiceCenter
add optional KPIs 472
assign CIs to SLAs 472
CIs and KPIs 446
complete integration 447
configure integration adapter 470
integration overview 442
See HP Service Manager 441
upgrade 473
view data in views 473
HP ServiceCenter Integration with HP
Business Availability Center 441
604
HP SOA Systinet
integration for SOA solution 27
HP SOA Systinet integration
enable 32
I
Import HP Operations Orchestration server
certificates
workflow for Solaris 500
workflow for Windows 499
integration
Netscout 487
integration adapter
Host, Host-Software Element,
Application-Host 417
integration administration 415
invoking Business Process Monitor script 263
J
J2EE - WebLogic module 22
J2EE WebSphere module 22
Java
UCMDB API 397
L
license
SAP 130, 131
SiteScope 131
SOA 31
limitations
HP Diagnostics 517
Siebel Log monitor on Unix platform
232
SOA reports 50
links between SAP transactions and BP steps
creating automatic links 139, 200
creating manual links 140, 201
deleting 141, 208
load test, configuring and running 537
LoadRunner, configuring and running a
scenario in 539
Location Load Analysis report 555
log folder
per Siebel Component CI 248
Index
M
Metrics Over Time reports 89
Monitor Deployment Wizard
Siebel monitors 209
using for SOA monitors 46
monitors
creating general monitors for SAP 135
set to report all monitors and
measurements 126
N
naming conventions
BPM transaction automatically linked
to SAP transactions 139, 200
Netscout
integration 487
Netscout integration
overview 487
Network Speed, run-time setting 536
New Run Book Mapping Configuration
wizard 505
O
operations
customizing number to display in
SOA reports 63, 64
overview
Business Process Recognition 573
OVO
CIs and KPIs 479
context menu items and tooltips 480
hierarchies 479
rules 480
OVO Hosts and Applications View
activate 485
P
packages 131
parameterization, for Performance and
Availability Lifecycle-generated
scripts 534
parameters.cfg 251, 252
Performance and Availability Lifecycle
user interface 546
Performance Center
configuring and running a load test in
537
Performance dimension
uninitialized 144
Performance KPI
no color 144
Processes 233
Processes report 258
Processes Tool - Advanced Filter dialog box
260
profile
creating 135
properties
derived 331
protocol
SAPGUI 136
Q
queries
limitations 303
UCMDB webservice API 325
R
Real User Monitor
convert data into Business Process
Recognition data 576
reconciliation of hosts 420
Regular Hierarchy
Business Process Monitor 199
relation
UCMDB webservice API 393
relationships details 420
report
Show Impacting SAP Transports 168
reporting
Dashboard APIs 409
using API 297
reports
Business Process Distribution 547
exporting to CRS 542
filtering 557, 569
605
Index
Location Load Analysis 555
retrieving from CRS 545
Typical Transaction Load 568
rum_page_t sample
example 307
rum_server_t sample
example 307
Run Book Mapping Configuration wizard
505
Run Books Configuration page 503
run-time settings 136
for Performance and Availability
Lifecycle 536
S
SAP
CIs 159
collecting system information 120
creating Business Process Monitor
profile 123
KPIs 164
menu options 164
System CIs 251
troubleshooting 143
SAP Application components
attaching BPM transactions 139, 200
SAP BPM scripts
not executing 145
SAP CCMS measurements
connecting to elements in SAP 127
SAP CCMS monitor 134
creating 134
using to retrieve measurements from
SAP system 124
SAP deployment
workflow 121
SAP dimension
Not up to date 143
SAP discovery
running 123
SAP Service
activating 129
administering 119
SAP system
monitoring 144
606
SAP Systems view 148
BPM measurements 152
SAP Transaction Changes report 169
SAP transactions
automatic link to BPM transactions
139, 200
SAP Transport Changes report 172
SAP users
simulation 135, 197
SAPGUI protocol 136
SARM
Analyzer tool, copying to the
SiteScope server 194
customize 228
running the user trace diagnostic 244,
245
SARM - User Trace Breakdown
running 244
SARM - User Trace Breakdown - Analysis
report 266
SARM - User Trace Breakdown (Run the
Diagnostics Tool) page 261
SARM - User Trace Breakdown dialog box 264
SARM logs
for Web and Application Server 247
SARM user trace breakdown diagnostic
application servers page 276
SARM-related issues
troubleshooting 228
scenario package
generating 551
saving in CRS 543
Scenarion Package Generation dialog box
559
script
editing 137
script templates
generation 529
refining in VuGen 533
scripts
invoking Business Process Monitor
script 263
opening from CRS 544
saving in CRS 543
uploading to Performance Center 545
Select CI Type page 506
Index
Select Location
dialog box 560
Select Run Books page 507
Select Topology dialog box 510
Select Transaction
dialog box 557
Server and Endpoint Summary report 94
service
Siebel 186, 192, 212
ServiceCenter
See HP Service Manager 441
Session Details page 528, 562
Sessions page 549, 565
Show Content
Siebel 251, 252
Show Impacting SAP Transports report 168
Showing Impacting SAP Transports report
167
Siebel
context menu options 254
Database Breakdown Configuration
