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Getting to the Core
English Language Arts
Grade 7 Unit of Study
The Power of Point of View
Final Revision: May 16, 2014
TEACHER EDITION
UNIT OVERVIEW
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
This unit introduces students to the concept of "point of view." Students will look at both nonfiction and fiction texts and analyze how point of view determines what information is included,
reflects the author’s bias, and conveys the theme. Students will then apply these concepts by
creating their own versions of a fairy tale from two distinct points of view.
Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception.
Essential Questions:
 How does a change in point of view affect our perception?
 How do writers use different points of view to develop a text?
 How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence a reader?
 How do omniscient, first-person, and third-person limited points of view differ and what
impact do they have on a reader's understanding of the text?
 How can point of view change the theme of a story?
Unit Timeline
Day 1
Lesson 1:
Quick-Write;
Vocabulary
Notebook (NB);
Image Analysis;
Wrecking the Text
Day 6
Lesson 2:
Research topic for
Argumentative
Presentation
Day 2
Lesson 1:
Plot Chart; Retell a
story from a
different POV
(narrative paragraph)
Day 11
Lesson 3:
Read “Yeh-Shen;”
Yeh-Shen What If…;
begin revising for
POV
Day 12
Lesson 3:
Continue Revising
for POV; complete
Vocabulary NB;
begin Fairy Tale
Times Two
Day 7
Lesson 2:
Additional prep as
necessary;
Presentations
Day 3
Lesson 2:
Vocabulary PPT &
NB; read “What’s
Really in a Name?”
Tracking Perspective
activity
Day 8
Lesson 2:
Presentations;
reflection
Day 13
Lesson 3:
Continue writing
Fairy Tale Times
Two
Day 4
Lesson 2:
Read “Are Young
Athletes…at Risk?”
Thinking Map;
QuickWrite
Day 9
Lesson 3:
Viewing with a
Focus; read “Point
of View;”
Vocabulary NB;
POV ID activity
Day 14
Lesson 3:
Complete Fairy Tale
Times Two and
share with class
Day 5
Lesson 2:
Vocabulary NB;
read “Beauty
Queens;” objective
vs. subjective; Textdependent Questions
Day 10
Lesson 3:
Read “Beauty and
the Beast;”
Text-dependent
Questions
Day 15
Lesson 3:
Reflective Exit Slip
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Table of Contents
Contents
Pages
Unit Planner: The Power of Point of View
Lesson 1 Planner
Resource 1.1 Optical Illusion and Quick-Write
Resource 1.2 Non-fiction Vocabulary Notebook
Resource 1.3 Far Side Cartoon and Questions
Resource 1.3T Far Side Cartoons without Captions (Teacher use only)
Resource 1.4 “The Blind Men and the Elephant” Poem and Wrecking the
Text Activity
Resource 1.5 Academic Conversation Placemat
Resource 1.6 Plot Chart
Resource 1.7 Narrative Paragraph Checklist
Resource 1.8 Optional Point of View Project: “A Walk in Their Shoes”
Lesson 2 Planner
Resource 2.1 Non-fiction Vocabulary PowerPoint (hardcopy)
Resource 2.2 Tracking Perspective: “What’s Really in a Name?”
Resource 2.3 “Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?”
Resource 2.4 Compare and Contrast Thinking Map
Resource 2.5 Quick-Write: Which argument was more convincing?
Resource 2.6 “Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?”
Resource 2.7 Additional Pictures for “Beauty Queens”
Resource 2.8 Text-dependent Questions for “Beauty Queens”
Resource 2.9 Instructions and Rubric for Argumentative Presentation
Resource 2.10 Reflection Prompt
Lesson 3 Planner
Resource 3.1 Fiction Vocabulary Notebook
Resource 3.2 Viewing with a Focus
Resource 3.3 Point of View Pictures
Resource 3.4 Fiction Vocabulary PowerPoint (hardcopy)
Resource 3.5A Point of View Identification Activity
Resource 3.5B Point of View Identification Activity – Answer Key
Resource 3.6 “Beauty and the Beast” Text-dependent Questions
Resource 3.7 “Yeh-Shen” What if…
Resource 3.8 Revising for Point of View
Resource 3.9 Fairy Tale Times Two
Appendix of Strategies Used in the Unit
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Santa Ana Unified School District Common Core Unit Planner-Literacy
Unit Title:
Grade
Level/Course:
Big Idea
Essential
Questions:
The Power of Point of View
7th Grade
English Language Arts
Time Frame: 15 Days
Point of view has the power to affect perception.
 How does a change in point of view affect our perception?
 How do writers use different points of view to develop a text?
 How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence a reader?
 How do omniscient, first-person, and third-person limited points of view differ and what impact do they have on a reader's
understanding of the text?
 How can point of view change the theme of a story?
Instructional Activities: Activities/Tasks
Duration: 3 days
Duration: 2 days
Lesson 2 (part 1) – Non-Complex Text: Vocabulary PPT
Lesson 1 – Non-Complex Text: Far Side Cartoon
Complex Texts: “What’s Really in a Name?” “Are Young Athletes Putting
Themselves at Risk?”
Complex Text: The Blind Men and the Elephant
Pre-Read
Quick-Write; Far
Side Cartoon;
Vocabulary
Notebook
Read 1 & 2
Unencumbered read
of The Blind Men and
the Elephant;
Wrecking the Text
Close Read
Plot chart; minor
character POV
paragraph
Pre-Read
Vocabulary PPT &
Notebook
Duration: 3 days
Unencumbered
read; Thinking
Map; Quick-Write
Lessons 3 – Non-Complex Texts: POV pictures, “Point of View,” Vocabulary
PPT; Complex Texts: “Beauty and the Beast”; “Yeh-Shen”
Beauty Queens?”
Unencumbered
read; objective vs.
subjective
Unencumbered
read; Tracking
Perspective activity
Close Read Athletes
Duration: 5-7 days
Lesson 2 (part 2) – Complex Text: “Should 4-Year-Olds Be
Read 1 & 2
Close Read: Name
Read 3
Text-dependent
Questions
Assessment
Research and
present an
argument
Close Read: POV Pics
r
Viewing with a Focus;
Vocabulary Notebook;
POV ID Activity
Close Read Beauty
Unencumbered read;
Text-dependent
Questions
Close Read YehShen
Unencumbered
read; “What if…”
revising for POV
Final Performance Task – “Fairy Tale Times Two: Rewrite a fairy tale from two different characters, using two different perspectives.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
1
Learning and Innovation:
21st Century
Skills:
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
Media Literacy
4.
Information, Communications & Technology Literacy (if technology available)
Tier II:
Tier III:
perspective, point of view, bias, objective, subjective,
perceive, convey
omniscient, third-person limited, first-person, theme
What pre-assessment will be given?
1.
2.
3.
Creativity & Innovation
Information, Media and Technology:
Information Literacy
Essential
Academic
Language:
Communication & Collaboration
Quick-Write
Cartoon analysis
Vocabulary Notebook - awareness of terms
Point of view picture - Viewing with a focus
How will pre-assessment guide instruction?
1.
2.
3.
4.
The Quick-Write will demonstrate students’ initial understanding of point
of view; it will also provide insight into students’ writing ability.
The cartoon analysis will show students' ability to understand the concept
of perspective.
Awareness of terms will determine how many examples and reminders of
terms students will require.
The analysis of the pictures will reveal students' ability to understand
different points of view.
End of Unit Performance Task:
Create two versions of a fairy tale: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the effects of point of view by creating two versions of a fairy tale from two different
characters and two different points of view.
Standards
Common Core Learning Standards Taught and Assessed (include
one or more standards for one or more of the areas below. Please
write out the complete text for the standard(s) you include.)
Assessment of Standards (include formative and summative)
What assessment(s) will be utilized for this
unit? (include the types of both formative
assessments (F) that will be used throughout
What does the
the unit to inform your instruction and the
assessment tell us?
summative assessments (S) that will
demonstrate student mastery of the standards.)
Bundled Reading Literature Standard(s):
(F) Viewing with a Focus (Lesson 1)
RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over
the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different
characters or narrators in a text.
(F) Wrecking the Text (Lesson 1)
(F) Plot Chart (Lesson 1)
(F) Tracking Perspective (Lesson 2)
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Viewing with a Focus
will demonstrate
whether students are
able to make POV
inferences from an
image.
Wrecking the Text will
reveal the students'
2
(S) POV Identification (Lesson 3)
(F) Responding to Text-dependent Questions (Lesson 3)
(F) Yeh-Shen What if… (Lesson 3)
Bundled Reading Informational Text Standard(s):
(F) Thinking Map (Lesson 2)
RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
(F) Quick-Write (Lesson 2)
RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a
specific word choice on meaning and tone.
RI.7.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the
author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.
RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support
the claims.
RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their
presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing
different interpretations of facts.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
(S) Text-dependent Questions (Lesson 2)
(F) Point of View Identification Activity (Lesson 3)
(F) Viewing with a Focus (Lesson 3)
ability to identify
different points of view
and perspective.
The Plot Chart,
Tracking Perspective,
Revision, POV
Identification,
Responding to TDQs,
and What if… will all
show whether students
can apply the concepts
of POV and perception
to new pieces of text
and infer the effects of
different POVs.
The Thinking Map,
Quick-Write, and TDQs
will reflect the students'
ability to draw evidence
from texts for
comparison/contrast.
The Point of View ID
Activity will illustrate
whether or not students
understand the point of
view terms and are able
to apply them
appropriately.
Viewing with a Focus
will demonstrate
whether students are
able to make POV
inferences from an
image.
3
Bundled Writing Standard(s):
(F) Quick-Writes (Lessons 1 & 2)
W7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
(F) Text-dependent Questions (Lesson 2, 3)
W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured even sequences.
(F) Yeh-Shen What if… (Lesson 3)
W7.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using
search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and
quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism
and following a standard format for citation.
(F) Revising for Point of View (Lesson 3)
(S) Fairy Tale Times Two (Lesson 3)
Bundled Speaking and Listening Standard(s):
(F) Collaborative Conversation (Lesson 1)
SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborate discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
(F) Think/Pair/Share (Lesson 1, 2, 3)
SL.7.4 Present claims and findings (e.g., argument, narrative, summary
presentations), emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with
pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact,
adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
(S) Oral Presentation (Lesson 2)
Bundled Language Standard(s):
(F) Quick-Writes (Lessons 1 & 2)
L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and
usage when writing or speaking.
(F) Text-dependent Questions (Lesson 2)
(F) Round Robin (Lesson 2)
(S) Oral Presentation (Lesson 2)
L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.7.4a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s
position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word
or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
The revision of "YehShen," and a fairy tale
will indicate students
ability to incorporate
POV into their own
creative writing.
(F) Yeh-Shen What if… (Lesson 3)
(F) Revising for Point of View (Lesson 3)
(S) Fairy Tale Times Two (Lesson 3)
The Quick-Writes,
TDQs, and What
if...will show whether
students can apply the
concepts of POV and
perception to new
pieces of text and infer
the effects of different
POVs and express their
ideas clearly and
succinctly.
All activities will
reflect students' abilities
to communicate clearly
and effectively and
support their
arguments.
The Quick-Writes,
TDQs, Oral
Presentation, and What
if… will indicate
students' abilities to
communicate clearly
and effectively and
support their
arguments.
The Revising of "YehShen" and the fairy tale
will reveal whether they
can tell a story in an
4
interesting way with
appropriate style and
sophistication.
Complex Texts to be used
Informational Text(s) Titles:




