Reproducibles - Math Solutions

Reproducibles - Math Solutions
Reproducibles
The following reproducibles are referenced and used with individual games. These
reproducibles are also available in downloadable, printable format at www.mathsolutions.com/
mathgamesreproducibles.
Game-Specific Reproducibles
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
187
Addition Table 0–5
Addition Table 0–10
Multiplication Table 1–6
Multiplication Table 0–10
Addition Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board, Completed
Addition Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board, Blank
Close to 0 Recording Sheets
Close to 20 Recording Sheets
Close to 100 Recording Sheet
Close to 1,000 Recording Sheets
Close to 100 Assessment: Joe’s Game
Compare (Shake and Spill) Chart
Cross Out Singles Game Boards, Version 1 (3-by-3 Array)
Cross Out Singles Game Boards, Version 2 (4-by-4 Array)
Cross Out Sums Game Board, Version 1 (Blackout)
Cross Out Sums Game Board, Version 2 (Tic-Tac-Toe)
Digit Place (A Secret Number Quest) Recording Sheet
Fifteen-Number Cross-Out Recording Sheet
Twenty-Number Cross-Out Recording Sheet
Finding Factors Game Board, Version 1 (Numbers 1–30)
Finding Factors Game Board, Version 2 (Numbers 1–50)
Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To Recording Sheet, Version 1 (Two Addends)
Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To Recording Sheet, Version 2 (Three Addends)
Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To Recording Sheet, Version 3 (Subtraction)
Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To Recording Sheet, Version 4 (Multiplication)
How Close to 0? Game Board
More! Recording Sheet
Order Up 21! Recording Sheet
Order Up 21! Assessment
Pathways Game Board 1
continued
187
31 Pathways Game Board 2
32 Pathways Game Board 3
33 Pathways Game Board 4
34 Times Ten Game Board 1
35 Times Ten Game Board 2
36 Times Ten Game Board 3
37 Times Ten Game Board 4
38 Roll 6 for 100 Recording Sheet
39 Roll 6 for 100 Assessment
40 Roll for $1.00 Game Board
41 Roll for 1 Recording Sheets
42Spinning Sums and Differences Place Value Spinner 1
43Spinning Sums and Differences Place Value Spinner 2
44 Spinning Sums and Differences Recording Sheet
45 Take Five, Make Ten! Assessment
47 Target “Pick Your Sum” Game Board
46 Target 300 (A Multiplication Game) Recording Sheet
Reproducibles Used with More Than One Game
236
The following reproducibles are referenced and used throughout the book; these tools are also
easily adaptable for use in other games.
A Hundreds Chart
B Numeral Cards
Game Directions
240
In addition to the above reproducibles, each game also has a reproducible condensed page of
directions written for students. These reproducibles are numbered starting with the letter G.
ADDITION TABLE 0–5
Reproducible 1
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
4
5
6
7
8
9
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ADDITION TABLE 0–10
Reproducible 2
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
1 0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
4
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
5
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
6
6
7
8
9
10 11
7
7
8
9
10 11
8
8
9
10 11
9
9
10 11
10 10 11
12
12 13
12 13 14
12 13 14 15
12 13 14 15 16
12 13 14 15 16 17
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
MULTIPLICATION TABLE 1–6
Reproducible 3
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
3
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
2
2
4
6
8
10
12
3
3
6
9
12
15
18
4
4
8
12
16
20
24
5
5
10
15
20
25
30
6
6
12
18
24
30
36
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
MULTIPLICATION TABLE 0–10
Reproducible 4
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
3 0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
0
2
4
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20
3
0
3
6
9
12 15 18 21 24 27 30
4
0
4
8
12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40
5
0
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50
6
0
6
12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60
7
0
7
14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70
8
0
8
16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80
9
0
9
18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90
10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ADDITION TIC-TAC-TOE
GAME BOARD, COMPLETED
Reproducible 5
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ADDITION TIC-TAC-TOE
GAME BOARD, BLANK
Reproducible 6
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CLOSE TO 0 RECORDING SHEETS
Reproducible 7
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game
(each player should have one sheet for five rounds of play).
