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F:\WordPerfect Documents\Better Bridge\Products\Improving Your
Doubles
Improving Your Judgment
Teacher’s Manual
by
Audrey Grant
ALL RIGHT RESERVED
No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from
the publisher.
Copyright © 2001 Better Bridge
247 Wanless Avenue
Toronto, Ontario M4N 1W5
Canada
Phone: (888) 266-4447
Fax: (416) 322-6601
Website: www.BetterBridge.com
Email: [email protected]
Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Lesson One
The Takeout Double
Hand 1 - The Classic Takeout Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Hand 2 - Takeout Doubles After Left-Hand Opponent Opens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Hand 3 - Takeout or Penalty? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Hand 4 - The Takeout Double to Show a Strong Overcall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Lesson Two
Advancing (Responding to) a Takeout Double
Hand 5 - Advancing the Takeout Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Hand 6 - When Responder Bids Over the Takeout Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Hand 7 - Advancing in Notrump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Hand 8 - Advancer’s Forcing Bids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Lesson Three
Doubler’s Rebid and the Subsequent Auction
Hand 9 - Doubler’s Rebid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Hand 10 - Handling a Redouble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Hand 11 - Doubler’s Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Hand 12 - Converting to a Penalty Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Lesson Four
Balancing and Other Doubles
Hand 13 - The Balancing Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Hand 14 - Advancing a Balancing Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Hand 15 - Takeout Double by a Passed Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Hand 16 - The Delayed Takeout Double . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
-i-
-ii-
Introduction
Overview
Doubles is a course focusing on the takeout double as it is commonly used. Much of the
material will be new, even to those who play regularly, so this topic provides a good way to
accommodate players of different levels of experience.
Understanding the many uses of the double can dramatically improve their game. The
course reviews the basics and introduces tools that improve judgment. Topics covered
include:
•
•
•
•
The takeout double
Responding to (advancing) the takeout double
Rebids by the doubler and the advancer
Balancing and other doubles
The course introduces features of the double that the participants might not have
considered. They can be well placed to get better results in competitive auctions.
In an Improving Your Judgment series, it’s important to acknowledge different opinions
about bidding, and to move on. It’s a good time to remind the players not to let a point or
two come between friends. Doubles has been written with the input of the best players in the
world (see the Acknowledgements in the textbook). The goal is to bring to the reader
authentic, up-to-date information.
Lesson Format
Doubles is organized into four chapters with four hands per chapter. The teaching unit is
the hand, which has material for a 45-minute class. Although the focus is doubles, these
courses offer a review of play and defense. For example:
HAND ONE
Part One
•
•
•
•
•
Short introduction: boxed information - Page 1
Play of the hand: instructions - Page 2
Review of the bidding - Pages 2-3
Review of play and defense - Pages 5–12
Observation - Page 12
-iii-
Part Two
•
•
Transitions . . . cards on the table to illustrate the concepts - Pages 12-17
Conclusion - Page 18
All of the hands follow this pattern. Part One is about 25minutes and Part Two 20 minutes.
Student Material
A copy of the Doubles book should be on each table before the first class begins. Students
are encouraged to put their names in the book. Some participants read the material before
the class, others look at it after the class, and, of course, a few won’t read it at all. Comments
such as “Don’t read ahead” or “You’ll get more out of the hands if you don’t look at them
until after you’ve played them” should be avoided. A student will use the book as it best suits
the individual learning style.
Teacher Preparation
The key to successfully using the lesson plans is to put in the work required to get good
results. The material has been tested many times. Care has been taken to include, in detail,
techniques that have been effective. Read the Doubles book and, although it may not seem
necessary, teachers find that it’s a good idea to read the lesson plan aloud.
Pitfalls
There are several pitfalls that can result in poor ratings. Here are the most common to avoid:
•
Asking a participant to answer a question when there was no indication that the
player wanted to contribute.
Tip: Tell the clients at the beginning that you won’t call on them to answer any
questions during the class. You could say you have a dollar in your pocket and you
owe it to the person you ask if you “forget.”
•
Standing close to the tables and watching as the hands are played.
Tip: Keep away from the tables during the time the hands are being played. Give the
students the privacy to experience the hand without interference. They’re unlikely
to call on the instructor to ask “Could you tell me what to bid with this hand?” unless
this practice is encouraged. The hands are discussed after the participants have a
chance to get acquainted with the hand on their own terms.
•
Going to from one table to another to clarify instructions.
-iv-
Tip: Give the instructions clearly. Call the direction before commenting on a
hand, even if this seems repetitive. Reminders are in the lesson plans in the boxed
instructions, e.g.: “Focus on the North hand.”
Give the suit before the cards. For example, “In Spades there are four cards, the
ace, king, and two low cards,” rather than “Put out the ace-king-three-two of
spades. The first method is easier on the class.
•
Being lead by the questions to give detailed answers on material that isn’t in the
course.
Tip: If a student asks about the negative double, for example, give a brief answer:
“The negative double is a takeout double by the responder and is the subject of
a separate course. I’d be glad to talk to you about it after the class.”
•
Starting the class late and finishing late.
Tip: Have the boards already on the table. At the time stated for the beginning of
the class give the introduction and have the students start to play the first hand.
Quietly, without judgment, seat latecomers while the hand is being played. Finish
on time, even when the class is being very well received. Avoid encores.
•
Having teachers’ pets.
Tip: Be aware of all of the individuals in the class rather than a small group which
seems to “get it and like us.” Try imagining the players in the class and their
names.
-v-
Hands 17 - 32
These are sixteen additional practice hands. They can be used by the teacher as a supervised
play course or as additional lesson hands.
Supervised Play
In a supervised play lesson, the students play approximately four hands per hour. They are
given 7 or 8 minutes to bid and play a hand. The teacher can then walk through the bidding
and play for about 7 or 8 minutes. The sixteen hands, therefore, provide four 1-hour sessions
or two 2-hour sessions.
Each set of four hands covers aspects from all four lessons. It is preferable, therefore, that
they be used after all four lessons have been presented. If you do want to run supervised play
before the lesson series is complete, select appropriate hands (check last column in the
summary below).
On each set of four hands, the dealer moves from North to East to South to West. In
competitive auctions, however, it is almost impossible to guarantee that each player will have
a turn as declarer in a set of four hands. The actual auction might proceed in a number of
ways. On some hands, the correct action may be to pass but, in practice, the students will bid.
Nonetheless, an attempt has been made to vary the declarer from hand to hand . . . without
making it too obvious whose “turn” it is to be declarer.
Some teachers set the contract before the play. There are advantages and disadvantages to
this approach. Try both ways and see which one you and your students prefer.
Additional Lesson Hands
If you have extra time at the end of the lesson, you can add one or more hands. Check the
last column in the summary to select a hand that matches (or enhances) the lesson material.
-vi-
Hand Summary
Use After
Hand
Hand
Dealer
Comments
17
N
A takeout double after both opponents have bid (double
of a 1NT response).
2
18
E
Using a responsive double to find the best partscore.
8
19
S
Doubler’s cuebid to show a strong hand.
10
20
W
Listening to the auction (to distinguish a penalty double
from a balancing double).
14
21
N
Opener’s use of the takeout double.
15
22
E
Illustrating that a takeout double isn’t used over an
opponent’s 1NT opening bid.
3
23
S
Advancer’s choice of suit (preferring a four-card major to
a five-card minor).
6
24
W
Doubler’s rebid after a responsive double.
12
25
N
Doubler’s rebid to show a hand too strong for a simple
(notrump) overcall.
11
26
E
Overcaller’s use of the takeout double.
16
27
S
An example of a penalty double (at the game level after
bypassing the opportunity for a takeout double).
4
28
W
Advancer’s cuebid response with an invitational hand.
7
29
N
Advancer’s competitive action with 6-8 points.
5
30
E
Doubler’s rebid with a minimum hand (pass).
9
31
S
Don’t balance with an unsuitable hand.
13
32
W
Standard takeout double (but the play is fairly complex).
1
-vii-
Conclusion
We wish you every success the class. Please contact us and share your opinions of the course.
We welcome your comments.
-viii-
Lesson 1 - The Takeout Double
Hand 1 - The Classic Takeout Double
WEST
HAND: 1
DEALER: NORTH
VUL:
NONE
NORTH
Í AK
Ì QJ974
Ë 863
Ê K76
WEST
Í Q J 10 8 5 3
Ì AK
Ë J 10 9
Ê 82
NORTH
EAST SOUTH
1Ì
Double 2Ì/3Ì
Pass
Pass
Pass
4Í
EAST
Í 9642
Ì 83
Ë AK2
Ê A J 10 5
SOUTH
Í 7
Ì 10 6 5 2
Ë Q754
Ê Q943
DECLARER:
West
OPENING LEAD: ÌQ by
North
Introduction
A closer look at the takeout double is a way to bring your game into the 21st
century. In today’s game it has become the most versatile call.
Bridge in the last century tended to focus on the penalty double. If partner
doubled an opponent’s call, you were usually expected to pass.
The modern game is much more competitive. Both sides are often in the auction.
The use of the double as a competitive tool has increased in popularity.
-1-
Play of the Hand
Bid and play the first hand. When you have finished, turn the cards face up,
dummy-style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? What is a reasonable auction?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the North hand.
Q. North is the dealer. What would North bid?
A. 1Ì – A popular choice.
•
13 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
Five-card major suit.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. After North opens the bidding 1Ì, what call does East make?
A. Double – A classic hand for a takeout double.
•
Enough strength to want to compete for the auction.
•
Approximately an opening bid.
•
Support for any suit partner chooses to bid.
This is an intermediate course and it’s assumed the students are familiar with the basic concept of the
takeout double.
-2-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. North has opened 1Ì and East doubles. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì/3Ì – A matter of style.
•
•
•
Responder values the hand using dummy points in place of length points:
•
5 points for a void;
•
3 points for a singleton;
•
1 point for a doubleton.
2Ì:
•
Four-card support for partner’s suit.
•
4 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton – a total of 7 points.
3Ì:
•
The modern style.
•
Designed to make it more difficult for the opponents to find their best contract.
•
Reasonably safe because the partnership has at least a nine-card trump fit . . .
making it unlikely that the opponents will double for penalty.
Q. If South were to jump to 3Ì instead of raising to 2Ì, how would North know that this
is a weak bid and not a limit (invitational) raise?
A. South could redouble1 with 10 or more points (or use a conventional 2NT raise2).
•
The important point is that the availability of the redouble after opener’s bid has
been doubled changes the meaning of responder’s bids. The standard agreement is
that a jump raise of opener’s suit is now weak (preemptive) rather than a limit raise.
1
After a takeout double, responder can redouble with 10 or more points. The redouble essentially says,
“This is our hand.” The corollary is that, if responder doesn’t redouble, responder has fewer than 10 points.
So, a jump raise by responder shows fewer than 10 points since responder didn’t start with a redouble. Similarly,
a new suit at the two level by responder, such as 2Ë, would also deny 10 points and could be passed. In theory,
a new suit by responder at the one level after a takeout double also denies 10 or more points. Most partnerships,
however, play the response in a new suit at the one level as forcing to make it easier for responder to look for
a fit.
2
Some partnerships use a jump to 2NT over the takeout double to show four-card or longer support for
partner’s suit and 10 or more points . . . a limit raise or better. This convention is called Truscott or Dormer
or Jordan. The partnership must agree to play this convention since it is not the standard agreement.
-3-
Focus on the West hand.
Q. North opens 1Ì, East doubles, and South jumps to 3Ì. What call does West make?
A. 4Í – Answer to How High and Where.
•
•
•
How High:
•
West has 11 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit . . . a total
of 13 points.
•
East is promising at least the values for an opening bid with the takeout double.
•
West ‘knows’ the partnership has enough combined strength for game.
Where:
•
East promised support for the unbid suits.
•
The partnership must have a nine or ten-card fit in spades.
Conclusion:
•
West bids 4Í whether South passed, raised to 2Ì, or jumped to 3Ì.
If some of the students want to bid 2Í or 3Í . . . expecting partner to bid again . . . explain that these
bids are only invitational and that East can pass with a minimum takeout double. Don’t go into a lot
of detail since advancing a takeout double will be discussed later. Instead, suggest that they simply follow
the maxim, “The partner who knows . . . goes.”
Q. After West jumps to 4Í, how does the auction continue?
A. Pass, Pass, Pass.
•
North has nothing extra for the opening bid.
•
East has nothing extra for the takeout double.
•
South has already shown the support for hearts.
-4-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose West is declarer in a contract of 4Í. Who makes the opening lead?
A. North.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What would North lead?
A.
ÌQ – top of the broken sequence in the suit bid and raised by the partnership.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. North leads the ÌQ and dummy comes down. A low heart is played from East. Which
card should South play?
A. Ì2 – A discouraging signal.
•
The ÌQ denies both the ÌK and ÌA . . . North would not lead away from the ÌA
against a suit contract.
•
The priority in this situation is attitude. South would like North to switch to another
suit after regaining the lead . . . preferably diamonds.
Leave North’s ÌQ face up. Turn the remaining North and South cards face down.
Focus on the East-West hands. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer
would plan to play the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. West is declarer in 4Í. How many losers does West have?
A. Four – Two spade losers, a diamond loser, and a club loser.
Q. What are West’s options for eliminating one of the losers?
A. Diamond finesse; repeated club finesse.
•
West could plan to take the diamond finesse, hoping to trap the ËQ.
•
West’s other option is to try to develop an extra trick in the club suit on which to
discard the diamond loser.
-5-
Q. What are the odds of the diamond finesse working?
A. 50-50 (50%).
•
If North holds the ËQ, West can lead the ËJ and trap the ËQ. It doesn’t matter if
North covers with the ËQ, since declarer holds the Ë10. If South holds the ËQ, the
finesse will lose.
•
North is slightly more likely to hold the ËQ because North opened the bidding but
the odds are essentially 50-50.
Q. What are the odds of developing an extra trick in the club suit?
A. 3-1 (75%).
Ê10 and then lead low to
•
Repeat the club finesse . . . first lead low to dummy’s
dummy’s ÊJ.
•
Declarer has a 75% chance of developing an extra trick in the club suit. That is better
than the 50% chance of the diamond finesse.
•
Let’s see why the club suit offers a 75% chance.
This is likely a new concept for most students and is the focus of discussion for the remainder of this
hand.
Turn all the East-West cards face down except for the club suit. Turn only the
club suit face up in the North-South hands.
NORTH
ÊK76
WEST
Ê82
EAST
Ê A J 10 5
SOUTH
ÊQ943
Q. This is the actual layout of the club suit. Can declarer get two tricks from the club suit?
A. Yes.
•
Declarer starts by leading a low club from dummy toward the ÊA-J-10-5.
•
If North plays second hand low, declarer tries to win a trick with the Ê10 but South
wins with the ÊQ. West’s first finesse loses.
•
After regaining the lead, however, declarer can repeat the finesse by leading another
club from the West hand toward dummy.
-6-
ÊJ. Since North holds the ÊK, declarer’s
•
If North plays low, declarer finesses the
second finesse is successful.
•
Declarer can now play dummy’s ÊA and discard the diamond loser.
•
What would happen if the ÊK and ÊQ were changed. There are three other possible
layouts. Let’s look at them one at a time.
Give North’s ÊK to South and South’s ÊQ to North.
NORTH
ÊQ76
EAST
WEST
Ê82
Ê A J 10 5
SOUTH
ÊK943
Q. If we exchange the ÊK and ÊQ, can we still develop a second trick in the suit?
A. Yes.
•
It works exactly the same way.
•
Lead a club from the West hand and the first finesse loses to South’s ÊK.
•
When declarer regains the lead, another club is played from the West hand. Whether
East plays the ÊQ or low, declarer gets a second trick in the suit.
•
In both cases a second club trick is developed with the help of the repeated finesse.
Give South’s ÊK to North.
NORTH
ÊKQ76
WEST
Ê82
EAST
Ê A J 10 5
SOUTH
Ê943
Q. What happens if North holds both the ÊK and ÊQ?
A. Declarer gets two tricks.
-7-
•
Lead a club from the West hand. If North plays a low club, play dummy’s Ê10 and
this wins the trick. Declarer then has the ÊA as a second trick and doesn’t lose any
club tricks.
•
If North ‘splits the honors’ by playing the ÊQ or ÊK when a low club is led from the
West hand, win with dummy’s ÊA. Now lead the ÊJ from dummy to drive out
North’s remaining high club. Dummy’s Ê10 is established as a winner on which to
discard the diamond loser.
•
But there’s one more case.
Give North’s ÊK and ÊQ to South.
NORTH
Ê76
EAST
WEST
Ê82
Ê A J 10 5
SOUTH
ÊKQ943
Q. What happens if South holds both the ÊK and ÊQ?
A. Declarer can’t get a second club trick.
•
When West leads a low club to dummy’s Ê10, the first finesse loses to South’s ÊQ.
•
When West regains the lead and leads another low club to dummy’s ÊJ, the second
finesse loses to South’s ÊK.
•
The only trick declarer gets is the ÊA.
Q. In three of the four cases, an extra winner can be developed in the club suit. What are
the odds for developing a second trick from the club suit?
A. 3 out of 4 . . . 75%.
Q. Declarer wants to get rid of a diamond loser. Should declarer try the diamond finesse
or establish a second club winner on which to discard the diamond loser?
A. The repeated club finesse.
•
Let’s see how to put this knowledge to work on the complete hand.
-8-
Give South’s ÊK to North and turn all four hands face up. Put the ÌQ in front of
North as the opening lead. Play the Ì3 from dummy. South plays the Ì2 as a
discouraging signal and declarer wins the first trick with the ÌK (or ÌA).
Trick 1:
North: ÌQ
East: Ì3
South: Ì2
West: ÌK
Turn the first trick face down. Focus on the West hand as declarer.
Q. As declarer with the West hand, should you start drawing trumps after winning the first
trick with the ÌK?
A. No.
•
Let’s see what might happen if you do start to draw trumps.
Trick 2:
West: ÍQ
North: ÍK
East: Í2
South: Í7
Q. After winning the ÍK, what should North do?
A. Lead a diamond.
•
On the first trick, South made a discouraging signal with the Ì2 so there is not much
future in hearts and the club suit does not look inviting.
•
North might switch to a diamond, hoping to establish a trick for the defense in that
suit. Let’s assume North switches to the Ë8 . . . top of nothing.
•
Declarer can win this trick with dummy’s ËK. Holding the ËQ, South should make
an encouraging signal with the Ë7. Declarer plays the Ë9.
Trick 3:
North: Ë8
East: ËK
South: Ë7
West: Ë9
Q. Is declarer in the right hand to start leading clubs?
A. No.
•
Declarer wants to lead clubs starting from the West hand.
•
Assume declarer continues to draw the remaining trump by leading the Í4 from
dummy. South discards the Ì5, declarer plays the Í10, and North wins the ÍA.
-9-
Trick 4:
East: Í4
South: Ì5
West: Í10
North: ÍA
Q. If North now leads a second diamond, can declarer make the hand?
A. No.
•
It’s now too late for declarer to establish a second trick in clubs. If declarer wins the
ËA and crosses to the West hand with the ÌA to take a club finesse, the first finesse
loses and South takes the setting trick with the established ËQ.
•
Declarer’s only alternative is to try the diamond finesse, which loses.
•
So, leading trumps won’t work3. Let’s return to the first trick.
Turn all the cards face up. Put the ÌQ in front of North as the opening lead.
Trick 1:
North: ÌQ
East: Ì3
South: Ì2
West: ÌK
Q. After winning the first trick with the ÌK, what should declarer do?
A. Lead a club.
•
Since declarer needs to lead clubs twice from the West hand to establish an extra trick
in the suit, declarer should make good use of the entries. Now is a good time to go
to work on the club suit.
Trick 2:
West: Ê2
North: Ê6
East: Ê10
South: ÊQ
Q. After winning the ÊQ, what does South do?
A. Lead a heart or a spade.
•
South can’t effectively lead a diamond away from the ËQ. That would make declarer’s
task easy.
•
Leading a club into dummy’s ÊA-J-10-5 is also unattractive.
Declarer can still make the contract after leading one round of trumps. North wins the ÍK and switches
to a diamond. Declarer wins and crosses to the West hand with the ÌA to take a club finesse. The club finesse
loses to South’s ÊQ, but South has nothing safe to return. The point is that declarer can’t afford to lead trumps
twice before starting to establish the extra club winner.
3
-10-
•
South could return a heart but South knows from the opening lead that declarer
holds both the ÌA and ÌK.
•
Let’s assume that South leads a spade which North wins with the ÍK.
Trick 3:
South: Í7
West: Í3
North: ÍK
East: Í2
Q. After winning the ÍK, what does North do?
A. Lead a diamond.
•
Having seen the discouraging heart signal from South, North might now switch to the
Ë8, top of nothing.
Trick 4:
North: Ë8
East: ËK
South: Ë7
West: Ë9
Q. After winning the ËK, what does declarer do?
A. Lead the Ì8 to the ÌA to repeat the club finesse.
•
Declarer can now get to the ÌA and lead another club.
Trick 5:
•
West: ÌA
South: Ì4
West: Ê8
North: Ê7
East: ÊJ
South: Ê3
Now declarer can play the ÊA and discard the diamond loser.
Trick 7:
•
South: Ì5
Declarer is now in the right hand to repeat the club finesse by leading a low club and
finessing dummy’s ÊJ.
Trick 6:
•
East: Ì8
East: ÊA
South: Ê4
West: Ë10
Declarer loses only two spade tricks and a club trick.
-11-
South: ÊK
Observation
•
East’s takeout double gets the East-West partnership to the excellent 4Í contract,
which could be made even though the ËQ is offside.
•
Let’s take a closer look at the takeout double.
A Closer Look at the Classic Takeout Double
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. One player takes all the spades,
another the hearts, another the diamonds, and the fourth player the clubs.
Construct the following hand in front of the East player.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: A takeout double shows values for an opening bid or more and support for the
unbid suits.
Spades: Four low spades.
Hearts:
Two low hearts.
Diamonds: The ËA, ËK, and a low diamond.
Clubs:
The ÊA, ÊJ, and two low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
EAST
5432
32
AK2
AJ32
W N E
?
S
Q. If you were the dealer, would you open the bidding with this hand?
A. Yes/No – A matter of judgment.
•
This is a borderline opening bid with 12 high-card points.
•
A popular way of determining whether to open the bidding with a borderline hand
in first or second position is to use the Rule of 20 . . . add the high- card points to the
number of cards in the two longest suits. If the total is 20 or more, open the bidding;
otherwise, pass.
•
Using this guideline, East should open 1Ê (12 + 4 + 4 = 20).
Q. Before East can open, however, North opens 1Ì. Can East overcall
with this hand?
A. No – Not the right hand.
•
No five-card or longer suit.
-12-
W N E
1Ì ?
S
Q. What call can East make?
A. Double – A good choice to compete.
•
A double of an opponent’s opening bid in a suit shows:
Requirements for a Takeout Double
•
•
Values for an opening bid or more.
Support for the unbid suits.
Q. Does East have the values for an opening bid?
A. Yes/No – Count dummy points.
•
With 12 high-card points, East has a borderline opening bid.
•
Value the hand for a takeout double using dummy points4:
Dummy Points for a Takeout Double
Void
Singleton
Doubleton
•
5 points
3 points
1 point
The reason behind using “dummy points”:
•
The double is asking partner to choose the trump suit, so the hand is likely to go
down on the table as the dummy.
•
The shortness in the opponent’s suit will, hopefully, allow partner to ruff some
losers in that suit in the dummy.
Some partnerships prefer a less aggressive scale (e.g. 2 points for a void, 1 point for a
singleton, 0 points for a void), but the general idea is to increase the value of the hand with
shortness in the opponent’s suit.
4
-13-
Q. Does East have support for the unbid suits?
A. Yes – Although it may not seem ideal.
•
The takeout doubler would ideally have four-card support for each of the unbid suits:
4-4-4-1 shape with the singleton in the opponent’s suit.
•
In practice, three-card support for an unbid suit is acceptable.
•
Prefer to have four-card support for an unbid major suit since partner is more likely
to choose a major suit than a minor suit.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Value the hand using dummy points.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Clubs:
EAST
5432
3
AK32
AJ32
W N E
1Ì ?
S
Q. North opens the bidding 1Ì. What is this value of this hand for making a takeout double?
A. 15 points – Value using dummy points.
•
There are still 12 high-card points. Add 3 dummy points for the singleton.
Hand 3:
Teacher’s Key Point: With a choice between an overcall and a takeout double, the double is more
flexible.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Clubs:
EAST
5432
—
AK432
AJ32
W N E
1Ì ?
Q. North opens 1Ì. What is this value of this hand for making a takeout double?
A. 17 points – 12 high-card points plus 5 dummy points for the void.
-14-
S
Q. With this hand, do you have a choice other than a takeout double?
A. Yes – There is the option of making an overcall of 2Ë.
Q. Which is the better choice with this hand, an overcall or a takeout double?
A. Takeout double – It is the game’s most flexible call.
•
An overcall suggests one suit.
•
A takeout double brings partner into the decision about the trump suit.
•
A 2Ë overcall on this hand could easily miss an eight-card spade fit.
Hand 4:
Teacher’s Key Point: Take vulnerability into account with a borderline decision on whether to make
a takeout double.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away the ËA.
Clubs:
Add a low club.
EAST
5432
—
K432
AJ432
W N E
1Ì ?
S
Q. North opens 1Ì. What call do you make with this hand?
A. Double/Pass/2Ê – 8 high-card points and 5 dummy points for the void makes a
borderline takeout double.
•
If partner would not be happy with this hand as dummy, pass instead of doubling.
•
Take the vulnerability into account. A takeout double with this hand would be more
dangerous if your side is vulnerable. If your side is non vulnerable, the risk is less,
especially if the opponents are vulnerable.
•
There is the option of overcalling 2Ê with this hand but the double is more flexible
and partner might expect more strength for a two-level overcall. For an overcall you
only have 8 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit. On the other
side of the coin, if you end up defending, you might prefer partner to lead a club
rather than a spade.
-15-
Hand 5:
Teacher’s Key Point: Pass if your hand is unsuitable for either an overcall or a takeout double, even
with an opening bid.
Spades: Take away a low spade; add the ÍA. Í
Ì
Hearts:
Add the ÌJ.
Ë
Diamonds:
Ê
Clubs:
Take away a low club.
EAST
A543
J
K432
AJ43
W N E
1Í ?
S
Q. Suppose North opens 1Í. What call does East make?
A. Pass – Even with 13 high-card points.
•
The hand has the strength for an opening bid but:
•
Without support for hearts, the hand doesn’t have the shape for a takeout double.
•
With only four-card suits, the hand is not ideal for an overcall of 2Ê or 2Ë either.
•
The best option is to pass for now. The auction isn’t over. Partner still has a
chance to bid and you may get another chance later.
Hand 6:
Teacher’s Key Point: You don’t need the ideal shape to make a takeout double but will have to use
your judgment.
Spades:
Hearts:
Add two low hearts.
Diamonds: Take away two low diamonds.
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
EAST
A543
J32
K4
AJ43
W N E
1Ë ?
S
Q. North opens 1Ë. What call does East make?
A. Double/Pass – A delicate decision.
•
The support for hearts is not ideal but most players would make a takeout double.
The hand is worth 13 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton.
•
It’s a matter of judgment and partnership style. If your partner would be disappointed
with this dummy in a heart contract, pass rather than double.
-16-
Q. Suppose North opens 1Ì. What call does East make?
A. Pass (Double) – Risky to come into the auction.
W N E
1Ì ?
S
•
With a doubleton diamond, most players would pass with this
hand. Three-card support for an unbid minor is acceptable but two-card support is
not good. The length in the opponent’s suit is also a danger sign.
•
However, some players might risk a takeout double with this hand. If partner chooses
spades or clubs, everything will be well. If partner chooses diamonds, West would have
to hope partner has five or six of them.
Hand 7:
Teacher’s Key Point: A double of an opening notrump bid is not for takeout using standard methods.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Clubs:
Take away a low club.
EAST
A543
J32
K42
AJ4
W N E
1NT ?
S
Q. North opens 1NT. What call does East make?
A. Pass – You can’t have support for four suits.
•
When an opponent opens 1NT, you can’t have an ideal hand for a takeout double.
At best, there would be three-card support for three of the unbid suits. The
partnership would be quite likely to land in a 4-3 fit.
•
The standard agreement is that a double of an opening notrump bid is for penalty,
not for takeout. It shows a hand of equal or greater strength to that of the notrump
bidder.
•
It is also dangerous to compete with a balanced hand when the opponent on your
right has announced a strong hand of 15-17 points. The opponent on your left is well
placed to double for penalties if the partnership can’t find a good fit.
•
A successful penalty double of an opening 1NT bid is rare, so many partnerships
prefer to assign the double a conventional meaning. However, that is a topic for
another time.
-17-
Conclusion
•
A double of an opponent’s opening bid in a suit is for takeout and shows:
•
•
•
support for the unbid suits
•
at least three-card support (except with a very strong hand)
•
preferably four-card support for an unbid major
13 or more points counting dummy points:
•
void
5 points
•
singleton
3 points
•
doubleton
1 point
A double of an opponent’s opening notrump bid is for penalty, not for takeout,
unless the partnership has some other conventional agreement.
-18-
Hand 2 - Takeout Doubles After Left-Hand Opponent Opens
HAND: 2
DEALER: EAST
N-S
VUL:
NORTH
542
AKJ4
4
A9853
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
K 10 9 7
10 8 3
J 10 7
Q72
WEST
NORTH
1Í
Pass
Pass
Double
4Ì (Pass)
EAST
1Ë
2Í
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
3Ì
Pass
EAST
QJ63
75
AQ962
K4
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
A8
Q962
K853
J 10 6
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
South
OPENING LEAD: ËJ by West
Introduction
The takeout double is the game’s most versatile call. With today’s competitive
bidding, it can be the tool that gets your side to the best contract.
There are two requirements:
• Shape — Support (length) in the unbid suits and shortness in the suit(s)
bid by the opponents.
• Strength — The values for an opening bid or better, counting dummy
points.
Let’s look at the type of hand that frequently comes up. Both sides are bidding for
the privilege of naming the trump suit.
-19-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 2. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and talk about the hand. What do you think is the best contract?
How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the East hand.
Q. East is the dealer. What call would East make?
A. 1Ë – 12 high-card points and 1 length point for the five-card diamond suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. After East opens 1Ë, what call does South make?
A. Pass – South’s hand is unsuitable for an overcall or takeout double.
•
South doesn’t have a good five-card suit to overcall.
•
With only 10 high-card points and no support for spades, South doesn’t have the
right type of hand for a takeout double.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s response to East’s opening bid of 1Ë?
A. 1Í – With 6 high-card points, West shows the four-card major.
Focus on the North hand. Discuss with the others at your table North’s choices
when the auction comes around.
Give the students about one minute to discuss North’s options.
-20-
Q. What are North’s options after hearing East open 1Ë, South pass,
and West respond 1Í?
A. Pass/2Ê/(2Ì)/Double – North has several options.
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í ?
•
North has enough to open the bidding . . . 12 high-card points
plus 1 for the five-card club suit. North doesn’t have to bid but would like to compete
for the contract.
•
An overcall of 2Ê would show the five-card club suit but would over-emphasize the
quality of the suit and might miss a fit in hearts.
•
The heart suit is better quality than the club suit but a two-level overcall would
promise at least a five-card suit.
•
The best choice is a takeout double. It shows both hearts and clubs. Partner chooses
the trump suit.
Q. Does North have enough strength for a takeout double?
A. Yes – A takeout double shows at least enough to open the bidding.
•
North has 12 high-card points and can count 3 dummy points for the singleton
diamond. That’s more than enough to compete.
Q. Does North have support for the unbid suits?
A. Yes – There are only two unbid suits, hearts and clubs.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. After North doubles West’s 1Í response does East have to bid?
A. No – East could pass.
•
If North had passed, East would have make a rebid. West’s 1Í response is forcing.
•
West will get another chance to bid with a strong hand.
•
. . . but passing may not be a good decision.
Q. Should East bid or pass?
A. East should bid 2Í – showing support for responder’s major.
•
East should make the normal rebid of raising to the two level. This shows the support
and a minimum-strength opening.
•
North’s double is for takeout. Raising to 2Í may make it more difficult for NorthSouth to compete. It will also help West decide how high to compete if North-South
do bid.
•
East should pass with a minimum opening bid and no support for responder’s suit.
-21-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. After East raises to 2Í, does South have to bid?
A. No – South doesn’t have to bid if East bids.
•
North will have a chance to bid again with a strong hand.
Q. Should South pass or bid?
A. Bid – South has enough to compete to 3Ì.
•
North has promised 13 or more points and South holds 10 high-card points. The
partnership has enough combined strength to compete for the contract.
•
South can expect the partnership to have an eight-card fit in hearts, one of the suits
promised by North.
•
Passing would let the opponents buy the contract at the two level in their best trump
fit. Competing to 3Ì has at least two things going for it: North-South may be able to
make a partscore, or even a game, in hearts; the 3Ì bid might push East-West beyond
their comfort level into a contract that can be defeated.
•
Besides, North has shown a desire to compete for the contract. It would be timid of
South not to cooperate whenever possible.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South bids 3Ì, what call does West make?
A. Pass – West has nothing extra to show, having already responded 1Í.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What are North’s choices after hearing South’s 3Ì call?
A. Pass/4Ì – A close decision.
•
North has already got the partnership into the auction and doesn’t need to bid again
once South has picked the trump suit.
•
However, North does have more than a minimum takeout double, 15 points . . . 12
high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton. Also, South has shown
willingness to compete to the three-level opposite what could be a minimum takeout
double. So, South likely has about 9-11 points. With excellent hearts, North may
choose to go for game and raise to 4Ì. It’s a close decision.
•
If North does choose to bid 4Ì, that should end the auction. None of the other
players has anything more to say.
Review of the Play and Defense
-22-
Q. Suppose South is declarer in a contract of 4Ì. Who makes the opening lead?
A. West.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What would West lead?
A.
ËJ or Í10 – West has a choice of suits to lead.
ËJ, top of the
•
West has no clear-cut opening lead and will probably start with the
touching high cards in partner’s original suit.
•
Since the partnership has bid and raised spades, West might also choose the Í10, top
of the interior sequence in that suit.
Suppose West leads the ËJ. Put that card face up in front of West. Turn the
remaining East-West cards face down. Focus on the North-South hands.
Q. Look at the hand from declarer’s (South’s) point of view. How many losers does South
have?
A. Seven – Assuming the trump suit behaves, South has a spade loser, four diamond losers,
and two club losers.
Q. The opening lead will establish South’s ËK as a winner after East takes the
could South plan to do with the remaining two diamond losers?
A. Trump them in dummy; discard them on extra club winners.
ËA. What
•
Since North has a singleton diamond, declarer could plan to ruff two diamond losers
in dummy.
•
The alternative is to try to establish extra club winners in dummy and discard the
diamond losers on them.
Q. What could South do about the two club losers?
A. Try a repeated club finesse – A 75% chance.
•
The club layout is similar to that of Hand 1. Declarer is missing the ÊK and ÊQ but
has all the other high clubs.
•
Declarer could plan to take repeated club finesses, hoping West holds the ÊK or the
ÊQ or both the ÊK and ÊQ. The repeated club finesse will only fail if East holds
both the ÊK and ÊQ.
-23-
Q. Which plan is better? Should declarer try to ruff two diamond losers in dummy or go
after the club suit?
A. Club suit – Ruffing diamonds will lead to complications.
•
Ruffing two diamond losers in dummy is unlikely to work. Declarer will have to ruff
at least one of them with one of dummy’s heart honors, potentially creating a heart
loser. Declarer will also have difficult getting back to the South hand to ruff the
second diamond loser since there aren’t many entries to the South hand. In addition,
declarer will still have to do something about one of the club losers. Otherwise
declarer will lose a spade trick, a diamond trick, and two club tricks.
•
Planning to take the repeated club finesse has two advantages. First, there is a 75%
chance that the repeated finesse will reduce the club losers to one. Second, declarer
should be able to establish dummy’s remaining two clubs as winners on which to
discard the diamond losers.
The students may have difficulty visualizing why it is not a good idea to try to ruff the diamond losers
in dummy. It’s probably best to walk through both lines of play.