"Point of View: Through Whose Eyes?" by John Leggett Holt Literature & Language Arts, First Course, pages 222-223
"What's Really in a Name?" Holt Literature & Language Arts, First Course, page 233
"Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?" Hyman and Pitcock, Scope, April 18, 2011
"Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?" Justin O'Neill, Scope, December 12, 2011
Literature Titles:



Resources/
Materials:
"The Blind Men and the Elephant" John Godfrey Saxe (Retrieved from
http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_poems_of_John_Godfrey_Saxe/The_Blind_Men_and_the_Elephant)
"Beauty and the Beast" Holt Interactive Reader pages 122-126
"Yeh-Shen" Chinese folk tale, retold by Ai-Ling Louie. Holt Literature & Language Arts, First Course, pages 251-255
Media/Technology:






PowerPoint: Non-Fiction POV Vocabulary
PowerPoint: Fiction POV Vocabulary
Images: Toddler Beauty Queens
Images: 3 Points of View
Discovery Education Video Segment: Overview of Public Speaking [04:57]
Discovery Education Video Segment: Presentations: More Than Words [06:59]
Other Materials:






Paper and writing instruments (student-provided)
Highlighters in yellow and blue (if available)
Computer and Internet access and audio capacity
Whiteboard and markers as needed
Document camera
Chart paper if desired
Cite several interdisciplinary or cross-content connections made in this unit of study (i.e. math, social studies, art,
Interdisciplinary etc.)
Point of view and bias are also extremely significant when discussing historical events and political events. Framing photos for point of view is
Connections:
critical in art.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
5
Differentiated
Instruction:
Based on desired student outcomes, what instructional
variation will be used to address the needs of English
Learners by language proficiency level?
Based on desired student outcomes, what instructional
variation will be used to address the needs of students
with special needs, including gifted and talented?
Multiple EL strategies are used in this unit including Thinking Maps,
Think/Pair/Share, group collaboration, speaking opportunities, and
visual media. Vocabulary words are defined for the students and
include a visual component.
Special Needs: Starting with IEP goals, teachers will collaborate
with the case manager to identify appropriate scaffolds,
accommodations and modifications. Differentiation includes visual
media introductions, Thinking Maps, and extended time for
assessments.
GATE: Students will have the opportunity to extrapolate a character
from a chosen pair of shoes and write about that character revealing
significant and interesting details. Students will also have the
opportunity to choose their own controversial topic to research for their
speaking presentations.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
6
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
SAUSD Common Core Lesson Planner
Unit: The
Power of
Point of View
Lesson #: 1
Grade Level/Course:
ELA Grade 7
Lesson 1 Planner
Teacher:
Duration: 2 Days
Date:
Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception.
Essential Question: How does a change in point of view affect our perception?
Common Core Content Standards:
Reading Literature
RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different
characters or narrators in a text.
Writing
W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured even sequences.
Common
Core
Standards
Speaking and Listening
SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborate discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others'
ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Language
L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.7.4a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position
or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Materials/
Resources/
Lesson
Preparation








SAUSD Common Core Unit
Resource 1.1 Optical Illusion and Quick-Write Prompt
Resource 1.2 Non-fiction Vocabulary Notebook
Resource 1.3 Far Side Cartoon and Questions
Resource 1.3T Two Versions of Far Side Cartoon
Resource 1.4 "The Blind Men and the Elephant" Poem and Wrecking the Text
Activity
Resource 1.5 Collaborative Academic Conversation Placemat
Resource 1.6 Plot Chart
Resource 1.7 Narrative Paragraph Checklist
7
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Lesson 1 Planner
 Resource 1.8 Optional Point of View Project: “A Walk in Their Shoes”
 Paper and writing instruments (student-provided)
 Computer and Internet access and audio capacity
 Whiteboard and markers as needed
 Document camera if desired
Objectives
Depth of
Knowledge
Level
College and
Career Ready
Skills
Content:
Language:
Students will:
 Interpret different perspectives
in a cartoon
 Read and paraphrase a poem
 Create a plot chart to
demonstrate understanding of a
familiar text
Students will work collaboratively to:
 Analyze and discuss a cartoon and poem
 Write a narrative paragraph in
first-person point of view
Level 1: Recall
Level 2: Skill/Concept
Level 3: Strategic Thinking
Level 4: Extended Thinking
Demonstrating independence
Building strong content knowledge
Responding to varying demands of
audience, task, purpose, and discipline
Valuing evidence
Comprehending as well as critiquing
Using technology and digital media strategically and capably
Coming to understand other perspectives and cultures
STUDENTS
TEACHER PROVIDES
FIGURE OUT THE
SIMPLE EXPLANATION
MEANING
(Tier II & Tier III)
Academic Vocabulary
Common Core
Instructional
Shifts
Pre-teaching
Considerations
Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction texts
Reading and writing grounded from text
Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary
KEY WORDS ESSENTIAL TO
WORDS WORTH KNOWING
UNDERSTANDING
perspective, point of view, bias,
subjective, objective
Hindu (Hindoo)
Indostan
theologic
ween
spake
quoth


Students should be able to Think/Write/Pair/Share effectively (stay on task,
participate fully in the activity, be respectful of others' opinions).
If students did not read "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" (Holt chapter 1, pages 20-34) an
alternative text that students are very familiar with should be used instead.
Lesson Delivery
Check method(s) used in the lesson:
Instructional
Methods
Modeling
Guided Practice
Guided Inquiry
Reflection
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Collaboration
Independent Practice
8
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Day 1
Lesson 1 Planner
Prior Knowledge, Context, and Motivation:
1. Before starting the lesson, have students look at the optical illusion picture in
Resource 1.1 and then respond to the following Quick-Write prompt: What do
you see when you first look at this picture? Now turn it upside down. Do you see
something different? Explain how looking at something from a different point of
view can affect your understanding of what you see.
2. After students complete their Quick-Write, have them turn to a partner and share
out their answers. Call on volunteers to share with the class.
3. Introduce the Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception, and the
first Essential Question: How does a change in point of view affect our
perception? Have students discuss this question based on their experience with
the optical illusion in Resource 1.1.
4. Using the Non-fiction Vocabulary Notebook (Resource 1.2), have students
identify whether they can use/define, have heard/seen, or don't know each word.
Let them know that they will be encountering these words throughout the unit.
NOTE: Consider putting up a Word Wall and add new vocabulary words as they
are encountered throughout the unit.
Differentiated
5. Visual Media Analysis: The Far Side Cartoon
Instruction:
a. Before the lesson, post multiple copies of the Far
Body of the
Lesson:
Activities/
Questioning/
Tasks/ Strategies/
Technology/
Engagement
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Side cartoon without the caption on two sides of
the room (these copies, referred to as Resource
1.3T, are provided in the Additional Teacher
Resources booklets). Half of them are labeled:
How do you think the characters under the bed
are feeling? and should be posted on one side of
the room. The other half is labeled: How do you
think the character on top of the bed is feeling?
and should be posted on the other side of the
room. Students will be viewing the cartoons in
groups of four, so post as many as needed for
half of the groups to view the cartoons at once
(while half of the groups are viewing the first
version, the other half can be viewing the
second, after which they will switch).
English Learners and
Students Who Need
Additional Support:
Students can
Think/Write/Pair/
Share before
participating in group
or class discussions.
Day 1 #6b: Draw
students’ attention to
the elephant cartoon
first and tell them that
the majority of the
poem is describing
what they see in9 the
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
b. In groups of four, have students first view one
version of the posted cartoon; they should read
and discuss the question on each cartoon before
moving on to the other version. The teacher
might ring a bell or play music when it’s time for
students to move to the second cartoon, or when
both viewings have been completed.
c. After returning to their seats, students will turn
to Resource 1.3. They will view the Far Side
cartoon, read the caption, and complete the
viewing guide. (Let students know that a picture
can be considered a type of text.)
d. Have students share their responses first with
their group members, and then with the class.
e. Do not initially provide students with the
definition of perspective. Ask them to connect
the idea of a change in perspective when they
hear the monster’s thoughts instead of the little
boy's; then call on students to offer their own
definition of the word. Teacher can break
perspective down into prefix and root (“per-”
meaning “through” and “spec” meaning “to see,
view, or look at”) to help students grasp its
meaning. Have students write their definition in
the Vocabulary Notebook (Resource 1.2). You
may also wish to help students connect the idea
that this change in perspective (giving us the
unexpected) is what provides the humor in the
cartoon.
Poem Analysis: The Blind Men and the Elephant
6. Wrecking the Text activity with a poem (Resource 1.4)
a. Explain that "Hindoo" is really "Hindu" which is
the adjective form of Hinduism, the third largest
religion in the world. (Hindu can also refer to a
person who practices Hinduism.) It is practiced
mostly in India. "Indostan" is literally the land of
people who practice "Indoo" (Hindu) so it refers
to the Indian subcontinent.
b. Read the poem aloud with students following
along.
c. Clarify any words that are confusing to the
students. Students may be able to guess/use
context clues to determine the meanings of spake
and quoth. Stanza IV: spake: the old (and no
longer in use!) past tense of speak; quoth: the old
(and no longer in use!) form of said. Moral
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Lesson 1 Planner
cartoon.
Day 1 #6d: Model
Stanzas 2 & 3 on the
Wrecking the Text
worksheet (Resource
1.4) for them with a
Think Aloud.
Day 2 #2: In pairs,
have students retell the
original story before
taking on a different
perspective.
Day 2 #4: If students
need additional help
with writing a
paragraph, you may
choose to include
some of the strategies
from the 6th Grade
Writing Notebook
(electronic “Writing
Paragraphs” lessons
can be found on the
SAUSD ELA
curriculum webpage
by following this link:
http://www.sausd.us/P
age/14433).
Accelerated
Learners:
Day 1 #5: Encourage
students to come up
with their own
examples of multiple
perspectives from
different texts or
situations in addition
to the cartoon. You
may also wish to
introduce “situational
irony” with the Far
Side cartoon.
Day 2: You might
have students create
the optional point
of
10
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
stanza: theologic: relating to religious truth or
divinity; ween: out of use word for think or
imagine. Also discuss text structure (i.e stanzas
and roman numerals). NOTE: A visual
representation has been provided in Resource
1.4 to assist students with comprehension.
d. In pairs, students will complete the Wrecking the
Text activity. Students will take turns reading a
stanza and paraphrasing the content.
Wrecking the Text asks students to break a text
down to its simplest meaning and to then
compare it with the original. This allows
students to demonstrate simple comprehension
of the text, but, more importantly, allows them
to understand the power of the original
language.
Lesson 1 Planner
view project, "A Walk
in Their Shoes" (see
Resource 1.8) as an
additional enrichment
activity. The
PowerPoint that
accompanies this
activity may be
accessed through the
SAUSD webpage by
following this link:
http://www.sausd.us/P
age/22743.
e. In a whole class discussion, have students share
their rewrites (stanza by stanza). Be sure that
they understand the last stanza. (People will
often argue passionately about something even if
they know nothing about it.)
f. Have students complete the final question (What
conclusions can you draw about the nature of
“perspective” from the poem? Support your
argument with evidence from the text) as a
Think/Pair/Share. They may use the
Collaborative Academic Conversation Placemat
(Resource 1.5) to guide and enhance their
discussion.
Day 2
1. Review and discuss the Big Idea: Point of view has the
power to affect perception, and the first Essential
Question: How does a change in point of view affect our
perception? Have students share what they have learned
so far in a partner, group, or whole class discussion.
Extending Understanding: Narrative Paragraph
2. Using a story that the students know well (e.g. "RikkiTikki-Tavi," found on pages 20-34 in the Holt textbook
– take time to briefly review as needed), students should
create a plot chart of the events of the story from the
perspective of one of the cobras. Remind students that
they should only include events that this cobra would
have been present for (Resource 1.6).
SAUSD Common Core Unit
11
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Lesson 1 Planner
3. After completing their plot charts, have students turn to
a partner and take turns sharing how the difference in
point of view changes the reader’s perception of the
events. Have students use the sentence frame on
Resource 1.6 to practice their academic language:
a. When the story is told from the perspective
(point of view) of _____________, the reader’s
perception (impression) of the events changes
because_______________________________.
4. Students will write a narrative paragraph illustrating the
events in their plot chart from the perspective of the
cobra. Remind students to be aware that the cobra they
chose may not have all the information available to him
or her as the students did as readers. Students should
write in first-person point of view using "I."
5. Review the Narrative Paragraph Checklist (Resource
1.7) with students to be sure they understand what needs
to be included in their paragraphs.
6. After they finish writing their paragraphs, have students
exchange with a partner and use the checklist to provide
constructive feedback using the included sentence
frames. Give students time to revise their paragraphs in
class or assign as homework.
Lesson Reflection
Teacher
Reflection
Evidenced
by Student
Learning/
Outcomes
SAUSD Common Core Unit
12
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.1
Optical Illusion and Quick-Write
What do you see when you first look at this picture? Now turn it upside down. Do you see
something different? Explain how looking at something from a different point of view can affect
your understanding of what you see.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
SAUSD Common Core Unit
13
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.2
Don't
know
Word
Can
define/
use it
Have
heard it/
seen it
Vocabulary Notebook: The Power of Point of View -- Non-Fiction
Definition
Application or example in texts
perspective
point of view
bias
subjective
objective
SAUSD Common Core Unit
14
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.3
THE FAR SIDE by Gary Larson
"I've got it again, Larry...an
like An
there's
I’ve eerie
got it feeling
again Larry.
eeriesomething
feeling on top of the bed."
Describe what you see
in the cartoon.
like there is something on top of the bed.
Whose voice is
represented by the
caption? What evidence
do you have from the
text (picture)?
In this type of situation,
who do we normally
hear from?
What makes this
funny?
If we did hear from that
character, what might
the caption say instead?
SAUSD Common Core Unit
15
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.3T
THE FAR SIDE by Gary Larson
I’vedo
gotyou
it again
Larry.
Ancharacters
eerie feeling
How
think
the
like
there the
is something
top of the bed.
under
bed areonfeeling?
SAUSD Common Core Unit
16
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.3T
THE FAR SIDE by Gary Larson
I’veyou
got itthink
again Larry.
An eerie feeling
How do
the character
on top
like there
is something
on top of the bed.
of the
bed is feeling?
SAUSD Common Core Unit
17
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.4
The Blind Men and the Elephant
A Hindoo Fable
By John Godfrey Saxe
I.
It was six men of Indostan
To learning much inclined,
Who went to see the Elephant
(Though all of them were blind),
That each by observation
Might satisfy his mind.
II.
The First approached the Elephant,
And happening to fall
Against his broad and sturdy side,
At once began to bawl:
"God bless me!—but the Elephant
Is very like a wall!"
III.
The Second, feeling of the tusk,
Cried:"Ho!—what have we here
So very round and smooth and sharp?
To me 't is mighty clear
This wonder of an Elephant
Is very like a spear!"
IV.
The Third approached the animal,
And happening to take
The squirming trunk within his hands,
Thus boldly up and spake:
"I see," quoth he, "the Elephant
Is very like a snake!"
V.
VI.
The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,
Said: "E'en the blindest man
Can tell what this resembles most;
Deny the fact who can,
This marvel of an Elephant
Is very like a fan!"
VII.
The Sixth no sooner had begun
About the beast to grope,
Than, seizing on the swinging tail
That fell within his scope,
"I see," quoth he, "the Elephant
Is very like a rope!"
VIII.
And so these men of Indostan
Disputed loud and long,
Each in his own opinion
Exceeding stiff and strong,
Though each was partly in the right,
And all were in the wrong!
MORAL
So, oft in theologic wars
The disputants, I ween,
Rail on in utter ignorance
Of what each other mean,
And prate about an Elephant
Not one of them has seen!
The Fourth reached out his eager hand,
And felt about the knee.
"What most this wondrous beast is like
Is mighty plain," quoth he;
"'T is clear enough the Elephant
Is very like a tree!"
SAUSD Common Core Unit
18
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.4
Wrecking the Text
Stanza
I
Paraphrase what the stanza says in your own words.
Six blind educated men from India went to “see” an elephant
because they were curious about it.
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
Moral
SAUSD Common Core Unit
19
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.4
What conclusions can you draw about the nature of “perspective” from the poem? Support your
argument with evidence from the text. (You may continue on the back of this page if needed.)
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
A visual interpretation of "The Blind Men and the Elephant"
SAUSD Common Core Unit
20
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.5
Academic Conversation Placemat
ELABORATE
X X X X
Support
Ideas with
Examples
 
