Guitar Guide - Artist Guitars

Guitar Guide - Artist Guitars
Guitar Guide
G U I TA R S
T Y P E S O F G U ITA R S
Headstock
Classical Guitar
Neck
Classical Guitars are a type of acoustic guitar strung
with nylon strings. They are used for playing classical,
flamenco and traditional folk music. This guitar provides
a good star ting point for young players and beginners
as the strings are softer and easier to play. Classical
guitars are available in full size, 3/4, 1/2 and 1/4 sizes.
Steel String Guitar
Steel string acoustic guitars come in many sizes, the
most common being dreadnought. There are a number
of larger and smaller sizes to suit different taste and
size of the player. OM guitars would suit a smaller build
player, whereas a Jumbo guitar would be better suited
to a larger player who is looking for a more “bassy”
louder sound.
Body
Headstock
Neck
Some steel string guitars are able to be plugged
into an amplifier, these are called acoustic/electric
guitars. These guitars are very similar to normal acoustic
guitars, except that they have a built in pickup which
transforms the acoustic sound into electric current so that
you can amplify the sound through a guitar amp or PA
system, or plug directly into a recording system.
When amplified they sound just like an acoustic guitar,
but louder (not like an electric guitar.)
Electric and Bass Guitars
Electric guitars and electric bass guitars are made to
be solely used with an amplifier. Generally they do not
produce sound on their own as an acoustic guitar does.
It’s called an electric guitar not because the guitar itself
is connected to any power, but because it has pickups
set under the strings that convert the string vibrations
into very small electrical current. This travels from the
output of the guitar, through a guitar lead, to the input
of the amp which amplifiers the electric current and
converts it back to sound which you hear out of the
speaker. Amplifier sizes range from bedroom practice
amps to large amp stacks for playing on stage. Electric
guitars use steel strings.
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Body
Headstock
Neck
Body
G U I TA R S
Guitar Guide
C A R I N G F O R YO U R G U ITA R
Guitars play their best and last much longer when they are well cared for. A guitar is a delicate
instrument, and when not in use it should be kept in a safe place where it’s not too damp or too
dry (in winter in front of a heater can be extremely dry and this isn’t good for the wood in
your guitar).
Don’t ever lean a guitar on a wall, or anywhere it may fall because if accidentally knocked
it could damage the guitar (it’s a very easy way to break the headstock). The safest place to
leave your guitar is in its case or, even better, a guitar stand where it is safe and your guitar
is always ready to play. Alternatively, if you lay your guitar down flat, out of the way, there is
nowhere for it to fall.
When you finish playing, clean the guitar and strings with a soft cloth, like a micro-fibre cloth.
Cleaning after use will mean that the strings last longer. Don’t use any solvents or silicon based
polishes (only use guitar polish) as these might affect your finish. Strings should be changed
regularly to get the best sound out of your guitar (1-2 months is ideal for most players, professionals
will change every week, and stars will change every concert!)
Always keep at least one spare set of strings, in case a string or two breaks just before you want
or need to play the guitar.
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Guitar Guide
G U I TA R S
STR I N G R E P L AC E M E NT
Don’t put nylon strings on a steel string guitar and don’t put steel strings on a nylon string guitar.
Do not over tighten guitar strings otherwise you could cause serious damage to the bridge and
top of the guitar.
When changing all 6 strings, it’s best to do it one at a time. So remove one string then thread
the new string. This maintains the correct tension on the neck.
For a classic, fit the replacement string into the tailpiece of the guitar. Nylon strings pass
through and over the bridge, and then looped.
Electric Guitar / Bass strings are attached to the tailpiece. There are many different types,
but always feed the string through the hole on the bridge/ tailpiece of the guitar.
For a steel string acoustic guitar, you change the string by removing the bridge pin, remove the
old string and feed the ball end of the new string into the hole. Replace the bridge pin back into
the hole so that the ball end is hooked around the underside of the bridge.
Once the string is replaced, wind the string onto the machine head. The machine head has a
hole to feed the string through. Feed the top of the string into the hole then turn the machine
head about 1 full turn. Lift the string between 2 to 3cm and wind the string. The aim is to get
the string wound roughly 3 times around the spool of the machine head so that the string will
grip to itself. Next tune the guitar, as described below. Then, “snap” the string by curling your
index finger around the string and pulling up, until you feel a reasonable amount of tension on
your finger.
Headstock
Machine
Heads
Bridge
Neck
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Guitar Guide
G U I TA R S
H OW TO TU N E YO U R G U ITA R
This is the standard tuning
for a six string guitar:
This is the tuning for a
four string Bass:
EADGBE
E A DG
The best way to tune is use an electronic tuner, or alternatively you could use a tuning fork or
simply tune to a piano, organ or keyboard. To tune with a piano, simply play the note corresponding
to the note you’re trying to tune and adjust the pitch of the guitar string until they are the same.
An electronic tuner is much easier to use because there is a gauge that tells you whether to
tune up or down and gives you a green light when you hit the note.
If these items aren’t available, tune your guitar by the following method:
1.
Tune the Low E to Pitch, as close as you can get it by ear
2.
Tune the A string to the 5th fret of the Low E string (adjust the tuning of the A string until it matches the pitch of the Low E, 5th fret).
3.
Tune the D string to the 5th fret of the A string.
4.
Tune the G string to the 5th fret of the D string.
5.
Tune the B string to the 4th fret of the G string.
6.
Finally, tune the E string to the 5th fret of the B string. The guitar should be in tune
with itself.
Never over tighten guitar strings. This overstretches the strings, and can even result in string or
guitar damage.
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Guitar Guide
G U I TA R S
P L AY I N G TH E G U ITA R
Once the guitar is tuned, it’s time to try a few simple chords. Here is a chord chart, and a few
simple songs. The black dots on the chord chart represent where to place your finger on the
fret board before strumming. Practice makes perfect, start out with simple chords, like a G or a C.
Once you have mastered a few chords, try reading some easy guitar charts.
Chord Chart
A
Am
A7
Am7
Asus4
B
Bm
B7
Bm7
Bsus4
2
C Cm C7Cm7 C5
3
D
Dm
D7
Dm7
Dsus4
E
Em
E7
Em7
Esus4
F
Fm
F7
Fm7
Fsus4
G
Gm
G7
Gm7
Gsus
3
3
3
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G U I TA R S
Guitar Guide
SUPPORT
To find a qualified teacher near you, go to:
http://www.artistguitars.com.au/view/guitarteachers
If you would like more information, visit our support page:
www.artistguitars.com.au/support
Or call us on:
FREECALL 1300 489 816
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