Let’s see the type of complications that might arise if declarer plans to ruff the
diamond losers in dummy. Turn all four hands face up. Put the ËJ in front of West
as the opening lead. Play a low diamond dummy, and have East win the first trick
with the ËA.
Trick 1:
West: ËJ
North: Ë4
East: ËA
South: Ë3
Q. After winning the first trick with the ËA, what is East likely to do?
A. Lead the ÍQ – Hoping to trap the ÍK in declarer’s hand.
•
Declarer, however, has the
signal with the Í10.
Trick 2:
•
East: ÍQ
ÍA and wins the trick. West will make an encouraging
South: ÍA
West: Í10
North: Í2
Now suppose declarer goes about ruffing a diamond in dummy.
Trick 3:
South: Ë5
West: Ë7
-24-
North: Ì4
East: Ë2
Q. How can declarer immediately get back to the South hand?
A. Lead to the ÌQ – The only immediate entry.
•
Declarer will have to lead dummy’s ÌJ and overtake with the ÌQ.
•
Otherwise, declarer will have to give up a trick in the spade suit5 or lead clubs. Let’s
assume declarer uses the heart suit as an entry.
Trick 4:
•
North: ÌJ
East: Ì5
South: ÌQ
West: Ì3
Declarer can now ruff a second diamond loser in dummy.
Trick 5:
South: Ë8
West: Ë10
North: ÌK
East: Ë6
Q. What difficulty is declarer running into with this line of play?
A. Declarer has created a heart loser.
•
By using dummy’s heart honors for entries and to ruff losers, declarer’s trump
holding is weakened. West will eventually get a trick with the Ì10.
•
Also, declarer still has the club suit to worry about.
Let’s go back and see how much easier it is to utilize the club suit. Turn all four
hands face up again. Put the ËJ in front of West as the opening lead. Play a low
diamond from North, and have East win the first trick with the ËA.
Trick 1:
•
North: Ë4
East: ËA
South: Ë3
East can again switch to the ÍQ.
Trick 2:
•
West: ËJ
East: ÍQ
South: ÍA
West: Í10
North: Í2
Since declarer is in the South hand, now is a good time to start playing the club suit.
Suppose declarer leads the ÊJ and West plays low. Declarer takes the first finesse,
5
There is nothing wrong with giving up a spade, but you don’t want to get into too many complications.
-25-
losing to East’s ÊK.
Trick 3:
South: ÊJ
West: Ê2
North: Ê3
East: ÊK
Q. What is East likely to do after winning the ÊK?
A. Lead a spade.
•
•
•
Since West has encouraged with the Í10, the defenders will likely take their
established spade trick and lead another round of the suit, which South can ruff.
Trick 4:
East: ÍJ
South: Í8
West: Í7
North: Í4
Trick 5:
East: Í6
South: Ì2
West: Í9
North: Í5
Declarer can now draw the defender’s trumps, ending in the South hand.
Trick 6:
South: Ì6
West: Ì3
North: ÌJ
East: Ì5
Trick 7:
North: ÌK
East: Ì7
South: Ì9
West: Ì8
Trick 8:
North: Ì4
East: Ë2
South: ÌQ
West: Ì10
With the trumps drawn, declarer can now repeat the club finesse.
Trick 9:
•
South: Ê10
East: Ê7
North: Ê5
West: Ê4
Once the second club finesse works, declarer has the remaining tricks. Declarer can
play another round of clubs to capture West’s ÊQ and then discard the two diamond
losers on North’s established club winners. South doesn’t even need the ËK!
-26-
Observation
•
There are two ways to get rid of the diamond losers:
•
Trump them in dummy or
•
Throw them on dummy’s winners.
•
Throwing them on dummy’s club winners is a better plan.
•
Let’s take a further look at the takeout double.
Takeout Doubles After Left-Hand Opponent Opens
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each person at the table take charge
of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of the North player.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: When the opponents have bid two suits, a takeout double can be used to show
the other two suits.
Spades: Three low spades.
Hearts:
ÌA, ÌK, ÌJ and a low heart.
Diamonds: A low diamond.
Clubs:
ÊA and four low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
432
AKJ2
2
A5432
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í ?
Q. If East opens 1Ë, South passes, and West responds 1Í. What call would North make with
this hand?
A. Double – For takeout.
•
A takeout double is made when the opening bid is on the right. It can also be used
after the bidding has been opened on the left.
•
If the opponents have bid two suits, a takeout double shows support for the two unbid
suits. In this case, hearts and clubs.
•
The takeout double is more flexible than an overcall. Both suits can be shown at
once. A 2Ê overcall might miss a fit in hearts.
-27-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: On some hands judgment is necessary to decide whether to overcall or double.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Take away a low spade.
Hearts:
Add a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
NORTH
43
AKJ32
2
A5432
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South passes, and West responds 1Í. What call does North make?
A. Double/2Ì – No clear choice.
•
Some hands have no clear-cut answer. There are two tools to compete: the overcall
and the takeout double. Use your judgment to decide which is likely to be successful.
•
The advantage of the takeout double is that it shows both suits, hearts and clubs.
South might pass an overcall of 2Ì with a singleton or void and a good fit in clubs
could be missed.
•
The advantage of overcalling is that the partnership will find an eight-card major suit
fit if partner has only three hearts. Even if South has only a doubleton heart, 2Ì
should be a reasonable spot. Also, if the opponents buy the contract, North would
prefer a heart lead to a club lead.
•
The disadvantage of doubling is that South is going to assume only four-card support
for the unbid suits. With four clubs and three hearts, for example, South is going to
prefer clubs and the partnership will miss an eight-card heart fit.
•
So, it is “six of one and half a dozen of the other.” Some players would overcall, some
would make a takeout double.
Some players might raise the possibility of using the unusual 2NT as takeout for hearts and clubs. That’s
a possibility. However, it has the disadvantage of committing the partnership to at least the three level.
Also, the unusual notrump is typically reserved for a weak hand (or a very strong hand) with length in
the two lower-ranking unbid suits. The West hand has too much defensive strength.
-28-
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: With a five-card major and a four-card minor, overcalling the major suit is
usually preferable to making a takeout double.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Clubs:
Take away a low club.
NORTH
43
AKJ32
32
A543
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South passes, and West responds 1Í. What call does North make?
A. 2Ì – Preferable to a takeout double.
•
With support for both unbid suits, a takeout double is a possible choice.
•
However, with a distinct preference for the major suit, most players would prefer to
emphasize the hearts with an overcall of 2Ì.
•
With a five-card major and a four-card minor, it’s better to overcall than double
unless the major suit is weak, ÌJ-x-x-x-x, for example.
•
Again, it is a matter of judgment.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: The number of suits shown by a takeout double is either two or three, depending
on how the auction has started.
Spades: Take away a low spade.
Hearts:
Take away a low heart.
Diamonds: Add the ËA and a low diamond.
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
4
AKJ3
A432
A543
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South passes, and West responds 1Í. What call does North make?
A. Double – A takeout double for hearts and clubs.
•
With four-card support for both unbid suits, a double is definitely preferable to an
overcall. It is showing a willingness to compete at the two level in hearts or clubs.
-29-
Q. Suppose East opens 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 2Í. What
call does North make?
A. Double – Takeout for the unbid suits.
W N E S
1Í P
2Í ?
•
Now there are three unbid suits, hearts, diamonds, and clubs.
•
By doubling, the partnership is committed to the three level. With 16 high-card
points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton spade, the hand is strong enough.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 3Í. What
call does North make?
A. Double – Double would still be for takeout.
•
W N E S
1Í P
3Í ?
We’ll discuss the level through which double is for takeout a little
later, but the point is that it’s a takeout double after responder makes a single raise
or a jump raise . . . provided North is willing to compete to the appropriate level.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Í, partner passes, and West responds 1NT.
W N E S
What call does North make?
1Í P
A. Double – The double of a 1NT response is not the same as the 1NT ?
double of a 1NT opening.
•
Responder is showing 6 or more points, so the double is for takeout of the only suit
bid by the opponents, spades.
This is an important point. Make sure the students understand the difference between a double of an
opening 1NT bid and the double of a 1NT response.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Í, partner passes, and West responds 2NT.
W N E S
What call does North make?
1Í P
A. Double/Pass – Depends on the meaning of 2NT.
2NT ?
• A double would be for takeout, showing the unbid suits, hearts,
diamonds, and clubs.
•
Whether doubling is a good idea depends on the meaning of 2NT. Before deciding
whether to double, North should be aware of, or ask, what 2NT shows.
•
If 2NT is natural and forcing, showing a balanced hand of about 13-15 points, it
would be risky to come into the auction. The opponents have the balance of power
and may not have a spade fit. It would be quite possible to get doubled and suffer a
large penalty when South bids at the three level.
•
If 2NT is artificial, showing support for spades, for example (Jacoby 2NT), then a
takeout double makes more sense. If the opponents have a fit in spades, it is more
likely that North-South has a fit somewhere. Also, if it is their hand, they will probably
bid to game in spades rather than take the time to double your side in a partscore.
-30-
Q. Suppose East opens 1Í, partner passes, and West responds 2Ê.
What call does North make?
A. Double/Pass – A judgment call.
W N E S
1Í P
2Ê ?
•
North could make a takeout double for the two unbid suits,
hearts and diamonds.
•
It is a little riskier, since the opponents have not yet found a fit. Nonetheless, most
players would prefer to compete.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ì, partner passes, and West raises to 2Ì. What
call does North make?
A. Pass – No support for spades.
W N E S
1Ì P
2Ì ?
•
A double would show support for all three unbid suits, spades,
diamonds, and clubs.
•
Although there is enough strength to open the bidding, the hand is unsuitable for
either a takeout double or an overcall. Pass for now. The auction isn’t over and
partner still has an opportunity to get into the auction.
You might want to skip this next point with an inexperienced group.
Q. Suppose East opens 1NT, partner passes, and West responds 2Í,
natural, planning to sign off in spades. What call do you make?
A. Double – A takeout double.
•
W N E S
1NT P
2Í ?
Since 2Í shows spades, a double would be takeout of spades, the
only suit bid naturally by the opponents.
Conclusion
•
A takeout double can be used after the bidding has been opened on your left.
•
The double shows support for the unbid suits. There may three unbid suits or only two
unbid suits.
•
The takeout double is a way to get into the auction. You will still have to exercise your
judgment on whether to double, overcall, or pass in any competitive auction.
-31-
-32-
Hand 3 - Takeout or Penalty?
HAND: 3
DEALER: SOUTH
E-W
VUL:
NORTH
QJ9
10 9 7 6
2
AKQ85
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
AK62
AKJ4
94
J74
WEST
NORTH
EAST
Double
Pass
Pass
Pass
3Í
SOUTH
3Ë
Pass
EAST
8743
Q52
A75
10 3 2
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
10 5
83
K Q J 10 8 6 3
96
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
East
OPENING LEAD: ËK by South
Introduction
The takeout double is one of the tools available to the partnership when the
opponents open the bidding.
Like any conventional agreement, the partnership has to agree on when it applies.
The most important distinction is between the takeout double and the penalty
double. A simple guideline is to treat all doubles for takeout except those that the
partnership specifically agrees are for penalties.
In the following hand, both sides are in the auction.
-33-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 3. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the South hand.
Q. South is the dealer. What would South call?
A. 3Ë – A three-level preemptive opening.
•
An opening suit bid at the three level typically shows a good seven-card suit.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South opens 3Ë, what call does West make?
A. Double – A double of a three-level preemptive opening bid is for takeout.
•
West has four-card support for both unbid majors and three-card support for clubs.
•
West has 16 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton diamond . . .
enough to compete at the three level.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. After South opens 3Ë and West doubles, what call does North make?
A. Pass – Avoid bidding over partner’s preemptive opening without a fit.
•
South has described a hand that will only take tricks if diamonds are trump.
•
North can’t expect to make a notrump contract without a fit for diamonds. Even if
the diamonds can be established, there is unlikely to be an entry to the South hand.
•
North shouldn’t suggest another suit by bidding 4Ê since the partnership is likely to
be too high already.
-34-
Focus on the East hand.
Q. Can East pass partner’s takeout double?
A. No – Takeout doubles should usually be taken out.
•
Partner may be doubling more on shape than strength.
•
The penalty may not be enough to compensate for a game or slam contract.
•
It will be expensive if the opponents make a doubled partscore contract.
Q. What call should East make?
A. 3Í – Bid the four-card major.
•
Partner is likely to have four-card support and the partnership should be in an eightcard fit. Don’t be concerned about the quality of the spade suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. After East bids 3Í, what call does South make?
A. Pass – Don’t bid the same cards twice.
South has already described the hand with the 3Ë preempt. Any further action is up
to partner.
•
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South passes East’s 3Í bid, what call does West make?
A. Pass – The partnership may already be too high.
•
East has not promised any values with the 3Í bid. East could have no points and the
partnership could be in trouble.
•
Although West has 17 points, West promised a good hand to make a takeout double
at the three level. West has nothing more to show.
•
As a rule of thumb, West is entitled to expect about 6-7 points in East’s hand6, making
it reasonably safe to commit the partnership to the three level with the original
takeout double. With more than 6 or 7 points, East should be making a stronger call.
Teacher Jerry Helms refers to this last concept as “ESS” – the takeout doubler can
“Expect Six or Seven points” in partner’s hand.
6
-35-
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make?
A. Pass – North has some defense against 3Í and no fit with partner.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. If East is declarer in a 3Í contract, who makes the opening lead?
A. South.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What would South lead?
A.
ËK – Top of the solid sequence.
Leave South’s ËK face up and turn the remaining North and South cards face
down. Focus on the East hand from declarer’s point of view. Discuss with the
others at the table how you would plan to play the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. As declarer in 3Í, how many losers does East have?
A. Six – One spade, two diamonds, and three clubs.
•
Declarer will have to hope the missing spades are divided 3-2 so there is only one
loser in that suit.
Q. What are declarer’s options for eliminating the extra losers?
A. Ruff a diamond; discard a club on a heart.
•
One of the diamond losers can be ruffed in the West hand after giving up a trick in
the suit.
•
One of the club losers can be discarded on the extra heart winner in dummy.
Q. Can declarer discard the club loser before drawing any trumps?
A. No – One of the heart winners is likely to get ruffed.
•
Even if the missing diamonds are divided 3-2, declarer will have a second trump loser
if the defender with the doubleton heart ruffs one of the heart winners.
-36-
Q. Can declarer draw all the defenders’ trumps before taking the heart winners?
A. No – Declarer can’t afford to give up the lead.
•
To draw all the defenders’ trumps would take three rounds and declarer would have
to give up the lead.
•
If the defenders gain the lead, they can take their three club winners before declarer
has discarded one of the club losers.
Q. How many rounds of trumps should declarer play before taking the heart winners?
A. Two – Leave the defenders’ trump winner outstanding.
•
Drawing exactly two rounds of trumps prevents the defender with the doubleton
trump from ruffing one of the heart winners.
•
Leaving the defenders’ high trump outstanding gives declarer a chance to discard a
club loser before the defenders can gain the lead.
•
Even if the defender with the remaining high trump does ruff one of the heart
winners, that is a trick that declarer had to lose anyway.
•
Let’s see how the play would go.
Turn all four hands face up. Put the ËK in front of South as the opening lead. Play
a low diamond dummy, and have East win the first trick with the ËA.
Trick 1:
South: ËK
West: Ë4
North: Ë2
East: ËA
Q. After winning the first trick with the ËA, what does declarer do?
A. Draw exactly two rounds of trumps.
Trick 2:
East: Í3
South: Í5
West: ÍK
North: Í9
Trick 3:
West: ÍA
North: ÍJ
East: Í4
South: Í10
Q. After drawing two rounds of trumps, what does declarer do next?
A. Start taking the heart winners.
•
Declarer wants to discard one of the club losers before the defenders gain the lead.
-37-
•
Trick 4:
West: Ì4
North: Ì6
East: ÌQ
South: Ì3
Trick 5:
East: Ì2
South: Ì8
West: ÌA
North: Ì7
Trick 6:
West: ÌK
North: Ì9
East: Ì5
South: Ë3
Trick 7:
West: ÌJ
North: Ì10
East: Ê2
South: Ë6
Declarer must discard a club loser, not a diamond loser. The diamond loser will be
ruffed in the dummy.
Q. Would it make any difference if North were able to ruff the fourth round of hearts rather
than follow suit?
A. No – Declarer can still discard the club loser.
•
If the defenders’ hearts were divided 3-3, declarer would still be okay. When North
ruffs the fourth round of hearts, declarer discards the club loser.
•
Declarer has to lose one trump trick anyway and still gets rid of the club loser.
Q. What does declarer do after discarding one of the club losers?
A. Give up a diamond – To prepare for a ruff.
Trick 8:
West: Ë9
North: Ê5
East: Ë5
South: Ë10
•
Declarer will now be able to ruff the remaining diamond loser in dummy.
•
Declarer loses only one spade trick, one diamond, and two clubs. If the defenders
lead clubs, declarer can ruff the third round.
Observation
•
By carefully managing the drawing of trumps – not too many rounds and not too few
– declarer can make exactly nine tricks in spades.
-38-
A Closer Look at Penalty Versus Takeout Doubles
Pick up the cards and sort them into suits. Each student take one suit and
construct the following hand in front of West.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout double is used over opening suit bids at the two, three, and four level.
Spades: ÍA, ÍK, Í10 and a low spade.
Hearts:
ÌA, ÌQ, and two low hearts.
Diamonds: A low diamond.
Clubs:
ÊQ and three low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
A K 10 2
AQ32
2
Q432
W N E
S
1Ë
?
Q. If South opens the bidding 1Ë, what call would West make?
A. Double – A classic takeout double.
•
West has 15 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton diamond.
•
West has support for the unbid suits.
Q. If South opens the bidding 2Ë, what call would West make?
W N E
A. Double – The takeout double can be used over weak two-bids.
•
The only difference is that West is committing the partnership to
compete at the two level, or three level if East has to bid clubs.
Q. If South opens the bidding 3Ë, what call would West make?
S
2Ë
?
W N E
A. Double – The takeout double can be used over three-level preempts.
S
3Ë
?
•
Now West is committing the partnership to enter the auction at
the three (or four) level.
•
West’s hand is worth about 18 points . . . 15 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for
the singleton.
•
Assuming partner has at least 6 or 7 points, the partnership should not be overboard
entering the auction at this level.
Q. If South opens the bidding 4Ë, what call would West make?
W N E
A. Double/Pass – The partnership must agree how high the takeout
double applies.
?
•
S
4Ë
Most partnerships agree that doubles of opening suit bids are
primarily for takeout through 4Ì. Doubles of 4Í or higher are primarily for penalty.
-39-
•
The higher the level, the more likely partner will consider converting the intended
takeout double into penalty because fewer tricks are required to defeat the contract.
•
Although there is no guarantee that the partnership will be safe at the four level, West
should probably take the risk of making a takeout double:
•
As a general guideline, the hand with the shape should take action whenever
possible. Partner may have considerable strength but not the right type of hand
to overcall or make a takeout double.
•
It may be riskier to pass than to bid. If South is weak, East-West could easily have
a game or a slam.
•
Opposite partner’s assumed 6 or 7 points, East-West should be close to game.
Q. If South opens the bidding 4Ì, what call would West make?
W N E
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double.
•
If the partnership agreement is that a double of 4Ì would be for
takeout, it would be dangerous for West to double. East might bid
diamonds . . . especially since West is short in that suit.
•
Passing does not end the auction; East may still act.
Q. If South opens the bidding 4Í, what call would West make?
S
4Ì
?
W N E
A. Double/Pass – A penalty double is a possibility.
S
4Í
•
If the partnership has agreed that a double of 4Í or higher is for
penalty, West could double.
•
West would expect to take at least three spade tricks and the ÌA . . . likely more.
?
Many partnerships prefer a double of 4Í to show ‘convertible values’ . . . enough high-card strength to
defeat 4Í but some support for the unbid suits should partner choose to take the double out with an
unbalanced hand. If that is the partnership understanding, West might choose to pass with this hand.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: A double of a notrump opening bid is for penalty.
Spades: Take away a low spade.
Hearts:
Take away a low heart.
Diamonds: Add the ËK and a low diamond.
Clubs:
-40-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
A K 10
AQ3
K32
Q432
W N E
?
S
1NT
Q. If South opens the bidding 1NT, what call would West make?
A. Double/Pass – A double of 1NT is for penalty.
•
It isn’t practical to use a double of 1NT as takeout. At best, West can have three-card
support for three of the unbid suits and the partnership is likely to land in a 4-3 fit
with South holding a strong hand.
•
The standard agreement is that double of an opponent’s 1NT (or 2NT) opening bid
is for penalty, not for takeout. It shows at least as much strength as the opening
notrump bid, likely more.
•
The advantage is that West is sitting over (after) the 1NT opener. The
example, are likely well placed to get two tricks.
•
The disadvantage is that West has to make the opening lead and will be leading into
declarer’s strength.
•
Without a good choice of opening lead, many players would prefer to pass with this
hand. It may be difficult to defeat 1NT and, if 1NT does go down, a small penalty
should be enough.
ÌA-Q, for
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: To double 1NT for penalty you should know what to lead.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Take away the ÍA.
Hearts:
Diamonds: Add the ËQ, ËJ, and Ë10.
Clubs:
Take away two low clubs.
WEST
K 10
AQ3
K Q J 10 3 2
Q4
W N E
S
1NT
?
Q. If South opens the bidding 1NT, what call would West make?
A. Double – An easy choice of opening lead.
•
17 high-card points and an excellent suit to lead.
•
West expects to develop five diamond winners and has entries in the other suits.
•
A penalty double is likely to be more rewarding than overcalling in diamonds and
playing in a partscore.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: Position at the table is important.
-41-
Spades: Add the ÍJ.
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away the ËJ, and Ë10.
Clubs:
Add a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
K J 10
AQ3
KQ32
Q42
W N E
S
4Í
?
Q. If South opens the bidding 4Í, what call would West make?
A. Double – West expects to defeat 4Í.
•
A penalty double of 4Í would be reasonable with this hand.
•
West expects to take two spade tricks if South holds the ÍA-Q, as seems likely.
•
West expects to take at least two tricks in the other suits.
Q. If North opens 4Í and this is followed by two passes, what call
would West make?
A. Pass/Double – A penalty double is less appealing.
W N E
4Í P
?
S
P
•
West’s ÍK-J-10 may take only one trick because North is likely
to hold the ÍA-Q.
•
West might still double, but the defensive prospects are not as good sitting under
(before) rather than over (after) the hand with the long spades.
Q. If North opens the bidding 1Í and, East passes, and South raises
to 4Í, what call would West make?
A. Pass – A penalty double is even less appealing.
W N E S
1Í P 4Í
?
•
West’s spades are not necessarily favorably placed. North may
hold the ÍA-Q.
•
Although South may have a weak hand, North may have a strong hand so West’s
other high cards may not take a lot of tricks.
•
A double will warn declarer about the lie of the cards and may help declarer make the
hand. It is probably best for West to pass and hope to beat the contract.
Conclusion
•
The partnership must agree on the level through which takeout doubles apply.
•
A common agreement is that doubles are takeout through 4Ì; doubles of 4Í or
higher are for penalty.
•
Doubles of opening notrump bids are for penalty using standard methods.
•
When deciding whether or not to double for penalty, take position into
consideration. High cards can be favorably placed over (after) an opponent and
unfavorably placed under (before)an opponent.
-42-
Hand 4 - The Takeout Double to Show a Strong Overcall
HAND: 4
DEALER: WEST
BOTH
VUL:
WEST
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
NORTH
Í K762
Ì J843
Ë J4
Ê K83
WEST
Í 85
Ì 10 9 6
Ë Q 10 9 6
Ê 10 7 5 2
NORTH
Pass
2Ì
3NT
EAST
1Í
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Double
3Ë
Pass
EAST
Í Q J 10 9 3
Ì AK7
Ë 8
Ê QJ64
SOUTH
Í A4
Ì Q52
Ë AK7532
Ê A9
DECLARER:
North
OPENING LEAD: ÍQ by East
Introduction
The double is a versatile call. It takes up no room in the auction and, unless it is
passed out for penalty, gives the doubler another chance to bid.
This feature allows the takeout double to be used for a dual purpose. In addition
to its standard meaning, it can be used to show hands too strong for a simple
overcall.
This is useful in the modern style because jump overcalls are no longer used to
show intermediate or very strong hands. The jump overcall in today’s game is
commonly used to show a weak, preemptive hand.
Let’s play another hand with both partnerships in the auction.
-43-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 4. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy-style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the West hand.
Q. West is the dealer. What is the opening call?
A. Pass.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What is North’s opening call?
A. Pass – Only 8 high-card points.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. East is the dealer. What is East’s opening call?
A. 1Í – 13 high-card points and a five-card major suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What is the value of the South hand?
A. 19 points – 17 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit.
Q. Is South’s hand suitable for a classic takeout double?
A. No – Wrong shape.
•
South has only a doubleton club and three-card support for the unbid major, hearts.
-44-
Q. Is South’s hand suitable for an overcall?
A. Yes/No - Good suit but too much strength.
An overcall of 2Ë would show the long suit but not the strength. It could be passed.
•
Q. What might North do if South were to overcall 2Ë?
A. Pass - Only 8 high-card points and two-card support.
•
North doesn’t have a five-card suit to bid and also isn’t strong enough to introduce
a new suit at the two level.
•
With only two-card support, North’s hand isn’t really suitable to raise to 3Ë.
•
North isn’t strong enough to bid 2NT, which would be invitational, showing about 1012 points.
Q. Can South make a jump overcall to 3Ë to show the extra strength?
A. No/Yes - Only if the partnership uses intermediate/strong jump overcalls.
•
The modern style is to use the jump overcall to show as a weak, preemptive bid, much
like a weak two-bid or a three-level preempt.
•
To compensate, most partnerships adopt the following style:
To Show a Hand Too Strong for a Simple Overcall
Start with a takeout double, planning to describe the
hand with the next bid.
•
Let’s see how this approach would work on this hand.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. If East opens 1Í and South doubles, what call does West make?
A. Pass – Only 2 high-card points and no fit for spades.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. East opens 1Í and South doubles. What type of hand does North assume that South
holds?
A. A standard takeout double – An opening bid or better and support for the unbid suits.
-45-
•
At this point, there’s no reason for North to assume South doesn’t have a normal
takeout double of spades
Q. What call does North make?
A. 2Ì – Expecting an eight-card fit.
•
Of the three unbid suits, hearts, diamonds, and clubs, North prefers hearts.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make over North’s 2Ì bid?
A. Pass – Nothing more to say.
•
With a minimum and no support from partner, East has no reason to bid again.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. After hearing North’s 2Ì response to the takeout double, what call does South make?
A. 3Ë – Showing the true nature of the hand.
•
By doubling and then bidding a news suit, South is showing a hand too strong for a
simple overcall.
•
In effect, the 3Ë call is similar to an old-fashioned strong jump overcall.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make?
A. Pass.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. After hearing South double and then bid 3Ë, what call does North make?
A. 3NT – Showing some values and some strength in spades.
•
North has already shown the heart suit in response to the takeout double.
•
North may be a little surprised to hear South bid diamonds after asking North to
choose the suit. South is showing a strong hand with diamonds . . . too strong to
simply overcall 2Ë.
•
With 8 high-card points and some strength in spades, North can expect that it will
likely be as easy to take nine tricks in notrump as nine or more in diamonds.
-46-
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make?
A. Pass.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Having described the hand, South respects North’s decision.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make?
A. Pass.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose North does become declarer in 3NT, who would be on lead?
A. East.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East lead?
A.
ÍQ – Top of the solid sequence.
•
East wants to promote winners in spades while retaining the ÌA and ÌK as entries.
Leave East’s ÍQ face up and turn the remaining East and West cards face down.
Focus on the North-South hands. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer,
North, could plan to play the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. As declarer in 3NT, how many tricks does North have?
A. Six – Two spades, two diamonds, and three clubs.
•
Three more tricks are required.
-47-
Q. Which suit provides the best opportunity to develop the three extra tricks required?
A. Diamonds – This suit alone could provide three extra tricks.
Q. Will declarer have any difficulty if the East-West diamonds are divided 3-2?
A. No – Three tricks can be established through length.
•
Declarer can simply play the ËA, ËK and give up a diamond trick.
•
Declarer will still have a spade winner to prevent the defenders from taking tricks in
that suit.
•
Dummy will have the ÊA as an entry to the diamonds.
Q. What is the only challenge declarer might have?
A. A 4-1 or 5-0 split of the missing diamonds.
Q. Can declarer make the contract if all five of the missing diamonds are in one hand?
A. No – At least two diamond tricks will have to be lost.
•
Declarer can only establish two extra tricks in diamonds.
•
In addition, if declarer has to give up the lead twice, the defenders will be able to
establish enough winners in spades to defeat the contract.
Q. Can declarer do anything if the missing diamonds are divided 4-1?
A. Perhaps – Depending on the layout of the missing diamonds.
•
Let’s take a look at the diamond suit.
Turn all the cards face down except for the diamond suit. Turn the diamond
suit face up in all four hands.
Teacher’s Note: You may not want to go through all of the following considerations.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
Ë Q 10 9 6
EAST
Ë8
SOUTH
ËAK7532
-48-
Q. This is the actual layout of the diamond suit. Can declarer get five tricks from the
diamond suit?
A. Yes – By leading toward the ËJ.
•
If declarer plays the ËA, ËK, and a third round of diamonds, West gets two tricks.
•
Instead, declarer must lead a low diamond from the South hand toward the ËJ.
•
If West plays low, declarer wins the ËJ and can then play the Ë4 back to dummy’s ËA
and ËK and give up a trick to West’s ËQ. Dummy’s remaining diamonds are winners.
•
If West plays the ËQ on the first trick, North plays the Ë4. After regaining the lead,
North can take the ËJ, cross to dummy in another suit, and take the ËA and ËK.
Dummy’s remaining diamonds are winners.
Give West’s Ë6 to East.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
Ë Q 10 9
EAST
Ë86
SOUTH
ËAK7532
Q. Would declarer still get five tricks if West held only three diamonds?
A. Yes – The diamonds divide 3-2.
•
Declarer can start by leading a low diamond toward the ËJ.
•
If West plays low, declarer will take all six tricks.
•
If West wins the ËQ, declarer’s remaining diamonds are all winners.
Give West’s Ë9 to East.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
EAST
Ë Q 10
Ë986
SOUTH
ËAK7532
-49-
Q. Does leading a low diamond toward the ËJ work if West holds the doubleton ËQ?
A. Yes – The defenders get only one diamond trick.
•
West has to play the ËQ when a low diamond is led; otherwise the defenders don’t
get any tricks in the suit.
Q. Would declarer do any better by playing the ËA and ËK?
A. No – Declarer still has to lose a diamond trick.
•
If declarer plays the ËA, ËK and a third round, East wins with the Ë9.
Give West’s Ë10 to East.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
ËQ
EAST
Ë 10 9 8 6
SOUTH
ËAK7532
Q. Does leading a low diamond from South work if West holds the singleton ËQ?
A. Yes – The defenders get only one diamond trick.
•
West wins the first trick with the ËQ but declarer later takes the ËJ, ËA, and ËK to
get rid of East’s remaining diamonds.
•
Playing the ËA (or ËK) first would also work in this layout. After the ËQ appears,
declarer can take a trick with the ËJ, cross to dummy, take the ËK, and give up a
diamond trick to East.
Give West’s ËQ to East. Give East’s Ë10 to West.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
Ë 10
EAST
ËQ986
SOUTH
ËAK7532
-50-
Q. Can declarer get five tricks if East holds four diamonds including the ËQ?
A. No – The defenders get two diamond tricks.
•
When a low diamond is led to North’s ËJ, East wins the ËQ.
•
When declarer later plays the ËA and ËK, East still has the Ë9 as a winner.
Q. Would it help for declarer to lead the ËJ in this layout?
A. No – The defenders still get two diamond tricks.
•
If North leads the ËJ, East should cover with the ËQ, forcing declarer to play dummy’s
ËK to win the trick.
•
When dummy’s ËA is played, East still has two high diamonds.
Give East’s Ë6 to West.
NORTH
ËJ4
EAST
ËQ98
WEST
Ë 10 6
SOUTH
ËAK7532
Q. Can declarer get five tricks if East holds three diamonds including the ËQ?
A. Yes – The defenders get only one diamond trick.
•
Declarer leads a low diamond toward the ËJ and East wins the ËQ.
•
On regaining the lead, declarer plays dummy’s
diamonds are winners.
•
Again, it wouldn’t help to lead the ËJ, East would cover with the ËQ and declarer
would still have to lose one trick.
-51-
ËA and ËK and the remaining
Give East’s Ë8 to West.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
Ë 10 8 6
EAST
ËQ9
SOUTH
ËAK7532
Q. Does leading a low diamond toward the ËJ work if East holds the doubleton ËQ?
A. Yes – The defenders get only one diamond trick.
•
East wins the first trick with the ËQ. Declarer later plays the ËA and ËK and dummy’s
remaining diamonds are winners.
•
It would not help to lead the ËJ if East covers with the ËQ.
•
Now let’s see the only time it would be better to lead the ËA or ËK.
Give East’s Ë9 to West.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
EAST
ËQ
Ë 10 9 8 6
SOUTH
ËAK7532
Q. Does leading a low diamond toward the ËJ work if East holds the singleton ËQ?
A. No – The defenders get two diamond tricks.
•
When declarer leads a low diamond to the ËJ, East wins with the singleton ËQ.
•
When declarer later plays dummy’s ËA and ËK, West still has the Ë10 left as a second
winner for the defense.
•
In this layout, declarer would succeed by playing the ËA (or ËK) first. When East’s
ËQ falls, declarer can win a second trick with the ËJ. Later, declarer takes dummy’s
ËK and gives up one diamond trick to East.
-52-
•
Let’s go back to the original holding.
Give East’s ËQ to West. Give West’s Ë8 to East.
NORTH
ËJ4
WEST
Ë Q 10 9 6
EAST
Ë8
SOUTH
ËAK7532
•
In summary, leading a low diamond toward the ËJ works whenever the missing
diamonds are divided 3-2 and when West holds the singleton ËQ or four diamonds
including the ËQ.
•
It only fails if East holds the singleton ËQ or those cases where declarer can’t avoid
losing at least two diamond tricks. When East holds four diamonds including the ËQ
or when the diamonds divide 5-0 it won’t matter how the suit is played.
•
Let’s see how playing diamonds this way will help declarer make the contract.
Turn all four hands face up and put the ÍQ in front of East as the opening lead.
Q. In which hand should declarer win the first trick?
A. Dummy (North) – To lead a diamond toward the ËJ.
ÍA to be in the right hand to lead
•
Declarer must win the first trick with dummy’s
toward the ËJ.
•
Let’s see what happens if declarer wins the first trick with the ÍK.
Trick 1:
East: ÍQ
South: Í4
West: Í5
North: ÍK
Q. How would declarer now get to dummy to lead a low diamond?
A. With the ÊA.
Trick 2:
North: Ê3
East: Ê4
-53-
South: ÊA
West: Ê2
Now declarer can lead a low diamond and let’s suppose West wins the ËQ.
•
Trick 3:
South: Ë2
West: ËQ
North: Ë4
East: Ë8
Q. What will West lead after winning the ËQ?
A. A spade – West wants to help develop East’s winners in the suit.
Trick 4:
West: Í8
North: Í2
East: Í3
South: ÍA
Q. What is declarer’s problem?
A. The diamond suit is blocked – There’s no entry back to the South hand.
•
If declarer plays a low diamond to the ËJ, there is no entry back to the South hand
to take the diamond winners.
•
If declarer plays dummy’s ËA and ËK, West will get a second diamond trick.
•
Let’s return to the first trick.
Turn all four hands face up and put the ÍQ in front of East as the opening
lead.
•
Let’s have declarer win the first trick in the South hand.
Trick 1:
•
South: ÍA
West: Í5
North: Í2
Now declarer leads a low diamond. Let’s suppose West chooses to win the ËQ.
Trick 2:
•
East: ÍQ
South: Ë2
West: ËQ
North: Ë4
East: Ë8
It would not have helped West to play low. Declarer would win the ËJ, take dummy’s
ËA and ËK, and give up the fourth round. Dummy’s remaining diamonds would be
established with the ÊA as an entry.
-54-
•
After winning the ËQ, West will return a spade which declarer can win with the ÍK.