Prompt starters:
Can you elaborate on…?
What does that mean?
What do you mean by....?
Can you clarify the part about…?
Tell me more about…
How is that important? How does it
support your point that…
I understand the part about…, but I
want to know…
Can you be more specific?
Response starters:
I think it means…
In other words,
More specifically, it is …
because…
Let’s see, an analogy might be…
It is important because…
Prompt starters:
Can you give an example from the text?
Where does it say that?
What are examples from other texts?
What is a real world example? Are there
any cases of that in real life?
Can you give an example from your life?
Response starters:
For example,
In the text it said that…
Remember in the other story we
read that…
An example from my life is
One case that illustrates this is…
Key question,
idea, theme, topic
Build
on/Challenge
Another’s Idea
Prompt starters:
Is that clear?
Can I hear what you heard?
Does that make sense?
Do you know what I mean?
What do you think?
I’m not sure of all that I said.
PARAPHRASE
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Response starters:
Let me see if I heard
you right…
To paraphrase what you
just said, you…
In other words, you are
saying that…
What I understood
was…
It sounds like you think
that…
I’m hearing that…
Prompt starters:
How can we summarize
what we discussed?
How can we bring these
ideas together?
What is our conclusion?
SYNTHESIZE
Response starters:
We can say that…
It boils down to…
We can agree
that…
Even though some
might think
that…, we
conclude that…
Prompt starters:
How can we add to this
idea of…
What other ideas or
examples relate to this
idea?
What else could support
this idea?
Do you agree?
What contradicts this?
What are other points of
view?
Response starters:
I would add that…
Building on your idea
that…, I think…
That idea connects to…
I see it a different way. On
the other hand…
Let’s stay focused on the
idea of…. Let’s get
back to the idea of…
That makes me think of…
That reminds me of…
I’m hearing that…
21
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.6
Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Plot Chart
Taking the perspective of one of the cobras, complete this plot chart. Remember
that you must only use events that you would have witnessed or could have inferred.
Climax:
Important Events:
Resolution:
Starting Situation:
Partner Share:
When the story is told from the perspective (point of view) of _____________,
Conflict (What's the problem?):
the reader’s perception (impression) of the events changes because_________
_______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
22
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.7
Narrative Paragraph Checklist (Adapted from Narrative Paragraph Checklist found at http://web.clark.edu/martpe/narrative%20parag.htm)
After writing your paragraph, check to see if you can answer “Yes” to all of the items below. If not, revise your paragraph as needed.
Check to see if:
1. All of your sentences are strong, clear and varied - some long and some short, all
interesting.
2. The order of the story is correct; if you forgot some key information, it will be
difficult to tell the story well.
3. Your story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.
4. Your transitions help explain the sequence your reader will have to follow.
5. Your main idea is clear and appears in the beginning.
6. Your conclusion restates what you said in your main idea.
7. Your paragraph is free of spelling or grammatical mistakes.
8. Your reader will easily understand how or why the event is taking place.
9. You have enough details such as time, location, or anything else needed for your
reader to understand the story.
10. Your retelling of the story from the perspective of the cobra helps the reader see the
events from a different point of view.
Yes
No
Partner Share
Exchange paragraphs with a partner and check to see if all the items above are included. Use the following sentence starters to share
your feedback:
I thought you wrote the part about _____________________________________________________________________really well.
You could improve your paragraph by __________________________________________________________________________.
My perception of the events in the story changed when you told the story from the point of view of ___________________ because
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
23
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.8
"A Walk in Their Shoes"
An Optional Point of View Project
Directions: Look at the pictures of shoes on the following pages and select one for this activity.
After you have chosen a shoe, create a character who would wear those shoes. Create details and
a past history for the character. Compose a one page profile in first or third person perspective of
the shoe owner, telling the story of his/her life. Remember that you are imagining the owner as a
living, breathing person, not just a mere list of facts. Your story should have a narrative flow. Be
creative and have fun!!
Student Model
Ella Lynne Myers, an eighteen year old ballerina, had just finished one of the most
exciting ballets of her life. For a poor girl from New Jersey, performing in New York City's
Nutcracker Ballet was the highlight of her life so far.
Ella, a slender and graceful teenager, had spent her whole life attending ballet school
since the age of seven. Waking up early every day was something she had to get used to but that
she had finally come to accept. She was the oldest of two children, and lived with a single
mother whose husband ran out on the family when Ella was two years old, leaving the girls
without any financial support. But it wasn’t long before Ella found what she was destined to do
for the rest of her life.
Despite the great odds against her and her family, Ella stumbled upon ballet one day after
watching the graceful ballerinas glide along the studio across the street from her New Jersey
apartment. Every day after the bus dropped her off at the corner street near the studio, Ella
dreamed big dreams of becoming a star ballerina for the New York Ballet Company. She'd once
seen how beautiful and graceful they were on TV, and they became her obsession. Every day,
she'd bug her mother to let her enroll in ballet classes, even though she knew the family couldn't
afford it. But it turned out that money wasn’t an obstacle; the girl's grandmother had set aside
some money for her which she was able to use for enrolling in ballet classes.
Ella hardly knew what she was in for that first day. By the end of the first year, however,
she showed amazing talent and caught the eye of her instructors. By the time Ella turned sixteen,
she was accepted into Juilliard School on a scholarship where she was trained by the greatest
ballerinas in the world. She was getting herself ready for the show of her life, which would
launch her into a new world of opportunity. Though she'd struggled for ten years with blistered
toes, bruises, torn muscles, and exhausting rehearsals, Ella Myers finally saw her name in
gleaming lights outside New York's Broadway Theatre and became what she had always
dreamed she could be.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
24
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
Resource 1.8
Use this page to plan your writing.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
25
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
5/16/2014
Resource 1.8
Resource 1.8
A Walk in Their Shoes
Optional Point of View Project
SAUSD Common Core Unit
26
1
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 1
SAUSD Common Core Unit
5/16/2014
Resource 1.8
27
2
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
SAUSD Common Core Lesson Planner
Unit: The
Power of
Point of View
Lesson #: 2
Grade Level/Course:
ELA Grade 7
Lesson 2 Planner
Teacher:
Duration: 6 days
Date:
Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception.
Essential Questions:
How does a change in point of view affect our perception?
How do writers use different points of view to develop a text?
How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence the reader?
Common Core Content Standards:
Reading Informational Text
RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.7.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author
distinguishes his or her position from that of others.
RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the
reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.
RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their
presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different
interpretations of facts.
Writing
Common
Core
Standards
W7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
W7.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search
terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or
paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a
standard format for citation.
Speaking and Listening
SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborate discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others'
ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.7.4 Present claims and findings (e.g., argument, narrative, summary presentations),
emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts,
details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear
pronunciation.
Language
SAUSD Common Core Unit
28
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Lesson 2 Planner
L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific
words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase
important to comprehension or expression.
Materials/
Resources/
Lesson
Preparation
Objectives
Depth of
Knowledge
Level
College and
Career Ready
Skills

