Name
Score
2
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
2
5
Round 3:
2
5
Round 4:
2
5
Round 5:
2
5
Total Score
Name
Score
2
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
2
5
Round 3:
2
5
Round 4:
2
5
Round 5:
2
5
Total Score
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CLOSE TO 20 RECORDING SHEETS
Reproducible 8
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game
(each player should have one sheet for five rounds of play).
Name
Score
1
1
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
1
1
5
Round 3:
1
1
5
Round 4:
1
1
5
Round 5:
1
1
5
Total Score
Name
Score
1
1
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
1
1
5
Round 3:
1
1
5
Round 4:
1
1
5
Round 5:
1
1
5
Total Score
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CLOSE TO 100 RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 9
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game
(each player should have one sheet for five rounds of play).
Name DATE
Score
1
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
1
5
Round 3:
1
5
Round 4:
1
5
Round 5:
1
5
Total Score
Place a star by your best round. What was your strategy for this round?
Was more skill or luck involved in this game? Explain.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CLOSE TO 1,000 RECORDING SHEETS
Reproducible 10
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game
(each player should have one sheet for five rounds of play).
Name
Score
1
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
1
5
Round 3:
1
5
Round 4:
1
5
Round 5:
1
5
Total Score
Name
Score
1
5
Round 1:
Round 2:
1
5
Round 3:
1
5
Round 4:
1
5
Round 5:
1
5
Total Score
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CLOSE TO 100 ASSESSMENT: JOE’S GAME
Reproducible 11
Name DATE
While playing Close to 100, Joe had the following cards:
6 2 3 5 7 1
He followed these rules:
1. Use any four of the cards to make two numbers. For example, a 6 and a 5 could make either 65
or 56. Try to make numbers that, when added, give you a total that is close to 100.
2. Write the two numbers and their total. For example: 42 1 56 5 98.
3. Find the score. The score is the difference between the total and 100. For example, if your total
is 98, your score is 2. If your total is 105, your score is 5.
What are some of the possible number sentences Joe could have made? What would his score be?
Come up with three different options.
SCORE
1.
2.
3.
1
5
1
5
1
5
Which of the three options is the best?
Why?
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
COMPARE (SHAKE AND SPILL) CHART
Reproducible 12
Copy the chart as needed to play the game (one chart for each pair of players).
MORE RED
SAME
MORE YELLOW
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CROSS OUT SINGLES GAME BOARDS
Reproducible 13
Version 1 (3-by-3 Array)
Copy the game boards as needed to play the game (each pair should have one sheet for three rounds of play).
Name
Name
Score for Each Round
Score for Each Round
1
Total
2
3
1
2
3
Total
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CROSS OUT SINGLES GAME BOARDS
Reproducible 14
Version 2 (4-by-4 Array)
Copy the game boards as needed to play the game (each pair should have one sheet for three rounds of play).
Name
Name
Score for Each Round
Score for Each Round
1
Total
2
3
1
2
3
Total
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CROSS OUT SUMS GAME BOARD
Reproducible 15
VERSION 1 (BLACKOUT)
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
10
10
10
11
11
11
12
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
CROSS OUT SUMS GAME BOARD
Reproducible 16
VERSION 2 (TIC-TAC-TOE)
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
2
4
6
8
10
13
10
14
10
15
18
12
20
12
19
11
16
11
17
11
3
5
7
9
9
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
DIGIT PLACE
(A SECRET NUMBER QUEST)
RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 17
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (one recording sheet per game).
Guess
Digit
Place
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
Player 2 / Game 1
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 2 / Game 2
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 2 / Game 3
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 1 / Game 2
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 1 / Game 3
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Reproducible 18
Player 1 / Game 1
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (each pair should have one sheet for three games).
FIFTEEN-NUMBER CROSS-OUT RECORDING SHEET
TWENTY-NUMBER CROSS-OUT
RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 19
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (each pair should have one sheet for three games).