Trick 3:
•
North: ÍK
East: Í3
South: Í4
East: Ì7
South: Ë3
West: Ë6
South: ÊA
West: Ê2
Declarer now takes the ËJ.
Trick 4:
•
West: Í8
North: ËJ
. . . and crosses to dummy’s ÊA as an entry.
Trick 5:
North: Ê3
East: Ê4
•
Now declarer is in the right place at the right time to play the ËA and ËK and take
the established diamond winners.
•
Eventually, declarer can take the ÊK as the ninth trick . . . two spades, five diamonds,
and two clubs.
Observation
•
North-South do well to get to 3NT on the combined hands. 5Ë can’t be made since
there are at least two heart losers and a diamond loser.
•
In 3NT, declarer should guard against a 4-1 diamond division by leading low toward
the ËJ. It won’t make any difference if the missing diamonds are divided 3-2 but will
be the winning play if the diamonds are divided 4-1 and West holds the ËQ.
•
Declarer must plan the play of the hand to make the best use of entries.
-55-
A Closer Look at Using the Takeout Double to Show a Strong Overcall
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each player take one suit. Construct
the following hand in front of South.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: A simple overcall shows about 6-17 points.
Spades:
Hearts:
ÍA and a low spade.
ÌA, ÌK, ÌJ, Ì10 and two low
hearts.
Diamonds: Three low diamonds.
Clubs:
Two low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
A2
A K J 10 3 2
432
32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. 1Ì – A simple overcall at the one level.
•
A one-level overcall shows a good five-card or longer suit (occasionally a very good
four-card suit) and anywhere from about 6-16 points.
•
If the partnership plays intermediate jump overcalls, you could bid 2Ì with this hand
. . . but that isn’t the modern style.
Q. Is the 1Ì overcall forcing?
A. No – Partner can pass.
Q. East opens the bidding 1Í. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – A simple overcall at the two level.
W N E S
1Í ?
•
A simple (non-jump) two-level overcall shows at least a good
five-card suit, typically a six-card or longer suit.
•
A two-level overcall shows about 12-17 points . . . a higher minimum than a one-level
overcall.
Q. Is the 2Ì overcall forcing?
A. No – Partner can pass.
•
A simple overcall is not forcing, although partner will expect about 12-17 points for
a two-level overcall.
•
Partner can pass with no fit and as many as 8 or 9 points since the partnership is
unlikely to miss a game.
-56-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: A jump overcall shows a weak hand with a long suit.
Spades: Take away the ÍA; add a low spade.
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
32
A K J 10 3 2
432
32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – A preemptive jump overcall.
•
The modern style is to play the jump overcall as a weak, preemptive bid.
•
A jump overcall to the two level shows a hand similar to an opening weak two-bid.
•
Most players would bid 2Ì with this hand even when vulnerable.
Q. East opens the bidding 1Í. What call does South make?
A. Pass/3Ì – Avoid a 2Ì overcall.
W N E S
1Í ?
•
The choice is really between making a weak jump overcall
which will get the partnership to 3Ì or passing.
•
Partner will expect a better hand for a 2Ì overcall . . . about 12-17 points.
•
Some players would stretch to 3Ì with this hand if non vulnerable . . . although
partner would expect a seventh heart.
•
Most players would not jump to 3Ì, especially when vulnerable.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: The partnership needs a way to handle hands too strong for a simple overcall.
Spades: Take away two spades; add ÍA, ÍK.
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away low diamond; add ËK.
Clubs:
-57-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AK
A K J 10 3 2
K43
32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – A forcing bid.
•
This hand has 18 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit.
•
It is too strong for a simple overcall of 1Ì since partner might pass with 6 or 7 points
and a game could be missed.
•
A jump to 2Ì would be preemptive.
•
At one time, you could start with a cuebid of 2Ë to show a very strong hand. In the
modern style, a cuebid of the opponent’s suit is usually assigned a conventional
meaning . . . Michaels, for example, to show a two-suited hand.
•
To compensate, the takeout double can be used to show a hand too strong for a
simple overcall.
Q. What is the advantage of using a takeout double instead of an overcall with this hand?
A. Partner will bid – The takeout double is (essentially) forcing.
•
Partner might pass an overcall. There would be no chance to show the extra strength.
•
Partner is expected to bid after a takeout double. South then gets an opportunity to
describe the hand.
•
If partner were to pass, converting the takeout double into a penalty double, the extra
strength should result in a large penalty.
Q. Will North know South has this type of hand for the takeout double?
A. No – North will expect a standard takeout double.
•
South plans to describe the true nature of the hand with the rebid.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South double, West passes, North responds 1Í, and
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Showing a hand too strong for a simple overcall.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í P ?
•
By doubling and then bidding a new suit, South is showing a
hand too strong for a 1Ì overcall.
•
Since a simple overcall has an upper limit of about 16 or 17 points, South is showing
at least 17 points.
Q. Is South’s 2Ì bid forcing?
A. No – But North should stretch to bid again.
•
South is showing a hand too strong for a simple overcall but isn’t committing the
partnership to game.
-58-
Q. What call would South make if North bid 2Ê over the takeout
double?
A. 2Ì – Same idea.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ê P ?
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë.
North and East pass. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Again, showing a hand too strong for a simple overcall.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë P P ?
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout double can be used to show a strong balanced hand.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away two low hearts.
Diamonds: Add the ËJ.
Clubs:
Add the ÊJ.
SOUTH
AK
A K J 10
KJ43
J32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – Too strong for a 1NT overcall.
•
South has a balanced hand with 20 high-card points.
•
A 1NT overcall would show about 15-18 points . . . similar to a 1NT opening bid.
•
Most partnerships play a jump to 2NT as unusual . . . showing a weak distributional
hand with the lower two unbid suits.
•
Instead, start with a takeout double. The extra strength compensates for the lack of
support for spades if North were to insist on that suit.
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, North bids
1Í, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT – Showing a hand too strong for a 1NT overcall.
•
By doubling and rebidding 1NT, South is showing a balanced
hand of about 19-21 points . . . too strong to overcall 1NT.
-59-
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í P ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, North bids
2Ê, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 2NT – Showing a hand too strong for a 1NT overcall.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ê P ?
The 2Ê response prevents South from describing the hand at
the one level. Nonetheless, South can afford to bid 2NT to show
a strong balanced hand.
Q. East opens the bidding 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, North bids
1Ì, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 3Ì – Showing a strong hand in support of hearts.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
•
The takeout doubler doesn’t need to follow through with the
original plan of rebidding in notrump if a fit is found in
another suit.
•
Jumping to game is too aggressive. North was forced to bid and could have very little.
Conclusion
•
With a hand too strong for a simple overcall, start with a takeout double.
•
Bid again at the next opportunity to describe the true nature of the hand.
-60-
Lesson 2 - Advancing (Responding to)
a Takeout Double
Hand 5 - Advancing the Takeout Double
WEST
HAND: 5
DEALER: NORTH
NONE
VUL:
NORTH
Í Q8
Ì J 10 3
Ë J954
Ê J832
NORTH
Pass
Double
Pass
4Ì
Pass
EAST
Pass
3Ì
Pass
SOUTH
1Í
Pass
Pass
EAST
Í 10 4 3
Ì Q9854
Ë K8
Ê A 10 5
WEST
Í 97
Ì AK72
Ë A 10 7 3
Ê K94
SOUTH
Í AKJ652
Ì6
Ë Q62
Ê Q76
DECLARER:
East
OPENING LEAD: ÍA by South
Introduction
The partner of the opening bidder is referred to as responder. It can be confusing
if the partner of the takeout doubler is also referred to as responder.
A modern term for the player who responds to a takeout double or an overcall is
the advancer. This lesson focuses on advancing a takeout double.
In general, be aggressive when advancing partner’s takeout double. When an
opponent has opened the bidding, your side can sometimes look for game with
as few as 24 points instead of the usual 25 or 26. Most of the missing high cards will
be in opener’s hand and this will help during the play.
Play of the Hand
-61-
Play Hand 5. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the North hand.
Q. North is the dealer. What is North’s opening call?
A. Pass – Only 5 high-card points.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is East’s opening call?
A. Pass – 9 high-card points plus 1 length point isn’t quite enough to open.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What is South’s opening call?
A. 1Í – 12 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit.
•
The hand is too strong for a weak two-bid. It’s a sound one-level opening bid.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South opens 1Í, what call does West make?
A. Double – 14 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton spade.
•
West has support for all the unbid suits . . . and four-card support for the unbid
major.
Focus on the North hand.
-62-
Q. As the partner of the opening bidder, what is another name for North?
A. Responder.
Q. After West doubles South’s 1Í opening, what call does responder make?
A. Pass – Only 5 high-card points and only a doubleton spade.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. As partner of the takeout doubler, what is another name for East?
A. Advancer.
Q. After responder passes, does advancer have to bid?
A. Yes (No) – The takeout double is essentially forcing if responder passes.
•
The only time advancer can pass the takeout double is when advancer wants to
convert it to a penalty double. Advancer rarely passes the takeout double.
Q. After West doubles South’s 1Í opening, what call does East make?
A. 3Ì – Showing an invitational hand.
•
Since advancer is forced to bid, a 2Ì call could be made on no points at all. West
might be afraid to bid again, even with a good hand, for fear of getting the
partnership too high. After all, West has already forced advancer to bid something.
•
East has 10 points . . . 9 high-card points plus 1 for the five-card suit. Since West has
promised at least an opening bid, East wants to show interest in reaching game.
•
Advancer shows an invitational hand by jumping a level, instead of bidding at the
cheapest available level.
Q. Can advancer be sure that the partnership has a fit in hearts?
A. Yes/No – West has promised support for the unbid suits.
•
West should have at least three-card support for hearts and likely four-card support
since it is the unbid major suit.
•
It is possible that West does not have support for hearts if West has a hand too strong
for a simple overcall.
•
If that is the case, West will describe the hand with the rebid. West’s extra strength
will make sure that the partnership won’t get overboard when advancer has enough
to make a jump response.
-63-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after East’s jump to 3Ì?
A. Pass – South has already described the hand with the 1Í opening bid.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after advancer jumps to 3Ì?
A. 4Ì/Pass – West has more than a minimum takeout double.
•
West has 15 points and advancer’s jump shows an invitational hand of about 9-11
points.
•
West could take the conservative view and pass but, with four-card support for hearts
and the remaining high cards likely to be well placed over South’s opening bid, most
players would accept the invitation.
•
As a general guideline, be aggressive in bidding game when your side knows where
most of the opponents’ strength lies:
•
Declarer can place most of the missing high cards in opener’s hand and plan the
play accordingly.
•
With strength on both sides of the table, declarer should have adequate entries
back and forth to help take finesses, establish suits, and get to winners.
Bidding Game in Competitive Auctions
With a good fit, game can often be made on as few as 24 points.
Q. If West does bid 4Ì, how will the auction continue?
A. Pass, Pass, Pass – No one has anything else to say.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. If East becomes declarer in 4Ì, who is on lead?
A. South.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What would South lead?
-64-
A.
ÍA – Top of the touching high cards.
It is assumed that the students are leading the ace from ace-king. If not, leading the
equally well.
ÍK will work
Focus on the North hand.
Q. If South leads the ÍA (or ÍK), what does North play on the first trick?
A.
Í8 (ÍQ) – The ÍQ would promise the ÍJ or a singleton.
• Technically, the ÍQ is only played if North also holds the ÍJ or if the ÍQ is a
singleton.
•
This is a standard defensive signal that would allow South to lead a low spade at trick
two if South wanted to have North win the trick . . . perhaps to lead through declarer.
•
Without the ÍJ, North plays the Í8.
•
On the actual hand, it won’t make much difference if North plays the
South holds the ÍJ, South will know North doesn’t have that card.
ÍQ. Since
There is no reason to go into further detail on this point. If most of the class wants to play the ÍQ to
show a doubleton, that’s fine.
•
Let’s assume North plays the Í8 on the first trick.
Trick 1:
South: ÍA
West: Í7
North: Í8
East: Í3
Turn the first trick face down.
Q. After winning the first trick with the ÍA, what will South likely do at trick two?
A.
ÍK – Continuing spades seems to be the best defense.
•
Continuing with spades is probably best. North might have the singleton
doubleton Í8-4 as well as the actual holding.
Trick 2:
South: ÍK
West: Í9
North: ÍQ
-65-
East: Í4
Í8 or
•
When South sees North’s ÍQ on the second trick, South will likely assume North has
a doubleton and didn’t play the ÍQ the first time because North didn’t hold the ÍJ.
Turn the second trick face down.
Q. If South assumes North has a doubleton spade, what will South lead at trick three?
A.
ÍJ – Hoping to win the trick or give North a chance to ruff.
•
Neither a diamond nor a club switch seems particularly attractive so South will
probably continue with a third round of spades.
•
South should continue with the ÍJ since it will win the trick if declarer doesn’t ruff.
•
At the same time, it gives North a chance to overruff if declarer ruffs.
Focus on the East hand. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer plans to
make the hand if South leads a third round of spades.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. What will happen if declarer trumps the third round of spades with a low heart?
A. North will overruff.
Q. Can declarer make the contract if North overruffs the third round of spades?
A. No - There is still a club loser.
•
Declarer will have already lost three tricks . . . the ÍA, ÍK, and the overruff.
•
Declarer still has to lose a club trick . . . assuming North holds on to enough
diamonds so that declarer cannot establish an extra winner in that suit7.
Q. What will happen if declarer trumps the third round of spades with a high heart?
A. North will discard and eventually get a trump trick with the ÌJ.
Q. Can declarer make the contract by ruffing high on the third round of spades?
A. No - There is now a heart loser and a club loser.
•
Declarer will have already lost two tricks . . . the ÍA and
7
ÍK.
North should discard clubs, not diamonds when declarer plays trumps. North can see the four-card
diamond suit in the West hand and should hold on to equal length in that suit to prevent declarer from
establishing an extra trick with the help of a ruff. North will have to hope that South can guard the club suit.
-66-
•
Declarer will now have a trump loser when the missing trumps don’t divide 2-2.
•
Declarer still has to lose a club trick . . . assuming North holds on to enough
diamonds so that declarer can’t establish an extra winner in that suit.
Q. If declarer can’t make the contract by ruffing the third round of spades high or low, is
there any way to make the hand?
A. Yes – discard a club from dummy.
•
Since it won’t help to ruff high or low on the third round of spades, East should look
for an alternative.
•
Instead of ruffing, East should discard a club from dummy on the third round of spades!
•
Since declarer has to lose a club trick anyway, this play is referred to as discarding a
loser on a loser.
•
Let’s see how discarding a club on the third round of spades helps declarer make the
contract.
Trick 3:
•
South: ÍJ
West: Ê4
North: Ê2
East: Í10
There is no need for North to ruff this trick since South’s ÍJ is a winner.
Q. After South wins the third trick with the ÍJ will it do any good to lead a fourth round of
spades?
A. No – East will be able to ruff.
•
If North ruffs, declarer can overruff and draw trumps without losing a trick in that
suit.
•
If North doesn’t ruff, declarer can ruff with a low trump and again draw trumps
without losing a trump trick.
•
So, let’s suppose South leads a club . . . a diamond or a heart would lead to the same
result. We’ll assume West’s ÊK wins the trick.
Trick 3:
•
South: Ê6
West: ÊK
North: Ê3
East: Ê5
East: Ì4
South: Ì6
Declarer can now draw trumps.
Trick 4:
West: ÌA
North: Ì3
-67-
•
•
Trick 5:
West: ÌK
North: Ì10
East: Ì5
South: Í2
Trick 6:
West: Ì2
North: ÌJ
East: ÌQ
South: Í5
Once trumps are drawn, declarer can safely ruff the club loser.
Trick 7:
East: ÊA
South: Ê7
West: Ê9
North: Ê8
Trick 8:
East: Ê10
South: ÊQ
West: Ì7
North: ÊJ
Declarer has the rest of the tricks.
Observation
•
If East-West bid to the aggressive 4Ì game, declarer will have to play carefully to
make the contract.
•
The loser on a loser play is a very useful ploy on many hands.
•
On this hand, declarer effectively exchanges the club loser for a third spade loser.
•
Instead of having to ruff the third spade high or low . . . which would create a trump
loser . . . declarer eventually gets to ruff a club after trumps are drawn.
-68-
A Closer Look at Advancing a Takeout Double
Pick up the cards and sort them into suits. Each player take one suit. Construct the
following hand in front of East.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer is (essentially) forced to bid when responder passes.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Three low spades.
Hearts:
Four low hearts.
Diamonds: Three low diamonds.
Clubs:
Three low clubs.
EAST
432
5432
432
432
W N E
X P
S
1Ë
?
Q. South opens 1Ë, West doubles, and North passes. Does East have to bid?
A. Yes – West’s double is for takeout.
•
If East passes, South will play in 1Ë doubled. East has no tricks on defense and West
is likely short in diamonds. South will make the contract with several overtricks.
•
Essentially, the takeout double is forcing on advancer when responder passes.
Q. What call does East make?
A. 1Ì – East prefers hearts.
•
Nothing bad is likely to happen when East bids 1Ì:
•
If North and South have the balance of strength, they are likely to bid and East
won’t have to play the contract.
•
If West has a very strong hand, East-West may make a partscore despite East’s
weakness.
Q. Suppose South opens 1Í, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 2Ì – East still prefers hearts.
W N E
X P
S
1Í
?
•
East has to bid, even though it gets the partnership to the two
level.
•
Although it is more risky to be at the two level than the one level, it is West’s
responsibility to take that into account when making the takeout double.
•
A response of 1NT is not a “negative” bid. It would show strength in the opponent’s
suit and some values.
-69-
Q. Suppose South opens 1Ì, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 1Í – East has to say something.
•
Sometimes there is no good choice . . . only the lesser of evils.
•
Again:
•
W N E
X P
S
1Ì
?
•
1NT is not an option with no strength in the opponent’s suit.
•
Pass is not an option since it is likely to lead to a worse result than bidding.
Hopefully, North-South will bid and get East off the hook.
Q. Suppose South opens 1Í, West doubles, and North bids 2Í. What
call does East make?
A. Pass – East is no longer forced to bid.
•
If responder makes a call other than pass, advancer doesn’t have
to bid with a weak hand.
•
With a very strong hand, West will get another opportunity to bid.
W N E
X 2Í ?
S
1Í
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer bids at the cheapest level with 0-8 points.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart; add the ÌK.
Diamonds: Take away a low diamond.
Clubs:
Add the ÊA.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
EAST
432
K432
43
A432
W N E
X P
S
1Ë
?
Q. South opens 1Ë, West doubles, and North passes. What call does East make?
A. 1Ì – Advancer bids at the cheapest available level with 0-8 points.
•
West has a choice between hearts and clubs. Although the clubs are stronger than the
hearts, bidding hearts is preferable because:
•
It keeps the auction lower . . . the partnership is at the one level rather than the
two level.
•
The takeout doubler is more likely to have four-card support for a major suit than
a minor suit.
•
If the partnership does have enough strength for game, it is more likely to be in
a major suit than a minor.
-70-
Q. Suppose South opens 1Í, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 2Ì – Advancer prefers the major suit.
•
Although both suits can be bid at the two level, the major is still
preferable.
•
As a general guideline:
W N E
X P
S
1Í
?
Advancer’s Choice of Suits
•
•
Advancer generally bids the longer suit.
With equal length, advancer bids the higher-ranking suit.
With a more advanced group you can discuss that this includes the situation where advancer has four
hearts and four spades. Rather than bidding up the line, advancer should usually bid spades first. If
the auction continues, advancer will then be in a position to conveniently mention hearts without
“reversing” (see pages 86/87).
Q. Would East expect to make a contract of 2Ì?
A. Yes – The partnership has a fit and at least half the overall strength.
•
West is likely to have four-card support for hearts so East should be in an eight-card
fit.
•
West has promised 13 or more points. Combined with East’s 7 high-card points, the
partnership should have 20 or more combined points.
•
West should expect to have a reasonable chance of making eight tricks in a heart
partscore if left to play there.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer jumps a level with 9-11 points.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart; add the ÌJ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away a low club; add the ÊQ.
-71-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
EAST
432
KJ43
43
AQ32
W N E
X P
?
S
1Ë
Q. South opens 1Ë, West doubles, and North passes. What call does East make?
A. 2Ì – Advancer wants to make an invitational bid.
•
West has 10 high-card points.
•
Since a bid at the cheapest available level could be made with no points at all,
advancer needs a way to show some values and interest in reaching a game contract.
•
Advancer makes an invitational bid by jumping a level, bidding 2Ì instead of 1Ì with
this hand.
•
Advancer’s jump is not forcing. It is invitational, showing about 9-11 points.
Q. Suppose South opens 1Í, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 3Ì – Advancer must jump to show an invitational hand.
•
W N E
X P
S
1Í
?
West’s jump will get the partnership to the three level but that
should be okay:
•
The partnership should have an eight-card fit in hearts.
•
The partnership should have at least 23 combined points.
•
If advancer doesn’t jump to show some values, West would be afraid to bid again even
with 15 or 16 points since advancer could have no points at all.
•
The jump is similar to a limit raise of 1Ì to 3Ì, showing an invitational hand and
four-card support.
•
Advancer is slightly more aggressive than responder . . . making an invitational jump
with about 9-11 points rather than 10-12. The partnership can afford to be more
aggressive when it knows where most of the missing points are located.
•
The level to which the partnership is taken by advancer’s jump depends on opener’s
bid and advancer’s suit. For example:
•
If South opens 1Ë, East’s jump is to 2Ì.
•
If South opens 1Í, East’s jump is to 3Ì.
•
If South opens 1Ë and East’s suit is clubs, East would have to jump to 3Ê to show
an invitational hand.
Q. Suppose South opens 2Í, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 4Ì – Advancer’s jump puts the partnership in game.
W N E
X P
S
2Í
?
•
East would have to bid 3Ì with no points at all.
•
With more than partner might expect, East should jump to show about 9-11 points.
•
This lands the partnership in game but that should be okay. West should have better
than a minimum takeout double to invite East into the auction over 2Í. West is
already willing to commit the partnership to the three level if East has a weak hand.
-72-
This may be a difficult concept to grasp and you may need to tell the class that the partnership cannot
be as accurate in competitive auctions as in uncontested auctions. For example, If North opened 1Ë,
South raised to 2Ë, and West doubled, East could make an invitational jump by bidding only 3Ì.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer gets the partnership to game with 12 or more points.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Add two low hearts.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away two low clubs.
EAST
432
KJ5432
43
AQ
W N E
X P
S
1Ë
?
Q. South opens 1Ë, West doubles, and North passes. What call does East make?
A. 4Ì – Advancer gets the partnership to game with 12 or more points.
•
West has 10 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit.
•
The partnership should have a nine or ten-card fit in hearts.
•
The partnership should have at least 25 combined points.
•
Advancer tends to be aggressive in competitive auctions, getting the partnership to
game with 12 or more points.
Unless someone raises the issue, skip the meaning of 3Ì in this auction. It is semi-preemptive . . .
showing a six-card or longer suit and about 6-8 points.
Q. Suppose South opens 1Í, West doubles, and North passes. What call
does East make?
A. 4Ì – Advancer again takes the partnership to game.
-73-
W N E
X P
?
S
1Í
Conclusion
•
A takeout double asks advancer to pick one of the unbid suits. With a choice of suits,
advancer bids the higher-ranking, preferring a major to a minor.
•
Advancer values the hand aggressively and bids at the appropriate level using the
following guideline:
Advancing a Takeout Double
0 - 8 points: Bid at the cheapest level.
9-11 points: Make an invitational bid by jumping one level.
12+ points: Get the partnership to game.
-74-
Hand 6 - When Responder Bids Over the Takeout Double
HAND: 6
DEALER: EAST
N-S
VUL:
NORTH
6543
J943
K82
K8
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
K97
A85
J64
9762
WEST
NORTH
2Ì
Pass
2Í
EAST
1Ì
Pass
SOUTH
Double
Pass
EAST
AQ
K Q 10 7 2
10 9 7
Q 10 3
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
J 10 8 2
6
AQ53
AJ54
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
North
OPENING LEAD: ÌK by East
Introduction
In today’s game, responder will often bid after an opponent’s takeout double,
even with a weak hand. Responder doesn’t want to make it easy for the opponents
to enter the auction and find their best spot.
When responder does something other than pass, advancer is no longer forced to
bid. However, the takeout doubler has invited partner into the auction and
advancer should be willing to accept the invitation with enough to compete.
If the partnership has 20 or more points . . . about half the deck . . . it should be
competing for the right to name the trump suit.
Let’s play the next hand and gain more experience with competitive bidding.
-75-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 6. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call would East make as dealer?
A. 1Ì – 13 high-card points and a five-card major suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call would South make over East’s 1Ì opening?
A. Double – An ideal takeout double.
•
South has 12 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton.
•
South has four-card support for each of the unbid suits.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. East opens 1Ì and South doubles. What call does West make?
A. 2Ì – A single raise.
•
West has 8 high-card points plus three-card support for the major.
•
West shouldn’t pass over the double. The double is for takeout, not for penalty.
•
West doesn’t want to make it to easy for North-South to enter the auction.
-76-
Focus on the North hand.
Q. East opens 1Ì, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ì. Does North have to bid?
A. No – Responder’s bid removes advancer’s obligation to bid.
•
When responder bids, advancer can pass and partner will have an opportunity to bid
again with a strong hand.
Q. Should North pass?
A. No – North has enough strength to compete for the contract.
•
North has 7 high-card points.
•
South has promised 13 or more points so the partnership has at least 20 combined
points . . . about half the total strength in the deal.
•
If North passes, East-West will likely buy the contract in 2Ì . . . their choice of trump
suit and level.
•
North and South should have enough strength to compete for partscore in their
choice of trump suit.
Q. What call should North make?
A. 2Í – Competing in the partnership’s likely eight-card fit.
•
South is likely to have four-card support for the unbid major suit.
•
North shouldn’t be concerned about the quality of the spades. South may have high
cards in the suit; if not, the partnership will have values elsewhere.
Q. Will South expect North to have a strong hand?
A. No – North is only competing.
•
With an invitational hand of about 9-11 points, North would jump to 3Í.
•
With a very weak hand of about 0-5 points, North would pass.
•
So, South can assume North is merely competing with about 6-8 points.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call would East make over North’s 2Í bid?
A. Pass – East has already described the hand with the opening bid.
-77-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call would South make?
A. Pass – South doesn’t have much extra strength for the takeout double.
•
North is only showing about 6-8 points, so the partnership is competing for partscore.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call would West make?
A. Pass – West has already described the hand with the raise to 2Ì.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose North is declarer in a contract of 2Í. Who makes the opening lead?
A. East.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East lead?
A.
ÌK – Top of the broken sequence in the suit the partnership has bid and raised.
Leave the ÌK in front of East and turn the remaining East-West cards face down.
Focus on the North hand as declarer in a contract of 2Í. Discuss with the others
at the table how you would plan to play the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. As declarer in 2Í, how many losers does North have?
A. 7 – Three spades and four hearts.
•
Assuming the missing spades are divided 3-2, declarer has three losers in that suit .
. . more if the spades are divided 4-1 or worse.
•
There are four losers in the heart suit but none in diamonds or clubs.
-78-
Q. What are declarer’s options for eliminating some of the losers?
A. Ruffing in dummy; discarding on extra winners.
•
Declarer can plan to ruff one or more of the heart losers in the dummy.
•
Declarer might be able to discard one or two heart losers on extra winners in the
dummy:
•
•
If the missing diamonds are divided 3-3, dummy’s fourth diamond will be a
winner.
•
Dummy’s ÊJ might be turned into a winner, either through a finesse or if the ÊQ
falls when a club is ruffed by declarer.
The play could follow many lines. Let’s look at one way the play might go.
Turn all the cards face up.
•
Suppose East leads the ÌK and it wins the first trick.
Trick1:
•
West: Ì5
North: Ì3
East: Ë10
South: Ë3
West: Ë4
North: ËK
South: Í2
West: Ì8
Declarer can now ruff a heart in dummy.
Trick3:
•
South: Ì6
East might choose to switch to the Ë10, hoping West holds the ËK and, perhaps the
ËJ. Declarer could win in the North hand, planning to ruff a heart.
Trick2:
•
East: ÌK
North: Ì4
East: Ì2
Declarer can return to the North hand with a club.
Trick4:
South: Ê4
East: Ê2
-79-
North: ÊK
West: Ê3
•
And ruff another heart loser.
Trick5:
•
•
East: Ì7
South: Í8
West: ÌA
With four tricks already, declarer might start to take some of the remaining winners.
Trick6:
South: ËA
West: Ë6
North: Ë2
East: Ë7
Trick7:
South: ËQ
West: ËJ
North: Ë8
East: Ë9
Trick 8:
South: ÊA
West: Ê6
North: Ê8
East: Ê10
North: Í3
East: ÊQ
Declarer can ruff a club for the eighth trick.
Trick 9:
•
North: Ì9
South: Ê4
West: Ê7
Declarer may try ruffing the last heart loser. West can overruff but declarer already
has eight tricks . . . and may come to a ninth in the trump suit.
Observation
•
North does well to compete to 2Í, since at least eight tricks can be made in that
contract.
•
Let’s see what might happen if North had passed and East-West were left to play in
a contract of 2Ì.
-80-
Turn all the cards face up.
Q. If East is declarer in a 2Ì contract, who would be on lead?
A. South.
Q. What might South lead?
A.
ÍJ – Top of the broken sequence.
•
Looking at the North hand, South’s best lead would be a diamond or perhaps a club.
•
Unfortunately, South can’t see partner’s hand and, with nothing else to go on, would
probably lead a spade.
Leave the ÍJ in front of South and turn the remaining North-South cards face
down. Focus on the East hand as declarer in a 2Ì contract. Discuss with the others
at the table how to make the contract after this opening lead.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does East have?
A. 6 – Three diamonds and three clubs.
•
Assuming the missing hearts are divided 3-2 or the
declarer won’t have any losers in the heart suit.
ÌJ falls on the first round,
Q. How can declarer plan to eliminate one of the losers?
A. Discard on the extra spade winner in dummy.
•
Either a diamond or a club loser can be discarded on dummy’s extra spade winner.
Q. Is there anything that might go wrong with declarer’s plan?
A. The missing hearts might divide 4-1.
•
This is quite likely since South made a takeout double.
•
If South holds four hearts, declarer can’t do anything about it.
Q. What can declarer do if North holds four hearts including the ÌJ?
A. Lead a heart from dummy and take a finesse against the ÌJ.
-81-
Q. At what point will declarer know whether the missing hearts are divided 4-1 or 3-2?
A. After two rounds of hearts.
•
If both defenders follow to the first two rounds, the missing hearts will have divided
3-2.
•
If a defender shows out on the second round of hearts, the hearts are divided 4-1.
Q. Where would declarer like to be after discovering the missing hearts are divided 4-1?
A. In the dummy.
•
Declarer can’t do anything if South holds four hearts including the ÌJ.
•
If North holds four hearts, declarer wants to lead the third round from dummy.
•
Let’s see how declarer can arrange all this.
Turn all the cards face up.
•
South leads a spade and East wins the first trick.
Trick 1:
•
West: Í7
North: Í3
East: ÍQ
Declarer takes the other spade winner to unblock the suit.
Trick 2:
•
South: ÍJ
East: ÍA
South: Í2
West: Í9
North: Í4
To guard against a possible bad split in hearts, declarer wants to play two rounds of
trumps ending in the West hand.
Trick 3:
East: ÌK
South: Ì6
West: Ì5
North: Ì3
Trick 4:
East: Ì2
South: Ë5
West: ÌA
North: Ì4
-82-
•
Declarer uncovers the bad heart break and is in the appropriate hand to do
something about it.
•
First, however, declarer uses the entry to take the ÍK and discard a diamond loser.
Trick 5:
•
West: ÍK
North: Í5
East: Ë7
South: Í8
East: Ì10
South: Ê5
Now declarer can take the heart finesse.
Trick 6:
•
West: Ì8
North: Ì9
Declarer gets three spade tricks and five heart tricks to make the contract.
If declarer had won the first two spade tricks and immediately crossed to the ÌA to discard a loser on the
ÍK, declarer wouldn’t find out about the bad heart break until playing the second round of hearts. Now
there would be no entry to dummy to take the heart finesse.
A Closer Look at Advancing After Responder Bids
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each player takes one suit.
Construct the following hand in front of North.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer should try to compete with 6-8 points.
Spades: The ÍQ and three low spades.
Hearts:
The ÌQ and two low hearts.
Diamonds: Two low diamonds.
Clubs:
The ÊK and three low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
Q432
Q32
32
K432
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë. What call does North make?
A. 2Í – Advancer wants to compete with 6-8 points.
•
North has 7 high-card points and there is a likely eight-card fit in spades.
•
South has 13 or more points, so the partnership has at least half the overall strength.
-83-
Q. What are the advantages of bidding?
A. Make a partscore; push the opponents higher.
•
North-South are likely to be able to make a two-level partscore contract if they have
an eight-card fit and approximately half the strength.
•
Even if 2Í goes down, East-West might make 2Ì and the penalty would be less than
the value of the opponents’ partscore.
•
East and West can no longer rest comfortably in a partscore of 2Ì. To buy the
contract, they will have to compete to at least 3Ì. That may be too high.
•
If the opponents do buy the contract, bidding might help the partnership on defense.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West bids 1NT. What
W N E S
call does North make?
1Ë X
A. 2Í – North should compete.
1NT ?
• Again, with 7 points, North has enough to compete.
•
With a choice between spades and clubs, most players would pick the major suit.
South is more likely to have four-card support for spades than clubs.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West passes. What call
does North make?
A. 1Í – Showing 0-8 points.
W N E S
1Ë X
P ?
•
When West passes, North is (essentially) forced to bid.
•
North doesn’t have enough to jump to 2Í. That would be invitational, showing about
9-11 points.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and North bids 1Í. East now bids 2Ë
and South and West both pass. What call does North make?
A. 2Í – North should be willing to compete to the two level.
•
With 7 points, North shouldn’t sell out to 2Ë.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í 2Ë P
P ?
Q. Will South expect North to hold a strong hand for making two bids?
A. No – North is already limited to about 8 points.
•
With 9 or more points, North would have jumped to 2Í originally.
•
North’s 1Í call showed 0-8 points; the 2Í call puts the hand in the 6-8 point range.
-84-
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ê, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ê. What
W N E S
call does North make?
1Ê X
A. 2Í/Pass – The decision is much closer.
2Ê ?
• Although West has 7 high-card points, 3 of the points are in the
opponents’ suit.
•
The ÊK is likely to be a wasted value for offense opposite South’s likely shortness in
the suit, leaving North with only 4 “working” points . . . the ÍQ and ÌQ.
•
The length and strength in clubs argue for defending rather than bidding.
•
Still, some players might bid 2Í anyway, hoping to push the opponents higher before
defending.
•
In a close decision like this, North might take the vulnerability into account . . .
passing if vulnerable; bidding if non vulnerable.
•
North doesn’t risk missing a game by passing. With a strong hand, South will have
another opportunity to bid.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 3Ë. What
call does North make?
A. Pass – North doesn’t have enough to compete to the three level.
W N E S
1Ë X
3Ë ?
•
With 7 high-card points, advancer doesn’t have quite enough to
compete to the three level.
•
It’s possible South only has three-card support for spades and the partnership could
be much too high in a 3Í contract . . . and get doubled for penalty.
•
South will expect more strength if North competes to the three level . . . about 9-11
points . . . and may continue to game.
•
The auction isn’t over if North passes. South might bid again with a strong hand.
With an experienced group you can point out how West’s jump to 3Ë . . . a preemptive raise in most
partnerships . . . makes the auction much more challenging for North-South. A good tactic to think
about.
You might want to skip part or all of the next example with an inexperienced group.
-85-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer wants to put the partnership in the best fit.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Add a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away a low club.
NORTH
Q432
Q432
32
K43
W N E S
1Ë X
P ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West passes. What call does North make?
A. 1Í/1Ì – Advancer has to pick a major suit.
•
North doesn’t have enough to make an invitational jump.
•
With four-card support for both hearts and spades, it’s basically a guess which suit to
bid.
•
Although South may have four-card support for both major suits, it’s possible that
South has only three-card support for one of the majors . . . the takeout doubler can’t
always have the perfect hand.
•
The general guideline in this situation, however, is for advancer to bid the higherranking suit, spades . . . rather than bidding “up the line” like responder.