Holt Literature & Language Arts, First Course, "What's Really in a Name?" pg. 233
Resource 2.1 Non-fiction Vocabulary PowerPoint
Resource 2.2 Tracking Perspective: “What’s Really in a Name?”
Resource 2.3 "Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?"
Resource 2.4 Blank Page for Compare/Contrast Thinking Map
Resource 2.5 Quick-Write: "Which argument was more convincing?"
Resource 2.6 "Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?"
Resource 2.7 Additional pictures for "Beauty Queens"
Resource 2.8 Text-dependent Questions for "Beauty Queens"
Resource 2.9 Instructions for Argumentative Presentation
Resource 2.10 Reflection Prompt
Access to library or computer lab for research for argumentative presentation
Paper and writing instruments (student-provided)
Highlighters in yellow and blue (if available)
Computer and Internet access and audio capacity
Whiteboard and markers as needed
Document camera
Content:
 Analyze the point of view of
three non-fiction articles
 Research and write an argument
of a selected topic
Language:
Students will work collaboratively to:
 Discuss selected texts
 Write and deliver a speech to support
their position on a topic
Level 1: Recall
Level 2: Skill/Concept
Level 3: Strategic Thinking
Level 4: Extended Thinking
Demonstrating independence
Building strong content knowledge
Responding to varying demands of
audience, task, purpose, and discipline
Valuing evidence
Comprehending as well as critiquing
Using technology and digital media strategically and capably
Coming to understand other perspectives and cultures
Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction texts
Common Core
Instructional
Shifts
Reading and writing grounded from text
Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary
SAUSD Common Core Unit
29
STUDENTS
TEACHER PROVIDES
FIGURE OUT THE
SIMPLE EXPLANATION
MEANING
(Tier II & Tier III)
Academic Vocabulary
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Pre-teaching
Considerations
Lesson 2 Planner
KEY WORDS ESSENTIAL TO
UNDERSTANDING
point of view
bias
objective
subjective

WORDS WORTH KNOWING
pseudonym
judgment
evaluation
call to action
Students should be able to Think/Write/Pair/Share effectively (stay on task,
participate fully in the activity, be respectful of others' opinions).
Students should be able to interact effectively using a Round Robin approach to
sharing.
Students should have access to research (library or digital), be able to evaluate
quality of sources, and use evidence without plagiarizing.


Lesson Delivery
Check method(s) used in the lesson:
Instructional
Methods
Modeling
Guided Practice
Guided Inquiry
Reflection
Collaboration
Independent Practice
Day 1
Prior Knowledge, Context, and Motivation:
1. Before starting the lesson, ask students to share their understanding so far of the
Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception, and the first Essential
Question: How does a change in point of view affect our perception? Refresh their
memory of "perspective" if necessary.
2. Introduce them to two additional Essential Questions:
 How do writers use different points of view to develop a text?
 How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence the reader?
Preparing the Learner
Body of the
Lesson:
Activities/
Questioning/
Tasks/ Strategies/
Technology/
Engagement
Differentiated
Instruction:
3. Explain that so far we have only discussed "perspective"
using fictional texts. However, perspective can heavily
influence writers of non-fiction, too.
English Learners:
Day 2 #6: Give ELs
4. Using the PowerPoint (Resource 2.1), provide definitions sentence starters to
help with their writing.
of point of view, bias, subjective, objective. Students will
"I believe that the
add these to their Non-fiction Vocabulary Notebook
(Resource 1.2). If building a Word Wall, add these terms to (yes/no) side was
more convincing
it.
because..."
Interacting with the Text: "What's Really in a Name?"
5. Read "What's Really in a Name?" on page 233 of the
SAUSD Common Core Unit
30
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Lesson 2 Planner
Holt textbook. Teacher will determine sections of the text
Students Who Need
that students can read alone, in pairs, or with the whole
Additional Support:
class; the Holt CD may also be used, depending on your
Day 1 #4: If students
students’ needs. Ask the “Direct Teaching” questions in the need to refer to
Holt T.E. sidebar to confirm students’ understandings about physical copies of
the text.
definitions, they may
use the PowerPoint
6. Clarify any of the people in the text whom the student
hardcopy slides in
might not know with a brief description.
their Student
7. Have students complete the Tracking Perspective activity Resources booklets
(Resource 2.2) in a Think/Write/Pair/Share. (Students will (Resource 2.1). The
work independently and then each share answers with a
teacher may also
partner.)
choose to print and
post the slides on the
8. Call on students to share their responses with the class.
walls.
Day 2
Interacting with the Text: "Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves
at Risk?" Debate
1. Ask students to read each side of the article silently
(Resource 2.3). They should circle any words or concepts
that they don't understand.
2. Clarify those words and concepts as necessary.
3. Ask students which Thinking Map would best represent
the ideas that are compared and contrasted in this article. On
the blank page (Resource 2.4), have students create their
map comparing/contrasting the evidence presented in the
Yes/No mini articles. Students will work independently at
first. An example of a Double Bubble Map is provided
below:
Day 2 #6: Provide
students with sentence
starters to help with
their writing. "I
believe that the
(yes/no) side was
more convincing
because..."
Day 2 #5 - 7: Assist
students in identifying
reliable sources and
supporting evidence
for claims.
Accelerated
Learners:
Day 1 #7: In place of
the Tracking
Perspective activity,
challenge students to
create a Thinking Map
that traces the author’s
argument in the
“What’s Really in a
Name?” article.
Day 3 #6: Draw
students’ attention to
4. Once students have a fairly complete map, have them
the word choice used
form groups of 3 or 4. They may use their own maps to
in the title of the
share out or put their ideas together in a group map.
article. Which words
5. Using a Round Robin format, students should share a
reveal the author’s
piece
of
evidence
or
an
opinion
that
has
not
yet
been
shared.
bias? Have students
SAUSD Common Core Unit
31
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Lesson 2 Planner
For example, if one student shares the point that “a lot of
write alternative titles
kids and adults think that youth sports in the U.S. have
that demonstrate a
become too intense,” another student may offer the
positive bias and
opposing view that “the amount of time that [sports] require neutral (objective)
and the pressure they place on young athletes” are actually
perspective.
positive qualities;” however, evidence already shared may
not be repeated.
Day 4-6 #1:
Accelerated learners
The Round Robin continues until there is nothing new to
may be allowed to
share.
choose their own
topics for
Students will conduct a Round Robin following these
research/presentation.
directions:



Share your responses one by one with your
group members.
Everyone shares.
Others may not interrupt or comment until
everyone has expressed his/her ideas.
In Round Robin sharing, emphasize the importance of being
an active listener (no interruptions). You may want to
model this process and have the directions posted or in front
of them until the students become familiar with this
structure.
6. Ask students to rank the power (how convincing is it?) of
evidence recorded on their map (e.g., the best argument
receives a “1”). For example, on the “yes” side of the
argument, students may decide that the physical injuries are
the most compelling reason why sports put young athletes at
risk (#1), followed by pressure from parents and fans (#2).
NOTE: Teacher may wish to preface this with a discussion
about what makes evidence powerful (scientific data,
logic/rationality, appeal to strong emotions, strong
examples) or weak (lack of data, over-generalized,
exaggerated appeals to emotion, illogical/irrational
thinking, weak/vague/disconnected examples).
7. Have students turn to the Quick-Write page (Resource
2.5) and complete it independently. Remind students that
they should only be using evidence from the articles to
decide which view was more convincing, not their own
personal opinions. Also, they can discuss if a particular
type(s) of evidence is more convincing than other types.
8. Again in a Round Robin, have students share the gist of
their Quick-Writes (one or two sentences only). Ask
students to share a group member’s response with the whole
class. (You may want to warn students of this BEFORE
SAUSD Common Core Unitthey share within their groups so that they are paying extra
32
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
close attention.)
Lesson 2 Planner
NOTE: Before (or in lieu of) the Round Robin, it might be
effective to have students choose a different side of the room
(one side for those who are “pro” youth sports and the
other side for those who are “con” youth sports) to stand
on, and then share their reasons why they chose that
position.
Day 3
Interacting with the Text: "Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty
Queens?"
1. Ask students to turn to their Vocabulary Notebooks
(Resource 1.2) and reread the definitions of "subjective"
and "objective" silently. Remind them that yesterday's
articles were clearly subjective (they were even titled with
yes/no opinions), but articles aren't always so obvious.
Alternatively, students could be asked to share their ideas
about the subjectivity of the articles with a partner or in a
Quick-Write format.
2. Ask students if any of them have seen the reality show
Toddlers and Tiaras (if they haven’t, explain that it is a TV
show about very young girls participating in beauty
contests). Allow students to share opinions and experiences
of the show for a few minutes and then have them turn to
the article "Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?"
(Resource 2.6).
3. Read the article aloud or have student volunteers read it
aloud; alternatively, students may read it independently or
aloud in pairs.
4. Tell students that they will be determining if the article is
subjective or objective. Have students reread the article
silently highlighting facts in blue and opinions in yellow (if
you don't want to use highlighters, you can have students
underline facts and circle opinions or put opinions in
parentheses).
5. On the overhead, have students share with you the facts
and opinions that they found and mark up your article
accordingly. After all the answers are collected, poll
students on each answer to see if they agree or disagree;
make changes as needed based on evidence that students
provide, supplying guidance as needed.
6. Show the cover of the magazine and the additional
picture (Resource 2.7 – this resource is available as a
hardcopy in the Student Resources booklet and may also be
accessed through the SAUSD webpage by following this
link: http://www.sausd.us/Page/22743). Ask students to
SAUSD Common Core Unitshare what they see and how they feel about it.
33
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Lesson 2 Planner
7. Draw students’ attention to the cover title "What Is
Wrong with this Picture? -- Inside the shocking world of
child beauty pageants,” and lead them through a close
reading and discussion based on the following questions:
Does that title sound like the author has an opinion about
the pageants? Is that opinion positive or negative? How do
you know? What text supports your view?
7. Have students reread the article for a third time, this time
identifying whether each line (or situation) shows child
pageants in a positive or negative (good or bad) light.
8. Text-dependent Questions (Resource 2.8): Have students
respond to the questions on the next page. Give them time
to work independently, then have students share with a
group in a Round Robin.
9. Ask students to share their own or a partner’s responses
with the class.
Day 4 – 6
Extending Understanding -- Performance Task: Argumentative
Presentation
Depending on time/resources, a paragraph is an acceptable
substitution for this activity but Standards and Objectives will differ
from the Lesson Plan.
1. Students will choose a topic from the list provided in the
instructions (Resource 2.9), research the topic to find
reliable supporting evidence, and present a cohesive
argument to the class. The purpose is to convince someone
to change a policy. (Research can be assigned as homework
the night before if that is a more viable option.)
2. Students should clearly state their claim, use appropriate
supporting evidence, and include a conclusion. Students
may use notes during their presentation, but they should still
make eye contact with the audience and not stumble over
words. Be sure to go over the rubric on Resource 2.9
together.
NOTE: If students have not practiced oral presentations
previously, they will need to see models of and practice
using effective eye contact, natural pacing, appropriate
volume, and pronunciation. Two Discovery Education video
segments that might be helpful are “Overview of Public
Speaking” [04:57] and “Presentations: More Than Words”
[06:59], which can both be accessed through the SAUSD
webpage by following this link:
http://www.sausd.us/Page/22743.
3. After the presentations have been delivered, add a
piece in which students respond to the following
SAUSD Common Core Unitreflection
34
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
questions (see Resource 2.10):