Player 1 / Game 1
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 1 / Game 2
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 1 / Game 3
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 2 / Game 1
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 2 / Game 2
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
Player 2 / Game 3
5 5 5 5 5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
FINDING FACTORS GAME BOARD
Reproducible 20
VERSION 1 (NUMBERS 1–30)
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
Player 1’s Color _____________
Player 2’s Color _____________
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Player 1’s Score _____________
Player 2’s Score _____________
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
FINDING FACTORS GAME BOARD
Reproducible 21
VERSION 2 (NUMBERS 1–50)
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
Player 1’s Color _____________
Player 2’s Color _____________
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
Player 1’s Score _____________
Player 2’s Score _____________
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GREATER THAN, LESS THAN, EQUAL TO
RECORDING SHEET Version 1 (Two Addends)
Reproducible 22
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (one recording sheet per game).
Player 1 Player 2
Round 1
1
1
Round 2
1
1
Round 3
1
1
Round 4
1
1
Round 5
1
1
Round 6
1
1
Round 7
1
1
Round 8
1
1
Round 9
1
1
Round 10
1
1
Together we had:
equalities and
greater than (>).
less than (<).
inequalities.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GREATER THAN, LESS THAN, EQUAL TO
RECORDING SHEET Version 2 (Three Addends)
Reproducible 23
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (one recording sheet per game).
Player 1 Player 2
Round 1
1
1
1
1
Round 2
1
1
1
1
Round 3
1
1
1
1
Round 4
1
1
1
1
Round 5
1
1
1
1
Round 6
1
1
1
1
Round 7
1
1
1
1
Round 8
1
1
1
1
Round 9
1
1
1
1
Round 10
1
1
1
1
Together we had:
equalities and
greater than (>).
less than (<).
inequalities.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GREATER THAN, LESS THAN, EQUAL TO
RECORDING SHEET Version 3 (Subtraction)
Reproducible 24
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (one recording sheet per game).
Player 1 Player 2
Round 1
2
2
Round 2
2
2
Round 3
2
2
Round 4
2
2
Round 5
2
2
Round 6
2
2
Round 7
2
2
Round 8
2
2
Round 9
2
2
Round 10
2
2
Together we had:
equalities and
greater than (>).
less than (<).
inequalities.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GREATER THAN, LESS THAN, EQUAL TO
RECORDING SHEET Version 4 (Multiplication)
Reproducible 25
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game (one recording sheet per game).
Player 1 Player 2
Round 1
3
3
Round 2
3
3
Round 3
3
3
Round 4
3
3
Round 5
3
3
Round 6
3
3
Round 7
3
3
Round 8
3
3
Round 9
3
3
Round 10
3
3
Together we had:
equalities and
greater than (>).
less than (<).
inequalities.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
HOW CLOSE TO 0? GAME BOARD
Reproducible 26
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board per game for each pair of players).
Player 1
Player 2
Round 1
Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
MORE! RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 27
Copy this recording sheet as needed to play the game (each pair
of players should have one sheet for two games).
Player 1___________________________
Player 2___________________________
Player 1
Player 2
(total number
of cubes)
(total number
of cubes)
Difference
Game 1
Game 2
TOTAL
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ORDER UP 21! RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 28
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play ten rounds of the
game. Each player or team of two should have a copy.
Round Equation
Score
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
TOTAL
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ORDER UP 21! ASSESSMENT
Reproducible 29
Name
Date
Blake and Jackson are playing the game Order Up 21! They drew the following cards:
4 5 2 3
Blake built this equation: (4 × 5) + 3 – 2
Jackson built this equation: 4 + 2 + (5 × 3)
Both boys believe they have the best equation (the one that will yield them the lowest score—
0 points) in the game of Order Up 21! Do you agree with Blake, Jackson, or both? Explain.
If Blake and Jackson did not use parentheses in their equations, would it have affected their total?