•
Let’s see why.
Q. Suppose advancer were to bid 1Ì after partner’s takeout double.
East now rebids 2Ë and both South and West pass. What call does
North make?
A. 2Ì/2Í/Pass – An awkward choice.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì 2Ë P
P ?
•
With 7 high-card points, advancer doesn’t want to sell out to 2Ë
opposite partner’s takeout double.
•
North could compete by bidding 2Ì but the partnership might be in a seven-card fit
if South has three hearts and four spades.
•
North could bid the second suit, 2Í, but that might put the partnership in a sevencard fit if South has three spades and four hearts. South would now have to bid 3Ì
to put the partnership back in its eight-card fit and the partnership would be at the
three level.
Q. Suppose advancer were to bid 1Í after partner’s takeout double.
East now rebids 2Ë and both South and West pass. What call does
North make?
A. 2Ì – An easy choice.
-86-
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í 2Ë P
P ?
•
Advancer wants to compete.
•
Bidding 2Ì will work well if partner has four-card support for either major.
•
With three spades and four hearts, South can pass 2Ì.
•
With four spades and three hearts, South can give preference back to 2Í and the
partnership remains at the two level.
•
By bidding 1Í, advancer is better placed to compete if the auction continues.
This next point (the responsive double) should be skipped with an inexperienced group.
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë. What
call does North make?
A. 2Í/2Ì/Double – It depends on the partnership methods.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë ?
•
Advancer wants to compete with 7 points.
•
Either 2Ì or 2Í could work well, if South has four-card support. However, NorthSouth could land in a 4-3 fit.
•
Following the general principle of bidding the higher-ranking suit first, 2Í leaves
North better placed if the auction continues. However, much of the time the auction
will end with North’s call.
•
Some partnerships resolve this dilemma by adopting the following convention8:
The Responsive Double
If responder raises opener’s suit to the two or three level over a
takeout double, advancer’s double is for takeout rather than
penalty.
•
Without this agreement, advancer’s double would be for penalty, not for takeout.
Q. If the partnership uses responsive doubles, what call could North make if East opens 1Ë,
South doubles, and North raises to 2Ë?
A. Double – A responsive double.
•
Advancer’s double would be for takeout, asking South to pick the suit.
•
Advancer would presumably have four-card support for both majors in this situation.
With only one four-card major, advancer would bid it instead of using the responsive
double.
8
Some partnerships use responsive doubles through the four level or higher.
-87-
Q. Suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 2Ë, and North
makes a responsive double. East passes, South bids 2Ì, and West
passes. What call does North make?
A. Pass – A responsive double doesn’t promise another bid.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë X P 2Ì
P ?
•
The partnership has found an eight-card fit.
•
Advancer’s intention was merely to compete to the best partscore, not to look for
game.
Q. What if South bids 2Í after North’s responsive double?
A. Pass – The partnership has found an eight-card fit.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë X P 2Í
P ?
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer bids one level higher than necessary or competes to the three level with 911 points.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Take away the ÍQ.
Hearts:
Add the ÌA.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
NORTH
432
AQ432
32
K43
W N E S
1Í X
P ?
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, and West passes. What call does North make?
A. 3Ì – Advancer invites game.
•
North has 9 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
A bid at the cheapest level, 2Ì, would show only 0-8 points.
•
Advancer shows an invitational hand of about 9-11 points by jumping a level.
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, and West raises to 2Í. What call does
North make?
A. 3Ì – Showing an invitational hand.
W N E S
1Í X
2Í ?
•
Advancer doesn’t need to jump to show an invitational hand.
•
By competing to the three level, advancer implies a hand of invitational strength.
•
With 0-8 points, advancer would pass over the raise to 2Í . . . not having enough to
compete at the three level.
-88-
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West passes. What call does
North make?
A. 2Ì – A jump shows an invitational hand.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P ?
Advancer only needs to jump to the two level when the opening
bid is a minor suit.
Q. Now suppose East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë.
What call does North make?
A. 3Ì – Advancer has to jump to show an invitational hand.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë ?
•
A bid of 2Ì would only be competitive, showing about 6-8 points
. . . too much to sell out to 2Ë.
•
To show an invitational hand, advancer has to jump to the three level.
This last point can be skipped with an inexperienced group.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: The responsive double can be used at the three level.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Add the ÍK.
Hearts:
Take away the ÌQ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
NORTH
K432
A432
32
K43
W N E S
1Ë X
3Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 3Ë. What call does North make?
A. Double – If the partnership uses responsive doubles.
•
With 10 high-card points, advancer has enough to compete to the three level.
•
Advancer could guess whether to bid 3Ì or 3Í but that might land the partnership
in a seven-card fit.
•
If the partnership uses responsive doubles, advancer can make a takeout double,
asking South to bid a suit . . . presumably a four-card major suit.
•
Whether South bids hearts or spades, the partnership will have found an eight-card
fit.
-89-
Conclusion
•
When responder bids, advancer is no longer forced to bid.
•
However, advancer should be willing to compete:
•
•
To the two level with about 6-8 points.
•
To the three level with 9-11 points.
If responder raises opener’s suit, the partnership can agree to play advancer’s double for
takeout rather than penalty . . . the responsive double convention.
-90-
Hand 7 - Advancing in Notrump
HAND: 7
DEALER: SOUTH
E-W
VUL:
NORTH
43
J 10 7 5
AQJ
A J 10 3
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
AK952
AK
10 9 6 2
97
WEST
NORTH
EAST
1Í
Pass
Double
Pass
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
1NT
EAST
10 6
Q983
843
Q862
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ87
642
K75
K54
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
South
OPENING LEAD: Í5 by West
Introduction
The takeout doubler typically describes a hand that is short in the opponent’s suit.
An ideal takeout double of 1Ì, for example, would be made with four spades, four
diamonds, four clubs, and a singleton heart.
Playing in one of the unbid suits is the first priority, even if advancer has some
strength in the opponent’s suit. A high card in the opponent’s suit, such as a king,
that is held by advancer is usually poorly placed to take a trick. The opening
bidder, on advancer’s left, is likely to hold the ace and queen.
When advancer does have a reasonable amount of strength, it may be an
advantage to play in a notrump contract. Advancer’s holding in opener’s suit is
somewhat protected if responder, on advancer’s right, can’t gain the lead. The
more strength advancer has the less there is available for responder.
-91-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 7. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make as dealer?
A. Pass – Only 9 high-card points.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after South passes?
A. 1Í – 14 high-card points and a five-card major suit.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make over West’s 1Í opening?
A. Double – A standard takeout double.
•
13 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton spade.
•
Support for the unbid suits . . . four-card support for the unbid major.
-92-
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make after West’s 1Í opening is doubled for takeout?
A. Pass – Only 4 high-card points and no fit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after partner’s takeout double?
A. 1NT – 9 high-card points with strength in the opponent’s suit.
•
A 1NT advance shows about 6-10 high-card points. It is not a weak bid.
•
Advancer needs a “good” holding in opener’s suit, especially when it is a major suit
. . . since that is likely to be the suit led.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s rebid over South’s 1NT call?
A. Pass – West has nothing extra for the opening bid.
•
Also, East passed over the double, indicating a weak hand with no fit for spades.
•
2Ë, showing the second suit, would be risky, especially since North is likely to have
length and strength in diamonds for the takeout double.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What is North’s rebid after advancer’s 1NT call?
A. Pass – North has already described the hand with the takeout double.
•
North has no reason to overrule advancer’s choice of contract.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is East’s call?
A. Pass.
-93-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose South is declarer in a contract of 1NT. Who makes the opening lead?
A. West.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What would West lead?
A.
Í5 – Fourth from longest and strongest.
•
Despite South’s 1NT call, West doesn’t have much reason to deviate from the
standard lead, especially with entries in hearts to help regain the lead.
•
A diamond lead would be a reasonable alternative.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East play on the first trick?
A.
Í10 – Third hand high.
Leave the Í5 in front of West as the opening lead and the Í10 in front of East as
the card played to the first trick. Turn the remaining East-West cards face down.
and focus on the South hand as declarer. Discuss with the others at the table the
best chance for making 1NT.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many tricks does declarer have?
A. Six – One spade (after winning the first trick), three diamonds, and two clubs.
Q. Which suits offer a chance for the extra trick required?
A. Clubs/Hearts/Spades – Clubs are the most promising.
•
The club suit can provide at least one trick through promotion.
•
Declarer can also try the straightforward club finesse, hoping West holds the ÊQ. It
could work since West opened the bidding. Even if it loses, declarer will get an extra
club winner.
•
The defenders might establish South’s remaining spade honor as a trick by taking the
ÍA and ÍK.
-94-
Q. Is there any danger?
A. Yes – East is a dangerous opponent.
•
If East gains the lead, East may return a spade, trapping South’s remaining honor and
allowing the defense to take four tricks in that suit . . . along with their heart winners.
•
Let’s see what might happen if declarer chooses to stake everything on the club
finesse.
Turn all the cards face up. Place the Í5 in front of West as the opening lead.
Skip the first point with an inexperienced group.
Q. West leads the Í5, a low spade is played from dummy, and East plays the Í10, third hand
high. Does it matter whether South wins this trick with the ÍJ or ÍQ?
A. Yes – The ÍQ is more deceptive.
If declarer wins the first trick with the ÍJ, West will ‘know’ that declarer also holds the
ÍQ. East would have played the ÍQ on the first trick if holding that card.
• If declarer wins the first trick with the ÍQ, West will be unsure who holds the ÍJ. East
would have played the Í10 holding both the ÍJ and Í10. Third hand plays high, but
•
only as high as necessary . . . the lower of touching honors.
•
It’s always a good idea for declarer to create doubt in the defenders’ minds whenever
possible.
•
If declarer wins the first tricks with the deceptive ÍQ and West regains the lead, West
might continue leading spades, thinking East holds the ÍJ9.
Trick 1:
•
West: Í5
North: Í3
East: Í10
South: ÍQ
Suppose declarer now tries to get an extra trick by taking the club finesse.
Trick 2:
South: ÊK
West: Ê7
North: Ê3
East: Ê2
While the defenders must usually play their cards in a standard manner to help partner
. . . leading fourth highest and top of touching honors, for example . . . declarer is under no
such compulsion. Declarer is free to play the cards in the most deceptive way to try to
confuse the defenders.
9
-95-
Trick 3:
South: Ê4
West: Ê9
North: Ê10
East: ÊQ
The finesse (surprisingly?) Loses to East’s ÊQ and East returns partner’s suit.
•
Trick 4:
•
East: Í6
South: ?
West:
It doesn’t matter whether South plays a low spade or the
spades and the ÌA-K to defeat 1NT.
North:
ÍJ, West can take four
Q. Is there anything declarer might have done to prevent East from gaining the lead?
A. Yes – Take the club finesse in the other direction.
•
Since East is the dangerous opponent, it would be better to take the club finesse in
the opposite direction.
•
Let’s see how that would work.
Turn all the cards face up.
Trick 1:
•
East: Í10
South: ÍQ
South: Ë5
East: Ë2
North: ËA
West: Ë3
. . . and takes the club finesse into the safe opponent by leading the ÊJ (or Ê10).
Trick 3:
•
North: Í3
Declarer now crosses to dummy.
Trick 2:
•
West: Í5
North: ÊJ
West: Ê2
South: Ê4
East: Ê7
On the actual layout, the club finesse wins and declarer has seven tricks without giving
East the lead . . . one spade, three diamonds, and three clubs.
-96-
•
Let’s see what would happen if West held the ÊQ instead of East.
Turn all the cards face up. Give East’s ÊQ to West and West’s Ë2 to East.
Trick 1:
•
East: Í10
South: ÍQ
South: Ë5
East: Ë6
North: ËA
West: Ë2
South: Ê4
East: ÊQ
. . . to takes the ‘backward’ club finesse.
Trick 3:
•
North: Í3
Declarer again crosses to dummy.
Trick 2:
•
West: Í5
North: ÊJ
West: Ê2
This time the finesse loses to East’s ÊQ.
Q. What can West do at this point to defeat the contract?
A. Nothing – West is not a dangerous opponent.
•
If West leads spades, declarer will get a trick with the ÍJ.
•
If West leads something else . . . a diamond perhaps . . . declarer has seven tricks
because dummy’s Ê10 s now a winner.
West might be able to put East on lead with a heart . . . although not on the actual hand . . . but this
would be a difficult defense to find. Declarer might even be more deceptive by crossing to dummy with the
ÊA, leaving West in doubt about the location of the ËK . . . making a heart shift even less likely.
Observation
•
When planning the play of the hand, determine whether one opponent is more
dangerous than the other.
•
Whenever possible, avoid giving up the lead to the dangerous opponent.
-97-
A Closer Look at Advancing in Notrump
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Give one suit to each player.
Construct the following hand in front of South.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: A 1NT bid by advancer can’t be made with a weak hand.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Three low spades.
Hearts:
Three low hearts.
Diamonds: Four low diamonds.
Clubs:
Three low clubs.
SOUTH
432
432
5432
432
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1Ì – The cheapest available bid.
•
Advancer should not bid notrump without length and strength in the opponent’s suit
since the takeout doubler is presumably short in that suit.
•
Instead, advancer may need to manufacture a bid in the cheapest available suit.
•
Hopefully, North won’t raise hearts too vigorously with a strong hand . . . taking into
account that advancer was forced to bid something.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s 1NT bid shows about 6-10 points with strength in the opponent’s suit.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away two low diamonds. Add
the ËA and ËQ.
Clubs:
-98-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
432
432
AQ54
432
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT – Showing a balanced hand with 6-10 points and strength in the opponent’s suit.
•
A 1NT bid by advancer is similar to a 1NT bid by responder. It shows about 6-10
points.
•
It also shows strength in the suit bid by the opponents. This is more important if the
opening bid is in a major suit rather than a minor suit. Opener is known to have at
least a five-card suit.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer has to use some judgment.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away a low diamond.
Clubs:
Add the ÊQ.
SOUTH
432
432
AQ5
Q432
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT/2Ê – Advancer has a choice.
•
North’s takeout double asks advancer to pick one of the unbid suits.
•
Advancer has to use some judgment in selecting notrump instead of bidding a suit.
•
With this hand, 1NT is probably a better choice than 2Ê because:
•
It requires one less trick than 2Ê.
•
North may have only three-card support for clubs, a minor suit. Advancer doesn’t
want to play in a 4-3 fit.
•
West may not have a lot of length or strength in diamonds. A minor suit opening
could be made on a three-card suit.
•
South’s diamond holding will provide two tricks in a notrump contract if West
leads the suit. Alternatively, it will prevent West from leading the suit without
giving up a trick.
-99-
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: A jump to 2NT shows about 11-12 points.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away a low club; add the ÊK.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
432
432
AQ5
KQ43
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What are South’s options?
A. 2NT/3Ê – Advancer has to show an invitational hand.
•
With 11 high-card points, South is too strong to bid at the cheapest available level.
•
South wants to invite opener to game by jumping a level.
•
South could jump to 3Ê, but this might land the partnership in a 4-3 fit or get the
partnership to 5Ê, an eleven trick contract.
•
An invitational jump to 2NT, showing about 11-12 points, is more likely to be the
winning call.
•
If North-South have enough for game, a nine trick contract should be easier than an
eleven trick contract.
Hand 5
Teacher’s Key Point: A jump to 3NT shows 13 or more points.
Spades: Take away a low spade; add the ÍK.
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
K43
432
AQ5
KQ43
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call would South make?
A. 3NT – The partnership should have enough for game.
•
With 14 high-card points, advancer wants to get the partnership to game opposite
partner’s takeout double.
•
With no likely eight-card fit in a major suit, nine tricks in notrump should be easier
than eleven tricks in clubs.
-100-
•
South has two diamond tricks if West leads the suit.
•
North-South should have enough combined strength to develop nine tricks even if
South doesn’t lead the suit . . . especially since declarer will know the location of most
of the missing high cards.
Q. West opens 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call would
South make?
A. 3NT – Same idea.
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
•
The strong club holding should be enough to make a 3NT contract viable, even if
North holds a singleton.
•
South shouldn’t consider passing. North-South are more likely to make game than
to extract a large penalty defending 1Ê doubled.
Don’t get into what South would do if the opening bid is 1Ì or 1Í. That’s a topic for the next lesson.
Conclusion
•
With good cards in the opponent’s suit and no better option, advancer can bid
notrump:
Advancing in Notrump
6 - 10 points:
11-12 points:
13+ points:
•
Bid notrump at the cheapest level.
Bid notrump, jumping one level.
Bid game in notrump.
Advancer needs to be more careful about having strength in the opponent’s suit if it
is a major than if it is a minor . . . which could be short.
-101-
-102-
Hand 8 - Advancer’s Forcing Bids
HAND: 8
DEALER: WEST
BOTH
VUL:
WEST
1Ë
Pass
Pass
NORTH
K85
AQ97
74
KJ93
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
Q 10 7 4
62
AKQJ5
74
NORTH
Double
2Ì
Pass
EAST
Pass
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
2Ë
4Ì
EAST
92
543
10 9 2
Q 10 8 6 5
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AJ63
K J 10 8
863
A2
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
North
OPENING LEAD: Ë10 by East
Introduction
Advancer’s bid at the cheapest level shows about 0-8 points and is non forcing.
Advancer’s jump shows an invitational hand of about 9-11 points and is also non
forcing. With 12 or more points, advancer generally takes the partnership to game.
With an invitational or game-going hand, advancer sometimes needs more
information from partner before deciding on the best contract. So, advancer
needs a forcing call.
The bid that is readily available for that purpose is the cuebid . . . a bid of the
opponent’s suit. Advancer obviously doesn’t want to play in the opponent’s suit
. . . with length and strength in the opponent’s suit, advancer could pass the
takeout double for penalty.
Let’s play the next hand to see a competitive auction in action.
-103-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 8. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s call in first chair?
A. 1Ë – 12 high-card points plus 1 for the five-card suit.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. Does North have enough to enter the auction?
A. Yes – North can make a takeout double.
•
North 13 high-card points and can add 1 dummy point for the doubleton diamond.
•
North has support for the unbid suits.
•
North has only three-card support for spades. That’s not perfect but it is adequate.
North can’t always wait for the perfect hand to enter the auction.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make over North’s takeout double?
A. Pass – Only 2 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card club suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. Opposite North’s takeout double, does South know how high the partnership belongs?
A. Yes, game – Advancer has 13 high-card points.
-104-
•
North is promising the values for an opening bid so the partnership has at least 26
combined points and belongs at the game level.
Q. Does South know where the partnership belongs?
A. No – Advancer can’t be sure which major suit is better.
•
North has promised support for the unbid suits but not necessarily four-card support.
•
South can’t be certain that the partnership has an eight-card fit in hearts or an eightcard fit in spades.
•
It’s even possible the partnership belongs in notrump if North has some strength in
diamonds.
Q. What forcing call is available to advancer to get more information from North?
A. 2Ë – A cuebid of the opponent’s suit.
•
A jump in either major suit would be invitational, not forcing.
•
If advancer wanted to play with diamonds as trump, advancer would simply pass and
defend for penalties.
•
So, there is no need for 2Ë as a natural call.
Advancer’s Cuebid
A bid of the opponent’s suit by advancer is forcing:
• It shows interest in reaching game . . . a hand of
invitational strength or more.
• It asks for further description of the doubler’s hand.
•
The term cuebid is the same as that used in slam bidding auctions to show aces and
kings. A cuebid of the opponent’s suit in a competitive auction, however, is simply an
artificial forcing bid.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, East passes, and South cuebids 2Ë. What call does West
make?
A. Pass/Double – West has already described the hand.
•
South’s cuebid is totally artificial, so there is no point in doubling for penalty . . .
North-South won’t be playing in diamonds.
-105-
•
The only reason to double is to emphasize the quality of the diamonds . . . to ensure
that East will lead the suit if North becomes declarer.
•
The disadvantage of doubling is that it gives North two additional options: passing
and redoubling. The availability of these bids may give North-South more room to
find the best contract on some hands.
•
West doesn’t have enough strength to bid 3Ë . . . or bid 2Í, a suit North-South are
likely to hold.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make after South cuebids 2Ë?
A. 2Ì – Showing the four-card heart suit.
•
Advancer’s cuebid is forcing, so the takeout doubler makes a descriptive bid.
•
With no five-card or longer suit, the takeout doubler usually bids four-card suits up
the line . . . bidding at the cheapest available level. The partnership is initially
searching for a trump fit.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make over North’s 2Ì call?
A. Pass.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South after North bids 2Ì and East passes?
A. 4Ì – The partnership has found its fit.
•
Advancer now knows the partnership has an eight-card major suit fit.
•
With 13 high-card points, advancer knows the partnership belongs in game.
Q. How does the auction continue after South’s 4Ì bid?
A. Pass, Pass, Pass – No one has anything else to say.
-106-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose North is declarer in a contract of 4Ì. Who makes the opening lead?
A. East.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East lead?
A.
Ë10 – Top of the touching high cards in partner’s suit.
Put the Ë10 in front of East. Turn the remaining East-West cards face down. Focus
on the North hand as declarer in a contract of 4Ì. Discuss with the others at the
table how declarer should play the contract.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have?
A. Five – One spade, two diamonds, and two clubs.
Q. What are declarer’s options for eliminating losers?
A. Finesse, ruff losers.
•
Declarer could try the spade finesse, hoping East has the ÍQ. However, West opened
the bidding so the finesse may not work.
•
Declarer could try the club finesse, hoping West has the ÊQ. That is more likely to
work than the spade finesse but is not a sure thing.
•
Declarer could plan to ruff two club losers in dummy. Provided the defenders can’t
ruff the first two rounds of clubs, this is a sure thing.
•
Declarer’s best option is to plan to ruff two club losers.
Turn all the cards face up. Put the Ë10 in front of East as the opening lead.
Q. Which card would West play on the first trick?
A.
ËJ – Overtaking.
•
West could let partner’s Ë10 win the first trick but will probably overtake in case it is
a singleton.
-107-
Trick 1:
•
East: Ë10
South: Ë3
West: ËJ
North: Ë4
West will likely continue with a second round of diamonds.
Trick 2:
West: ËA
North: Ë7
East: Ë2
South: Ë6
•
West will probably continue with a third round of diamonds.
•
Declarer has all the high hearts, so there is no danger of being overruffed.
Trick 3:
West: ËK
North: Ì7
East: Ë9
South: Ë8
Q. Can declarer afford to draw trumps at this point?
A. No – Declarer needs to ruff club losers10.
•
Even if the missing hearts are divided 3-2, drawing trumps would take three rounds,
leaving only one heart in dummy.
•
Since two clubs need to be ruffed, declarer can’t afford to draw all the trumps.
•
Declarer can go about ruffing a club loser.
Trick 4:
North: Ê3
East: Ê5
South: ÊA
West: Ê4
Trick 5:
South: Ê2
West: Ê7
North: ÊK
East: Ê6
Trick 6:
North: Ê9
East: Ê8
South: Ì8
West: Ë5
10
Declarer could actually play the hand as a dummy reversal . . . playing three rounds of spades and then
ruffing the fourth round in the North hand. However, there’s no need to go through that line of play.
-108-
•
With all the high hearts, declarer doesn’t have to worry about being overruffed11.
•
Since the ÊQ hasn’t appeared, declarer will have to ruff the last club.
•
Declarer can get back to the North hand in the trump suit.
•
•
Trick 7:
South: Ì10
West: Ì2
North: ÌQ
East: Ì3
Trick 8:
North: ÊJ
East: ÊQ
South: ÌJ
West: Í4
Declarer can draw the remaining trumps, overtaking to get back to the North hand.
Trick 9:
South: ÌK
West: Ì6
North: ÌA
East: Ì4
Trick 10:
North: Ì9
East: Ì5
South: Í3
West: ËQ
Now declarer can take the two spade tricks and make the contract.
Observation
Turn all the cards face up.
•
If South did not have the cuebid available on this hand, the partnership might get to
the wrong contract.
•
South would have to guess which suit to bid and might jump to 4Í, choosing the
higher-ranking suit.
•
In 4Í, South would likely lose two diamond tricks and two spade tricks, going
down one.
Technically, declarer should take the ÍA and ÍK early to prevent a defender from discarding spades while
clubs are being ruffed . . . and later being able to ruff one of declarer’s spade winners. On the actual hand, it
won’t matter.
11
-109-
A Closer Look at Advancer’s Cuebid
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each student take one suit.
Construct the following hand in front of South.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s only forcing call is a cuebid of the opponent’s suit.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
The ÍA, ÍJ, and two low spades.
The ÌK, ÌJ, and two low hearts.
Three low diamonds.
The ÊA and a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AJ32
KJ32
432
A2
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ë – Cuebidding the opponent’s suit.
•
Advancer knows the partnership belongs in game but needs more information to
determine the best trump suit.
•
Advancer’s cuebid of diamonds doesn’t promise any particular holding in the suit.
It is merely forcing. Here, for example, South holds three low cards in diamonds.
Q. Suppose West opens 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call
does South make?
A. 2Ê – Cuebidding the opponent’s suit.
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
•
Advancer again wants to be in game opposite North’s takeout double.
•
To search for the best spot, South starts with a cuebid.
•
On this hand, South holds the ace of the opponent’s suit, but that is coincidence, not
a requirement.
•
The cuebid is totally artificial and simply asks partner for a further description of the
hand.
Q. Suppose West opens 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. South
cuebids 2Ê. West passes, North bids 2Ì, and East passes. What call
does South make?
A. 4Ì – Advancer knows how high and where.
•
W N E S
1Ê X P 2Ê
P 2Ì P ?
Advancer knows both how high (game) and where (hearts) the partnership belongs
and takes the partnership to the best contract.
-110-
Q. Suppose North bids 2Í in response to South’s cuebid. What call does
South make?
A. 4Í – South can be confident the partnership has an eight-card fit in
spades.
W N E S
1Ê X P 2Ê
P 2Í P ?
Q. Suppose West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East raises to 2Ë. What
call does South make?
A. 3Ë – A cuebid.
W N E S
1Ë X 2Ë ?
•
Advancer can use the cuebid at any level to get more information from partner.
•
If North bids 3Ì over the cuebid, South will raise to 4Ì; if North bids 3Í, South will
raise to 4Í. Cuebidding helps the partnership reach the right major-suit game.
Q. Suppose West opens 3Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call
does South make?
A. 4Ê – A cuebid.
W N E
3Ê X P
S
?
•
A cuebid offers the best chance of guaranteeing that the partnership lands in an
eight-card fit.
•
North is likely to have four-card support for both unbid majors, but there is no
guarantee.
•
Having the cuebid available takes some pressure off the takeout doubler to always
have the perfect hand. North can make a takeout double of 3Ê with four spades and
only three hearts, for example, with some assurance that the partnership has a tool
available to avoid landing in a 4-3 fit . . . at least some of the time.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer can make a cuebid with a hand of invitational strength or more.
Spades:
Take away the ÍA and add the ÍQ.
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ32
KJ32
432
A2
W N E
1Ë X P
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ë – A cuebid.
-111-
S
?
•
With 11 high-card points South wants to make an invitational bid. With four cards in
both majors, however, it isn’t clear whether South should jump to 2Ì or to 2Í.
•
The cuebid helps resolve this challenge. A cuebid only promises game-invitational
values . . . although advancer can have more. It is only forcing until a suit has been agreed
. . . bid and raised.
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, East passes, and South cuebids 2Ë.
West passes, North bids 2Ì, and East passes. What call does South
make?
A. 3Ì – Inviting partner to bid game with more than a minimum
takeout double.
•
W N E S
1Ë X P 2Ë
P 2Ì P ?
A raise to 3Ì is invitational, not forcing. The cuebid is only forcing until a suit has
been agreed. With game-going values, South would raise to 4Ì.
Q. What if North bids 2Í instead of 2Ì?
A. 3Í – An invitational raise.
W N E S
1Ë X P 2Ë
P 2Í P ?
•
The takeout doubler can’t tell if advancer has an invitational or
a game-going hand until advancer’s rebid . . . unless advancer is
a passed hand.
•
If advancer passed initially, then a cuebid shows only invitational values. Advancer
would presumably have opened the bidding with enough to insist on game opposite
a takeout double.
Q. Suppose South is dealer and elects to pass. West opens with a weak
2Ë bid, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 3Ë – A cuebid.
•
W N E
2Ë X P
S
P
?
Being a passed hand, South can afford to cuebid to show
invitational values with doubt about the best denomination.
Q. If North bids 3Ì after the cuebid, what call can South make?
A. Pass (4Ì) – A matter of judgment.
W N E
S
P
2Ë X P 3Ë
P 3Ì P ?
•
Since South passed initially, the 3Ë cuebid specifically showed
invitational values only. South does not have to bid again when
North bids 3Ì . . . or 3Í.
•
North should be aware that South is a passed hand. With more than a minimum for
the takeout double, North should jump to 4Ì or 4Í.
•
South has a good hand opposite North’s takeout double and may well decide to
continue to game anyway. The point, however, is that South isn’t forced to bid again
having cuebid as a passed hand.
-112-
Advancer’s Cuebid
If responder passes after opener’s suit has been doubled for takeout,
advancer’s only forcing bid is a cuebid of opener’s suit.
• The cuebid shows at least invitational values and doubt about the best
denomination and/or level. Otherwise, advancer makes a natural
invitational or game bid.
• By an unpassed hand, advancer’s cuebid is forcing until a suit has been
agreed . . . bid and raised by the partnership.
• By a passed hand, advancer’s cuebid shows only invitational values and
does not promise another bid.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: When advancer doesn’t have the strength to cuebid, advancer should be
prepared to bid again if necessary . . . for example, by starting with the higher-ranking suit.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away the ÊA; add a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ32
KJ32
432
32
W N E
1Ë X P
S
?
Q. West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1Í (1Ì) – Advancer has to choose the suit.
•
With only 7 high-card points, South doesn’t have enough to make an invitational bid
by jumping to the two level . . . or by cuebidding. Instead, South has to guess which
major to bid.
•
The best choice is to bid 1Í . . . the higher-ranking suit. This makes it economical to
later bid hearts if given the opportunity.
•
For example, over 1Í, West might rebid 2Ë. If this is passed back around, South can
now compete with 2Ì. North can then correct back to 2Í with a preference for
spades over hearts.
•
If South were to bid 1Ì, it would be more awkward to compete later. Suppose West
now bids 2Ë and the bidding comes back to South. If South bids 2Í to show the
second suit, North will have to go to the three level, 3Ì, with a preference for hearts
over spades.
-113-
This next point may be a little beyond the students at this level.
•
With a choice of four-card suits to bid at the cheapest level, advancer bids them in the
reverse order to responder. Responder bids four-card suits up the line . . . lowestranking first. Advancer bids four-card suits down the line . . . highest-ranking first.
This next point can be skipped with an inexperienced group.
Teacher’s Key Point: The partnership can agree to use responsive doubles when responder raises.
Q. Suppose West opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East raises to 2Ë. What
call does South make?
A. 2Í/2Ì/Double – It depends on the partnership methods.
W N E S
1Ë X 2Ë ?
•
East’s raise to 2Ë removes advancer’s obligation to bid. With 7 high-card points and
both majors, however, advancer should be willing to compete to the two level.
•
Using standard methods, South will have to guess which suit to bid in this situation.
•
There is slight preference for 2Í over 2Ì because bidding 2Í leaves some flexibility
to later bid hearts if there is further competition.
•
A conventional way to resolve the dilemma of whether to bid hearts or spades is to use
the responsive double . . . as introduced in the previous lesson hand.
Responsive Double
If responder raises opener’s suit after a takeout double, advancer’s double is
for takeout and shows:
• Enough strength to compete at the appropriate level.
• Both major suits if the opponents are bidding and raising a minor suit.
With just one major, advancer bids it.
• Both minor suits if the opponents are bidding and raising a major suit.
With the unbid major suit or only one minor, advancer bids that suit.
Q. Suppose the partnership has agreed to use responsive doubles. West
W N E S
opens 1Ë, North doubles, and East raises to 2Ë. What call does 1Ë X 2Ë ?
South make?
A. Double – Showing enough to compete at the two level and both major suits.
-114-
Q. Over South’s responsive double, West passes and North bids 2Ì.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Advancer’s responsive double doesn’t promise another bid.
W N E S
1Ë X 2Ë X
P 2Ì P ?
•
The responsive double only promises enough to compete.
Advancer will usually pass whichever suit partner chooses.
•
With extra strength, the takeout doubler will have to jump or cuebid.
Conclusion
•
When responder passes after a takeout double, advancer’s only forcing bid is a cuebid
of opener’s suit.
•
A cuebid by an unpassed hand shows at least invitational values and is forcing until
the partnership has bid and raised a suit.
•
A cuebid by a passed hand shows invitational values and advancer does not promise
another bid.
•
If responder raises opener’s suit, some partnerships agree to play that advancer’s
double is for takeout rather than penalty. This is a responsive double and only shows
enough to compete at the appropriate level.
-115-
-116-
Lesson 3 - Doubler’s Rebid and
the Subsequent Auction
Hand 9 - Doubler’s Rebid
WEST
HAND: 9
DEALER: NORTH
VUL:
NONE
NORTH
Í 10 5 3
Ì J 10 9 7
Ë Q865
Ê 10 7
WEST
Í 874
Ì Q3
Ë J72
Ê J8432
Pass
Pass
NORTH
Pass
1Ì
Pass
EAST
1Ë
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Double
3Ì (2Ë)
EAST
Í A62
Ì K64
Ë A K 10 9
Ê 965
SOUTH
Í KQJ9
Ì A852
Ë 43
Ê AKQ
DECLARER:
North
OPENING LEAD: ËA by East
Introduction
After the takeout double, advancer usually chooses the trump suit and decides
whether to stop in partscore, invite game, or bid game.
Unless advancer has asked for further information by making an invitational bid
or a cuebid, the takeout doubler shouldn’t consider bidding again except with
considerable extra strength.
The takeout doubler must be very careful when advancer has bid at the cheapest
available level. Advancer was forced to bid and may have no points at all!
Let’s play the next hand to see how the players try to get to their best contract.
-117-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 9. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the North hand.
Q. As dealer, does North have an opening bid?
A. No.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. After North passes, what call does East make?
A. 1Ë – A balanced hand with 14 high-card points, not strong enough to open 1NT.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make over East’s 1Ë opening bid?
A. Double – The strength of the takeout double is unlimited.
•
South has 19 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton diamond.
•
South has support for the unbid suits . . . including four-card support for both majors.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South doubles the 1Ë opening bid, what call does West make?
A. Pass – Only 4 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
West might consider raising to 2Ë but with only three-card support the partnership
could land in a 4-3 fit . . . or even a 3-3 fit!
-118-
Focus on the North hand.
Q. After partner doubles the 1Ë opening and West passes, what call does North make?
A. 1Ì – Choosing an unbid suit and bidding at the cheapest available level.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is East’s rebid after North takes the double out to 1Ì?
A. Pass – East has said everything with the opening bid.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What is the value of the South hand?
A. 20 points – 19 high-card points plus 1 for the doubleton.
Q. If South had opened 1Ê and North had responded 1Ì, what call would South make?
A. 4Ì – Putting the partnership in game.
•
A response of 1Ì would show 6 or more points and four or more hearts.
•
South would know the partnership has an eight-card or longer major suit fit and
enough combined strength for game.
Q. How many points has advancer shown with the 1Ì bid?
A. 0-8 points – Advancer bid at the cheapest level.
Q. Does South know where the partnership belongs?
A. Yes – Hearts.
•
North should have four or more hearts, so the partnership has an eight-card fit.
With an experienced group you could mention that it is possible North holds only three hearts. North
might have a very weak hand without four cards in one of the unbid suits.
Q. Does South know how high the partnership belongs?
A. No – The combined strength is somewhere between 20 and 28 points.
•
North might have fewer than 6 points and the partnership could belong in partscore.
•
North might have about 6-8 points and the partnership could belong in game.
-119-
Q. What call does South make after advancer’s 1Ì bid?
A. 3Ì – Inviting advancer to bid game.
•
South doesn’t have enough strength to insist on game.
•
South can make a strong invitation to game by making a jump raise.
•
As a general guideline, South would:
•
Pass the 1Ì advance with a minimum takeout double of about 13-16 points.
•
Raise to 2Ì with a medium-strength takeout double of about 17-18 points.