Lesson 2 Planner
Was your speech objective or subjective?
What was your point of view?
How did that affect your perception of the topic?
Lesson Reflection
Teacher
Reflection
Evidenced
by Student
Learning/
Outcomes
SAUSD Common Core Unit
35
11/6/2013
Vocabulary
Grade 7
The Power of Point of View
Vocabulary
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.1
Point of view
Bias
• A way that someone looks at or thinks about
something.
When you work with other
people, it is a good idea to
try to see things from your
teammates’ point of view.
Subjective
• Allowing personal beliefs, opinions, and
attitudes to influence writing or
interpretation
SAUSD Common Core Unit
▫point of view
bias
▫bias
▫subjective
▫objective
• A leaning in favor of or against a person or
issue
A good teacher will grade
students fairly, with no bias.
Objective
• Real, factual, without bias
“Lady Justice” is blind
and weighs evidence
without using her
personal opinions.
36
1
11/6/2013
A closer look at…
Objective vs. Subjective
Objective
Subjective
• gives information without
judgment or evaluation
• usually relies heavily on
facts
• tells actual events that
occurred, without stating
more than can be
inferred
• includes personal view or
opinion
• may just describe
something from the
author’s point of view
• may include facts but will
probably exclude some
facts that do not support
opinion
SAUSD Common Core Unit
37
2
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.2
Tracking Perspective: "What's Really In a Name?"
Pages 233-234
The writer doesn't understand why Patsy changed her name.
What are 3 ways that the writer explains why some people change their names?
1.
2.
3.
What is the writer's main concern about changing names?
Explain the following quote: “Know from whence you came. If you know from
whence you came, there are absolutely no limitations to where you can go.”
What is the writer’s perspective on changing names? How do you know?
SAUSD Common Core Unit
38
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.3
"Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?"
Injuries and burnout are on the rise among young people in competitive sports
YES
NO
A lot of kids and adults think that
youth sports in the U.S. have become too
intense. In 2006, the Minnesota Youth
Soccer Association polled young players
about behavior they had observed at sports
games. More than a third said that they had
been yelled at or teased by a fan; 15 percent
said their parents got angry when they
played poorly. In a similar poll by Sports
Illustrated for Kids in 2001, 74 percent of
kids said that they had witnessed out-ofcontrol adults at their games.
This sort of behavior takes an
emotional toll. One recent study reported
that 70 percent of young athletes drop out of
their sports by age 13. Many of those kids
told researchers that sports weren't much
fun.
There are also physical risks. Half of
all sports injuries among kids each year are
caused by simple overuse, according to the
American Academy of Pediatrics. Stress
fractures, ruptured ligaments, and growthplate* injuries can cause lifelong problems.
They're all avoidable with rest and
moderation.
I know more than I'd like to about
such injuries. When my son was 18, he
ruptured an elbow ligament while pitching
for his high school baseball team. At the
time, he was playing for three different
baseball teams in three different seasons. I
wish I'd realized then how excessive that
was.
Those who argue that youth sports
are too intense point mostly to two factors-the amount of time that they require and the
pressure they place on young athletes.
These are the very qualities, however that
make sports so valuable.
Youth sports today indeed require a
big investment of time, money, and energy.
But the physical and emotional benefits that
come from playing sports are worth it.
Young athletes who spend countless
hours training learn the value of discipline
and commitment. There is simply no way
other than tireless repetition to master the
skills necessary to succeed in competitive
athletics. When an athlete performs well as
a result of this kind of training, he or she
develops genuine self-confidence.
With parents shouting from the
sidelines and college scouts watching, highlevel competitions are packed with pressure.
But when managed well, this pressure can
bring out the best in young athletes.
To successfully compete in this
environment, young athletes must develop
mechanisms for blocking out distractions
and concentrating only on the details
relevant to performance. Instead of being
held back by the pressure, they learn to
thrive under it.
In the soccer club I work for, I've
seen countless kids achieve their potential as
a result of all their hard work. It's the
intensity that makes youth sports so
valuable.
- Mark Hyman
Sports Journalist and Author
* Growth plates are areas of growing tissue at the
ends of children's leg and arm bones. They are the
weakest part of a young person's skeleton.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
-Nathan Pitcock
Chicago Magic Soccer Club
Junior Scholastic April 18, 2011
39
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.4
"Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?"
Thinking Map to Compare and Contrast the Ideas in the Article
SAUSD Common Core Unit
40
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.5
Quick-Write
"Are Young Athletes Putting Themselves at Risk?
Which argument was more convincing? Why? Discuss the quality, quantity, and type of
evidence provided. You may use your Thinking Map (Resource 2.4) as a reference. Be sure to
use only the evidence in the articles, not your own personal opinions.
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
41
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.6
Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?
Millions of young children compete in pageants across America. Do these contests go too far?
By Justin O'Neill
Scholastic Scope
December 12, 2011
Four-year-old Karley stands in her family's kitchen, dressed in a bikini. She screams in
terror as her mom approaches with a spray can. There is no escape for Karley. The dreaded
moment has arrived.
The instant the cold mist hits her bare shoulders, Karley squirms, cries out, and stomps
her feet. She shakes like she has been electrocuted.
"Look at your white legs!" Karley's mom scolds, while covering her daughter head to toe
with fake tanner.
Welcome to the strange world of child beauty pageants.
In the Name of Beauty
Some 3 million kids -- most of them girls -- between the ages of 6 months and 16 years
compete in American pageants each year. They face off locally and nationally in categories such
as swimsuits, talent, evening wear, and themed costumes. This is a world where toddlers sport
fake fingernails, a mother feeds her daughter 10 Pixy Stix as a pre-pageant energy boost, and
parents routinely drop five grand on a child's pageant outfit.
You can see it all on TLC's controversial reality show Toddlers & Tiaras. Young
contestants like Karley endure a lot in the name of "beauty": eyebrow waxes, wigs, heavy
makeup, manicures, and partial dentures called "flippers" that fill in gaps left by missing front
teeth. This can't possibly be good for kids, can it? Pageant fans say it's harmless fun. They say
that pageants can even benefit children by building their confidence and public-speaking skills.
Plus, pageant winners earn college scholarships, cash -- and those cherished sparkly tiaras, of
course.
Others think that child beauty contests are downright ugly. For one thing, pageants are
costly. Besides buying a closet full of pricey dresses, families spend fortunes on entry fees,
travel, hotel rooms, makeup, and coaches.
Damaging Message?
Perhaps more seriously, some believe that beauty pageants send the damaging message
that appearance is the most important thing about a person. Critics also worry that instead of
celebrating individuality, pageants encourage girls to change their looks to fit narrow, invented
standards of beauty. There is a concern as well over the way contestants imitate the fashions and
behaviors of adult celebrities, strutting across the stage in short skirts and revealing dresses. Is it
appropriate for children to dress and act in such a mature way?
Despite the opposition, pageant parents insist that competing in beauty contests is no
different from playing a sport, which also requires time and money and puts intense pressure on
young competitors. Like young athletes, little beauty queens learn discipline, feel great pride in
their accomplishments, and form lasting friendships.
Yet where but on Toddlers & Tiaras can you watch a mother convince her 8-year-old
daughter to have her eyelashes dyed? For some, this kind of thing is cute fun. It's enough to
make others want to scream.
Just like Karley.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
42
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Resource 2.7
43
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
SAUSD Common Core Unit
Resource 2.7
44
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.8
"Should 4-Year-Olds Be Beauty Queens?"
Text-dependent Questions
1. Was the article more positive or negative toward child beauty pageants? Support your answer
with textual evidence.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
2. Is the article subjective or objective? How do you know?
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
3. What is the author's opinion on child beauty pageants? How do you know that that is his
opinion?
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
4. What evidence could the author have included that would have made the article more
balanced?
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
SAUSD Common Core Unit
45
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.9
Argumentative Presentation
You will be presenting an argument to the class. You will select a topic and decide on the claim
that you would like to make. You will research that topic and compile evidence that supports
your claim. After your presentation is written, you will deliver it as a speech.
Possible Topics:
Should schools require students to wear a uniform?
Should schools be allowed to sell "junk" food (e.g., soda, fried chips)?
Should girls and boys be taught in same gender classrooms?
How could your school or community be improved? (Choose only one way.)
Should cell phones be banned from schools?
To make a good presentation:
 State your claim (including your topic!) clearly
 Have sufficient, relevant information that supports your claim.
 Close your speech powerfully. (Make sure the audience knows your opinion and perhaps
what they should do about it - a “call to action”.)
 Do not read your speech.
 Make eye contact with the audience.
 Speak at a natural pace and a volume that can be heard by all students.
 Pronounce your words clearly.
Use the space below to brainstorm ideas. Refer to the rubric on the next page to guide your
planning.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
46
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.9
Rubric:
4 Points
3 Points
2 Points
1 Point
Topic and claim are very
clearly stated.
Topic and claim are
adequately stated.
Topic and claim are
somewhat clearly stated.
Topic and/or claim are
not clearly stated.
Claim is fully supported
with sufficient relevant
information.
Claim is adequately
supported with relevant
information.
Claim is somewhat
supported with relevant
information.
Claim is not supported
by relevant information.
Conclusion powerfully
states the speaker's
opinion and may include
a call to action.
Conclusion adequately
states the speaker's
opinion.
Conclusion somewhat
states the speaker's
opinion.
Conclusion does not
state the speaker's
opinion.
Speaker consistently
maintains eye contact,
natural pace, appropriate
volume, and
pronunciation.
Speaker adequately
maintains eye contact,
natural pace, appropriate
volume, and
pronunciation.
Speaker occasionally
maintains eye contact,
natural pace, appropriate
volume, and
pronunciation.
Speaker does not
maintain eye contact,
natural pace, appropriate
volume, or
pronunciation.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
47
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 2
Resource 2.10
Reflection
Now that you have delivered your argumentative presentation, answer the following questions:



Was your speech objective or subjective?
What was your point of view?
How did that affect your perception of the topic?
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
48
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
SAUSD Common Core Lesson Planner
Unit: The
Power of
Point of View
Lesson #: 3
Grade Level/Course:
ELA Grade 7
Lesson 3 Planner
Teacher:
Duration: 5-7 days
Date:
Big Idea: Point of view has the power to affect perception.
Essential Questions:
 How does a change in point of view affect our perception?
 How do writers use different points of view to develop a text?
 How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence the reader?
 How do omniscient, first-person, and third-person limited points of view differ and what impact do
they have on a reader's understanding of the text?
 How can point of view change the theme of a story?
Common Core Content Standards:
Reading Literature
RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different
characters or narrators in a text.
Reading Informational Text
RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word
choice on meaning and tone.
Writing
Common
Core
Standards
W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured even sequences.
Speaking and Listening
SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborate discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others'
ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Language
L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Materials/
Resources/
Lesson
Preparation