page 244, 284
default CIs 254
deploying 187
diagnostics tools 236
record Business Process transactions
197
service 186, 192, 212
Show Content 251, 252
Siebel Application Server Monitor 185
Siebel Application Server solution template
211
Siebel CIs
manual configuration 191, 216
Siebel Component CI 256
Siebel Component Group CI 256
Siebel Database Breakdown
Analysis report 287
Siebel Database Breakdown Configuration
report 284
Siebel Database Breakdown Diagnostic tool
243, 250
Siebel Deployment Validator dialog box 218
Siebel Deployment Validator Test Summary
dialog box 222
Siebel Enterprises CI 256
Siebel Enterprises View 240
Siebel Enterprises view
errors occurring while building 224
troubleshooting 226
Siebel Gateway CI 256
Siebel Gateway Server solution template 211
Siebel Log Monitor 185
Siebel Measurement Group CI 256
Siebel monitors
concepts 185
deploying 209
deploying using Monitor Deployment
Wizard 209
deploying using Siebel solution
templates 211
Siebel solution
architecture 183
configuring 203
license 182
troubleshooting 223
Siebel Web Server Application CI 256
Siebel Web Server Extension CI 256
Siebel Web Server Monitor 185
Siebel Web Server solution template 211
siebel.cfg 251, 252
SiteScope
attaching SiteScope to HP Business
Availability Center for SAP 126
connection parameters 227
license 131, 132
monitors for SOA 28
post-installation procedure 131
SiteScope CCMS Solution Template 125
SiteScope CCMS Solution template
using for SAP 125
SiteScope Measurement CIs 257
SiteScope measurements
checking in SAP 129, 155
SiteScope monitor
manual attach 48
specify default for Siebel 214
SiteScope monitors
deploy 32
deploy for SOA solution 46
deploying for SOA using Monitor
Deployment Wizard 46
607
Index
for SAP 134
specify default for Siebel 214
SiteScope server
copying the srvrmgr and the SARM
Analyzer tool to 194
SiteScope source adapter
synchronizing 126
SOA
CIs 53, 62
deploy SiteScope monitors for 46
deployment workflow 30
discovery patterns for 22
information in views 52
integrating with HP SOA Systinet 27
integration HP Diagnostics data 25
SiteScope monitors 28
view data in Dashboard 60
SOA discovery modules 22
SOA information in Dashboard 34, 61
SOA reports
limitations 50
SOA solution
overview 18
Software Component File 159
solution
Siebel 179, 235
Speed Simulation settings 536
srvrmgr tool
copying to the SiteScope server 194
ss_t sample
example 306
Support Package File Information 159
Systinet
integration for SOA solution 27
T
table information
Web Services 105, 111
Tasks 233
Tasks Diagnostics Tool - Advanced Filter
dialog box 292
Tasks Diagnostics Tool report 289
Technology Web Service Integration
Monitor 28
608
third-party data
process flowchart 422
third-party integrations 295
timeout
changing default for SiteScope
monitor 214
increasing default for SARM Task or
SARM Analyzer 215
Top Metrics report 100
TopologyMap
UCMDB webservice API 325
Total Database Time chart 231
trans_t sample
example 306
Transaction Location Regular Hierarchy 199
Transaction Runs per Location graph 557
Transaction/Location
Business Process Monitor 199
troubleshooting
HP Diagnostics 517
SAP solution 143
SARM-related issues 228
Typical Transaction Load report 568
U
UCMDB
querying
webservice 328
UCMDB Java API
application structure 399
integration user, creating 401
jar file 400
permissions 399
using 398
UCMDB Web service API
using 322
UCMDB webservice API
addCIsAndRelations 352
calculateImpact 355
chunkInfo 395
CIT name 392
class name 392
configuration type name 392
deleteCIsAndRelations 354
errors 328
Index
exceptions 328
executeTopologyQueryByName 338
executeTopologyQueryByNameWith
Parameters 339
executeTopologyQueryWithParamete
rs 340
getAllClassesHierarchy 336
getChangedCIs 340
getCIsByID 342
getCIsByType 343
getClassAncestors 335
getCmdbClassDefinition 336
getFilteredCIsByType 344
getImpactPath 356
getImpactRulesByNamePrefix 357
getQueryNameOfView 348
getTopologyQueryExistingResultByN
ame 349
getTopologyQueryResultCountByNa
me 349
identifier in impact analysis methods
337
inherited properties query 347
key attributes 391
labels 325
parameter format 333, 390, 394
permissions 324
query methods 337
query, properties returned 330
relation 393
ShallowRelation 394
TopologyMap 325
TQL queries 325
update methods 335, 352, 355
updateCIsAndRelations 354
Web Service, calling 328
UDDI Monitor 28
UDDI Registry
for SOA 22
user trace diagnostic (SARM) 244, 245
SAP Systems 148
Siebel Enterprises 240
views
SOA 52
Web Services 52
VuGen
correlating recorded values 535
parameterization 534
refining script templates 533
W
Web Server CI 257
Web Servers - IIS module 22
Web Service
API 301
API, data returned 300
UCMDB API 321
UCMDB webservice API 328
Web Service Monitor 28
Web Services
customizing number to display in
SOA reports 63, 64
discovering 22
information in views 52
workflow
for deploying SAP 121
for deploying SOA 30
V
view
OVO Hosts and Applications View
485
609
Index
610
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