•
Make a jump raise with a very strong takeout double of about 19-21 points.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after South jumps to 3Ì?
A. Pass.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make after partner’s jump to 3Ì?
A. Pass – Declining the invitation.
•
North has only 3 high-card points . . . 2 of which are in the opponent’s suit.
•
Even though South is issuing a strong invitation, the partnership is unlikely to have
enough combined strength for game.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make?
A. Pass.
-120-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Who’s on lead against 3Ì?
A. East.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East lead?
A.
ËA – Top of the touching honors.
•
East doesn’t have any other attractive lead.
•
The ËA is likely to win the first trick and East will be in a better position to decide
what to do next after seeing the dummy.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What card would West play on the first trick?
A.
Ë2 – A discouraging signal.
•
East’s opening lead probably shows the ËA and ËK but West doesn’t hold the ËQ.
•
If East also holds the ËQ, East can continue leading the suit without West’s help.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. After winning the first trick with the ËA, what would West lead at trick two?
A. Club, diamond, heart, or spade – Nothing is really attractive.
•
West has made a discouraging signal in diamonds, so leading the ËK will win a
second trick but may help declarer by establishing the ËQ as a winner.
•
A trump lead could be right, but leading away from the ÌK is risky.
•
A spade lead is unlikely to do much good and may help declarer establish winners in
the suit.
•
A club lead is unlikely to do much good, but won’t do any harm. Declarer is always
going to get the three club winners in dummy.
•
Let’s suppose East settles on the passive lead of a club at trick two . . . which doesn’t
help declarer in any way.
-121-
Turn the East-West hands face down. Focus on the North hand as declarer in a 3Ì
contract. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer might plan to play the
hand if East leads the ËA and then switches to a club.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have?
A. Seven – One spade, two hearts, and four diamonds.
Q. How can declarer eliminate some of the diamond losers?
A. Discarding and ruffing.
•
Declarer can discard one diamond loser on the extra club winner in dummy.
•
A second diamond loser might be discarded on an extra spade winner in dummy
after the ÍA has been driven out.
•
Alternatively, a diamond loser can be ruffed in dummy.
•
If East ever takes the ËK, declarer’s ËQ will become established.
•
Essentially declarer should not have any difficulty holding the diamond losers to two.
Q. How can declarer eliminate one of the heart losers?
A. With a repeated finesse – Assuming East holds one or both missing honors.
•
Missing both the ÌK and ÌQ, declarer’s best chance is to take two heart finesses.
•
This will hold the heart losers to one if East holds the ÌK or the ÌQ or both the ÌK
and ÌQ.
•
It will only lose if West holds both the ÌK and the ÌQ . . . a 25% chance.
•
Actually, the odds are better than 75% since East opened the bidding and West didn’t
have enough to respond, making it highly unlikely West holds both the ÌK and ÌQ.
This type of repeated finesse was discussed in Hands 1 and 2. If the students are still unclear about how
it works, you can turn up only the heart suit and walk through the various possibilities.
Q. Assuming declarer can hold the diamond losers to two, the main focus will be to hold the
heart losers to one. Does have any challenge in playing the hearts?
A. Yes – Lack of entries.
•
To try the repeated heart finesse, declarer needs to get to the North hand twice.
•
There are no sure entries to the North hand, so declarer will have to create some.
•
Let’s see how this might be done.
-122-
Turn all the cards face up. Place the ËA in front of East as the opening lead.
•
East wins the first trick with the ËA as West makes a discouraging signal.
Trick 1:
•
East: ËA
South: Ë3
West: Ë2
North: Ë5
East now finds the most challenging defense by leading a club . . . probably a high
club to show no real interest in the suit.
Trick 2:
East: Ê9
South: ÊQ
West: Ê2
North: Ê7
•
Declarer is in the wrong hand to start leading trumps. So, declarer can try to create
an entry with the Í10 by leading a high spade from dummy to drive out East’s ÍA.
•
East might refuse to win the first spade trick but that won’t do much good because
declarer could continue with another high spade12.
•
Let’s assume East chooses to win the first spade trick.
Trick 3:
•
West: Í4
North: Í3
East: ÍA
Suppose East continues the passive defense by leading another club.
Trick 4:
•
South: ÍK
East: Ê6
South: ÊK
West: Ê3
North: Ê10
North: Í10
East: Í2
Declarer can now use the Í10 as an entry.
Trick 5:
South: Í9
West: Í7
12
If East ducks two rounds of spades, declarer can take the club winners and discard the remaining spade
from the North hand. Declarer then loses at most two hearts and two diamonds.
-123-
North now takes the first heart finesse . . . which loses to West’s ÌQ.
•
Trick 6:
•
North: ÌJ
West: Ì4
South: Ì2
East: ÌQ
West’s best defense is to lead back a diamond, trapping North’s ËQ. Declarer is then
forced to ruff the third round of diamonds in the dummy.
Trick 7:
West: ËJ
North: Ë6
East: Ë9
South: Ë4
Trick 8:
West: Ë7
North: Ë8
East: Ë10
South: Ì5
Q. How can declarer get back to the North hand to repeat the heart finesse?
A. Ruff the ÊA!
Trick 9:
•
South: ÊA
West: Ê4
North: Ì7
East: Ê5
Now declarer can take the second heart finesse . . . which is successful.
Trick 10:
North: Ì10
West: Ì6
South: Ì8
East: Ì3
•
Declarer now draws the last trump and dummy’s remaining spades are winners.
•
Declarer loses only the ÍA, one heart trick, and two diamonds.
Observation
•
South must be careful not to get the partnership overboard, despite holding 20
points.
•
3Ì is a precarious contract but can be made if declarer is creative in manufacturing
entries to the North hand.
•
Sometimes the best defense is to be passive, giving nothing away and letting declarer
do all the work.
-124-
More On Doubler’s Rebid
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each student take one suit.
Construct the following hand in front of South.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: With a minimum takeout double, pass advancer’s minimum response.
Spades: The ÍQ, ÍJ and two low spades.
Hearts:
The ÌA and three low hearts.
Diamonds: Two low diamonds.
Clubs:
The ÊK, ÊQ and a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ32
A432
32
KQ2
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – A standard takeout double.
•
South has 12 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton diamond.
•
South has support for the unbid suits.
Q. West passes the takeout double and North bids 1Ì. East passes. What
call does South make?
A. Pass – With a minimum takeout double, South passes advancer’s
minimum response.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
•
The double has forced advancer to choose a suit. Advancer may have no points at all.
Advancer’s bid at the cheapest level shows about 0-8 points. Even if advancer has 8
points, the partnership doesn’t belong any higher than partscore.
•
The partnership may already be too high. Bidding risks getting the partnership into
more trouble.
•
The takeout doubler doesn’t promise a second bid. It is up to advancer to invite or
bid game with more than a minimum.
Teacher’s Key Point: Even if the opponents bid again, the takeout doubler should pass advancer’s
minimum response. Any further action is up to advancer.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes and North bids 1Ì. East
now bids 2Ë. What call does South make?
A. Pass – East’s bid doesn’t affect South’s call.
•
South’s hand hasn’t become any stronger because East bids
-125-
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì 2Ë ?
again. South should pass to show a minimum takeout double . . . about 13-16 points.
Q. Which partner is responsible for competing further for North-South?
A. North – It is up to advancer.
•
Advance should take further action if the partnership has enough to compete.
•
By passing, South gives the partnership an opportunity to get out of the auction if
advancer holds a very weak hand.
•
With about 6-8 points, North should bid again over East’s 2Ë. North’s second bid
won’t promise much. North’s hand is already limited since North didn’t make an
invitational or forcing bid on the previous round.
Q. After East rebids 2Ë, South passes and East passes. North now bids
2Ì and East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – North’s second bid doesn’t promise much.
•
North’s hand is already limited to at most 8 points since North
didn’t make an invitational or forcing bid on the previous round.
W N E
1Ë
P 1Ì 2Ë
P 2Ì P
S
X
P
?
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout doubler passes with a minimum hand even if advancer shows some
values.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë. North bids 2Í
and East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – North is limited to about 8 points.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë 2Í P ?
•
North wasn’t forced to bid after West raised opener’s suit, so
North is showing some values.
•
North, however, is only promising about 6-8 points. With a hand of invitational
strength or more, North would have jumped or cuebid.
•
With same minimum takeout double, South should pass.
Teacher’s Key Point: With a bare minimum for the takeout double, 13-14 points, doubler generally
passes advancer’s invitational response.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 2Í.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – North’s jump to 2Í is invitational, showing about 9-11 points.
•
With a hand worth only 13 points, South should decline
advancer’s invitation.
-126-
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Í P ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 2Ë, and North jumps
to 3Ì. East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – South’s hand is still a bare minimum.
•
Over West’s raise, North has to jump to show invitational values,
about 9-11 points.
•
South should decline the invitation.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 3Ë, and North bids 3Í.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Advancer’s 3Í is merely competitive, not forcing.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë 3Ì P ?
W N E S
1Ë X
3Ë 3Í P ?
•
Ideally, North has about 9-11 points to compete at the three level,
but North might have stretched to compete with a little less.
•
South should be content to have brought the partnership into the auction. There’s
no reason to get too high.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 3Ë, and North bids 3Í.
East now bids 4Ë. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Any further action should be taken by North, not South.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
3Ë 3Í 4Ë ?
Again, South’s hand hasn’t improved beyond the original takeout
double. South should be pleased that the partnership’s competitive bidding has
pushed the opponents to the four level where there is a chance to defeat them.
Teacher’s Key Point: If advancer cuebids, the takeout doubler is forced to bid again, even with a
minimum double, if the next player passes.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 2Ë. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Searching for a fit.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ë P ?
•
The cuebid is advancer’s only forcing call. It shows a hand of at
least invitational strength and doubt about the best contract. Advancer is asking for
a further description of the takeout doubler’s hand.
•
With both majors and a minimum takeout double, South simply bids the cheapest
available four-card suit, 2Ì on this hand. The partnership is initially searching for a
suitable fit.
-127-
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s cuebid is only forcing for one round. The doubler does not have to
keep bidding if advancer makes an invitational bid.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 2Ë. East
passes, South bids 2Ì, and West passes. North raises to 3Ì and East
passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Rejecting the invitation with a minimum takeout double.
•
W N E
1Ë
P 2Ë P
P 3Ì P
S
X
2Ì
?
Advancer’s cuebid is forcing until a suit has been agreed. North’s
raise to 3Ì agrees on hearts as trumps but is only invitational. With enough for game,
North would jump to 4Ì.
You can skip the next point with an inexperienced class.
Teacher’s Key Point: If responder bids and advancer doubles, the takeout doubler needs to know
whether advancer’s double is for penalty or takeout. Many partnerships use responsive doubles when
responder raises opener’s suit to the two or three level.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, East raises to 2Ë, and North doubles.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass/2Ì – Depending on the partnership agreement.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë X P ?
•
The standard agreement is that North’s double is for penalty. In
that case, South should pass, accepting North’s judgment.
•
If the partnership has agreed to use responsive doubles, then North’s double is for
takeout, showing enough to compete but uncertainty about the best denomination.
North likely has four cards in both major suits and doesn’t want to land in a 4-3 fit.
In that case, South should bid the cheapest available four-card suit, 2Ì on this hand.
With three hearts and four spades, South would bid 2Í.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: If advancer makes an invitational bid, the takeout doubler accepts the invitation
with more than a bare minimum, about 15-16 points.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart; add the ÌQ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
-128-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ32
AQ43
32
KQ2
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – 14 high-card points plus 1 dummy point and support for the unbid suits.
Q. After South’s takeout double, West passes, and North bids 1Ì. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – The hand is still in the minimum category.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
•
Advancer has at most 8 points for the minimum response, so
there is no danger of missing a game by passing.
•
Advancer could also have no points and bidding again would get the partnership into
trouble.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 2Í.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 4Í (3Í) – Accepting the invitation.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Í P ?
•
Advancer’s jump is invitational, showing about 9-11 points. With
15 points, South has more than a bare minimum and should probably accept the
invitation by bidding game.
•
South could hedge a little by raising to 3Í, but that is ‘passing the buck.’ With close
decisions, it is best to be aggressive in this situation. Game will often be made with as
few as 24 or 25 combined points when the strength is reasonably evenly divided
between the two hands.
•
Also, North may have an easier time playing the hand when East is marked with most
of the outstanding strength for the defenders. East will have to make the opening
lead; North will ‘know’ where most of the missing high cards are located; West may
have difficulty gaining the lead to help out the defense.
•
In close decisions, you can improve your judgment by considering whether your
values are working or wasted. Here, the high cards look well placed. For example, the
ÌQ should be useful . . . if partner holds the ÌK, the ÌQ will represent a trick; if
partner doesn’t hold the ÌK, it is likely to be favorably placed in the opening bidder’s
(East’s) hand where it can be finessed. Similarly, the ÊK-Q are likely to be useful . .
. if partner doesn’t hold the ÊA, it is likely to be with the opening bidder and partner
can lead toward the ÊK-Q to establish two tricks in the suit.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: You need to use your judgment when advancer makes an invitational bid. Some
of your values may be wasted and you need to devalue the hand.
-129-
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away a diamond; add the ËQ.
Clubs:
Take away the ÊQ; add a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
QJ32
AQ43
Q3
K32
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ì P ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 2Ì. East passes. What
call does South make?
A. Pass (3Ì) – Devaluing the hand to a minimum.
•
This hand has the same strength as the previous hand . . . 14 high-card points plus 1
point for the doubleton diamond.
•
However, the points aren’t all working. The ËQ is likely to be a wasted value. If the
opening bidder holds the ËA-K, North-South will have two losers in the suit . . .
exactly the same as when South holds two low diamonds.
•
This hand is closer to 13 points than 15 points, and South should probably reject
advancer’s invitation.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 2Ë, and North bids 2Ì.
East raises to 3Ë. What call does South make?
A. Pass (3Ì) – Not enough to raise.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë 2Ì 3Ë ?
•
Advancer didn’t have to bid after West raised, so the 2Ì bid
shows some values, about 6-8 points.
•
This is a minimum double since the ËQ is almost surely wasted. Raising to 3Ì would
promise some extra strength and/or distribution.
•
South’s pass doesn’t end the auction. Advancer will still get another chance to
compete and may bid 3Ì with a suitable hand for play rather than defense.
Rebid by the Takeout Doubler with a Minimum Hand (13-16)
• With a minimum takeout double, don’t bid again unless advancer shows at
least invitational values.
• If advancer makes an invitational bid, accept with the top of the minimum
range but pass otherwise. With a borderline decision, consider whether
your high cards are likely to be working (useful) or wasted.
• If advancer makes a responsive double, bid up the line at the cheapest level
with a choice of four-card suits.
-130-
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: With a medium-strength takeout double, about 17-18 points, the doubler can
show the additional strength by bidding again after advancer makes a minimum bid.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away the ËQ.
Clubs:
Add the ÊQ.
SOUTH
QJ32
AQ43
3
KQ32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – 14 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton diamond.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, North bids 1Ì, and East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Showing more than a minimum-strength takeout double.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
•
With a medium-strength hand, about 17-18 points, South should
make a further move to show the additional strength.
•
Remember, the partnership may be able to make game with as few as 24 or 25
combined points in a competitive auction where most of the defender’s strength lies
in only one hand. North could have as many as 8 points, so the partnership could
have 25 combined points.
•
On the other hand, North may have no points, so South shows the extra strength by
making a simple raise. With a minimum takeout double, South would pass.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, North bids 1Ì, and East
rebids 2Ë. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Showing extra strength.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì 2Ë ?
The situation is essentially the same. With a minimum takeout
double, South would pass over East’s 2Ë bid.
Teacher’s Key Point: With a medium-strength takeout double, accept advancer’s invitational bid.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 2Í.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 4Í – Accepting the invitation.
•
North’s jump is invitational, showing about 9-11 points.
-131-
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Í P ?
•
Since the partnership has at most about 28 combined points, South doesn’t need to
give any consideration to a slam contract.
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s cuebid promises another bid if advancer is an unpassed hand. The
takeout doubler doesn’t need to jump even with more than a minimum. The partnership is still
looking for a fit.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 2Ë. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Ì – Looking for a fit.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ë P ?
•
Advancer’s cuebid shows a hand of at least invitational strength
. . . 9 or more points. Since South has extra strength, the partnership is headed for
game.
•
The first priority, however, is to find a fit. With a choice of suits to show, South starts
with the cheapest available bid, 2Ì, showing four (or more) hearts.
•
Since advancer is an unpassed hand, South doesn’t have to jump to show the extra
strength. North has promised at least one more bid since the auction is forcing until
a suit has been agreed. If North raises to 3Ì, for example, South would show the
extra strength by accepting the invitation.
This next point should only be covered with a more advanced group.
Teacher’s Key Point: If advancer is a passed hand, advancer’s cuebid does not guarantee another bid.
The takeout doubler will have to jump with extra strength.
Q. Suppose North passed originally. East opens 1Ë, South doubles,
West passes, and North bids 2Ë. East passes. What call does South
make?
A. 3Ì – Jumping to show the extra strength.
W N E S
P 1Ë X
P 2Ë P ?
•
Advancer is limited to a hand of at most invitational strength since advancer passed
originally. Advancer’s cuebid shows interest in reaching game but doesn’t promise
a second bid.
•
The partnership is still searching for a fit, but South wants to make sure that a game
isn’t missed. South knows the partnership should have the combined strength for a
game. In effect, South is showing at least four hearts and accepting the invitation at
the same time.
-132-
Teacher’s Key Point: With a minimum or medium hand for the takeout double, there is generally no
reason to bid again if advancer takes the partnership to game.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 4Ì.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Not enough to consider a slam.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 4Ì P ?
•
Advancer’s jump to game shows at least 12 points. South has a
little extra but not enough to consider a slam since the partnership may have only 29
(12+17) combined points.
•
Advancer could have started with a cuebid, 2Ë, if interested in exploring slam
possibilities. North wants to settle for game and South should simply be happy to have
a little extra . . . for a change!
You might want to skip the next point with an inexperienced group.
Teacher’s Key Point: If the partnership uses responsive doubles, the takeout doubler has to jump to
show extra strength. A responsive double does not promise another bid.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë. North doubles
and East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass/3Ì – Depending on the partnership agreement.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë X P ?
•
With no special agreement, North’s double is for penalty and
South should pass.
•
If the partnership has agreed to play responsive doubles, North’s double is for
takeout and South should bid.
•
Playing responsive doubles, North is showing only enough to compete at the two
level. If South bids only 2Ì, North will likely pass. To show extra strength, South
should jump to 3Ì. This isn’t forcing but shows a medium-strength hand and invites
North to continue to game with 8 or 9 points rather than 6 or 7.
•
South’s 3Ì bid shows four hearts but doesn’t deny four spades. If South were to skip
over hearts and bid 3Í, South would tend to deny four hearts and show four spades.
Hand 5
Teacher’s Key Point: If the takeout doubler bids a new suit or notrump over advancer’s minimum bid,
it promises at least a medium strength hand. The takeout doubler is typically showing a hand too
strong for a simple overcall.
-133-
Spades: Add the ÍA and a low spade.
Hearts:
Take away the ÌQ and a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AQJ432
A4
3
KQ32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double (1Í) – Too strong for a simple overcall.
•
With 16 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit, this hand is a little
too strong for a simple overcall of 1Í in most partnerships.
•
South can start with a takeout double, planning to show the spade suit at the next
opportunity.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 1Ì. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 1Í – Following through with the original plan.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
•
Advancer has bid under the assumption that South has a standard
takeout double. The 1Ì bid shows about 0-8 points.
•
There is no need to jump. Doubling and then bidding a new suit shows a hand of at
least medium strength.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 2Ê. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Í – Showing a hand too strong for a simple overcall.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ê P ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West raises to 2Ë. North and East
pass. What call does South make?
A. 2Í – Following through to show a hand too strong to overcall 1Í.
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë P P ?
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, and West jumps to 3Ë. North and East
pass. What call does South make?
A. 3Í/Pass – The opponents have presented a challenge.
W N E S
1Ë X
3Ë P P ?
•
South will probably continue with 3Í . . . but this is a bit of an
overbid and South might consider passing.
•
When choosing to double rather than overcall, South has to be prepared with a
suitable follow up. The subsequent auction may make it difficult to show the nature
of the hand at a convenient level.
-134-
•
For this reason, some players might prefer overcalling 1Í with this hand instead of
starting with a takeout double. This understates the strength somewhat . . . and risks
missing a game if the overcall is passed out . . . but does get the essential feature of
the hand across before the opponents can make things too awkward.
•
It’s a matter of judgment. Most players would probably start with a double, hoping
that the auction continues smoothly rather than spiraling out of control.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North jumps to 2Ì.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 2Í – Following the initial plan to show the spade suit.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ì P ?
There is no need to jump. By inference, 2Í is forcing. North has
shown invitational strength and South has shown extra values by doubling and
bidding a new suit. The partnership has enough combined strength for game and is
merely searching for the best denomination.
•
•
•
•
Rebid by the Takeout Doubler with a Medium Hand (17-18)
If advancer bids at the cheapest level, raise advancer’s suit or bid a new suit
(or notrump) with a medium-strength hand for the takeout double.
If advancer makes an invitational bid, accept with a medium strength hand.
If advancer cuebids, bid a suit at the cheapest level if advancer is an
unpassed hand . . . planning to show the extra strength at the next
opportunity. If advancer cuebids as a passed hand, jump a level to show the
extra strength and invite advancer to bid game.
If advancer makes a responsive double, jump to show the extra strength.
Hand 6
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout doubler can show a maximum hand of about 19 or more points by
jump raising advancer’s minimum bid or by cuebidding.
Spades: Take away two low spades.
Hearts:
Add the ÌJ and a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
-135-
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AQJ4
AJ32
3
KQ32
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – 17 high-card points and 3 dummy points for the singleton diamond.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 1Í. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 3Í (2Ë) – Issuing a strong invitation.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í P ?
•
South cannot afford to insist on game since advancer may have
no points at all. The fact that East opened the bidding and South has such a strong
hand increase the likelihood that North doesn’t have much.
•
South’s jump to 3Í isn’t forcing but is highly invitational. With a minimum takeout
double of about 13-16, South would pass the 1Í response. With a medium-strength
takeout double of about 17 or 18 points, South would raise to 2Í. The jump raise,
therefore, shows about 19-21 points. Advancer should continue to game with 4 or 5
points or more.
•
Another way for the takeout doubler to show a very strong hand is to cuebid the
opponent’s suit at the next opportunity, 2Ë in this case. This is usually done when
doubler has an even stronger hand than this or, perhaps, with a very strong hand but
some doubt about the best denomination. If South held only three-card support for
spades, for example, South might cuebid to get additional information. On this hand,
however, South has a natural jump raise in hearts which gets the message across to
advancer.
Hand 7
Teacher’s Key Point: A takeout double followed by a rebid in notrump over advancer’s minimum call
shows a hand too strong to overcall directly in notrump.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away the ÌA.
Diamonds: Add the ËA and ËK.
Clubs:
Take away a low club.
SOUTH
AQJ4
J32
AK3
KQ3
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Double – With 20 high-card points South is too strong to overcall 1NT.
•
A 1NT overcall shows about 15-18 points. A jump to 2NT is commonly used as the
unusual notrump convention, showing the minors or the lowest two unbid suits.
•
South plans to rebid in notrump, showing a hand too strong to overcall 1NT.
-136-
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 1Ì. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT – Showing a balanced hand of about 19-21 points.
•
It is a good idea to be reasonably conservative in this situation.
East has about 13 or more points for the opening bid, leaving very little for West or
North. Even though South knows where most of the missing points are located, it may
be difficult to find an entry to the North hand to take any finesses.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 2Ê. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 2NT – Bidding notrump at the cheapest level.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Ì P ?
W N E S
1Ë X
P 2Ê P ?
In this case, the cheapest level is the two level. The 2NT rebid is
not a jump, so it shows about 19-21 points . . . the same as a 1NT rebid over an
advance of 1Ì.
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout doubler’s rebid may depend on advancer’s choice of call.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 1Í. East
passes. What call does South make?
A. 3Í (2Ë) – Showing a highly invitational hand of about 19-21 points.
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1Í P ?
•
Although South was intending to rebid in notrump, there is no
need to follow through with that plan once a major suit fit is found.
•
Some players might choose to cuebid with the South hand, showing the strength and
some doubt about the denomination. Despite the spade fit, it is possible that the
hand might play equally well in notrump since South is balanced and has two
diamond winners. Nine tricks are sometimes easier than ten.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West passes, and North bids 1NT.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 3NT – Expecting the partnership to have enough for game.
•
Advancer’s 1NT call is constructive, not weak, and shows about 610 points.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South doubles, West raises to 2Ë, and North bids 2Í.
East passes. What call does South make?
A. 4Í – South has enough to take the partnership to game.
•
W N E S
1Ë X
P 1NT P ?
Advancer didn’t have to bid over West’s raise, so the 2Í bid shows
enough to compete at the two level, about 6-8 points.
-137-
W N E S
1Ë X
2Ë 2Í P ?
Rebid by the Takeout Doubler with a Maximum Hand (19-21)
•
•
If advancer bids at the cheapest level, make an invitational jump raise
in advancer’s suit or cuebid the opponent’s suit.
If advancer shows some values, take the partnership to game.
Conclusion
•
When considering your rebid as the takeout doubler, put your hand into one of three
categories:
•
Minimum
13-16 points
•
Medium
17-18 points
•
Maximum
19+ points
•
With a minimum hand, don’t bid again unless partner has shown at least invitational
values.
•
With a medium hand, raise partner’s suit or bid a new suit.
•
With a maximum hand, make an invitational jump raise or cuebid the opponent’s suit
as a forcing bid.
-138-
Hand 10 - Handling a Redouble
HAND: 10
DEALER: EAST
N-S
VUL:
NORTH
J 10 9 4
76
82
Q9872
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
Q7
A 10 4 2
Q J 10 9 4
K5
WEST
NORTH
Redouble
2Ë
3NT
2Ê
Pass
Pass
EAST
1Í
Pass
2NT
Pass
SOUTH
Double
Pass
Pass
Pass
EAST
AK852
J53
53
A64
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
63
KQ98
AK76
J 10 3
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
East
OPENING LEAD: ÊJ by South
Introduction
The takeout double is an invitation for partner to compete in the auction but
advancer isn’t forced to bid if responder bids.
Generally, advancer needs some values to compete if responder shows some
strength. If responder raises opener’s suit or bids a new suit, advancer can
compete at the two level with about 6-8 points and at the three level with about 911 points.
There is one exception. If responder redoubles, advancer doesn’t have to bid but
may wish to do so, even with a very weak hand. The partnership may need to find
a fit to keep out of trouble.
On some hands, everyone is in the auction.
-139-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 10. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is East’s opening call?
A. 1Í – 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-car major.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make over the 1Í opening bid?
A. Double – 13 high-card points and support for the unbid suits.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is the value of the West hand?
A. 13 points – 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
Q. How does West show a strong hand over a takeout double?
A. Redouble – The standard way to show 10 or more points.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. If West redoubles, does North have to bid?
A. No – The redouble removes advancer’s obligation to pick a suit.
•
If advancer passes, the double will get another opportunity to bid.
-140-
Q. If North passes, what is likely to happen?
A. South will have to bid – Likely 2Ë or 2Ì.
•
East will probably pass the redouble.
•
South will then have to bid something. Otherwise, East will play in 1Í redoubled and
receive a game bonus for making seven or more tricks.
•
In effect, North’s pass will ask South to choose the suit for the partnership.
•
South will choose one of the four-card suits, 2Ë or 2Ì.
Q. If South were to bid 2Ë or 2Ì would that be a reasonable contract for North-South?
A. No – Likely a 4-2 fit.
•
Assuming South has a standard takeout double, South is unlikely to have a five-card
or longer suit.
Q. How can North warn South not to bid hearts or diamonds?
A. By bidding 2Ê – Showing a distinct preference for that suit.
•
A bid by advancer after a redouble does not promise much strength.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. If North bids 2Ê over West’s redouble, what call does East make?
A. Pass – Nothing to say at this point.
•
West’s redouble shows a good hand but doesn’t describe the distribution.
•
Opener generally passes, giving the redoubler an opportunity to describe the hand.
•
Opener could double 2Ê for penalty, but the club holding isn’t quite strong enough.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. Does advancer’s 2Ê bid show any values?
A. No – Advancer is likely to have a weak hand.
•
East has shown 13 or more points with the opening bid.
•
South has 13 points for the takeout double.
•
West has 10 or more points for the redouble.
•
That doesn’t leave much for advancer.
Q. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Accepting advancer’s choice of trump suit.
-141-
•
The partnership may already be too high.
•
Bidding is likely to get the partnership into more trouble.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. When North’s 2Ê call is passed back to West, what call does West make?
A. 2Ë – Showing the five-card diamond suit.
•
West doesn’t have enough in clubs to make a penalty double.
•
West doesn’t have three-card support for opener’s suit.
•
West has not yet shown the five-card diamond suit.
•
After the redouble, 2Ë is forcing, just as if South had passed and West had responded
2Ë to East’s opening 1Í bid.
•
With a weak hand with diamonds, West would have bid 2Ë immediately over the
double instead of redoubling first.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make over West’s 2Ë bid?
A. Pass – Nothing more to say.
•
North-South are now off the hook. It appears the hand belongs to East-West.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make over West’s 2Ë bid?
A. 2NT – Showing a minimum balanced hand.
•
East now rebids as though West had responded 2Ë directly over the 1Í opening bid.
•
East has already shown the five-card major suit and doesn’t have a fit for diamonds.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make over East’s 2NT bid?
A. Pass.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after East’s 2NT bid?
-142-
A. 3NT – Putting the partnership in game.
•
West’s hand is worth 13 points, giving the partnership 26 or more combined points.
•
The partnership doesn’t have a fit in spades or diamonds.
•
There’s no reason to mention the hearts. East could have shown a four-card heart suit
over 2Ë and South is likely to have four hearts for the takeout double.
Q. How will the auction continue over 3NT?
A. Pass, pass, pass.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose East is declarer in a contract of 3NT. Who makes the opening lead?
A. South.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What would South lead?
A.
ÊJ – Top of the touching high cards in the suit bid by North.
•
North has shown a preference for clubs, so the partnership is likely to have an eightcard or longer fit in that suit.
•
North didn’t show any interest in hearts or diamonds, so South should probably steer
clear of these suits.
Put the ÊJ in front of South as the opening lead. Turn the remaining North-South
cards face down. Focus on the East hand as declarer in 3NT. Discuss with the
others at the table how declarer should plan to take nine tricks.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many tricks does declarer have?
A. Six - Three spades, one heart, and two clubs.
Q. What are declarer’s options for developing the three extra tricks required?
A. Spade, diamonds, hearts.
•
The spades might provide two extra tricks if the missing spades are divided 3-3. If the
missing spades are divided 4-2, an extra trick can be developed through length . . . by
giving up a trick in the suit.
-143-
•
Two tricks can be developed through promotion in the diamond suit. The suit will
provide a third trick through length if the missing diamonds divide no worse than 4-2.
•
The heart suit might provide an extra trick through length if the missing hearts divide
3-3. It might also provide an extra trick through the finesse . . . by leading toward the
Ì10, for example, hoping South holds the ÌK and ÌQ13.
•
The best option appears to be diamonds, since that suit can provide all three tricks.
Q. Is there any danger if declarer decides to establish the extra winners in diamonds?
A. Yes – North-South may establish enough winners to defeat the contract.
•
The defenders will gain the lead twice in diamonds, with the ËA and ËK.
•
They may be able to establish three winners in the club suit if the missing clubs are
divided 5-3.
Q. What can declarer do to make the contract if the missing clubs are divided 5-3?
A. Use the hold up play.
•
Declarer can plan to hold up one round of clubs, hoping the defender with the
length in clubs won’t have an entry after the clubs are established.
First, let’s see what might happen if declarer doesn’t hold up. Turn all the cards
face up. Have South lead the ÊJ, North make an encouraging signal with the Ê9
and declarer win the first with the ÊA.
Trick 1:
•
South: ÊJ
West: Ê5
North: Ê9
East: ÊA
Declarer now goes about establishing the diamonds.
Trick 2:
East: Ë5
South: ËK
•
South persists by leading another club.
•
It’s too late for declarer to hold up.
13
There are other possibilities in this suit.
-144-
West: Ë4
North: Ë2
Trick 3:
•
South: Ê10
West: ÊK
North: Ê2
East: Ê4
The defenders are going to win the race. If declarer leads another diamond, South
will win and the defenders take three club winners to defeat the contract.
Let’s see how the holdup play would help. Turn all the cards face up. Have South
lead the ÊJ, North make an encouraging signal with the Ê9 and declarer let the
defenders win the first trick.
Trick 1:
•
South: ÊJ
West: Ê5
North: Ê9
East: Ê4
South continues with a second club which is won by dummy’s ÊK.
Trick 2:
South: Ê10
West: ÊK
North: Ê2
East: Ê6
•
Declarer now starts promoting the diamonds.
•
North will probably give a count signal, but it won’t help South to hold up.
Trick 3:
•
East: Ë3
South: ËK
South: Ê3
West: Ì2
North: ÊQ
East: ÊA
Declarer finishes promoting the diamonds. It won’t help South to play low.
Trick 5:
•
North: Ë8
South knocks out declarer’s last high club.
Trick 4:
•
West: ËQ
East: Ë5
South: ËA
West: Ë4
North: Ë2
The difference the hold up play makes is that South has no club left to lead.
-145-
•
Declarer has the three established diamonds to go with three spades, one heart, and
two club tricks.
Turn all the cards face up.
You can skip the next point if short of time.
Q. Could declarer have used the holdup play in another way?
A. Yes – Ducking the second round of clubs.
•
Declarer could win the first round of clubs with dummy’s ÊK.
•
After knocking out one of South’s diamond honors, declarer could duck the second
round of clubs.
•
This would have the same effect . . . South would have no club left to lead after
winning the second diamond trick.
If declarer does hold up in clubs, South should probably switch to a low heart, hoping North holds the
ÌJ. Declarer can make the contract by playing low from dummy, but might play the ÌA . . . in which
case South would get two heart tricks to go with the two diamond tricks and club trick. There’s no need
to discuss this unless a student raises the point.
Observation
•
•
If advancer had not bid 2Ê over the redouble, North-South might get into trouble.
•
South would bid 2Ë or 2Ì and West would probably double for penalty.
•
If North now bids, it will have to be 3Ê and East might double that contract,
especially since North-South are vulnerable.
•
North-South can be defeated two tricks in a contract of 3Ê doubled if East leads
a trump. That would be a penalty of 500 . . . more than the value of East-West’s
non vulnerable game.
East-West reached the normal contract of 3NT despite the interference.
-146-
Redoubles
This section can be skipped.
Pick up the cards and sort them into suits. Each student take one suit. Construct
the following hand in front of West.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Responder redoubles to show a variety of hands with about 10 or more points.
Spades: The ÍQ and a low spade.
Hearts:
The ace and three low hearts.
Diamonds: ËQ, ËJ and three low diamonds.
Clubs:
The ÊK and a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
Q2
A432
QJ432
K2
W N E S
1Í X
?
Q. East opens 1Í. South doubles for takeout. What call does West make?
A. Redouble – Showing 10 or more points.
•
If South had passed, West would make the natural response of 2Ë, forcing.
•
When South doubles, West has a new option, the redouble.
•
The standard agreement is that when opener’s bid of one-of-a-suit is doubled for
takeout, a redouble by responder shows about 10 or more high-card points and says,
“This is our hand, partner.”
•
The redouble covers a wide variety of hands, falling into three categories:
1. Hands with no fit for partner and no long suit. With this type of hand,
responder plans to double the opponents for penalty or, if that seems
inappropriate, bid notrump.
2. Hands with a long suit which responder was intending to bid. With this type
of hand, responder plans to show the suit after redoubling . . . unless the
opponents bid that suit, in which case responder can double for penalty.
3. Hands with a fit for partner. With this type of hand, responder plans to show
the support after redoubling.
Q. What does the redoubler expect opener to do after the next opponent makes a call?
A. Pass (Double/Bid) – Opener is generally expected to pass.
•
Since the redoubler has not yet described the hand type, opener generally passes
whether or not the opponent bids over the redouble. This gives the redoubler an
opportunity to describe the type of hand . . . or make a penalty double.