SAUSD Common Core Unit
Holt Literature & Language Arts, First Course – "Point of View: Through Whose
Eyes?" by John Leggett pages 222-223; "Yeh-Shen" pages 251-255
Holt Interactive Reader – "Beauty and the Beast" pages 122-126
Resource 3.1 Fiction Vocabulary Notebook
49
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Lesson 3 Planner
 Resource 3.2 Viewing with a Focus
 Resource 3.3 Point of View Pictures
 Resource 3.4 Fiction Vocabulary PowerPoint
 Resource 3.5A Point of View Identification Activity
 Resource 3.5B Point of View Identification Activity – Answer Key
 Resource 3.6 "Beauty and the Beast" Text-dependent Questions
 Resource 3.7 “Yeh-Shen” What if…
 Resource 3.8 Revising for Point of View
 Resource 3.9 Fairy Tale Times Two
 Paper and writing instruments (student-provided)
 Computer and Internet access and audio capacity
 Whiteboard and markers as needed
 Document camera if desired
 Chart paper if desired
Content:
Language:
Students will:
Students will work collaboratively to:
 Read to understand the meaning
 Explain the point of view of various texts
of literary point of view terms
 Rewrite a passage from “Yeh-Shen” in a
different point of view
 Contrast the point of view of
Objectives
various versions of the same
 Compose two versions of the same fairy
story
tale told from different perspectives
 Rewrite fairy tales from alternate
points of view using effective
narrative techniques
Depth of
Knowledge
Level
College and
Career Ready
Skills
Level 1: Recall
Level 2: Skill/Concept
Level 3: Strategic Thinking
Level 4: Extended Thinking
Demonstrating independence
Building strong content knowledge
Responding to varying demands of
audience, task, purpose, and discipline
Valuing evidence
Comprehending as well as critiquing
Using technology and digital media strategically and capably (if technology available)
Coming to understand other perspectives and cultures
TEACHER PROVIDES SIMPLE
EXPLANATION
STUDENTS
FIGURE OUT THE
MEANING
(Tier II & Tier III)
Academic Vocabulary
Common Core
Instructional
Shifts
Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction texts
Reading and writing grounded from text
Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary
KEY WORDS ESSENTIAL TO
WORDS WORTH KNOWING
UNDERSTANDING
point of view
first-person
third-person limited
omniscient
theme
dynasties, sage
perceive, convey
SAUSD Common Core Unit
50
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Pre-teaching
Considerations

Lesson 3 Planner
Students should be able to Think/Write/Pair/Share effectively (stay on task,
participate fully in the activity, be respectful of others' opinions).
Lesson Delivery
Check method(s) used in the lesson:
Instructional
Methods
Modeling
Guided Practice
Guided Inquiry
Reflection
Collaboration
Independent Practice
Day 1
Prior Knowledge, Context, and Motivation:
1. Before starting the lesson, remind students of the Big Idea: Point of view has the
power to affect perception, and the Essential Questions: How does a change in point
of view affect our perception? How do writers use different points of view to develop
a text? How can a certain point of view that a writer chooses influence the reader?
Refresh their memory of "perspective" if necessary.
2. Introduce the remaining Essential Questions:
 How do omniscient, first-person, and third-person limited points of view
differ and what impact to they have on a reader's understanding of the text?
 How can a change in point of view change the theme of a story?
3. Using the Fiction Vocabulary Notebook, have students identify whether they can
use/define, have heard/seen, or don't know each word (Resource 3.1).
Preparing the Learner
Body of the
Lesson:
Activities/
Questioning/
Tasks/ Strategies/
Technology/
Engagement
4. Have students turn to Viewing with a Focus (Resource 3.2).
Project the three Point of View pictures in color on the
board/screen (Resource 3.3 – this resource is available as a
black and white hardcopy in the Student Resources booklet and
may also be accessed through the SAUSD webpage by
following this link: http://www.sausd.us/Page/22743). Provide
enough time for students to view the pictures and respond to the
questions.
5. Once students have examined all three pictures, have them
respond to the questions at the bottom of the chart: "From each
picture’s point of view, what would you see and notice? What
would you NOT see and notice? What are the
advantages/disadvantages of each perspective?”
6. After students finish writing their responses, have them take
turns sharing with a partner. The teacher may call on volunteers
to share answers with the class.
Interacting with the Text
7. Have students turn to pg 222 in Holt and read the essay,
SAUSD Common Core Unit“Point of View: Through Whose Eyes?” aloud with students
Differentiated
Instruction:
English Learners
and Students
Who Need
Additional
Support:
Day 2 #2: Use
Interactive Reader
CD (that pauses
for students to
complete the
questions).
Accelerated
Learners:
Day 2 #4: Have
students
Think/Write/Pair/
Share with the
51
question "What
is
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Lesson 3 Planner
following along. (The CD or student readers are acceptable as
the theme of each
well.)
version? How does
the change in point
8. Using the Fiction Vocabulary PowerPoint (Resource 3.4 –
of view affect the
accessed through the SAUSD webpage by following this link:
theme?"
http://www.sausd.us/Page/22743), have students record the
definitions in their Fiction Vocabulary Notebook (Resource
3.1). If building a Word Wall, add these terms to it.
9. Have students complete the Point of View Identification
activity (Resource 3.5) in class or for homework.
Day 2
Day 5: Creative
writers can create
their own fairy tale
that can be told
from two points of
view.
1. Have students trade and grade the Point of View
Identification activity (Resource 3.5) from the day before.
Review the correct answers but have students award points
based on completion rather than strictly correct answers.
Alternatively, you may choose to collect and grade this
worksheet as a formal assessment piece.
2. Open to page 122 in the 7th grade Interactive Reader. Read
“Beauty and the Beast” (both versions) aloud, or have students
take turns reading aloud. (If you do not have Interactive
Readers, an electronic version of “The Beauty and the Beast”
can be accessed through the SAUSD webpage by following this
link: http://www.sausd.us/Page/22743.)
3. Have students reread each version silently and complete the
Text-dependent Questions (Resource 3.6).
4. Once students have answered the questions, have them
Pair/Share their results and then ask students to share their
partner's responses with the class.
5. As both versions of “Beauty and the Beast” are subjective, it
may be valuable to discuss the objective truths of the narrative.
Teacher might include discussion about the “absolute plot” or
“the true story” to help reinforce the idea that one’s perceptions
are all based on one’s point of view/perspective.
6. Review Big Idea and answer Essential Questions.
Day 3
1. Ask if students are familiar with the Cinderella fairy tale.
After all the "yes’s," share the fact that there are more than 900
versions of "Cinderella." Scholars have traced the oldest
version back more than a thousand years, to China. Let
students know that we will be reading a Chinese version of the
story titled "Yeh-Shen."
2. Have students open their Holt books to page 251. Read the
first three pages of story aloud (or play the CD), then have the
SAUSD Common Core Unitstudents read in partners to finish the story.
52
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Lesson 3 Planner
3. Ask students to think (but not yet say) which point of view
this story uses. When you give them the cue, have them
chorally respond with first, third, or omniscient. If you hear
responses other than omniscient, guide the students to the
correct identification. (Does the narrator use "I" to describe
himself/herself? Is the narrator a character in the story? Does
the narrator share the thoughts and feelings of multiple
characters?) If you’re concerned that choral response may not
capture all students, alternatives include having students use
individual dry erase boards, hand signals, and/or having them
share with a partner.
4. In preparation for the next task, discuss how a story’s theme
can change based on the point of view used. For example, how
did the theme of “Beauty and the Beast” change when it was
told from the point of view of the Beast?
5. Have students begin working on the "Yeh-Shen” What if...
activity (Resource 3.7). Model as needed. Students will
Think/Write/Pair/Share. Ask students to share partner's
responses with the class.
6. Have the students read the directions for "Revising for Point
of View" (Resource 3.8). For homework, students should
reread the listed passages and choose which passage they would
like to revise.
Day 4
1. Have students silently reread the definitions of the types of
point of view (Vocabulary Notebook, Resource 3.1). At this
time, if you have not been talking about it throughout, have
students complete The "Examples in the Text" portion of both
Vocabulary Notebooks (non-fiction and fiction, Resources 1.2
and 3.1) using text examples from this unit. Have students
Think/Write/Pair/Share; ask students to share what their
partners came up with.
2. Have students find the "Revising for Point of View" page
(Resource 3.8). Remind students that the original story was
written in the omniscient point of view, so they must either
choose first-person or third-person limited. Their revision must
accurately reflect the point of view of the narrator with
appropriate pronouns, taking into account what information is
accessible to the narrator. (Students may need to review
pronouns.)
3. Give the students time to write their revisions.
4. Once most students are winding down their writing (can be
finished as homework), have them work with a partner taking
turns reading their revisions to each other.
5. For homework, students will write down as many fairy tales
as they are familiar with and then choose a tale that they would
SAUSD Common Core Unitlike to tell from two different perspectives (Resource 3.9).
53
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Lesson 3 Planner
Days 5-7
Have students share the titles of fairy tales they chose with the class
while you create a master list or Circle Map on the overhead or on
chart paper.
Extending Understanding
1. Go over the rubric on Resource 3.9 (see below) with the
students and review narrative writing as needed. For additional
resources, teacher may access the 7th grade writing lessons on
the SAUSD curriculum webpage by following this link:
http://www.sausd.us/Page/14433.
4 Points
3 Points
2 Points
1 Point
Narrative contains
a clearly defined
beginning,
middle, and end;
transitions are
consistently used
to convey
sequence.
Narrative contains
an adequately
defined
beginning,
middle, and end;
transitions are
usually used to
convey sequence.
Narrative contains
a somewhat
defined
beginning,
middle, and end;
transitions
occasionally used
to convey
sequence.
Narrative does not
contain a
beginning,
middle, and end;
transitions are not
used to convey
sequence.
Characters are
richly defined and
developed; points
of view are
clearly expressed.
Characters are
adequately
defined and
developed; points
of view are
relatively well
expressed.
Characters are
somewhat defined
and developed;
points of view are
expressed, but not
clear.
Characters are not
well defined or
developed; lacks
point of view.
Descriptive words
and details are
powerfully used
to capture action
and convey
experiences and
events.
Descriptive words
and details are
adequately used
to capture action
and convey
experiences and
events.
Descriptive words
and details are
somewhat used to
capture action and
convey
experiences and
events.
Descriptive words
and details are not
used to capture
action and convey
experiences and
events.
Writing contains
few or no errors
in English
conventions
(grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation,
spelling).
Writing contains
some errors in
English
conventions that
do not interfere
with the reader's
understanding.
Writing contains
some errors in
English
conventions that
interfere with the
reader's
understanding.
Writing contains
many errors in
English
conventions that
interfere with the
reader's
understanding.
2. Before student begin to write, have students
Think/Write/Pair/Share: When they were revising the "YehShen" passage, what did they have to keep in mind? Was there
anything that proved to be tricky or difficult about the process?
SAUSD Common Core Unit
54
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Lesson 3 Planner
3. Students should proceed to write the two versions of their
fairy tales in class. (Teacher can provide examples of fairy tales
to be used as a reference if needed.)
If necessary, students can finish as homework.
Opportunities to accelerate Learning Through Technology:
If you have the technology, students may type their fairy tales and use
visuals, or they may create a digital presentation (PowerPoint, Prezi,
etc.) to share their fairy tales with the class.
4. Students post their finished fairy tales to share with the class.
5. Reflective Exit Slip (this can be done the next day to allow
for more writing time): Display the following questions on the
overhead or board:



How did the change in point of view change your story?
What did you have to keep in mind as you wrote the
different versions?
Did one version seem more "accurate"? If yes, why?
Lesson Reflection
Teacher
Reflection
Evidenced
by Student
Learning/
Outcomes
SAUSD Common Core Unit
55
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.1
Don't
know
Word
Can
define/
use it
Have
heard it/
seen it
Vocabulary Notebook: The Power of Point of View -- Fiction
Definition
Application or example in texts
point of view
omniscient
first-person
third-person
limited
SAUSD Common Core Unit
56
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.2
Viewing with a Focus
For each of the three pictures you will see, answer all three questions.
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Describe what you can see in
this picture.
How involved in the action do
you feel?
What information might you be
missing out on outside of the
picture?
Once you have viewed all three pictures, answer the following questions:
From each picture’s point of view, what would you see and notice? What would you NOT see and notice? What are the
advantages/disadvantages of each perspective?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
SAUSD Common Core Unit
57
5/1/2014
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.3
Resource 3.3
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
SAUSD Common Core Unit
58
1
11/6/2013
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.4
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3 Resource 3.4
Vocabulary
¾
¾
¾
¾
point of view
first-person
third-person, limited
omniscient
GRADE 7
THE POWER OF
POINT OF VIEW
Vocabulary -- Fiction
Point of View
…
The vantage point from which a story
is told
First-Person
•
•
Third-Person, Limited
•
•
The narrator is not a character in the
story.
The narrator tells the story through the
thoughts and feelings of just one
character.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
The narrator is a character in the
story.
The narrator tells the story through
only his/her perspective.
Omniscient Point of View
•
•
The narrator is not a character in the
story.
The narrator tells the story through the
most personal thoughts and feelings
of all the characters.
59
1
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.5A
Point of View Identification Activity
Directions: Read each of the passages below. Identify its point of view and explain how you
know you're right. Choose from first-person, third-person limited, or omniscient point of view.
Passage #1:
"As I walked by the corner of my room,
where my computer table was set up, I
pressed the on button, slid a diskette into the
floppy drive, then went to brush my teeth.
By the time I got back, the computer's
screen was glowing greenly, displaying the
message: Good morning, Kevin."
Passage #2:
"The princess bent down to kiss the slimy
toad; she was once told that if she kissed a
toad by the side of a pond, the toad would
magically turn into a handsome prince. She
thought and wished to herself, 'If only, if
only,' but when she went to kneel down, the
toad was gone."
Passage #3:
"The young maiden's loveliness, her hair
solid black and shining in the sun, made her
seem such a lovely being. The king
suddenly knew without a doubt that he was
to marry her. The entire town would throw
them a grand wedding and the two would
live happily ever after."
Passage #4:
"There was so much to learn and understand
when it came to being a dragonrider that
sometimes, Keevan was overwhelmed.
How would he ever be able to remember
everything he ought to know at the right
moment?"
SAUSD Common Core Unit
1. Point of View: _____________________
2. How do you know?: _________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
1. Point of View: _____________________
2. How do you know?: _________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
1. Point of View: _____________________
2. How do you know?: _________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
1. Point of View: _____________________
2. How do you know?: _________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
60
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.5B
Point of View Identification Activity – Answer Key
Directions: Read each of the passages below. Identify its point of view and explain how you
know you're right. Choose from first-person, third-person limited, or omniscient point of view.
Passage #1:
"As I walked by the corner of my room,
where my computer table was set up, I
pressed the on button, slid a diskette into the
floppy drive, then went to brush my teeth.
By the time I got back, the computer's
screen was glowing greenly, displaying the
message: Good morning, Kevin."
Passage #2:
"The princess bent down to kiss the slimy
toad; she was once told that if she kissed a
toad by the side of a pond, the toad would
magically turn into a handsome prince. She
thought and wished to herself, 'If only, if
only,' but when she went to kneel down, the
toad was gone."
Passage #3:
"The young maiden's loveliness, her hair
solid black and shining in the sun, made her
seem such a lovely being. The king
suddenly knew without a doubt that he was
to marry her. The entire town would throw
them a grand wedding and the two would
live happily ever after."
Passage #4:
"There was so much to learn and understand
when it came to being a dragonrider that
sometimes, Keevan was overwhelmed.
How would he ever be able to remember
everything he ought to know at the right
moment?"
SAUSD Common Core Unit
1. Point of View: First-person
2. How do you know?: Told from firstperson point of view using “I.”
1. Point of View: Third-person limited
2. How do you know?: Told from the
viewpoint of the princess.
1. Point of View: Omniscient
2. How do you know?: Narrator reveals
multiple points of view.
1. Point of View: Third-person limited
2. How do you know?: Told from the
viewpoint of Keevan.
61
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.6
"Beauty and the Beast"
Text-dependent Questions
Version 1
Version 2
Is the narrator a
character in the
story?
If the narrator is a
character, what
pronouns does the
narrator use to
describe himself or
herself?
What does the
narrator know
about other
characters'
thoughts and
feelings?
From which point
of view is the story
told?
(omniscient,
first-person, and
third-person)
What overall effect
did the choice of
narrator have on
the story? Use
evidence from the
stories to support
your conclusion.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
62
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.7
"Yeh-Shen"
What if...
If the following character became the
narrator, what other details, thoughts, or
feelings might the reader learn about?
IfIf Yeh-Shen narrated the story
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
____
If the stepmother narrated the story
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
If the king narrated the story
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
SAUSD Common Core Unit
If the following character became the
narrator, what might be the story's
theme?
If Yeh-Shen narrated the story, the
theme might be
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
If the stepmother narrated the story, the
theme might be
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
If the king narrated the story, the theme
might be
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
63
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.8
Revising for Point of View
"Yeh-Shen"
Directions: You will choose one of the short passages below and revise it so that it is being told
from a different point of view. Since "Yeh-Shen" is told with an omniscient narrator, you may
choose first-person or third-person limited for your version. Use the lined pages attached for
your writing.
Passage 1: The Killing of Yeh-Shen’s Fish (page 252)
Somehow the stepmother heard of this. She was terribly angry to discover that Yeh-Shen
had kept a secret from her. She hurried down to the pond, but she was unable to see the fish, for
Yeh-Shen’s pet wisely hid itself. The stepmother, however, was a crafty woman, and she soon
thought of a plan. She walked home and called out, “Yeh-Shen, go and collect some firewood.
But wait! The neighbors might see you. Leave your filthy coat here!” The minute the girl was out
of sight, her stepmother slipped on the coat herself and went down again to the pond. This time
the big fish saw Yeh-Shen’s familiar jacket and heaved itself onto the bank, expecting to be fed.
But the stepmother, having hidden a dagger in her sleeve, stabbed the fish, wrapped it in her
garments, and took it home to cook for dinner.
When Yeh-Shen came to the pond that evening, she found her pet had disappeared.
Overcome with grief, the girl collapsed on the ground and dropped her tears into the still waters
of the pond.
Passage 2: The Feast (pages 253-254)
That day Yeh-Shen turned many a head as she appeared at the feast. All around her
people whispered, “Look at that beautiful girl! Who can she be?”
But above this, Stepsister was heard to say, “Mother, does she not resemble our YehShen?”
Upon hearing this, Yeh-Shen jumped up and ran off before her stepsister could look
closely at her. She raced down the mountainside, and in doing so, she lost one of her golden
slippers. No sooner had the shoe fallen from her foot than all her fine clothes turned back to rags.
Only one thing remained—a tiny golden shoe. Yeh-Shen hurried to the bones of her fish and
returned the slipper, promising to find its mate. But now the bones were silent. Sadly Yeh-Shen
realized that she had lost her only friend. She hid the little shoe in her bedstraw and went outside
to cry. Leaning against a fruit tree, she sobbed and sobbed until she fell asleep.
The stepmother left the gathering to check on Yeh-Shen, but when she returned home,
she found the girl sound asleep, with her arms wrapped around a fruit tree. So, thinking no more
of her, the stepmother rejoined the party. Meantime, a villager had found the shoe. Recognizing
its worth, he sold it to a merchant, who presented it in turn to the king of the island kingdom of
T’o Han.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
64
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.8
Passage 3: Yeh-Shen Retrieving Her Slipper (pages 254-255)
It wasn’t until the blackest part of night, while the moon hid behind a cloud, that YehShen dared to show her face at the pavilion, and even then she tiptoed timidly across the wide
floor. Sinking down to her knees, the girl in rags examined the tiny shoe. Only when she was
sure that this was the missing mate to her own golden slipper did she dare pick it up. At last she
could return both little shoes to the fish bones. Surely then her beloved spirit would speak to her
again.
Now the king’s first thought, on seeing Yeh-Shen take the precious slipper, was to throw
the girl into prison as a thief. But when she turned to leave, he caught a glimpse of her face. At
once the king was struck by the sweet harmony of her features, which seemed so out of keeping
with the rags she wore. It was then that he took a closer look and noticed that she walked upon
the tiniest feet he had ever seen.
With a wave of his hand, the king signaled that this tattered creature was to be allowed to
depart with the golden slipper. Quietly, the king’s men slipped off and followed her home.
All this time, Yeh-Shen was unaware of the excitement she had caused. She had made
her way home and was about to hide both sandals in her bedding when there was a pounding at
the door. Yeh-Shen went to see who it was—and found a king at her doorstep. She was very
frightened at first, but the king spoke to her in a kind voice and asked her to try the golden
slippers on her feet. The maiden did as she was told, and as she stood in her golden shoes, her
rags were transformed once more into the feathered cloak and beautiful azure gown.
Use this space to plan your revision.
Which passage will you revise? ____________________________________________________
From whose perspective will you write? _____________________________________________
What point of view will you use? (First-person or third-person limited)
______________________________________________________________________________
Think about how you will change the way the story is told based on the character’s perspective,
and which pronouns you will use depending on the point of view used.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
65
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.8
Passage #______ from the perspective of ____________________________
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
66
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.8
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
67
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.9
Fairy Tale Times Two
Directions: Use the space below to brainstorm as many fairy tales that you can remember well.
You will choose a fairy tale that you are very familiar with and tell it from two points of view
and two different characters. (For example, the "Beauty and the Beast" versions were told as
omniscient and first-person from the Beast.)
Example of “Beauty and the Beast” from the omniscient point of view:
“Long ago there lived a merchant with three lovely daughters…”
Example of “Beauty and the Beast” from the first-person point of view:
“I was glad when I turned into a beast…”
SAUSD Common Core Unit
68
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.9
Once you have chosen your fairy tale, use the rubric below to guide your narrative writing.
Lined paper has been provided on the following pages for you to write your fairy tales.
4 Points
3 Points
2 Points
1 Point
Narrative contains a
clearly defined
beginning, middle, and
end; transitions are
consistently used to
convey sequence.
Narrative contains an
adequately defined
beginning, middle, and
end; transitions are
usually used to convey
sequence.
Narrative contains a
somewhat defined
beginning, middle, and
end; transitions
occasionally used to
convey sequence.
Narrative does not
contain a beginning,
middle, and end;
transitions are not used
to convey sequence.
Characters are richly
defined and developed;
points of view are
clearly expressed.
Characters are
adequately defined and
developed; points of
view are relatively well
expressed.
Characters are somewhat
defined and developed;
points of view are
expressed, but not clear.
Characters are not well
defined or developed;
lacks point of view.
Descriptive words and
details are powerfully
used to capture action
and convey experiences
and events.
Descriptive words and
details are adequately
used to capture action
and convey experiences
and events.
Descriptive words and
details are somewhat
used to capture action
and convey experiences
and events.
Descriptive words and
details are not used to
capture action and
convey experiences and
events.
Writing contains few or
no errors in English
conventions (grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation, spelling).
Writing contains some
errors in English
conventions that do not
interfere with the
reader's understanding.
Writing contains some
errors in English
conventions that
interfere with the
reader's understanding.
Writing contains many
errors in English
conventions that
interfere with the
reader's understanding.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
SAUSD Common Core Unit
69
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.9
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
70
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.9
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
71
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View, Lesson 3
Resource 3.9
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SAUSD Common Core Unit
72
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Appendix of Strategies Used in the Unit
(not comprehensive)
Quick-Write – page 74
Round Robin – page 75
Thinking Maps – page 76
Think-Pair-Share – page 77
Viewing with a Focus – page 78
Vocabulary Notebook – page 79
Wrecking a Text – page 80
SAUSD Common Core Unit
73
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Quick-Write: Teacher Rationale and Procedure
Purpose: The Quick Write invites students to make a connection between background knowledge
and themes expressed in a text or unit. It provides students with an opportunity to give a quick gutlevel reaction to ideas, situations, or events. Since the goal of the activity is to capture students’ first
impressions, memories, or feelings, linguistic accuracy and complexity are not stressed.
Required for use: An open-ended and engaging prompt that connects to topics, themes or issues
about which students have some background knowledge is an important part of what makes this task
effective. If the prompt is too general or too removed from students’ experiences in or out of school,
students may feel unsure about how to approach the topic. A commitment to fluency on the part of the
teacher and students is also required. Students need to know that correctness is not the focus of the
activity. If need be, encourage students to write in their native language and require them to use
English to talk about what they wrote.
Structure of the activity: One way this activity may be explained to students is to tell them that
the writing goes “from your heart to your hand to the paper.” Introduce the prompt and, if need be,
provide some context by connecting the topic to students’ knowledge and experience and the topic or
theme that the prompt explores. Give students no more than five minutes to write. If a student says
that he or she cannot think of anything to write about have the student write, “I don’t know what to
write about” for the allotted time.
Process outline:
1) Students respond in writing to a prompt without focusing on spelling and grammar correctness.
2) Students have no more than 3-5 minutes to write their response.
Adapted from Understanding Language ell.stanford.edu
SAUSD Common Core Unit
74
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Round-Robin: Teacher Rationale and Procedure
Purpose: This task structures small group interaction and participation to ensure that all students
have a voice and those students who might otherwise monopolize small group work do not limit
anyone else’s opportunities to participate. By requiring that every student states his or her response to
teacher-initiated questions without interruption, each member of the group connects his/her own ideas
to that of their peers and has opportunities to build conceptual and linguistic understanding.
Required for use: Students need time to develop a response to a question prior to engaging in the
Round Robin task. The question(s) need to be substantive and open-ended so that students are engaged
and learning from each other. If the question(s) are closed, responses will be repetitive and learning
constrained.
Structure of the activity: Round Robin requires members of a group to listen to and learn from
peers without interruption. Students may feel that agreeing and adding information when someone is
sharing information shows engagement. To promote active listening, without speaking, some teachers
use a prop when first introducing this task. The student holding the prop “holds the floor,” and when
done speaking, he or she passes the prop to the next person. Eventually students will internalize the
structure and will not need a material reminder.
Process outline:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Each student shares his/her response to a prompt.
One person speaks at a time
Nobody should interrupt
If a student’s answer is similar to somebody else’s, the student may not pass. Instead the
student should indicate agreement (“I have the same opinion as… I also think …”)
5) There are no interruptions or discussions until the four members have finished sharing their
responses.
Adapted from Understanding Language ell.stanford.edu
SAUSD Common Core Unit
75
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Thinking Maps: Teacher Rationale and Protocol
Purpose: Thinking Maps are eight specific visual patterns. Visualizing our thinking allows us to
have a concrete image of our abstract thoughts. Visual representations enhance the brain's natural
ability to detect and construct meaningful patterns. Thinking Maps reduce anxiety by providing
familiar visual patterns for thinking and working with complex ideas and situations.
Required for use: Thinking Maps professional development is designed to increase teacher and
leadership effectiveness. A 3-5 year plan of action should be designed to address the specific yearly
goals within a school or district improvement plan.
Structure of the activity: Each visual is linked to a specific thought process. By connecting a
concrete visual design with a specific abstract thought process, students create mental visual patterns
for thinking. Thinking Maps are most effective when used to teach readiness standards or objectives.
Disciplinary literacy requires students to think critically, creatively and analytically in all content
areas. As students learn different concepts with increasing complexity, they can apply the same
patterns for cognition in all areas.
Students use visual patterns to work collaboratively for deeper comprehension at all content areas and
grade levels. They are empowered with the tools to analyze complex texts and think mathematically
for conceptual understanding and problem solving. In addition, students use Thinking Maps for the
production and distribution of a range of writing types and purposes
Process outline:
Each Thinking Map is designed to answer guiding questions that are related to a specific thought
process.
1) Circle Map – defining in context. Understand and use general (Tier 2) and domain-specific
(Tier 3) academic vocabulary.
2) Tree Map – classifying and grouping. Identify the main idea(s), key supporting ideas and
details in complex texts.
3) Bubble Map – describing with adjectives. Use relevant descriptive details and sensory
language in reading and writing.
4) Double Bubble Map –comparing and contrasting. Compare and contrast important points in
two texts or points of view; draw comparative inferences about two populations.
5) Flow Map – sequencing and ordering. Understand the steps and patterns in complex processes
in order to answer questions and solve problems.
6) Multi-Flow Map – analyzing causes and effects. Evaluate the argument and specific claims in
a text; determine the impact the author’s purpose and point of view have on a text.
7) Brace Map – identifying part/whole relationships. Use common affixes to determine and
clarify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary terms.
8) Bridge Map – seeing analogies. ”Choose two historical leaders and show their relationship to
important movements or conflicts. Remember to state your relating factor.”
Adapted from thinkingmaps.com/thinking_maps_common_core.php
SAUSD Common Core Unit
76
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Think-Pair-Share: Teacher Rationale and Protocol
Purpose: Providing “think time” increased quality of student response so that students become
actively involved in thinking about the concepts presented in the lesson. When students talk over new
ideas, they are forced to make sense of those new ideas in terms of their prior knowledge. Their
misunderstandings about the topic are often revealed and resolved during the discussion state.
Students are more willing to participate since they don’t feel the peer pressure involved in responding
in front of the whole class. Think-Pair-Share provides opportunities to bridge concepts as well as
schema build for English Learners.
Structure of the activity:
 Assign Partners—Be sure to assign discussion partners rather than just saying “Turn to a
partner and talk it over.” When you don’t assign partners, students frequently turn to the most
popular student and leave the other person out.
 Change Partners—Switch the discussion partners frequently. With students seated in teams,
they can pair with the person beside them for one discussion and the person across from them
for the next discussion.
 Monitor Discussion—Walk around and monitor the discussion stage. You will frequently hear
misunderstandings that you can address during the whole-group discussion that follows.
 Randomly Select students—During the sharing stage at the end, call on students randomly.
You can do this by having a jar of popsicle sticks that have student names or numbers on them.
Draw out a popsicle stick and ask that person to tell what their PARTNER said. The first time
you may find they didn’t listen well to their partner, but if you keep using this strategy, they
will learn to listen to their partner.
Process outline:
Think:
1) The teacher asks one or two questions for students to consider.
2) In order to see what they are thinking, and to provide further scaffolding to them if needed, the
teacher asks students to jot down key elements of their answer using words or phrases, but not
complete sentences.
3) Depending on the complexity of the questions, the teacher may assign between three and five
minutes for students to jot down their ideas.
4) In the meantime, the teacher circulates around the classroom monitoring and checking what
students have written. An empty piece of paper may be an indication that the students need
support from the teacher.
Pair:
5) Students are asked for form dyads. There are many ways of doing this, depending on time
available, the nature of the questions, or even what time of the day it is (classes immediately
after lunch may require opportunities for movement).
Share:
6) Dyads orally share their responses with each other.
7) All students should be read –if called upon—to present to the class their partner’s responses
first, and then their own.
SAUSD Common Core Unit
77
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Viewing with a Focus: Teacher Rationale and Protocol
Purpose: This task helps students focus on main ideas and key information as they “read” visual
text such as a movie or video clip, a picture, an advertisement, etc. In the same way that reading focus
questions help students navigate through extraneous or non-salient information in a written text,
questions for viewing help students focus on what the teacher thinks is important or noteworthy in a
predominately visual text.
Required for use: The questions that guide students’ viewing of text need to focus on central
ideas in the discipline or subject area. If students are asked low-level questions, they will concentrate
on details instead of key ideas or discipline specific ways of analyzing text.
Structure of the activity: Students are asked to read or view with a specific purpose in mind.
For example, they may be given three questions to consider as they view a text or members of a group
may have different questions to focus on. Students may need several different possible models of how
they might begin their responses to a focus question. Models should be generative, meaning that
students are learning ways of using language that will be useful in other academic settings. If visual
texts are lengthy, complex, or viewed in different ways (with sound, without sound), students may
need questions for different sections or viewings.
Process outline:
1) Students use the focus question(s) as a guide for viewing and jotting down notes in response to
the question(s).
2) Students initially work alone, but may share responses with a partner or small group.
Adapted from Understanding Language by WestEd’s Teacher Professional Development Program
SAUSD Common Core Unit
78
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Vocabulary Notebook: Teacher Rationale and Protocol
Purpose: Focuses on developing essential vocabulary and providing vocabulary instruction in
context. This notebook also serves as a tool students can use across disciplines and can be adapted for
some high-stakes exams (glossary).
Vocabulary Notebook includes