Explain.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
PATHWAYS GAME BOARD 1
Reproducible 30
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
81
54
63
36
72
28
18
32
81
24
48
64
21
16
56
12
9
42
49
27
346789
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
PATHWAYS GAME BOARD 2
Reproducible 31
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
81
64
48
36
63
30
42
32
35
28
72
25
49
24
45
16
54
20
40
56
456789
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
PATHWAYS GAME BOARD 3
Reproducible 32
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
54
28
42
72
63
77
36
16
99
64
49
32
44
81
121
56
48
66
88
24
4678911
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
PATHWAYS GAME BOARD 4
Reproducible 33
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
72
36
49
88
54
84
77
96
132
56
63
81
48
108
121
66
99
144
64
42
67891112
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TIMES TEN GAME BOARD 1
Reproducible 34
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
90
450
300
810
200
180
630
540
350
250
240
150
210
270
360
420
280
160
490
120
345679
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TIMES TEN GAME BOARD 2
Reproducible 35
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
810
480
540
640
630
210
360
160
720
560
280
120
180
90
320
420
810
490
240
270
346789
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TIMES TEN GAME BOARD 3
Reproducible 36
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
560
400
200
640
160
720
250
490
240
450
300
420
320
350
280
810
640
480
360
630
456789
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TIMES TEN GAME BOARD 4
Reproducible 37
Copy the game board as needed to play the game (one game board for each game).
540
630
990
440
480
280
770
640
810
660
420
360
490
1210
880
720
160
320
560
240
4678911
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ROLL 6 FOR 100 RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 38
Copy the recording sheet as needed to play the game
(each player should have one sheet for four rounds of play).
Name
Equations: ROUND 1
Scoring
had
.
won because
had
is
.
closer to 100 than
.
Equations: ROUND 2
Scoring
had
.
won because
had
is
.
closer to 100 than
.
Equations: ROUND 3
Scoring
had
.
won because
had
is
.
closer to 100 than
.
Equations: ROUND 4
Scoring
had
won because
.
had
is
.
closer to 100 than
.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ROLL 6 FOR 100 ASSESSMENT
Reproducible 39
Name
Sam was playing a round of Roll 6 for 100. This is what he had recorded after five rounds:
6+5 +1 + 3 + 5
When Sam rolls the die for a final time, what number should he hope for? Explain.
ROLL 6 FOR 100 ASSESSMENT
Name
Sam was playing a round of Roll 6 for 100. This is what he had recorded after five rounds:
6+5 +1 + 3 + 5
When Sam rolls the die for a final time, what number should he hope for? Explain.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ROLL FOR $1.00 GAME BOARD
Reproducible 40
Copy this game board as needed to play the game, one copy per player.
Name
Roll
Dimes
Pennies
Running Total
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
__________ is __________ away from $1.00.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
ROLL FOR 1 RECORDING SHEETS
Reproducible 41
Copy this recording sheet as needed to play the game, one recording sheet per player.
Name
Roll
Dimes
(one-tenth of
$1.00)
Pennies
Running
Total
Pennies
Running
Total
(one-hundredth
of $1.00)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Name
Roll
Dimes
(one-tenth of
$1.00)
(one-hundredth
of $1.00)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
SPINNING SUMS AND DIFFERENCES
PLACE VALUE SPINNER 1
Reproducible 42
Copy this spinner as needed to play the game, one spinner per pair of players.
HUNDREDS
ONES
TENS
1. Pass out one large paper clip per pair of players.
2. Use the tip of a pencil to keep the paper clip on the spinner.
3. Spin the paper clip while holding the pencil or have a partner hold the pencil
while you spin the paper clip.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
SPINNING SUMS AND DIFFERENCES
PLACE VALUE SPINNER 2
Reproducible 43
Copy this spinner as needed to play the game, one spinner per pair of players.