-147-
•
If the next opponent bids, opener does have the option of making a penalty double
with length and strength in the suit. In effect, opener is saying, “If you don’t have
much of a fit and are considering doubling the opponents’ contract, I’m happy to
cooperate. It looks like they are in trouble. I have good defense against the trump suit
they have chosen. If they run to another suit, perhaps you can double for penalty.”
•
Opener does have one other option. With a weak distributional hand, opener can
rebid the original suit or show a second suit. Opener is saying, “My hand is too weak
or too distributional to consider defending if you were thinking of doubling their
contract.”
•
Opener only bids in front of the redoubler with a weak hand, not a strong hand. With
a strong hand, opener should usually pass, waiting to hear what the redoubler has to
say. Opener’s pass is forcing . . . redoubler has to do something after declaring that
the side has the balance of strength. Opener can show the extra strength and
distribution at the next opportunity.
Teacher’s Key Point: The redoubler may have 10 or more points and a fivecard or longer suit.
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, West redoubles, and North passes.
East dutifully passes and South bids 2Ë. What call does West make?
A. Double – For penalty.
W N E S
1Í X
XX P P 2Ë
?
•
The opponents have landed at the two level in West’s best suit. East-West should be
able to get a penalty larger than the value of any game they can make.
•
West’s penalty double doesn’t necessarily end the auction. East might choose to pull
the penalty double by bidding something. East would be showing a sound opening
bid . . . because East passed after the redouble . . . but some reason for not wanting
to defend. The partnership will then continue bidding to game or slam.
•
One of the opponents may bid another suit after being doubled in 2Ë. This is usually
an indication that the opponents are in trouble . . . on a misfit . . . and doubling
whatever contract they reach is probably going to lead to a large penalty.
Teacher’s Key Point: The redoubler may be hoping to penalize the opponents,
especially if opener can cooperate.
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, East redoubles, and North bids 2Ê.
East doubles and South passes. What call does West make?
A. Pass/3NT.
•
W N E S
1Í X
XX 2Ê X P
?
Opener is cooperating with the redoubler by showing length and strength in clubs
. . . likely at least four clubs. If East has spades and clubs and West has diamonds and
-148-
hearts, the opponents are unlikely to take many tricks. West should probably pass.
•
In situations like this, vulnerability is a factor. East-West must judge whether they can
extract a large enough penalty to compensate for their likely game contract. If West
doesn’t think that is the case, West could simply bid game, probably 3NT.
Teacher’s Key Point: Redoubler’s bid of a new suit is forcing if the redoubler is not a passed hand.
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, East redoubles, and North bids 2Ê.
East passes and South passes. What call does West make?
A. 2Ë.
W N E S
1Í X
XX 2Ê P P
?
•
East didn’t double North’s 2Ê bid, so East likely has fewer than
four clubs. It looks as though North-South have found a fit and
it may be difficult to defeat them enough tricks to compensate for East-West’s likely
game contract.
•
West can bid 2Ë, the same call West would have made without the interference. The
redouble promised 10 or more points, so 2Ë is forcing. Only if West had passed
originally, limiting the hand to at most 12 points, would a new suit after a redouble
be invitational (similar to a 2Ë response to a third or fourth chair opening bid of
1Í).
Teacher’s Key Point: Responder does not have to redouble when holding 10
or more points. A new suit at the one level is forcing.
Q. East opens 1Ê. South doubles. What call does West make?
W N E S
1Ê X
?
A. 1Ì (Redouble) - Redouble is an option.
•
Responder isn’t forced to redouble with 10 or more points when there is an
alternative one-level response available. The redouble is a tool that should only be
used when responder will be in a position to know what to do next.
•
On this hand, it may be inconvenient to start with a redouble. It will work well if the
opponents bid hearts or diamonds because West can then double for penalty. If the
opponents bid spades, however, the auction may become awkward. Suppose North
bids 1Í over the redouble and South raises to 2Í. West will now be making the first
really descriptive bid at the three level.
•
Most partnerships continue to treat a new suit at the one level as forcing over a takeout
double . . . ignoring the takeout double. That allows West to bid 1Ì, looking for the
best contract for the partnership before the opponents’ interference gets in the way.
-149-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Over an opponent’s takeout double, many partnerships use a conventional
method (Truscott/Dormer/Jordan) to show a hand with four-card support for opener’s suit and about
10 or more points.
Spades: Take away the ÍQ; add a low spade.
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away a low diamond.
Clubs:
Add a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
32
A432
QJ32
K32
W N E S
1Ì X
?
Q. East opens 1Ì. South doubles for takeout. What call does West make?
A. 2NT/Redouble/3Ì.
•
West has 10 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton spade. If South
had passed, West would make a limit raise to 3Ì, inviting opener to bid game.
•
South’s double changes West’s options because the redouble is now available.
•
With 10 high-card points, West could start with a redouble, planning to show the
heart support at the next opportunity.
•
Redoubling when holding four-card support, however, might leave West poorly
placed if the opponents find a fit and jam the auction. Suppose, for example, North
jumps to 2Í over the redouble, East passes, and South raises to 3Í. Now West has no
convenient bid. Doubling the 3Í contract for penalty with two low spades isn’t a good
option. Bidding 4Ì, on the other hand, is an overbid.
•
Many partnerships resolve this dilemma by using a conventional jump to 2NT over
the takeout double to show a limit raise . . . or better . . . in opener’s suit. This is not
the Jacoby 2NT convention . . . that no longer applies after a takeout double in
standard methods. It’s similar to Jacoby 2NT and is referred to as the Truscott,
Jordan, or Dormer convention.
•
West could simply jump to 3Ì as a limit raise, but that isn’t the modern style. The
standard agreement is that a jump raise of opener’s suit after a takeout double is
preemptive, not a limit raise.
A complete discussion of Truscott/Jordan/Dormer 2NT is outside the scope of the course.
-150-
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: Because of the use of the redouble and/or Truscott convention, responder’s jump
raise of opener’s suit over a takeout double is preemptive rather than a limit raise.
Í
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away the ÌA; add a low heart. Ì
Ë
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Ê
Clubs:
Take away the ÊK.
WEST
32
5432
QJ432
32
W N E S
1Ì X
?
Q. East opens 1Ì. South doubles for takeout. What call does West make?
A. 3Ì/Pass/2Ì.
•
With only 3 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton spade and 1 for
the doubleton club, it would not be unreasonable for West to pass over the takeout
double. However, that gives North-South plenty of room to find their best spot.
•
West might raise to 2Ì to make it more challenging for North-South to compete.
•
The modern style, however, would be to make a preemptive jump to 3Ì. This puts
more pressure on the opponents to find their best spot. North might have enough
to compete to 2Í but be unwilling to risk going to 3Í. If North bids 3Í, how does
South know whether North is stretching to compete or making a game invitation?
•
It might seem risky to jump to the three level with a weak hand, but it will rarely lead
to a poor result. East-West have at least a nine-card fit in hearts, making it difficult for
the opponents to double for penalty. Even if East-West are defeated in 3Ì, given
West’s weakness it is quite likely that the opponents can make a game or even a slam.
Q. If West were to jump to 3Ì over South’s takeout double, how would East know this is a
weak bid and not a limit (invitational) raise?
A. No redouble or 2NT.
•
With 10 or more points, West could start with a redouble. Also, West could jump to
2NT to show a limit raise or better if the partnership is playing that convention.
•
Standard practice is that a jump raise of opener’s suit after a takeout double shows
four-card or longer support but a weak hand . . . about 4-7 points.
-151-
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: Because of the availability of the redouble, most partnerships treat a new suit
at the two level by responder as non forcing over an opponent’s takeout double.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart.
Diamonds: Add the ËA.
Clubs:
WEST
32
543
AQJ432
32
W N E S
1Í X
?
Q. East opens 1Í. South doubles for takeout. What call does West make?
A. 2Ë.
•
•
If South had passed, West would have to respond 1NT to opener’s 1Í bid. West
doesn’t have enough to bid a new suit at the two level, 2Ë, which would be forcing.
After the takeout double, however, West can bid 2Ë to show the good suit. The 2Ë
bid is not forcing. With 10 or more points and a good diamond suit, West would start
with a redouble, planning to bid diamonds on the next round.
•
Standard practice is to treat a new suit response at the two level as non-forcing after
a takeout double. This is a corollary from the use of the redouble.
Responder’s Actions After a Takeout Double
After opener’s suit bid at the one level has been doubled for takeout:
•
Responder shows 6 or more points by:
•
•
•
Bidding a new suit at the one level (forcing).
Responder shows 10 or more points by:
•
Redoubling with the intention of doubling the opponents for
penalty, bidding a new suit (forcing), or showing support for
opener’s suit. Opener should generally pass, waiting to see which
type of hand responder holds.
•
Jumping to 2NT to show four-card or longer support for opener’s
suit and the strength for a limit raise or better.
Responder shows fewer than 10 points by:
•
Bidding a new suit at the two level (non-forcing).
•
Making a jump raise of opener’s suit to the three level, showing fourcard or longer support and a weak (preemptive) hand.
-152-
Advancer’s Action After a Redouble
Pick up all the cards and sort them into suits. Each player at the table take one
suit. Construct the following hand in front of North.
Hand 5
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer doesn’t have to bid if responder redoubles. However, advancer may
want to bid.
Spades: Three low spades.
Hearts:
Two low hearts.
Diamonds: The ËJ and five low diamonds.
Clubs:
Two low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
432
32
J65432
32
W N E S
1Í X
XX ?
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, and West redoubles. Is North forced to bid?
A. No – Once West redoubles, advancer can pass.
•
If West had passed, advancer would have to say something.
•
The auction won’t end in 1Í redoubled because South gets another chance to bid.
•
Having said that advancer could pass doesn’t mean that advancer should pass.
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, and West redoubles. What call does North make?
A. 2Ë – Showing a distinct preference for diamonds over clubs or hearts.
•
The danger in passing is that East will likely pass and the auction will come back to
South. Not wanting to defend 1Í redoubled, South will have to pick a suit. If South
bids 2Ì, this may be doubled by West. It is now too late to stop in 2Ë. North would
have to run to 3Ë, one level higher.
Q. If North bids 2Ë over the redouble, will South expect some values?
A. No – Advancer can’t be expected to hold much after a redouble.
•
East has shown about 13 or more points with the opening bid; South has shown about
13 or more points with the takeout double; West has shown 10 or more points with
the redouble. That leaves very little for North.
•
North’s 2Ë is non forcing and doesn’t promise anything except a preference for
diamonds rather than clubs or hearts. North is simply trying to find a fit so that the
partnership won’t get doubled and suffer a large penalty.
-153-
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away two low diamonds.
Clubs:
Add two low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
432
32
J654
5432
W N E S
1Ì X
XX ?
Q. East opens 1Ì, South doubles, and West redoubles. What call does North make?
A. Pass – Leaving the decision to partner.
•
Advancer has a slight preference for diamonds but not enough to make a choice in
front of partner. If South holds four clubs and three diamonds, the partnership
would be better off playing in the eight-card fit.
•
If South bids 2Ê or 2Ë, North would be happy to pass since the partnership has
landed in an eight-card fit.
•
If South bids 1Í, North should probably pass, especially if West hasn’t doubled.
Bidding at the two level would require North-South to take eight tricks rather than
seven. The opponents may bid and get North-South out of trouble.
Conclusion
•
When partner’s takeout double is followed by a redouble, advancer is usually trying
to find a safe spot where the partnership won’t suffer a large penalty.
•
With a distinct preference for one of the unbid suits, advancer should bid the suit.
This doesn’t promise any strength, just some length in the suit.
•
With no preference, advancer can pass and leave the decision to partner.
-154-
Hand 11 - Doubler’s Double
HAND: 11
DEALER: SOUTH
E-W
VUL:
NORTH
Q 10 8 2
A
AJ95
AKJ7
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
AK7
J 10 9 5 3
KQ8
84
WEST
NORTH
EAST
1Ì
Pass
Pass
Double 3Ì/2Ì
Double
Pass
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
Pass
4Ë
EAST
964
KQ72
2
96532
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
J53
864
10 7 6 4 3
Q 10
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
South
OPENING LEAD: ÌJ by West
Introduction
A takeout double can be made with a variety of hands. Most of the time, the
doubler will have the classic hand . . . an opening bid and support for the unbid
suits. Sometimes, the doubler will have a stronger hand . . . a hand too strong for
a simple overcall or a very strong takeout double.
The doubler has a number of ways to show the extra strength with the rebid.
Bidding a new suit shows extra values; cuebidding the opponent’s suit shows a
strong hand; and sometimes the doubler can make a second double.
Advancer must keep in mind that subsequent doubles by the takeout doubler are
still for takeout . . . even though they are showing a strong hand.
Let’s play a hand where everyone may get in the auction.
-155-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 11. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the South hand.
Q. Does South have enough to open the bidding?
A. No.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s opening call?
A. 1Ì – 13 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card major.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What does North do after West opens 1Ì?
A. Double – 19 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton heart.
•
North has support for the unbid suits.
•
The takeout double is unlimited in strength.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is the value of the East hand after West opens 1Ì?
A. 8 points – 5 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton diamond.
-156-
Q. What call would East make if North had passed over West’s 1Ì opening?
A. 2Ì – Showing support and about 6-10 points.
Q. What call does East make after North doubles West’s 1Ì opening?
A. 3Ì(2Ì) – A preemptive raise.
•
Standard practice is to treat responder’s jump raise after a takeout double as
preemptive, showing four-card support and a weak hand.
•
The advantage of the preemptive raise is that it is both descriptive and makes it more
difficult for the opponents to find their best contract.
•
With the strength for a limit raise or more, responder has two options:
•
•
Redouble . . . planning to show the support at the next opportunity;
•
Bid a conventional 2NT (Truscott/Jordan/Dormer) if the partnership has that
agreement.
Responder doesn’t have to make a preemptive raise. Responder could simply raise
to 2Ì.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. If East jumps to 3Ì over North’s takeout double, what call does South make?
A. Pass – South doesn’t have to bid after responder raises.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. West opened 1Ì, North doubled, East jumped to 3Ì and South passed. What is West’s
next call?
A. Pass – West has a minimum opening bid.
•
East’s raise was preemptive, so West has no reason to consider bidding game.
•
West’s hand is unsuitable for a sacrifice bid. West has reasonable defense against any
contract North-South might reach.
•
East’s action has already made the auction challenging for North-South. West doesn’t
want to undo the effectiveness of East’s call.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. Should North consider further competition?
A. Yes – North’s hand is worth about 22 points.
-157-
•
South’s pass denies enough strength to compete at the three level . . . about 9-11
points.
•
However, South could still have about 6-8 points, enough for game, or enough for
North-South to compete at the three or four level.
Q. What call can North make to compete further?
A. Double – A second takeout double.
•
The initial takeout double showed approximately the values for an opening bid.
•
By repeating the double with no encouragement from advancer, North is showing at
least a hand of intermediate strength . . . about 17 or more points.
•
The second double is still for takeout. North’s distribution hasn’t changed . . .
support for the unbid suits and shortness in hearts.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make over North’s second double?
A. Pass – East has already described the hand with the original jump to 3Ì.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. Can South pass North’s second double?
A. No(Yes) – North’s double is still for takeout.
•
A pass would convert the double into a penalty double. South would need a much
stronger holding in the opponents’ suit to consider such an action.
Q. What call does South make?
A. 4Ë – Bidding at suit at the cheapest available level.
•
South’s hand is worth only 4 points . . . 3 high-card points plus 1 length point.
•
Even if North has a very strong hand, game is highly unlikely unless North can bid
again.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make over 4Ë?
A. Pass – Nothing more to add.
-158-
Focus on the North hand.
Q. Should North bid again over advancer’s 4Ë?
A. No – North has done enough.
•
North has already doubled twice and shown a willingness to compete at the three or
four level.
•
Advancer has not made any encouraging bid and could have no points at all.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make?
A. Pass – Nothing more to say.
The 3Ì bid has done its work, pushing North-South into a partscore at the four level.
•
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Who is on lead against a contract of 4Ë played by South?
A. West.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What would West lead against 4Ë?
A.
ÌJ – Top of the sequence in the partnership’s suit.
• West might consider the ÍA to look at dummy, but this is more likely to help declarer
than the defense. North likely has four spades for the takeout double and South is
unlikely to have a fit . . . having chosen diamonds rather than spades.
•
Leading diamonds, the opponent’s trump suit, is likely to help declarer.
•
A club lead is a consideration, hoping to get a ruff.
Put the ÌJ face up in front of West and turn the remaining East-West cards
face down. Focus on the South had as declarer in a contract of 4Ë. Discuss with
the others at the table how declarer would plan to make the contract.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
-159-
Q. As declarer in 4Ë, how many losers does South have?
A. Six – Two spades, two hearts, and two diamonds.
Q. How would South plan to eliminate three losers?
A. Ruff or discard heart losers; take a repeated diamond finesse.
•
Declarer could plan to ruff two heart losers in dummy but that is unnecessary. The
heart losers can be discarded on dummy’s extra club winners after trumps are drawn.
•
Since two spade tricks must be lost, declarer should focus on holding the diamond
losers to one.
•
The best play in the diamond suit is the repeated finesse. This will succeed if West has
the ËK, the ËQ, or both the ËK and ËQ . . . a 75% chance.
This theme has been covered in earlier hands. If necessary, you can walk through the various possible
layouts of the diamond finesse to explain why the repeated finesse is best.
Let’s see how declarer might play the hand. Turn all the cards face up. Put the
ÌJ in front of West as the opening lead.
Declarer wins the first trick with dummy’s ÌA. East would probably encourage with
the Ì7, having no interest in spades or clubs.
•
Trick 1:
West: ÌJ
North: ÌA
East: Ì7
•
Declarer wants to start leading diamonds from the South hand.
•
Declarer can reach the South hand with the Ê10 . . . or ÊQ.
South: Ì4
Trick 2:
North: Ê7
East: Ê2
South: Ê10
West: Ê4
•
Declarer now leads a low diamond toward dummy.
•
If West plays low, declarer intends to finesse dummy’s Ë9, or ËJ. On the actual layout,
dummy’s Ë9 would win and declarer could play the ËA and then take the club
winners.
•
Suppose West decides to play the ËQ . . . splitting the honors. Declarer wins this trick.
Trick 3:
South: Ë3
West: ËQ
-160-
North: ËA
East: Ë2
•
Declarer doesn’t need to repeat the diamond finesse. Instead, declarer can simply
play the ËJ (or Ë9 or Ë10) to drive out West’s ËK.
Trick 4:
North: ËJ
East: Ê3
South: Ë4
West: ËK
•
West can’t do anything other than take the ÍA and ÍK.
•
On regaining the lead, declarer can draw the outstanding trump and take the club
winners, discarding the heart losers.
•
All declarer loses are two spades and a diamond.
Observation
•
In some auctions, the takeout doubler can make a second . . . or third . . . takeout
double to compete for the contract.
•
Advancer should treat the subsequent double as a takeout double . . . based on the
original double.
•
On this hand, declarer’s plan is to avoid two diamond losers. If declarer had simply
played the ËA and a second round of diamonds . . . hoping the missing diamonds are
divided 2-2, the contract would be defeated. West would get two spade tricks and two
diamond tricks.
•
If declarer had tries to take the club winners before drawing trumps . . . perhaps to
try and discard spade losers . . . West would ruff the third round. The contract would
again be defeated.
•
The repeated diamond finesse is the best approach, especially since West opened the
bidding and is likely to hold at least one of the missing diamond honors.
-161-
Doubler’s Subsequent Actions
Pick up the cards and sort them into suits. Each player take charge of one suit.
Construct the following hand in front of North.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: A takeout double has no upper range.
Spades: The ÍA, ÍJ, and two low spades.
Hearts:
A low heart.
Diamonds: The ËA, ËK and two low diamonds.
Clubs:
The ÊA, ÊQ and two low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
AJ32
2
AK32
AQ32
W N E
1Ì ?
S
Q. West opens the bidding 1Ì. What call does North make?
A. Double – 18 high-card points plus 3 dummy points for the singleton heart.
•
With support for the unbid suits, North makes a takeout double.
•
There is no upper range for the takeout double. The additional strength can be
shown later in the auction.
•
Unless advancer passes the takeout double . . . which is very unlikely . . . doubler will
get another opportunity to bid.
Teacher’s Key Point: Doubler can show a very strong hand by following the takeout double with a
cuebid.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 1Í. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 3Í – Showing a strong takeout double.
W N E S
1Ì X P 1Í
P ?
•
North’s hand is worth 21 points. That’s a very strong hand, but
not enough to commit the partnership to game.
•
South may have no points at all . . . a likely prospect given West’s opening bid and
North’s strength.
•
North wants to issue a strong invitation. One way to do this is to give a jump raise to
3Í. Since North would pass with a minimum hand of about 13-16 points and make
a mild invitational raise to 2Í with about 17-18, the jump to 3Í shows a very powerful
hand of about 19-21 points.
-162-
Q. Is there any other call South could make to show a strong hand?
A. Yes – Cuebid 2Ì.
•
North can show a strong hand by following up the takeout double with a cuebid of
the opponent’s suit.
•
The cuebid is forcing, asking advancer to make a further descriptive bid. Since
advancer has promised no strength with the 1Í call, advancer could jump with some
extra strength, or bid a new suit, or bid notrump with some length and strength in
the opponent’s suit.
•
With nothing extra to show, advancer simply rebids 2Í. This doesn’t promise a fivecard suit. It only says that advancer doesn’t have much.
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s simple rebid after a cuebid shows nothing extra.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 1Í. West
passes, North cuebids 2Ì, East passes, and South bids 2Í. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 3Í – Making a strong invitation.
W N E S
1Ì X P 1Í
P 2Ì P 2Í
P ?
•
South’s rebid of 2Í doesn’t show anything extra. South had to say
something after North’s 2Ì cuebid and 2Í was the cheapest bid available.
•
With 21 points in support of spades, North still doesn’t want to give up on game.
North can raise to 3Í, giving North one last chance to bid game with a little
something.
•
This is the strongest invitation North can make . . . stronger than jumping to 3Í
directly over South’s 1Í response.
•
North will have to judge whether to make a straightforward invitation with a jump
raise or whether to make a stronger invitation by cuebidding and then raising.
Teacher’s Key Point: A cuebid is sometimes more flexible than a raise of advancer’s suit. It leaves
more room and leaves more options open.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 2Ë. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 2Ì – A strength-showing cuebid.
W N E S
1Ì X P 2Ë
P ?
•
A raise to 3Ë doesn’t show North’s strength but a jump raise to
4Ë takes the partnership beyond a possible 3NT contract.
•
A cuebid of 2Ì let’s advancer know that North has a strong hand . . . likely with very
good diamond support. North can hear what advancer has to say next.
-163-
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancer’s response to the cuebid may provide additional information to help
determine the best contract.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 2Ë. West
passes, North cuebids 2Ì, East passes, and South bids 2NT. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 3NT – The most likely game.
W N E S
1Ì X P 2Ë
P 2Ì P 2NT
P ?
•
South’s 2NT call shows a little something with some strength in
hearts. Otherwise, advancer would simply rebid 3Ë.
•
Nine tricks in a contract of 3NT is likely to be easier than eleven tricks in 5Ë.
Teacher’s Key Point: If advancer does anything except rebid the original suit at the cheapest available
level, advancer is likely to have some values and/or distribution.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 2Ë. West
passes, North cuebids 2Ì, East passes, and South bids 3Ê. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 5Ë(3Ì) – Taking the partnership to game.
W N E S
1Ì X P 2Ë
P 2Ì P 3Ê
P ?
•
South’s 3Ê call shows a little something; otherwise, South would
simply rebid 3Ë. It looks reasonable to take a chance on game.
•
North’s alternative is to make a further forcing bid of 3Ì to try to extract even more
information from advancer.
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout doubler can sometimes re-cuebid to get additional information from
advancer.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 2Ë. West
passes, North cuebids 2Ì, East passes, and South bids 3Ë. West
passes. What call does North make?
A. 3Ì/4Ë – Making one more try for game.
W N E S
1Ì X P 2Ë
P 2Ì P 3Ë
P ?
•
Advancer’s rebid of 3Ë doesn’t show anything extra. It doesn’t
even promise more than four diamonds.
•
North could raise to 4Ë making one more try.
•
An alternative is for North to re-cuebid 3Ì. This leaves open the possibility of reaching
3NT. If advancer simply returns to 4Ë, North should probably pass. Enough is
enough.
-164-
Teacher’s Key Point: A second double by the takeout doubler is still for takeout.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, and East raises to 2Ì. South and
West pass. What call does North make?
A. Double – A second takeout double.
W N E S
1Ì X 2Ì P
P ?
•
Advancer’s pass shows too little to compete over the 2Ì raise.
Advancer could still have some values. North doesn’t want to give up on competing.
•
A second double by North is still for takeout. It shows more than a minimum takeout
double. Otherwise, North would pass.
•
North might consider cuebidding 3Ì, but this isn’t as flexible as a second double
since it uses up an extra level of bidding and commits the partnership to at least the
three level.
Teacher’s Key Point: The higher the level, the stronger the doubler should be to take further action
when advancer has not promised any values.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, and East raises to 2Ì. South passes
and West raises to 3Ì. What call does North make?
A. Double – Showing willingness to compete at the three level.
W N E S
1Ì X 2Ì P
3Ì ?
•
North needs a very strong hand to invite South into the auction
at the three level or four level.
•
South has already denied a suitable hand for competing at the two level opposite the
initial takeout double.
Teacher’s Key Point: A second double is still for takeout even if the opponents have bid two suits.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, and East responds 1Í. South passes
and West raises to 2Í. What call does North make?
A. Double – A takeout double for diamonds and clubs.
W N E S
1Ì X 1Í P
2Í ?
•
Although North promised spades with the original double,
North’s second double is not for penalty . . . it is still for takeout.
•
North is showing extra values for the original takeout double and is asking advancer
to pick one of the remaining unbid suits, diamonds or clubs.
•
North is willing to compete to the three level even though advancer is likely to have
very little. With the opponents bidding and raising spades, it is likely South has a
singleton in that suit. South, therefore, should have length in at least one minor suit.
-165-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Doubler will sometimes have the option of doubling again, cuebidding, or
raising advancer’s suit. Each choice sends a slightly different message.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades: Take away a low spade.
Hearts:
Add a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
NORTH
AQ3
32
AK32
AQ32
W N E S
1Ì X P 1Í
2Ì ?
Q. West opens 1Ì, North doubles, East passes, and South bids 1Í. West rebids 2Ì. What
call does North make?
A. Double – The most flexible call.
•
Advancer has had the opportunity to choose a suit but hasn’t promised any strength.
•
North has the option of raising spades to the two level, making a jump raise to the
three level, cuebidding 3Ì, or making a second takeout double.
•
With only three-card support, North should avoid raising when other options are
available. Advancer has not promised more than a four-card suit.
•
A cuebid is usually used when doubler has a strong hand with four-card support or
when probing for a stopper in the opponent’s suit, hoping to play notrump.
•
A second takeout double denies four-card support for advancer’s suit. Otherwise,
doubler would simply raise or jump raise advancer’s suit, or cuebid with a really
strong hand. It tends to show three-card support for advancer’s suit and says, “I still
want to compete but I’m not entirely happy with the choice of suit. Do you have a
second suit or do you want to stick with the first choice?”
•
On this hand, a second double is the most flexible call. In addition to sending the
right type of message, it leaves the additional option of defending 2Ì if advancer
chooses to convert the takeout double into a penalty double by passing. Advancer
knows North has extra strength and doesn’t have four-card support for spades.
Conclusion
•
In addition to raising advancer’s suit, the takeout doubler has other options with a
strong hand: cuebidding or, perhaps, making a second (or third) takeout double.
•
A cuebid typically shows a fit with advancer’s suit and a very strong hand with
game or, perhaps, slam interest. It is sometimes used to probe for a notrump
contract if advancer has some length and strength in the opponent’s suit.
•
A second double is still for takeout. If advancer has already bid a suit, the second
double denies four-card support for advancer’s suit.
-166-
Hand 12 - Converting to a Penalty Double
HAND: 12
DEALER: WEST
BOTH
VUL:
WEST
1Ë
Pass
NORTH
K Q 10 8
K Q 10 9
3
K J 10 7
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
A42
A763
AQ84
92
NORTH
Double
EAST
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
EAST
J653
85
72
Q6543
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
97
J42
K J 10 9 6 5
A8
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
West
OPENING LEAD: Ë3 by North
Introduction
The general guideline is to “take out takeout doubles.” The takeout doubler may
be doubling based on a distributional hand without a lot of high-card strength.
Also, it is expensive if the opponents make a doubled contract, especially a
doubled partscore.
Nonetheless, advancer does have the option of passing the takeout double and
converting it to a penalty double.
This option becomes more attractive at a high level, when fewer tricks are required
to defeat the opponent’s contract.
Since the takeout doubler will usually be short in the opponents’ suit, advancer
should have length and strength in the opponent’s suit before considering passing
for penalty, especially at a low level.
Let’s play the next hand and see the multi-purpose use of the takeout double.
-167-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 12. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make in first chair?
A. 1Ë – 14 high-card points.
•
A balanced hand too weak to open 1NT is opened one of a suit.
•
With no five-card major, the longer minor is opened.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. After West opens 1Ë, what call does North make?
A. Double – Support for the unbid suits, 14 high-card points, and 3 dummy points.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. After West’s 1Ë opening is doubled for takeout, what call does East make?
A. Pass – Not strong enough to bid with only 3 high-card points.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after North doubles 1Ë for takeout?
A. Pass – Turning the takeout double into a penalty double.
•
South’s best suit is diamonds.
-168-
•
Advancer can’t bid diamonds. 2Ë would be a cuebid. Besides, South doesn’t want to
contract for eight tricks with diamonds as trumps when West is already contracting
for seven tricks with diamonds as trumps.
•
Advancer expects to get at least four tricks in the trump suit, along with the ÊA.
Combined with North’s promised high-card strength, it should be possible to defeat
1Ë several tricks.
•
With no better alternative, advancer’s best choice is to defend for penalty. The
penalty should more than compensate for any contract North-South can make. In
addition, East-West are vulnerable.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After South passes, what call does West make?
A. Pass - There doesn’t appear to be a better spot.
•
Since South is passing for penalties, West might consider bidding 1Ì or 1NT (or
redoubling for rescue).
•
However, any bid is likely to get East-West into further trouble. North is likely to have
length and strength in the unbid suits.
•
1Ë doubled appears to be West’s best contract. West expects to take at least four
tricks.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. If the contract is 1Ë doubled, who is on lead?
A. North.
Leave the North hand face up on the table and turn the remaining cards face
down. Discuss with the others at the table what North should lead against 1Ë
doubled.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the opening lead.
Q. How many tricks must North-South take to defeat 1Ë?
A. Seven.
•
In effect, North-South must make a contract of 1Ë . . . or more.
Q. If North and South were declaring a diamond contract, what would be a priority?
A. Drawing trumps – To prevent the opponents from ruffing winners.
-169-
•
North and South likely have the majority of strength since they have contracted to
take seven or more tricks with diamonds as the trump suit.
•
Presumably, the only way East-West can take extra tricks is through ruffing some of
North-South’s winners.
Q. What should North lead against 1Ë doubled?
A.
Ë3 – Starting to draw trumps.
•
When advancer has passed a low-level takeout double, the standard opening lead is
a trump.
•
Let’s see how the defense would go if North leads a trump.
Turn all the cards face up. Put the Ë3 in front of North as the opening lead.
Trick 1:
North: Ë3
East: Ë2
South: ËK
West: ËA
Q. What is declarer likely to try to do after winning the first trick?
A. Ruff a loser.
•
It won’t do declarer much good to try to develop extra winners in spades or
diamonds. Even if a trick could be established in dummy, declarer has no way to
reach it.
•
Declarer’s only hope for an extra trick is to try to make use of dummy’s remaining
trump to ruff a heart loser.
•
Declarer will probably start by leading the ÌA14.
Trick 2:
West: ÌA
North: Ì9
East: Ì5
South: Ì2
Q. What must South be careful to do on the second round of trumps?
A. Win the trick – To lead another round of trumps.
•
South wants to gain the lead to lead another diamond. It is unlikely that North has
a second diamond to lead.
Trick 3:
West: Ì3
North: Ì10
14
East: Ì8
South: ÌJ
Declarer could start by leading a low heart, but it makes no difference to the defense.
-170-
•
By overtaking North’s Ì10, South is in position to lead a second round of trumps.
•
North will probably make an encouraging signal in spades on this trick.
Trick 4:
South: ËJ
West: ËQ
North: Í10
East: Ë7
Q. How many more tricks is declarer likely to take?
A. One - The ÍA.
•
South will eventually gain the lead with the ÊA to draw West’s remaining trumps with
the Ë10 and Ë9.
•
West’s only remaining trick is the ÍA.
Q. What would be the score for North-South?
A. 800 – East-West would be defeated three tricks, doubled, and vulnerable.
Now let’s what would happen if North doesn’t lead a trump. Turn all the cards
face up.
Q. What might North lead if not leading a trump?
A.
ÌK/ÍK – Top of a broken sequence.
•
North is slightly more likely to lead a heart than a spade because of the Ì9.
•
Leading the ÊJ, top of an interior sequence, is riskier.
Q. Assuming North leads the ÌK, would declarer win the first trick?
A. No (Yes) – Declarer would probably duck15.
•
Declarer has to lose a heart trick anyway, so declarer would probably take the loss
early, keeping the ÌA as an entry to the West hand.
Trick 1:
North: ÌK
East: Ì5
South: Ì2
West: Ì3
Q. What is North likely to do after winning the first trick with the ÌK?
A. Lead a trump – Trying to stop a ruff in dummy.
•
Seeing the doubleton heart in dummy and South’s discouraging signal, North may
. . . belatedly . . . shift to a trump.
It doesn’t make any difference on the actual hand. Declarer can win the ÌA and lead a second round to
prepare for ruffing a heart.
15
-171-
Trick 2:
•
North: Ë3
East: Ë2
South: ËK
West: ËA
Declarer now ruffs a heart loser.
Trick 3:
West: ÌA
North: Ì9
East: Ì8
South: Ì4
Trick 4:
West: Ì6
North: Ì10
East: Ë7
South: ÌJ
Q. How many tricks will declarer take?
A. Five – The ÍA, the ÌA, a heart ruff, and the ËA and ËQ.
•
The defenders must be careful not to let West get a sixth trick with the
allowing West to ruff a third round of clubs, for example.
Ë8 . . . by
Q. What would be the score for North-South?
A. 500 – East-West would be defeated two tricks, doubled, and vulnerable.
•
Since North and South are also vulnerable, the penalty might not be enough
compensation if they can make a game contract.
Observation
•
Advancer rarely passes partner’s takeout double to convert it to a penalty double.
•
If advancer does pass, the takeout doubler should lead a trump. It will usually gain
one or more tricks for the defenders.
•
On the actual hand, defending 1Ë doubled is the best result for North-South. NorthSouth will probably make 3NT16 but that is less than the score for defeating 1Ë
doubled by three tricks.
3NT by South can actually be defeated if West leads the Ê9 and East doesn’t play the ÊQ.
16
-172-
Converting a Takeout Double Into a Penalty Double
Take the cards from all four hands and sort them into suits. Each person at the
table take charge of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of South.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Take out takeout doubles.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Three low spades.
Three low hearts.
Three low diamonds.
The ÊQ, ÊJ, Ê3, and Ê2.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
432
432
432
QJ32
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
Q. West opens the bidding 1Ê. North doubles and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1Ë – Taking out the takeout double.
•
North’s double is for takeout and South is expected to pick one of the unbid suits.
South should take out the takeout double unless there is a strong reason not to.
•
Although the club suit is South’s best suit and South has an uncomfortable choice
among the three unbid suits, South should not consider passing with this hand.
•
West should have an easy time making at least seven tricks with clubs as the trump
suit. North is likely short in clubs, with a singleton or a void. If South passes, West will
know which defender has most of the missing clubs and will be able to play the hand
accordingly. If West holds the ÊA-K, it is possible that South won’t take a single trick
on defense.
•
Bidding has much more going for it than passing. Even if North-South can’t make
anything, the penalty for being defeated may be less than the penalty for letting EastWest make a doubled contract. A more likely result is that East-West will continue to
bid, taking North-South out of a poor contract.