Word and Translation (primary language)
Picture or Image
Definition
Source Sentence
Original Sentence
Process
Include Key Words Essential to Understanding, those words that cannot be deciphered using content
clues.
1) In table groups, students share any knowledge they already have on these words (definition,
where they have seen/hears it, etc.).
2) Teacher walks around the room and notes students’ knowledge and/or misconceptions.
3) Teacher leads a discussion on these words and provides sample explanations.
4) Students record the information in their Vocabulary Notebooks (word/translation, visual or
image, definition, source sentence, and original sentence).
NOTE: Teachers may also want to create worksheets or transfer images to a PowerPoint if desired.
You may also want to include other essential words (from AWL and content-specific lists). These may
be words that students can decipher meaning using context clues.
1) Using “Wordsift,” www.wordsift.com, teacher notes key vocabulary from Academic Word
List (AWL) and content-specific vocabulary to alert students to notice while reading the text.
2) Student record words in Vocabulary Notebook and during/after reading include: translation
(EL students), picture or image, definition, example source sentence, original sentence.
Students should include personal new words as well to increase their vocabulary. Teacher should
provide students with numerous opportunities for them to say and write using these words.
IMPORTANT NOTE: The first column of the Vocabulary Notebook (Word/Translation) is a
personal glossary for English learners. Students can use this on some high-stakes exams, such as the
CAHSEE. Students would simply need to cut along the line of the first column to have their personal
glossary.
Adapted from Sonja Munevar Gagnon, QTEL training
SAUSD Common Core Unit
79
ELA Grade 7 The Power of Point of View
Appendix
Wrecking a Text: Teacher Rationale and
Protocol
Purpose: Focuses on rewriting a complex text into its simplest form in order to determine
meaning and appreciate the author’s craft.
Structure of the activity: Wrecking the text involves the student undertaking an intensive
analysis of a linguistically complex text to come to terms with what it says, how it says it, and
what it means. This is accomplished by breaking the text down to its most basic meaning and
then comparing it to the original text to identify how the author chooses specific language and
structure to express his/her ideas. This allows students to demonstrate simple comprehension of
the text, but, more importantly, allows them to understand the power of the original language.
Process outline:
Students work independently or in pairs to read the selected text and use context clues to
determine the basic meaning.
2) Students rewrite the text in their own words at its most basic level of meaning.
3) Students then compare the simplified text to the original and draw conclusions about how
the meaning is affected by the author’s choices.
1)
Adapted from Diane Lapp, Text Complexity training
SAUSD Common Core Unit
80
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