•
Even with length and strength in the opponent’s suit, South should not bid 1NT with
a weak hand. 1NT is likely to play very poorly opposite club shortness in North’s
hand. There will be no long suit to develop and it will be difficult to reach the South
hand to lead toward the North hand to take finesses. Most of North-South’s assets will
be face up on the table, making it easy for East-West to defend.
•
A 1NT response is constructive, showing about 6-10 points with length and strength
in the opponent’s suit.
•
Instead, South should make the cheapest available bid, 1Ë.
-173-
Teacher’s Key Point: Take higher the level, the more tempting it is to pass.
Q. West opens the bidding 3Ê. North doubles and East passes. What
call does South make?
A. 3Ë – The cheapest available bid.
W N E
3Ê X P
S
?
•
The higher the level, the more tempting it is to pass and convert partner’s takeout
double to a penalty double. Partner is likely to have a better hand to double at the
three level than the one level and fewer tricks are needed to defeat the opponents’
contract.
•
Nonetheless, it is usually advisable to take out the double when the decision is close.
Partner’s takeout double is likely to be based on distribution . . . a singleton or void
in the opponent’s suit . . . rather than a lot of high cards. Advancer doesn’t want to
discourage partner from making aggressive, shapely doubles, to keep the partnership
competitive.
•
On this hand, there is no guarantee of even one trick on defense, so advancer should
take out the double by making the cheapest available bid of 3Ë.
Teacher’s Key Point: Consider your position at the table.
Q. East opens the bidding 3Ê. South passes, West passes, and North
doubles. East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Relying on two tricks on defense.
W N E S
3Ê P
P X P ?
•
It is easier to pass a takeout double and convert it to a penalty
double when advancer’s trumps are favorably placed over (behind/after/to the left
of) the bidder.
•
Assuming East has the ÊA-K for the preemptive opening bid, it is likely that advancer
will get two tricks on defense with the ÊQ and ÊJ. If partner can produce three
tricks on defense, North-South will defeat the contract.
•
Here, passing and hoping to take five or more tricks on defense looks to be a better
option than bidding and contracting for at least nine tricks.
•
Passing is still risky. If the ÊA or ÊK turns up in dummy, South may only get one
club trick. Also, partner might be doubling a little light in the balancing position . .
. more on that in a future lesson . . . and it may be West who holds most of the highcard strength.
-174-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: A 1NT response is constructive, showing about 6-10.
Spades: Take away a low spade; add the ÍK.
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
K43
432
432
QJ32
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
Q. West opens the bidding 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT – Showing about 6-10 points and length and strength in the opponent’s suit.
•
Although advancer’s club holding isn’t that strong, there is reason to believe it is
sufficient. West’s club holding is suspect. It could be as few as three cards.
Teacher’s Key Point: Avoid notrump with a reasonable alternative.
Q. West opens the bidding 1Í, North doubles, and East passes. What
call does South make?
A. 2Ê (1NT) – Choosing one of the unbid suits.
W N E
1Í X P
S
?
•
The hand falls into the range for 1NT but the spade holding is less secure. West has
at least a five-card suit and the defenders may be able to take all the tricks in the suit
if East has an entry and can trap South’s ÍK.
•
A safer call is 2Ê. Ideally, North will have four-card support for clubs and the
partnership will be in an eight-card fit, even though it will be at the two level.
•
In addition, bidding 2Ê doesn’t prevent the partnership from reaching a notrump
contract. If North shows a strong hand, South can show the spade stopper later.
-175-
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: To convert a low level takeout double into a penalty double, a solid trump
holding is preferable.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Take away a low spade.
Hearts:
Take away a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Add the Ê4 and Ê5.
SOUTH
K4
43
432
QJ5432
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
Q. West opens the bidding 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. 1NT (Pass) – Probably the safest action.
•
With six clubs, passing for penalty looks like a reasonable choice.
•
However, it is dangerous to defend for penalty at a low level without a solid trump
holding. If West holds the ÊA-K-10-9, for example, declarer is likely to get four trump
tricks despite South’s length in the suit. With two or three tricks elsewhere, West may
do quite well in a notrump contract. It would not even be surprising for West to make
one or more overtricks in 1Ê doubled.
•
South shouldn’t be tempted to pass because West might have opened with a three-card
suit. West could easily have a five-card or longer suit . . . especially since North may
hold a singleton or void.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: Consider converting a takeout double into a penalty double when you have
guaranteed trump tricks.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Take away the Ê2 and Ê3; add the
Ê10 and Ê9.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
K4
43
432
Q J 10 9 5 4
W N E
1Ê X P
S
?
Q. West opens the bidding 1Ê, North doubles, and East passes. What call does South make?
A. Pass – Expecting to take four tricks in the trump suit.
-176-
•
South’s club holding is a lot more solid than in the previous layout. South has a
reasonable expectation of taking four trump tricks even if West has a holding such
as ÊA-K-8-7.
•
Combined with North’s high cards, South has a reasonable expectation that 1Ê
could be the best contract for North-South, not East-West.
Q. If South does pass the takeout double, what should North lead if the final contract is 1Ê
doubled?
A. A trump – Helping South to draw trump.
•
The main danger in defending a low level doubled contract is that declarer may be
able to take a lot of tricks by ruffing your side’s high cards.
•
If West holds ÊA-K-3-2 and a singleton diamond, for example, West may be able to
take tricks with the Ê2 and Ê3 in addition to the ÊK and ÊA if given the
opportunity.
•
To prevent this, the defenders want to lead trumps at every opportunity so they can
eventually draw West’s low clubs and prevent them from being used to ruff the
defenders’ high cards.
•
In effect, North-South are contracting to take at least seven tricks with clubs as trump
and, therefore, should be following declarer’s normal tactic of drawing trump.
•
North should lead a club . . . assuming North isn’t void . . . even with a ‘dangerous’
looking holding such as a singleton ÊK.
Conclusion
•
It is almost always correct to take out partner’s low level takeout double rather than
pass and defend for penalty.
•
The higher the level, the more frequently advancer can consider passing partner’s
takeout double and converting to a penalty double, especially if advancer’s trump
holding is favorably placed.
•
To pass a low level takeout double, advancer should usually have a solid trump
holding that will prevent declarer from taking tricks with low trump cards.
•
If partner passes a low-level takeout double, it is almost always correct to lead a trump.
-177-
-178-
Lesson 4 - Balancing and Other Doubles
Hand 13 - The Balancing Double
WEST
HAND: 13
DEALER: NORTH
VUL:
NONE
NORTH
Í A 10 2
Ì AKJ964
Ë Q9
Ê Q 10
WEST
Í K865
Ì 72
Ë AK42
Ê 875
NORTH
1Ì
Double
2Ì
Pass
Pass
EAST
Pass
3Ë
SOUTH
Pass
Pass
EAST
Í Q4
Ì Q83
Ë 10 8 7 6 5
Ê AK2
SOUTH
Í J973
Ì 10 5
Ë J3
Ê J9643
DECLARER:
East
OPENING LEAD: Ì10 by South
Introduction
When the opponents open the bidding and stop in a partscore contract, it’s
tempting to feel the auction is over. There might even be relief that the opponents
have not bid game.
This isn’t the time to sit back, however. Your partnership might have as much
strength as the opponents and may have a suitable trump fit.
Judgment must be exercised in deciding whether to compete for the contract or
to defend. If you decide to compete, the takeout double is one of the tools to get
back into the auction.
Let’s look at a classic situation in which a player must to decide whether to pass or
bid.
-179-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 13. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy-style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What would North bid?
A. 1Ì – 16 high-card points plus 2 length points for the six-card suit.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. Does East have enough to compete over North’s 1Ì opening?
A. No – The hand is unsuitable for an overcall or takeout double.
•
East has 11 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
The quality of the diamond suit is not good enough for an overcall, especially at the
two level.
•
East doesn’t have support for spades, the unbid major . . . and the suit partner is most
likely to choose.
Q. What call does East make?
A. Pass.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make in response to North’s 1Ì opening?
A. Pass – Only 3 high-card points and no fit.
-180-
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What will happen if West passes?
A. The auction is over.
•
West is in the passout position.
Q. Does West have enough strength for a takeout double?
A. Yes/No – Not for a direct takeout double.
•
West has 11 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton heart.
•
West also has support for the unbid suits.
•
This isn’t quite enough to make a takeout double directly over a 1Ì opening bid
because it would promise an opening bid or more.
•
In the passout position, however, West has to protect the partnership interests and:
A takeout double in the passout position can be made
with less strength than in the direct position
•
West keeps the auction going by making a takeout double.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What does North do after West’s double?
A. 2Ì (Pass/Redouble) – Making it more difficult for East to enter the auction.
•
West could pass . . . perhaps hoping to buy the contract in 1Ì doubled. That’s
unlikely, however, since the double is for takeout.
•
West could redouble to show the extra strength.
•
A better choice is to rebid 2Ì:
•
Since South passed, North-South probably doesn’t have the majority of strength.
•
Bidding at the two level makes it more difficult for East to enter the auction.
•
Bidding again shows the extra strength.
•
Rebidding the hearts shows a six-card or longer suit, giving South the option of
showing support if East-West bid.
-181-
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make after West doubles and North rebids 2Ì?
A. 3Ë17 – Showing enough strength to compete at the three level.
•
East has 11 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit. That’s usually
enough to look for game opposite a takeout double. There are two reasons, however,
for taking a less agressive approach:
•
The ÌQ in the opponent’s suit is of dubious value.
•
East must be more cautious when West doubles in the passout position. West
might have less strength than in the direct position.
•
If North had passes, East might jump to 3Ë to show an invitational hand of about 9-11
points.
•
After North bids 2Ì, competing to the three level shows about the same strength.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after East bids 3Ë?
A. Pass.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s rebid after advancer competes to 3Ë?
A. Pass – Nothing more to say.
•
West has a minimum . . . or sub-minimum . . . for the takeout double.
•
The partnership is unlikely to have game since East passed over 1Ì and didn’t cuebid
in response to the takeout double.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make after East’s 3Ë call is passed around?
A. Pass – Nothing more to say.
•
North has done enough with the opening bid and rebid.
•
South has shown no interest in competing any higher.
17
2NT would be another possibility . . . a bit aggressive.
-182-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose East is declarer in a contract of 3Ë. Who makes the opening lead?
A. South.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What would be the opening lead?
A.
Ì10 – top of a doubleton in partner’s suit.
Place the Ì10 in front of South as the opening lead. Turn the remaining North
and South cards face down. Focus on the East hand as declarer in a contract of
3Ë. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer would plan the play.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have?
A. Five or more – Depending on the division of the missing trumps.
•
Declarer has a spade loser, three heart losers, and a club loser.
•
Declarer will have a trump loser unless the missing diamonds are divided 2-2.
Q. Which loser might declarer plan to eliminate?
A. Heart – By ruffing or establishing the ÌQ.
•
Once trumps are drawn, declarer can ruff a heart loser in the dummy.
•
Assuming North holds the ÌA and ÌK, it may not be necessary to ruff a heart. The
ÌQ will become a winner.
Q. What is declarer’s main concern in the 3Ë contract?
A. Losing a trump trick.
•
Declarer will have to lose a trump trick if the missing hearts don’t divide 2-2.
•
Declarer may also have to lose a trump trick if the defenders can arrange an uppercut.
•
Let’s see how the defense might go.
Turn all the cards face up. Place the Ì10 in front of South as the opening lead.
-183-
•
North will win the first trick.
Trick 1:
•
South: Ì10
West: Ì2
North: ÌK
East: Ì3
With no clearly better alternative, North will likely continue by taking a second heart
trick.
Trick 2:
North: ÌA
East: Ì6
South: Ì5
West: Ì7
Q. What is North’s best continuation at this point?
A. Another heart18 – Hoping South can ruff.
•
Leading another heart can gain in two ways:
•
South can ruff East’s ÌQ, which would have been a winner. This will prevent
declarer from making use of it later . . . for discarding a club from dummy, for
example.
•
South may be able to uppercut dummy . . . by ruffing high enough force declarer
to overruff with the ËK or ËA to win the trick, thereby promoting North’s ËQ
into a winner.
Q. If North does lead a third round of hearts, what card does South play?
A.
ËJ – To force out one of dummy’s high trumps.
•
Discarding is unlikely to do any good. South’s diamonds will now fall under dummy’s
ËA and ËK.
•
Ruffing with the Ë3 is likely to be ineffective. Declarer can overruff with dummy’s Ë4.
•
South can’t see the ËQ in North’s hand but can imagine it and visualize the
possibility of promoting it by ruffing with the ËJ.
Q. If South does ruff the third round of hearts with the ËJ, what might happen if declarer
overruffs?
A. The contract might be defeated19.
•
Declarer now has a diamond loser.
•
Declarer still has a spade loser and an eventual club loser.
Likely the ÌJ as a suit preference signal for spades, the higher-ranking of the remaining suits.
18
19
Declarer can still make the contract by endplaying North, but might not find this line. It shouldn’t be
mentioned to the students.
-184-
Q. Does declarer have an alternative?
A. Yes – Discarding a club from dummy.
•
Declarer isn’t forced to overruff. Declarer has a club loser and might choose to
discard a club on this trick . . . discarding a loser on a loser.
•
Let’s see how this would work.
Trick 3:
•
North: ÌJ
East: ÌQ
South: ËJ
West: Ê5
Let’s assume South now leads a club. It doesn’t actually matter what South leads.
Trick 4:
•
South: Ê4
West: Ê7
North: ÊQ
East: ÊK
Declarer can now draw the outstanding trumps.
East: Ë5
South: Ë3
West: ËK
North: Ë9
Trick 6:
West: ËA
North: ËQ
East: Ë6
South: Ê3
•
Trick 5:
Now declarer can ruff the club loser.
West: Ê8
North: Ê10
East: ÊA
South: Ê6
Trick 7:
East: Ê2
South: Ê9
West: Ë2
North: Ì4
•
Trick 6:
Declarer’s only remaining loser is the ÍA. East-West make the 3Ë contract.
Observation
•
When a bid is followed by two passes, a third pass will end the auction.
•
This is known as the passout position.
•
To protect the interests of the partnership, the player in the passout position can
compete with less than the values required in the direct position.
•
On defense, an uppercut can be used to try to establish a trick in the trump suit.
•
As declarer, the loser on a loser play is a useful option.
-185-
The Classic Balancing Double
Take the cards from all four hands and sort them into suits. Each person at the
table take charge of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of West.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: This is a standard takeout double in the direct chair.
Spades:
Two low spades.
Hearts:
ÌA and three low hearts.
Diamonds: The ËK and three low diamonds.
Clubs:
The ÊK, ÊQ, and a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
32
A432
K432
KQ2
W N E
S
1Í
?
Q. South opens the bidding 1Í. What call does West make?
A. Double – 12 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton spade.
•
With support for the unbid suits, West makes a takeout double.
•
When the opening bid is on the right it is in the direct position . . . acting directly over
the opening bid.
Teacher’s Key Point: You can also make a takeout double in the balancing position.
Q. North opens the bidding 1Í. East and South pass. What call does
West make?
A. Double – A takeout double in the balancing position.
•
W N E
1Í P
?
S
P
When a bid on West’s left has been followed by two passes, West
is said to be in the balancing position.
Q. What is the primary difference between passing in the direct position and passing in the
balancing position?
A. A pass in the balancing position ends the auction.
•
A pass in the direct position means partner is guaranteed at least one more bid in the
auction.
•
A pass in the balancing position immediately ends the auction.
Q. When North opens the bidding 1Í and East and South pass, what inference can be drawn
about the combined strength held by East-West?
-186-
A. East-West likely hold at least half the high-cards . . . 20 points or more.
•
North hasn’t opened with a strong two bid, so North is likely limited to at most 21
points. North could have considerably less . . . as few as 12 or 13 points.
•
Responder, South, passed the opening bid. Responder likely has fewer than 6 points
. . . perhaps no points at all.
•
North-South are unlikely to have 26 combined points, since they have stopped below
game. They could have as few as 12 or 13 combined points. On average, North-South
probably have about 20 combined points.
•
Since there are 40 high-card points in the deck . . . and distribution adds some points
. . . East-West are likely to have at least 20 combined points and may have enough for
game.
•
East’s pass doesn’t deny a strong hand. It simply says that East has a hand unsuitable
for either an overcall or a takeout double.
Hand2
Teacher’s Key Point: A double can be made in the balancing position with about three points less than
in the direct position.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away the ÌA and add the ÌQ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
32
Q432
K432
KQ2
W N E
1Í P
?
S
P
Q. North opens the bidding 1Í. East and South pass. What call does West make?
A. Double – A light takeout double in balancing position.
•
With 10 high-card points plus 1 for the doubleton spade, West doesn’t have quite
enough to make a takeout double in the direct position.
Double in Balancing Position
•
•
A takeout double in the balancing position can be made with
about 3 points (a king) less than in the direct position.
West’s alternative is to pass and let North-South play in a 1Í contract.
-187-
•
There is a strong inference that East-West have at least half the points in the deck.
This is where the term balancing position comes from. When one side stops in
partscore, it is likely that the overall strength is relatively evenly balanced between the
two sides.
•
If West has only 10 high-card points, then it is likely that East also has about 10 points.
•
With the strength evenly divided between the two sides, East-West want to compete
for the contract if possible.
•
By doubling rather than passing, West has more to gain than to lose. East-West might
make a partscore . . . or even a game contract if East has a strong hand. North-South
may be pushed higher if they want to buy the contract . . . perhaps to a contract they
cannot make. East may have length and strength in spades and be in a position to
pass West’s takeout double and defend for penalty. East couldn’t make a penalty
double of 1Í in the direct position.
•
The disadvantage to doubling is that North-South might bid to a better contract . . .
perhaps even a game. Or, East-West might get too high.
•
East might expect West to have a better hand . . . similar to a double in the direct
position. However, it is standard practice for advancer to make allowance for a double
in the balancing position . . . recognizing that the doubler might be up to a king
‘light’.
•
A double in the passout or balancing position is sometimes referred to as a reopening
double because a pass would close (end) the auction but a double keeps it going.
Teacher’s Key Point: Don’t make a balancing bid with an unsuitable hand.
Q. North opens the bidding 1Ì. East and South pass. What call does
West make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double.
W N E
1Ì P
?
S
P
•
West has enough strength to make a balancing double but
doesn’t have support for spades, the suit East is likely to bid if West doubles.
•
West’s best choice is to pass and defend. West has a reasonable hand for defending
against a heart partscore contract.
•
It is likely that North-South are not in their best contract. If West makes a balancing
bid, North-South might get to a better spot.
•
West’s length in hearts also makes it unlikely that East has a suitable hand for
competing. With heart shortage, East would make a takeout double with a good hand
or overcall with a good suit. Either East has a hand too weak for one of these actions
or a hand with some length in hearts . . . in which case, it is probably best for EastWest to be defending against 1Ì.
-188-
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: A balancing 1NT call shows about a king less than a direct 1NT overcall.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Add the ÍK.
Hearts:
Take away a low heart.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
WEST
K32
Q43
K432
KQ2
W N E
1Ë P
?
S
P
Q. North opens the bidding 1Ë. East and South pass. What call does West make?
A. 1NT/Pass – A close decision.
•
With length in diamonds, it would be reasonable for West to pass and choose to
defend.
•
With 13 high-card points, however, there is some risk in passing. If East holds a
similar hand, the partnership could have 26 combined points and miss a game
contract.
•
West’s hand isn’t suitable for a takeout double. There is only three-card support for
whichever suit advancer chooses.
•
Instead, with some length and strength in the opponent’s suit, West might make a
balancing bid of 1NT. In the balancing position, an overcall of 1NT is made with
about a king . . . 3 points . . . less than in the direct position. 1NT shows about 12-14
points rather than 15-17. Some partnerships agree on an even wider range . . . about
11-15.
Hand 4
Teacher’s Key Point: With a hand too strong for a balancing 1NT call, start with a takeout double.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away a low heart; add the ÌA.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
K32
AQ4
K432
KQ2
W N E
1Ê P
?
Q. North opens the bidding 1Ê. East and South pass. What call does West make?
A. Double – Too strong for a balancing 1NT.
-189-
S
P
•
In the direct position . . . if South had opened 1Ê . . . West would overcall 1NT with
this hand, showing about 15-18 points.
•
In the balancing position, West is too strong to make a balancing bid of 1NT since that
would promise only 12-14 points.
•
Instead, West starts with a takeout double, planning to rebid notrump over East’s call.
If East bids 1Í, for example, West will rebid 1NT. This shows a balanced hand of
about 15-18 points.
•
The situation is similar to that in the direct position. With a hand too strong for a
direct overcall of 1NT, start with a takeout double and then bid notrump. It is the
same in the balancing position . . . except that a balancing bid of 1NT would be
weaker than in the direct position, so the double followed by notrump shows a hand
too strong for a balancing 1NT.
Conclusion
•
In the balancing position, a takeout double can be made with up to a king less than
in the direct position. Advancer must allow for this when making a call . . . more on
that later.
•
A balancing takeout double doesn’t necessarily show less than in the direct position.
It may show less.
•
Don’t make a balancing bid with a hand unsuitable for doubling or overcalling.
Sometimes it is best to simply pass and defend.
•
Overcalls in a suit or in notrump can also be made in the balancing position with up
to a king less than in the direct position. With a hand too strong for a balancing
overcall, start with a takeout double and then bid the suit or notrump.
-190-
Hand 14 - Advancing a Balancing Double
HAND: 14
DEALER: EAST
N-S
VUL:
NORTH
A Q 10 4
842
K87
J83
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
J95
AK3
10 9 3
7642
WEST
NORTH
2Ì
Pass
Pass
Pass
2Í
EAST
1Ì
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
Double
Pass
EAST
K7
Q 10 9 6 5
QJ4
A95
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
8632
J7
A652
K Q 10
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
West
OPENING LEAD: Ì10 by East
Introduction
A pass can be a descriptive bid. A pass by the dealer shows fewer than 13 points.
A pass after an opponent opens denies a suitable hand for an immediate overcall
or takeout double.
A player can bid after an original pass. Subsequent bids, however, must be taken
in the context of the earlier pass.
This concept can often allow the partnership to compete when the points are
fairly evenly distributed between the two sides. The double is a useful tool.
Let’s look at an example of competing at the partscore level.
-191-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 14. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and talk about the hand. What do you think is the best contract?
How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What does East call as dealer?
A. 1Ì – 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card major.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after East opens 1Ì?
A. Pass – Unsuitable for an overcall or a takeout double.
•
South has no five-card or longer suit to overcall.
•
Although South has support for the unbid suits, the hand only has 10 high-card
points . . . with the ÌJ being of dubious value. Partner would expect more for an
immediate takeout double.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make in response to East’s 1Ì opening?
A. 2Ì – Three-card support for the major suit and 8 high-card points.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make after West bids 2Ì?
A. Pass – Unsuitable for an overcall or takeout double.
-192-
•
North has no five-card or longer suit to overcall. Overcalling a good four-card suit at
the two level is risky.
•
With 10 high-card points, North doesn’t have enough to make a direct takeout
double.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What rebid does East make after West’s raise to 2Ì?
A. Pass – A minimum opening bid.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. If South passes, what happens?
A. The auction is over – West is declarer in 2Ì.
•
South is in the passout position . . . a pass ends the auction.
Q. How much strength are East and West likely to have?
A. About 20-23 points – Approximately half the overall strength on the deal.
•
East has at least 13 points but did not make a move toward game. So, East has fewer
than about 17 points.
•
West has at least 6 points to raise but not enough for an invitational (limit) raise.
•
Some of the East-West points may come from distribution rather than high cards.
Q. How much strength are North and South likely to have?
A. About 20 points – Approximately half the overall strength on the deal.
•
South has 10 high-card points.
•
Presumably, North has about the same. Otherwise, the opponents would have bid
more.
Q. Does it seem fair that East-West should buy the contract uncontested in 2Ì?
A. No – The strength is evenly divided between the two sides.
•
East-West have an easy time finding their fit because their high-card points are
divided 13-7, giving East an opening bid and West enough to respond.
•
North-South have a more challenging time because their high-card points are divided
10-10, leaving neither with enough for a direct takeout double.
•
Nonetheless, there’s no reason that East-West should get to comfortably choose the
trump suit. North-South should be able to compete.
-193-
Q. What would be a suitable competitive action by South?
A. Double - A takeout double.
•
South does have support for the unbid suits, spades, diamonds, and clubs.
Q. How will North know that South doesn’t have 13 or more points for the takeout double?
A. South passed over 1Ì.
•
With 13 or more points and support for the unbid suits, South would have doubled
1Ì.
•
South is in the passout position . . . similar to the situation when there is an opening
bid followed by two passes. This is often referred to as the balancing position because
the points are approximately balanced between the two sides when one side stops in
partscore at a low level.
Double in Balancing Position
•
•
A takeout double in the balancing position can be made with
about 3 points (a king) less than in the direct position.
A double in the passout position is sometimes called a reopening double since it keeps
the auction going rather than closing it.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after South doubles the 2Ì contract?
A. Pass – West has described the hand with the raise to 2Ì.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does advancer, North, make after West passes South’s double?
A. 2Í – Choosing the unbid suit in which to compete.
•
With 10 high-card points, advancer usually makes an invitational jump when partner
doubles to show a hand in the 9-11 point range.
•
Opposite a balancing double, however, advancer must be more conservative since
partner may have less than when making an immediate takeout double.
•
Since South passed over the original 1Ì opening, South can’t have a takeout double
of hearts with 13 or more points. So, the partnership is only competing for partscore.
-194-
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make after North bids 2Í?
A. Pass – East has nothing extra for the original opening bid.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. After North bids 2Í and East passes, what call does South make?
A. Pass – South has already done enough by getting the partnership into the auction.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. After North bids 2Í and East and South both pass, what call does West make?
A. Pass – West has nothing extra.
•
The tables have turned and West is now in the passout or balancing position.
•
West will have to decide whether to let North-South buy the contract in 2Í or
whether to compete further.
•
West could compete by bidding 3Ì or doubling but, with only three-card support and
8 points has no reason to bid any more.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose North is declarer in a contract of 2Í. Who makes the opening lead?
A. East.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What would East lead?
A.
Ì10 – Top of the touching high cards from an interior sequence.
• East might choose the ËQ but hearts have been bid and raised by the partnership.
• Let’s suppose East leads the Ì10 and West wins the first trick with the ÌK.
Trick 1:
East: Ì10
South: Ì7
-195-
East: ÌK
North: Ì2
•
With nothing better to do, West may continue by taking the ÌA.
Trick 2:
West: ÌA
North: Ì4
East: Ì5
South: ÌJ
Turn the remaining East-West cards face down. Focus on the North hand as
declarer in a contract of 2Í. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer
would plan to play the hand from this point.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have?
A. Seven – Two spades, three hearts, one diamond, and one club.
•
Declarer has lost the first two heart tricks and still has one left.
•
Assuming the spades divide no worse than 3-2, declarer will lose at most two tricks in
that suit.
Q. How would declarer plan to eliminate two of the losers?
A. Ruff heart; take trump finesse.
•
The remaining heart loser can be ruffed in dummy.
•
Declarer can hope to hold the spade losers to one . . . likely with the help of a finesse.
Turn all the remaining North-South cards face down except for the spade suit.
Since declarer’s main challenge is to hold the spade losers to one, discuss with the
others at the table how the spade suit should be handled.
Q. How should declarer plan to play the spade suit?
A. Finesse ÍQ/ Finesse Í10/Play ÍA.
•
One option is to lead a spade from dummy and finesse the ÍQ, hoping West holds
the ÍK. If the first finesse loses, declarer can later finesse the Í10, hoping West holds
the ÍJ.
•
A second option is to finesse the Í10 first. If this loses to the ÍJ, declarer can finesse
the ÍQ next. This is slightly better than the first option since declarer won’t lose any
spade tricks if West holds both the ÍK and ÍJ.
•
The best option on this hand, however, is to start by playing the ÍA!
•
Let’s see why.
-196-
Turn up only the spade suit in all four hands.
NORTH
Í A Q 10 4
EAST
ÍK7
WEST
ÍJ95
SOUTH
Í8632
Q. What happens on the actual hand if declarer starts by finessing the ÍQ?
A. The finesse loses – But declarer can still recover.
•
After the first finesse loses, declarer can later cross to dummy and finesse the Í10.
•
The second finesse works and declarer loses one trick.
Q. What happens on the actual hand if declarer starts by finessing the Í10?
A. It loses to the ÍK – Declarer loses only one trick.
•
After the first trick drives out East’s ÍK, declarer can draw the remaining trumps.
•
So, either finesse works on the actual hand. However, declarer was lucky.
You may want to skip the following section on playing the spade suit or leave it until the end of the
lesson.
Give East’s Í7 to West.
NORTH
Í A Q 10 4
WEST
ÍJ975
EAST
ÍK
SOUTH
Í8632
-197-
Q. What would happen if declarer started by finessing the ÍQ?
A. Declarer would lose two spade tricks.
•
The first finesse loses to the ÍK.
•
Declarer can take a second finesse of the Í10, but will still lose a trick to West’s ÍJ.
Q. What would happen if declarer started by finessing the Í10?
A. Declarer would lose two spade tricks.
•
The first finesse loses to the ÍK.
•
Declarer can then play the ÍA and ÍQ but will still have to lose a trick to West’s ÍJ.
Q. What would happen if declarer started by playing the ÍA?
A. Declarer would lose one spade trick.
•
The first finesse drops East’s ÍK.
•
Declarer can then cross to dummy and finesse the Í10.
Give West’s ÍJ to East.
NORTH
Í A Q 10 4
EAST
ÍKJ
WEST
Í975
SOUTH
Í8632
Q. What would happen if declarer started by finessing the ÍQ?
A. Declarer would (probably) lose two spade tricks.
•
The first finesse loses to the ÍK.
•
Unable to see the East hand, declarer will likely take a second finesse of the Í10, but
it will lose to East’s ÍJ.
Q. What would happen if declarer started by finessing the Í10?
A. Declarer would (probably) lose two spade tricks.
•
The first finesse loses to the ÍJ.
•
Unless declarer has seen East’s hand, declarer will later finesse the ÍQ and lose to
East’s ÍK.
-198-
Q. What would happen if declarer started by playing the ÍA?
A. Declarer would lose one spade trick.
•
The ÍA drops East’s ÍJ.
•
Declarer can then use the ÍQ to drive out the ÍK and draw the remaining trump
with the Í1020.
•
In summary, playing the ÍA first is best if East is known to hold the ÍK.
Q. Why would declarer think that East holds the ÍK?
A. East needs it for an opening bid.
•
East opened the bidding.
•
West won the first two tricks with the ÌA and ÌK. If West also held the ÍK:
•
East would not have enough high-card strength to open the bidding.
•
West might have done more than raise to 2Í.
Return to the original holding by giving East’s ÍJ to West and West’s Í7 to East.
NORTH
Í A Q 10 4
EAST
ÍK7
WEST
ÍJ95
SOUTH
Í8632
Q. What happens on the actual hand if declarer starts by playing the ÍA?
A. Declarer still loses only one spade trick.
•
On the first round of spades neither the ÍK or ÍJ appears.
•
Declarer can now cross to dummy and lead a low spade.
•
When West plays the Í9, declarer finesses the Í10 . . . imagining from the bidding
that East holds the ÍK.
Technically, after dropping the ÍJ, declarer should cross to dummy and lead toward the ÍQ and Í10 in
case East’s ÍJ is singleton.
20
-199-
Turn all the cards face up.
•
On the actual layout, 2Í will be made if declarer manages to lose only one trump
trick. Declarer loses one spade, two hearts, a diamond, and a club.
Before leaving this hand, let’s consider what would happen if South didn’t make
the balancing takeout double. East would be left as declarer in a 2Ì contract.
Focus on the East hand and discuss with the others at the table how East would
fare in 2Ì.
Q. How many losers does East have in a 2Ì contract?
A. Six – Two spades, two diamonds, and two clubs.
•
There is no loser in the trump suit provided:
•
The missing trumps divide 3-2 or
•
The missing trumps divide 4-1 or 5-0 and the ÌJ is singleton or
•
The missing trumps divide 4-1 and North holds the ÌJ . . . which can be finessed.
Q. How can declarer avoid one of the spade losers?
A. Finesse – Leading toward the ÍK.
•
If the defenders don’t lead a spade, declarer can lead a spade from the West hand,
hoping North holds the ÍA.
•
On the actual layout, this works and declarer has only five losers.
Observation
•
North-South do well to compete to 2Í on this auction. East-West would make the 2Ì
contract.
•
By reaching 2Í, North-South leave East-West with no winning option. If East-West bid
3Ì, that contract can be defeated and North-South will still get a plus score . . .
although it would be slightly less than what they would receive for making 2Í.
•
If East-West were to bid to 3Ì, North-South should not compete any further. They
have done their job by pushing East-West from a plus score (2Ì making) to a minus
score (3Ì down one).
•
The balancing takeout double is a useful tool when competing for partscore.
•
When faced with an A-Q combination, don’t automatically plan on finessing the
queen. There may be other ways to play the suit . . . including playing the ace first.
-200-
Advancing a Balancing Double
Take the cards from all four hands and sort them into suits. Each person at the
table take charge of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of North.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Opposite a direct takeout double, advancer gets the partnership to game with
12 or more points.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
ÍJ and two low spades.
ÌQ, ÌJ and three low hearts.
ËK and ËQ.
ÊQ, ÊJ, and a low club.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
J32
QJ432
KQ
QJ3
W N E S
1Í X
2Í ?
Q. East opens the bidding 1Í and South doubles. West raises to 2Í. What call does North
make?
A. 4Ì – Advancer has enough to put the partnership in a game contract.
•
North has 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit..
•
Advancer can expect the takeout doubler to have about 13 or more points and should
get the partnership to game with about 12 or more points and a fit with one of the
suits being promised by the takeout double.
•
With a five-card suit, the partnership will have an eight-card fit even if the takeout
doubler has only three-card support for hearts.
Teacher’s Key Point: With enough strength to open the bidding, it isn’t always possible to enter the
auction after the opponents open the bidding.
Q. East opens the bidding 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 2Í.
What call does North make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double or an overcall.
W N E S
1Í P
2Í ?
•
Although North would have opened the bidding 1Ì, it is not
convenient to enter the auction at this point.
•
North’s five-card suit is too weak to introduce at the three level.
•
North doesn’t have support for all the unbid suits.
•
South has not promised any strength and East could have a very strong hand.
•
North should pass. North is not in the balancing position, so North’s pass won’t end
the auction. South still has another chance to bid.
-201-
Teacher’s Key Point: Opposite a balancing takeout double, advancer makes allowance that partner
doesn’t have an opening bid.
Q. East opens 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 2Í. North and East
pass and South doubles. West passes. What sort of hand is South
showing?
A. South is making a balancing takeout double.
W N E S
1Í P
2Í P P X
P ?
•
The standard agreement is that South’s double is for takeout.
The opponents have found a fit and the auction has stopped in partscore.
•
Even without this agreement, North can’t expect partner to have a penalty double
with length and strength in spades. East has promised five or more spades with the
opening bid; West has shown three or more spades with the raise; North is looking
at three spades. That leaves at most two spades for South.
•
South is making a takeout double of spades but can’t logically have the full values for
a takeout double. South would have made an immediate double of 1Í with 13 or
more points and a hand suitable for a takeout double.
•
South is in the balancing, or protective, position. If South passes, the auction is over
and East-West will get to play in 2Í. South is making a balancing takeout double and
could have as few as 9 or 10 points.
Q. What call does North make?
A. 3Ì – Advancer must make allowance for a balancing double.
•
North would jump to game over a direct takeout double but must be more cautious
when partner makes a double in the passout position.
•
South doesn’t have a full opening bid and the partnership likely has only enough
combined strength for a partscore.
Teacher’s Key Point: Know when to stop.
Q. East opens 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 2Í. North and East
pass and South doubles. West passes and North bids 3Ì. East now
bids 3Í and South and West pass. What call does North make?
A. Pass (Double) – North-South have done enough.
W N E
1Í
2Í P P
P 3Ì 3Í
P ?
S
P
X
P
•
North has already decided the partnership belongs in partscore.
Bidding again would be inconsistent.
•
North should be satisfied that the opponents have been pushed to the three level
thanks to partner’s balancing action. If partner had not doubled, the opponents
would have rested quietly in 2Í. South’s double may have pushed them too high.
-202-
•
In a competitive matchpoint game, North might make an aggressive double, hoping
to collect a penalty as compensation for the potential partscore reward for 3Ì. There
is no guarantee of success for this action. North-South may not have been making 3Ì,
and it is quite possible that East-West can take nine or ten tricks in a spade contract.
Doubling would be too aggressive.
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Don’t make a ‘one-suited’ takeout double.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Add the ÍQ.
Hearts:
Take away the ÌQ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
NORTH
QJ32
J432
KQ
QJ3
W N E
1Ì ?
S
Q. West opens 1Ì. What call does North make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double.
•
North has the values for a takeout double but not the distribution. North has only
two-card support for diamonds and three-card support for clubs.
•
Making an ‘off-shape’ takeout double is not generally a good idea. In effect, North
would be saying, “Bid anything you like . . . as long as it’s spades!”
•
North should pass. There may be an opportunity to get back into the bidding later.
Teacher’s Key Point: Opposite a balancing double, advancer may have to ‘hedge’ a little.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North passes, and East passes. South doubles and
West passes. What call does North make?
A. 2Ì – A cuebid, showing interest in reaching game.
W N E
1Ì P P
P ?
S
X
•
Opposite a direct takeout double, advancer would probably
commit the partnership to game with this hand.
•
Opposite a takeout double in the balancing position, advancer must proceed more
cautiously. Partner may have up to 3 fewer points than in the direct position. On the
other hand, advancer could have a full takeout double.
•
To cover both possibilities, advancer can start with a cuebid of 2Ì.
-203-
Teacher’s Key Point: Partnership cooperation is necessary to compete successfully after a balancing
double.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North and East pass, and South makes a balancing
takeout double. West passes and North cuebids 2Ì. East passes,
South bids 2Í, and West passes. What call does North make?
A. 3Í (Pass) – Inviting game.
W N E S
1Ì P P X
P 2Ì P 2Í
P ?
•
Opposite a full takeout double, North would now jump to game.
Opposite a balancing takeout double, North should be more cautious and only invite
game by raising to 3Í.
•
This will allow South to pass with a light takeout double.
•
With a standard takeout double, South should accept the invitation. South doesn’t
need more than 13 points. South has to recognize that North is underbidding slightly
to make allowance for a light takeout double.
•
In aggressive partnerships . . . where South might make a balancing double on a very
weak hand . . . North might not even bother inviting over South’s 2Í bid. North
would assume that South would make a stronger call than 2Í with a ‘real’ takeout
double. It’s all a matter of style and judgment.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: Listen to the auction to determine what partner’s bid means.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Take away
Clubs:
Í
Ì
ËQ; add a low diamond. Ë
Ê
NORTH
QJ32
J432
K2
QJ3
W
1Ì
2Ì
P
N E S
P 1NT P
P P X
?
Q. West opens 1Ì, North passes, East responds 1NT, and South passes. West rebids 2Ì and
North and East pass. South now doubles and West passes. What sort of hand is South
showing?
A. A balancing takeout double.
•
Although the opponents have not found a fit, West has shown a six-card suit and,
combined with North’s four-card holding, it is unlikely that South has enough hearts
to be making a low-level penalty double. In addition, any high cards in hearts that
South holds would be unfavorably placed. Most partnerships would treat South’s
double for takeout in this position.
•
However, South didn’t make an immediate takeout double of hearts by doubling the
-204-
1NT response. Instead, South made a balancing double and is showing a hand too
weak for a direct takeout double. South likely has about 10 points and is just trying
to compete for the contract.
Q. What call should North make?
A. 2Í – Competing for partscore.
•
Although advancer would make an invitational jump with 9-11 points over a direct
double, advancer should not jump in this position. In making the balancing double,
partner is already assuming that North holds about 10 points. North has nothing
beyond what could be expected.
Teacher’s Key Point: Don’t be talked into overbidding.
Q. West opens 1Ì, North passes, East respond 1NT, and South passes.
West rebids 2Ì and North and East pass. South makes a balancing
double, West passes, and North bids 2Í. East now bids 3Ì and South
and West pass. What call should North make?
A. Pass – The partnership has done its job.
W
1Ì
2Ì
P
P
N E
P 1NT
P P
2Í 3Ì
?
S
P
X
P
•
With only 10 high-card points, North wouldn’t make an
invitational jump to 3Í over the balancing double. Following this logic, North
shouldn’t be tempted to compete to 3Í over 3Ì.
•
North should be content that South’s balancing double has pushed the opponents
one level higher than they would like to be. Now East-West stand a better chance of
defeating the contract.
Conclusion
•
A balancing double can be made when the opponents have stopped in a partscore
after finding a fit.
•
Even if the opponents have not clearly agreed on a suit, the logic of the situation will
usually indicate whether a double is for penalty or for takeout. When in doubt,
assume the double is for takeout. It is rarely a good idea to double the opponents’
low-level contract for penalty.
•
Advancer must listen closely to the auction. In a balancing situation, advancer must
avoid bidding too much. Partner is likely to have a weaker hand than in the direct
position and is doubling on the assumption that advancer holds some of the missing
strength. Don’t bid the same cards twice.
-205-
-206-
Hand 15 - Takeout Double By a Passed Hand
HAND: 15
DEALER: SOUTH
E-W
VUL:
NORTH
K95
A874
QJ96
A3
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
A872
93
K83
QJ75
WEST
NORTH
EAST
Pass
Double
Pass
1Ë
2Ì
Pass
Pass
3Ê
SOUTH
Pass
1Ì
Pass
EAST
Q4
10 6 5
A72
K9642
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
J 10 6 3
KQJ2
10 5 4
10 8
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
East
OPENING LEAD: ÌK by
South
Introduction
The value of a hand changes as the auction progresses. It may improve when a
trump fit is found; it may drop as high cards become unfavorably placed.
Although an initial pass denies the values for an opening bid, the hand may later
improve to 13 or more points, making it reasonable to enter the auction. Even if
the hand doesn’t improve, it is already limited by the pass and you can use this to
your advantage. Partner won’t expect as much if you do make a call later in the
auction.
The auction isn’t over until a bid has been followed by three passes, so there are
many opportunities to compete, especially for partscore.
Let’s look at an example of bidding by a passed hand.
-207-
Play of the Hand
Play Hand 15. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the South hand.
Q. South is the dealer. Does South have an opening bid?
A. No – Only 7 high-card points.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. Does West have enough to open?
A. No – Only 10 high-card points and no five-card suit or longer.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What is North’s initial call?
A. 1Ë – 14 high card points.
•
With a balanced hand too weak for 1NT, North opens the longer minor.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What does East do after North opens 1Ë?
A. Pass – Only 9 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
The club suit isn’t strong enough for a two-level overcall.
-208-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What is South’s response to partner’s 1Ë opening?
A. 1Ì – Responding up the line with two four-card suits.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s call?
A. Double (Pass) – West can make a takeout double.
•
West could pass and leave the auction to North-South, but most players prefer to
compete for the contract whenever possible.
•
West has four-card support for both unbid suits, clubs and spades.
•
West has 10 high-card points plus 1 dummy point for the doubleton heart.
Q. How will partner know West doesn’t have 13 or more points for the takeout double?
A. West is a passed hand.
•
West’s hand might have improved slightly with the auction . . . West is counting 1
dummy point for the doubleton, for example . . . but East can’t expect too much.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What is North’s rebid after West doubles partner’s 1Ì response?
A. 2Ì – Showing the support and a minimum-strength opening bid.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What is East’s call after partner doubles and North raises to 2Ì?
A. 3Ê (Pass) – Competing for the contract.
•
Both East and West are passed hands, so East might choose not to compete.
•
However, West has invited the partnership into the auction and East has 9 high-card
points and a five-card suit.
•
The partnership likely has a nine-card fit in clubs. With only two unbid suits, West is
likely to have four-card or longer support for both of them.
•
Most players would compete to 3Ê with the East hand:
•
East-West might buy the contract.
•
North-South might be pushed to an uncomfortable level.
-209-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make after East bids 3Ê?
A. Pass – Nothing extra to show.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make after East bids 3Ê?
A. Pass – West has done enough getting the partnership into the auction.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What is North’s call after East’s 3Ê bid is followed by two passes?
A. Pass – North has described the hand with the opening bid and raise of responder’s suit.
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose East is declarer in a 3Ê contract, who would be on lead?
A. South.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What would be South’s opening lead?
A.
ÌK – Top of the solid sequence in the suit bid and raised by the partnership.
Place the ÌK in front of South as the opening lead. Turn the remaining NorthSouth cards face down. Focus on the East hand as declarer in a contract of 3Ê.
Discuss with the others at the table how declarer would plan to make the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have?
A. 6 – One spade, three hearts, one diamond, and one club.
•
There should only be one trump loser unless South holds all four missing clubs.
-210-
Q. How would declarer plan to eliminate two losers?
A. Ruff heart and establish an extra spade winner.
•
The third heart loser can be ruffed in the dummy.
•
Declarer can’t do anything about the club loser or spade loser, so the only hope is to
eliminate a diamond loser.
•
A diamond can’t be ruffed in dummy, so declarer must establish an extra winner on
which to discard the loser.
•
Declarer can try to establish an extra spade winner.
•
Let’s see how this works.
Turn all four hands face up.
•
Suppose South wins the first trick as North makes an encouraging signal.
Trick 1:
South: ÌK
West: Ì3
North: Ì8
East: Ì5
South continues with the ÌQ which wins the second trick.
•
Trick 2:
South: ÌQ
West: Ì9
North: Ì4
East: Ì6
Q. Suppose South now switches to a diamond. Should declarer win with the ËK or ËA?
A.
ËK – Declarer wants to be in dummy to lead toward the ÍQ.
•
The entries to dummy are limited, so declarer doesn’t want to waste them.
Trick 3:
South: Ë4
West: ËK
North: Ë9
East: Ë2
Q. Can declarer start drawing trumps?
A. No – Declarer would lose the race.
•
North could win the ÊA and establish a diamond winner before declarer can
establish the extra spade winner.
•
Declarer now leads toward the ÍQ. It won’t do North any good to play low since
declarer would win the ÍQ and avoid a spade loser.
Trick 4:
West: Í2
North: ÍK
-211-
East: Í4
South: Í3
•
North will probably try to establish a diamond trick for the defense.
Trick 5:
•
North: ËQ
East: ËA
South: Ë5
West: Ë3
Declarer now takes the established spade winner.
Trick 6:
East: ÍQ
South: Í6
West: Í7
North: Í5
Q. How does declarer get to dummy?
A. With a heart ruff.
Leading a club won’t work. North can win the ÊA and take the established diamond
winner.
•
Trick 7:
East: Ì10
South: Ì2
West: Ê5
North: Ì7
Now dummy’s ÍA can be taken to get rid of the diamond loser.
•
Trick 8:
West: ÍA
North: Í9
East: Ë7
•
Now it is safe for declarer to draw trumps.
•
Declarer loses one spade, two hearts, and a club.
•
Before moving on, let’s look at the defense on this hand.
South: Í10
Turn all the hands face up. Place the ÌK in front of South as the opening lead.
Focus on the North-South hands on defense against a contract of 3Ê. Discuss
with the others at the table how North-South might defeat the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the defense. It is unlikely that they will spot the winning
defense.
Q. What do the defenders have to do to prevent declarer from making the contract?
A. Establish a diamond trick – Before declarer can get rid of the diamond loser.
•
Let’s see how this can be done.
-212-
•
Suppose North makes a discouraging signal on the first trick instead of an
encouraging signal21.
Trick 1:
South: ÌK
West: Ì3
North: Ì4
East: Ì5
•
Based on the discouraging signal, South might switch to a diamond instead of playing
a second round of hearts.
•
Again, declarer must win in dummy to lead toward the ÍQ.
Trick 2:
South: Ë4
West: ËK
North: Ë9
East: Ë2
Declarer leads toward the ÍQ and North hops up with the ÍK.
•
Trick 3:
•
West: Í2
North: ÍK
East: Í4
South: Í3
North plays a diamond to establish a winner for the defense.
Trick 4:
•
North: ËQ
East: ËA
South: Ë5
West: Ë3
West: Í7
North: Í5
South can take the established spade winner.
Trick 5:
East: ÍQ
South: Í6
Q. What is the difference between this situation and the earlier one?
A. Declarer has no quick entry to dummy.
•
By not leading a second round of hearts early on, the defenders have deprived
declarer of using a heart ruff to get to dummy.
•
Declarer also can’t reach dummy right away with a club because North has the ÊA.
•
Whether declarer leads a heart or a club, the defenders win and take their established
diamond trick to defeat the contract.
•
The defenders get one spade, two hearts, a diamond, and a club.
•
Nice defense . . . but difficult to find.
North can bring about the same defense by overtaking the ÌK and switching to a diamond.
21
-213-
•
Before moving on, let’s consider what would happen if East-West didn’t get into the
auction.
Turn all the hands face up. Focus on the South hand as declarer in a contract of
2Ì. Discuss with the others at the table how declarer would fare in 2Ì.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does South have in a contract of 2Ì?
A. Five – Two spades, two diamonds, and one club.
•
After drawing trumps, South can establish the diamonds by driving out the ËA and
ËK or the spades by driving out the ÍA and ÍQ.
Observation
•
West does well to get into the auction. North-South can make the 2Ì partscore.
•
Even if North-South find the winning defense to defeat 3Ê, East West will do
better than letting North-South make 2Ì (unless North-South find an unlikely
double to collect 200 points).
•
If North-South push on to 3Ì, East-West should defend. South can make only
eight tricks in a 2Ì contract, losing two spades, two diamonds, and a club.
•
To discard a loser, declarer sometimes has to establish an extra winner in dummy.
•
On defense, don’t be too eager to take the tricks in front of you. It is often better to
establish winners in other suits before taking all the immediate winners.
-214-
Takeout Double By a Passed Hand
Take the cards from all four hands and sort them into suits. Each person at the
table take charge of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of West.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Valuing a hand for an opening bid.
Spades:
ÍQ, Í10, and two low spades.
Hearts:
ÌA, ÌJ and three low hearts.
Diamonds: A low diamond.
ÊQ, ÊJ, and two low clubs.
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
Q 10 3 2
AJ32
2
QJ32
W N E
?
S
Q. West is the dealer. What call does West make?
A. Pass – 10 high-card points and no five-card or longer suit.
•
Applying the Rule of 20 (adding the high-card points to the number of cards in the
two longest suits) gives 12 + 4 + 4 = 18 . . . not enough for an opening bid in first or
second chair.
•
Some players might open by choosing to value the singleton diamond as 3 points.
That isn’t the recommended approach. Short suits tend to be of value only after a fit
has been found.
Teacher’s Key Point: The value of a hand rises or falls during the auction.
Q. West passes, North passes, East passes, and South opens 1Ë. What
call does West make?
A. Double – The value of the hand has increased.
•
W N E S
P P P 1Ë
?
When considering a takeout double, you can value the hand
using dummy points. West can add 3 points for the singleton diamond to the 10 highcard points.
-215-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: A takeout double by a passed hand doesn’t promise a full opening bid.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds: Add a low diamond.
Clubs:
Take away the ÊJ.
WEST
Q 10 3 2
AJ32
32
Q32
W N E S
P P P 1Ë
?
Q. West passes, North passes, East passes, and South opens 1Ë. What call does West make?
A. Double – A passed hand takeout double.
•
West has 9 high-card points and can add 1 dummy point for the doubleton diamond.
That’s a total of 10 points.
•
West would not have enough to make a classic takeout double but has enough to
make a takeout double as a passed hand.
•
A classic takeout double promises about 13 or more points. It has an unlimited upper
range. However, West passed originally, so advancer won’t be expecting much. West’s
hand might have re-valued to 13 or more points, but West didn’t have enough highcard strength to open the bidding. Advancer should only expect about 9-12 points.
•
Since both West and East have already passed, the partnership is only competing for
partscore. The objective of West’s double is to get the partnership into the auction,
not to look for a possible game contract.
Teacher’s Key Point: Weigh the risk against the potential gain when considering a takeout double.
Q. West passes, North opens 1Ë, East passes, and South raises to 2Ë.
What call does West make?
A. Double/Pass – A borderline decision.
W N E S
P 1Ë P 2Ë
?
•
As a passed hand, West is free to make a takeout double without
promising too much other than support for the unbid suits.
•
The higher the level, the more dangerous it is to enter the auction. However, it is
generally best to be aggressive. There is usually more to gain than to lose by
competing. Your side might have a makeable partscore or a good sacrifice, or you may
push the opponents too high or keep them from bidding a game.
•
In this situation, most players would be willing to enter the auction with a takeout
double, even though there is a definite risk of being doubled for a large penalty since
partner could have nothing. Perhaps vulnerable against non vulnerable opponents,
West should exercise more caution and pass with this hand.
-216-
•
One additional risk in entering the auction is that it gives information to the
opponents. They will have a better idea how to play the hand if they win the auction.
Teacher’s Key Point: Use your judgment . . . keeping partner in mind.
Q. West passes, North opens 3Ë, East passes, and South passes. What
call does West make?
A. Double/Pass – Another borderline decision.
W N E
P 3Ë P
?
S
P
•
If West had not passed originally, most players would consider
this hand too weak to make a takeout double. Advancer would expect a stronger hand
and, in fact, West could have a very strong hand.
•
Once West has passed, there is less danger in making a takeout double at this point.
Advancer will know that West doesn’t have the high-card strength for an opening bid.
•
Also, advancer should recognize that West is in the balancing position and may be
stretching to help the partnership compete.
•
It is risky to re-open the bidding with a takeout double, but most players would be
willing to take the chance. Partner may have a strong hand with length and strength
in diamonds and be waiting for a re-opening double. After all, partner couldn’t make
a direct penalty double of 3Ë since a double by East would be for takeout.
•
Of course, if the passed-hand balancing takeout double doesn’t work out very well .
. . hopefully you are playing with a partner with a sense of humor!
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout double can be used after the opponents have bid two suits.
Q. West passes, North opens 1Ê, East passes, and South responds 1Ë.
What call does West make?
A. Double – For the unbid suits.
W N E S
P 1Ê P 1Ë
?
•
West’s double here is still for takeout, showing support for the two
unbid suits, hearts and spades.
•
Since West passed originally, partner will expect a ‘light’ takeout double for the
majors.
Teacher’s Key Point: Don’t be too aggressive.
Q. West passes, North opens 1Ë, East passes, and South responds 1Í.
What call does West make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a passed-hand takeout double.
•
W N E S
P 1Ë P 1Í
?
There is good support for hearts but only moderate support for
clubs. Advancer would expect at least four-card support for each of the two unbid
-217-
suits.
•
In addition, a takeout double would commit the partnership to the two level. Much
too dangerous on this hand.
Hand 3
Teacher’s Key Point: The takeout double is flexible.
Spades:
Hearts:
Take away the ÌA and ÌJ.
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Add the ÊA and ÊJ.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
Q 10 3 2
32
32
AQJ32
W N E S
P 1Ë P 1Ì
?
Q. West passes, North opens 1Ë, East passes, and South responds 1Ì. What call does West
make?
A. Double – The most flexible call.
•
West could overcall 2Ê as a passed hand. Advancer won’t be expecting too much and
the overcall does have some lead-directional value.
•
However, the takeout double also brings spades into the picture. If advancer has a
weak hand, for example, the partnership might escape being doubled if East has a
four-card spade suit.
Conclusion
•
After passing originally, it is still possible to enter the auction with a takeout double.
•
Advancer should recognize that the doubler passed originally and act accordingly.
Advancer should usually only be considering competing for partscore.
•
In deciding whether to make a takeout double, weigh the possible gain against the
possible loss, including such factors as vulnerability and level. It is generally best to
be aggressive . . . but only with an understanding partner.
-218-
Hand 16 - The Delayed Takeout Double
HAND: 16
DEALER: WEST
BOTH
VUL:
WEST
1Ë
2Í
Pass
NORTH
3
KQ96
K752
AJ74
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
WEST
QJ75
A 10
Q 10 9 8 6
K8
NORTH
Pass
Double
Pass
EAST
1Í
Pass
Pass
SOUTH
Pass
4Ì
EAST
10 9 8 6 2
73
AJ
10 9 6 5
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
AK4
J8542
43
Q32
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
DECLARER:
South
OPENING LEAD: ÍQ by West
Introduction
A player who passes when presented with a chance to open is describing a hand
with fewer than 13 points. If the same player later doubles, advancer must take the
original pass into consideration when deciding what to bid.
A player who passes after an opponent opens doesn’t deny 13 or more points. The
pass merely shows a hand unsuitable for an overcall or takeout double of the
opponent’s bid. If the same player later doubles, advancer must take the auction
into consideration when deciding what to bid. If the double is made directly over
an opponent’s bid, it usually shows a strong hand of 13 or more points. If the
double is made in the balancing position, it could be weaker.
To become familiar with this concept, let’s play this next hand where an original
pass by each member of the partnership doesn’t stop them from getting to game.
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Play of the Hand
Play Hand 16. When you have finished playing the hand, turn the cards face up,
dummy-style, and discuss the hand with the others at your table. What do you
think is the best contract? How should the auction go?
Give the students 7-8 minutes to bid and play the hand and then have them turn the hand face up on
the table.
Turn all fifty-two cards face up, dummy-style.
Review of the Bidding
Focus on the West hand.
Q. West is the dealer. What is West’s opening call?
A. 1Ë – 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card diamond suit.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. Does North have the right type of hand to make a takeout double?
A. No – North has 13 high-card points but doesn’t have support for spades.
Q. Does North have the right type of hand to make an overcall?
A. No – North doesn’t have a five-card suit.
North might consider overcalling 1Ì on a four-card suit, but this isn’t usually a good
idea unless the four-card suit is very strong, ÌA-K-J-10 for example.
•
Q. What call does North make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double or an overcall.
•
The auction isn’t over. South still has an opportunity to bid and North may get an
opportunity to describe the hand later in the auction.
•
North’s pass doesn’t deny an opening bid.
Focus on the East hand.
-220-
Q. What does East respond?
A. 1Í – East has 5 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card spade suit.
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What is South’s call?
A. Pass – Only 10 high-card points and the heart suit is too weak for a two-level overcall.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What is West’s rebid?
A. 2Í – West has a minimum opening bid and four-card support for responder’s suit.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make?
A. Double – A takeout double of spades.
•
Now that the opponents have found a fit in spades, North wants to compete.
•
North’s double shows support for the unbid suits, hearts and clubs, and also diamonds.
With a two-suited hand containing only hearts and clubs, North would likely have
overcalled on the first round.
If the students have difficulty with this point, have them try to construct a hand for North with spade
shortness that is suitable for a takeout double of spades but is unsuitable for an overcall in hearts or
clubs. The conclusion is that North has some length and, likely, some strength in diamonds.
•
North’s double in this situation is referred to as a delayed takeout double. North delayed
acting initially because North had a takeout double of spades, not diamonds. North
didn’t deny the values for an opening bid with the initial pass over the 1Ë opening
. . . only a hand unsuitable for a double or an overcall.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make after North’s double?
A. Pass – East has nothing extra for the initial response.
-221-
Focus on the South hand.
Q. What call does South make?
A. 4Ì (3Ì) – Getting the partnership to game.
•
Note that North is doubling directly over an opponent’s bid, not in the balancing
position. North, therefore, has opening values but a hand unsuitable to overcall or
double West’s 1Ë opening.
•
North’s takeout double of 2Í shows willingness to compete to the three level when
South could have very little.
•
South has 10 high-card points and a five-card heart suit. This is enough to jump in
response to North’s takeout double, taking the partnership to game in hearts.
•
An advance of 3Ì would not show the value of the South hand. South is forced to say
something over partner’s takeout double and would bid at the cheapest available level
with no points at all.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What call does West make over South’s 4Ì call?
A. Pass – West has already described the hand by opening and then raising spades.
Focus on the North hand.
Q. What call does North make?
A. Pass.
Focus on the East hand.
Q. What call does East make?
A. Pass.
•
East doesn’t have enough distribution to consider making a sacrifice bid of 4Í. West
has opened the bidding and East has some defensive strength. It is possible that 4Ì
can be defeated.
-222-
Review of the Play and Defense
Q. Suppose South is declarer in 4Ì, who would be on lead?
A. West.
Focus on the West hand.
Q. What would West lead?
A.
ÍQ – Top of the touching honors in the suit bid and raised by the partnership.
Place the ÍQ in front of West and turn the remaining East-West cards face down.
Focus on the South hand as declarer in a 4Ì contract. Discuss with the others at
the table how declarer should plan to play the hand.
Give the students a couple of minutes to discuss the play.
Q. How many losers does declarer have in a contract of 4Ì?
A. Five – One spade, one heart, two diamonds, and one club.
Q. How does declarer plan to eliminate the spade loser?
A. Ruff in dummy.
Q. How does declarer hope to eliminate a diamond loser?
A. Lead toward the ËK – Hoping West, who opened 1Ë, holds the ËA.
Q. Is there any possibility of eliminating the club loser?
A. Yes – If West has the singleton or doubleton ÊK.
•
Let’s focus on the club suit.
Turn up only the club suit in all four hands. Turn the remaining cards face down.
-223-
NORTH
ÊAJ74
WEST
ÊK8
EAST
Ê 10 9 6 5
SOUTH
ÊQ32
Q. Should South lead the ÊQ from this combination?
A. No – West should cover with the ÊK.
•
Even though West can’t see East’s holding, West should cover, hoping to promote a
club winner in partner’s hand.
•
Assuming West does cover with the ÊK, declarer gets only two tricks in the suit. The
third round is won by East’s Ê10.
•
The general guideline for declarer is:
Don’t lead an honor if you can’t afford to have it covered.
Q. What should South lead from this combination?
A. A low club – Planning to finesse dummy’s ÊJ.
•
When the finesse works, declarer plays the ÊA.
•
When West’s ÊK falls under the ÊA, declarer’s ÊQ is a winner and declarer doesn’t
lose any tricks in the suit.
Q. Is this the only layout in which declarer can avoid the loss of a club trick?
A. No – West could have a singleton ÊK.
Give West’s Ê8 to East.
NORTH
ÊAJ74
WEST
ÊK
EAST
Ê 10 9 8 6 5
SOUTH
ÊQ32
-224-
•
If declarer starts by leading a low club, West’s ÊK appears and declarer wins the ÊA.
The ÊQ and ÊJ are now winners.
•
If declarer were to lead the ÊQ, West would play the ÊK and declarer would be left
with a club loser.
Q. Can declarer avoid a club loser if West has three or more clubs including the ÊK?
A, No – Assuming West defends correctly.
Give East’s Ê9 and Ê8 to West.
NORTH
ÊAJ74
WEST
EAST
ÊK98
Ê 10 6 5
SOUTH
ÊQ32
Q. What happens if declarer starts by leading a low club from the South hand?
A. Declarer loses a club trick.
•
Declarer wins the first trick with dummy’s ÊJ.
•
If declarer then plays the ÊA, West’s ÊK doesn’t fall.
•
If declarer comes back to the South hand and leads the ÊQ, West covers and East
wins the third round of the suit with the Ê10.
Q. What happens if declarer starts by leading the ÊQ from the South hand?
A. Declarer loses a club trick.
•
West covers with the ÊK and declarer has to win with the ÊA.
•
Declarer can take a trick with the ÊJ but must lose the third round to East’s Ê10.
•
In summary, declarer can only avoid the loss of a club trick if West started with the
singleton or doubleton ÊK.
•
Let’s see how declarer makes use of this on the actual hand.
-225-
Give West’s Ê9 to East and turn all the hands face up.
West leads the ÍQ and South wins the first trick.
•
Trick 1:
•
West: ÍQ
North: Í3
East: Í2
South: ÍK
Since declarer is in the right hand to try the diamond finesse, this is probably the best
time. There’s no hurry to draw trumps or to ruff the spade loser.
Trick 2:
South: Ë3
West: Ë8
North: ËK
East: ËA
•
The finesse loses. There goes declarer’s first chance.
•
Let’s assume East leads back the ËJ and West overtakes with the ËQ.
Trick 3:
•
East: ËJ
South: Ë4
West: ËQ
North: Ë2
With nothing better to do, West leads a third round of diamonds on which East
discards a spade and declarer ruffs.
Trick 4:
West: Ë10
North: Ë5
East: Í3
South: Ì2
•
Declarer doesn’t have any reason to further delay drawing trumps.
•
Let’s assume West ducks the first round and wins the second with the ÌA.
South: Ì4
West: Ì10
North: ÌQ
East: Ì3
Trick 6:
North: ÌK
East: Ì7
South: Ì5
West: ÌA
•
Trick 5:
West continues passively by leading another high diamond.
Trick 7:
West: Ë9
North: Ë7
-226-
East: Í8
South: Ì8
•
Now declarer is in the right place to try the only remaining chance . . . bringing in the
club suit for no loser.
Trick 8:
South: Ê2
West: Ê8
North: ÊJ
East: Ê5
Declarer anxiously watches to see what West plays on the next trick22.
•
Trick 9:
•
North: ÊA
East: Ê6
South: Ê3
When the ÊK falls, declarer has the rest of the tricks. The
declarer’s spade loser can be ruffed in dummy.
East: ÊK
ÊQ is a winner and
Conclusion
•
North-South do well to get to game after West’s opening bid.
•
North had to pick the appropriate time to enter the auction and South had to
cooperate by recognizing the type of hand North held to pass and then double.
•
Declarer was unlucky that the main chance for making the hand . . . the diamond
finesse . . . failed.
•
However, it’s always a good idea to have a contingency plan.
•
Suit combinations can be quite challenging. Missing 10's and 9's . . . or even lower
cards . . . can make a difference in how to tackle the suit.
•
Try to visualize the layout necessary to make the contract.
Declarer can be fairly confident that the ÊK is doubleton. West has shown up with two hearts and five
diamonds. Assuming West has four spades for the raise to 2Í, West can only have two clubs.
22
-227-
The Delayed Double
Take the cards from all four hands and sort them into suits. Each person at the
table take charge of one suit. Construct the following hand in front of North.
Hand 1
Teacher’s Key Point: Bidding opposite a direct takeout double.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
ÍQ and two low spades.
ÌJ and four low hearts.
ËK, ËQ, and ËJ.
ÊQ and ÊJ.
NORTH
Q32
J5432
KQJ
QJ
W N E S
1Í X
2Í ?
Q. East opens 1Í, South doubles, and West raises to 2Í. What call does North make?
A. 4Ì – With 12 high-card points plus 1 length point, North has enough to bid game,
•
South has made a standard takeout double of an opponent’s opening bid, showing
about 13 or more points and support for the unbid suits.
•
The ÍQ is of dubious value, but the fifth heart and the high cards in clubs and
diamonds more than compensate for this flaw.
Teacher’s Key Point: Bidding opposite a passed hand takeout double.
Q. Suppose South passes initially, West opens 1Í, North passes, and
East responds 1NT. Now South doubles and West rebids 2Í. What
call does North make?
A. 3Ì – Competing for partscore.
W N E
1Í
2Í
S
P
P 1NT X
?
•
South passed originally, denying an opening bid. South’s
subsequent double, even though it is directly over an opponent’s bid, is limited and
could be based on as few as 9 or 10 points with suitable distribution.
•
Although North has a hand worth 13 points, it is probably not worth a jump to game
opposite a passed-hand takeout double. North should settle for partscore and bid
only 3Ì . . . especially since the ÍQ is of dubious value.
Teacher’s Key Point: Bidding opposite a balancing double.
Q. East opens 1Í, South passes, and West raises to 2Í. North and East
pass. South now doubles. West passes. What call does North make?
-228-
W N E S
1Í P
2Í P P X
P ?
A. 3Ì – Competing for partscore.
•
South is in the balancing position.
•
South’s double is for takeout because the opponents have stopped at a low level
partscore after finding a fit.
•
South had an opportunity to make a takeout double of spades at the one level but
chose to pass so South doesn’t have the values for a direct takeout double of 1Í.
•
All this indicates North should settle for a partscore of 3Ì despite having 13 points.
Teacher’s Key Point: Listen carefully.
Q. East opens 1Ë, South passes, and West responds 1Í. North passes
and East raises to 2Í. South now doubles and West passes. Has
South denied the values for an opening bid?
A. No – South didn’t have an opportunity to open the bidding.
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í P 2Í X
P ?
•
It might appear that South is a passed hand since South passed
over the opening bid of 1Ë. However, South’s pass does not fall into the category of
a passed hand.
•
A passed hand is a hand that had an opportunity to open the bidding but chose to pass instead.
•
The bidding was opened in front of South by East. South only had an opportunity to
make a takeout double or overcall, not to open.
•
South could have a strong hand that is unsuitable for either a takeout double or an
overcall over 1Ë.
Q. Is South in the balancing position when making the double?
A. No – If South had passed, it would not have ended the auction.
•
South was not in the balancing position over the raise to 2Í. North would still get an
opportunity to bid for the partnership if West had passed.
•
If South and West had passed over the raise to 2Í, it would be North that would be
in the balancing position, not South.
Q. Is South making a takeout double or a penalty double?
A. Takeout – The opponents have found a fit in spades and are at the partscore level.
•
South is making a takeout double, not a penalty double.
•
North has an additional clue. The opponents likely have eight or more spades and
North has three spades. South can hardly have enough length and strength in spades
to be making a penalty double at the two level.
-229-
Q. What type of hand does South hold?
A. A takeout double of spades.
•
South is making a takeout double of spades. South is showing an opening bid and
support for hearts and clubs . . . and some diamond length as well.
Q. Why is South likely to hold some length in diamonds?
A. South didn’t overcall in hearts or clubs.
•
South is short in spades, likely a singleton or void.
•
With a five-card or longer suit in hearts or clubs, South might have chosen to overcall
over 1Ë. Since South didn’t overcall, South likely has only four hearts and four clubs.
•
That leaves room in the South hand for diamonds.
Q. Why didn’t South make a takeout double of 1Ë?
A. South doesn’t have support for spades.
•
South is making a takeout double of spades. South couldn’t double 1Ë because East
doesn’t have length or strength in spades.
Q. What call does North make?
A. 4Ì – Getting the partnership to game.
•
North has 12 high-card points plus 1 length point for the five-card suit.
•
Even though the ÍQ is likely to be a wasted value, North has enough to bid game.
•
By doubling, South has forced North to bid at the three level, even though North
might hold a weak hand. North has much more than South could expect.
-230-
Hand 2
Teacher’s Key Point: Some hands are unsuitable for a direct takeout double.
Leave the North hand face up on the table and construct the following hand for
South.
Spades:
Hearts:
Diamonds:
Clubs:
Spades:
A low spade.
ÌA and three low hearts.
Hearts:
Diamonds: ËA and three low diamonds.
Clubs:
ÊA and three low clubs.
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
NORTH
Q32
J5432
KQJ
QJ
Í
Ì
Ë
Ê
SOUTH
4
A876
A432
A432
W N E S
1Ë ?
Q. East opens 1Ë. What call does South make?
A. Pass – The hand is unsuitable for a takeout double or an overcall.
Teacher’s Key Point: Making a delayed takeout double.
Q. East opens 1Ë. South passes, West responds 1Í and North passes.
East raises to 2Í. What call does South make?
A. Double – A takeout double of spades.
•
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í P 2Í ?
South is showing a willingness to compete in hearts or clubs or,
by inference, diamonds.
Teacher’s Key Point: Advancing a delayed takeout double.
Q. East opens 1Ë. South passes, West responds 1Í and North passes.
East raises to 2Í, South doubles, and West passes. What call does
North make?
A. 4Ì – Putting the partnership in game.
-231-
W N E S
1Ë P
1Í P 2Í X
P ?
•
Once North recognizes the type of hand South is showing with the delayed takeout
double, North has enough to put the partnership in game in hearts.
•
North is in the same position as if South had made a direct takeout double of a 1Í
opening bid, showing 13 or more points and support for the unbid suits.
•
4Ì is a reasonable contract . . . and will likely make an overtrick. North can trump
two spade losers in the dummy, leaving only one spade loser. If the missing hearts are
divided 2-2, there is only one loser in that suit. North can eliminate the club loser by
discarding it on dummy’s extra diamond winner or has the additional option of
taking a club finesse.
Conclusion
•
The meaning of a delayed double depends on the way the auction has gone and
advancer must listen closely.
•
A delayed takeout double can be made by a passed hand, in the balancing position,
or by a hand that passed but isn’t a passed hand and isn’t in the balancing position.
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