THOUSANDTHS
TENTHS
HUNDREDTHS
1. Pass out one large paper clip per pair of players.
2. Use the tip of a pencil to keep the paper clip on the spinner.
3. Spin the paper clip while holding the pencil or have a partner hold the pencil
while you spin the paper clip.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
SPINNING SUMS AND DIFFERENCES
RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 44
Copy this recording sheet as needed to play the game, one sheet per player.
Name
Player #
ROUND
NUMBERS
GENERATED
ADDITION
EQUATION
SUBTRACTION
EQUATION
POINTS
SCORED
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
TOTAL POINTS _______
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TAKE FIVE, MAKE TEN! ASSESSMENT
Reproducible 45
NameDate ___________
Pretend you drew the following five cards for the game of Take Five, Make Ten!.
Build five equations. Use the back of this paper if you have more than five.
Equations
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Which equation do you think no one else in your class might have written?
Circle that equation and explain why you think it is original.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TARGET 300 (A MULTIPLICATION GAME)
RECORDING SHEET
Reproducible 46
Copy this recording sheet as needed to play the game, one sheet for each player for one game (five rounds).
ROUND
PLAYER 1
PLAYER 2
Name ____________________
Name ____________________
Multiplier Options
3 10
3 20
3 30
3 40
3 50
1
2
3
4
5
TOTAL
Player 1
is
Player 2
away from 300.
is
away from 300.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
TARGET “PICK YOUR SUM”
GAME BOARD
Reproducible 47
Copy this game board as needed to play the game, one copy per game.
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
HUNDREDS CHART
Reproducible A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
NUMERAL CARDS
Reproducible B
0 1 2
3 4 5
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
NUMERAL CARDS, continued
Reproducible B
5 6 7
8 9 10
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
NUMERAL CARDS, continued
Reproducible B
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-1
Game 1:
A “Mazing” 100
Objective
During this game, players create a maze from
zero to one hundred by moving through the
hundreds chart. Moves can be both horizontally (when adding ones) and vertically (when
adding or counting by tens).
Materials
• Hundreds Chart (Reproducible A),
1 per player or pair of players
• marker, crayon, or colored pencil, 1 per
player or pair of players
Directions
1. If playing in pairs, decide who is Player 1
and who is Player 2.
2. On the hundreds chart, write the word
Start next to the square numbered 1. Write
the word End next to the square numbered
100.
3. One player rolls the die. Move the corresponding number of squares (for the first
roll, move in ones—this is only for the first
roll), tracing your path with a marker, crayon, or colored pencil as you go.
Players
4. The next player rolls the die. Both players
decide if the number rolled will represent
a 10 or a 1.
1 or 2
(players may play solo or as a team of two)
5. Move the corresponding number of squares,
tracing your path as you go.
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 player or pair of players
6. Repeat Steps 4 and 5 until you reach the
end of the hundreds chart.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-2A
Game 2A:
Addition Table Trail
Objective
Directions
During this game, players take turns covering
sums across or down the game board (the addition table) in an attempt to build a trail. The
first player to complete his or her trail (from
one side of the game board to the other) is considered the winner.
1. Each player chooses which color counter
her or she will use (must be different).
Materials
3. Take turns rolling the dice. Only two dice
are rolled at a time. When it is the first player’s turn, he or she selects two of the four
dice to roll. Any combination of dice to
roll can be chosen: both labeled 0–5, both
labeled 5–10, or one of each. For example,
a player might choose to roll both the 0–5
dice if he is trying to get a sum in the upper
left quadrant of the board. Or, the player
might roll both the 5–10 dice to get a sum
in the lower right quadrant of the board. A
player may also roll one of each.
• Addition Table 0–5 or 0–10 (Reproducibles 1
and 2), 1 per pair of players
• counters (25 of each color),
50 per pair of players
• dice (2 labeled 0–5, 2 labeled
5–10), 4 per pair of players
Players
2
2. Each player will be moving within the
addition table in a different direction. Decide who will move horizontally and who
will move vertically.
4. The numbers that come up are the addends. Cover the sum that represents the
roll on the addition table with one of that
player’s colored counters.
5. If the sum has already been covered,
roll one of the dice again. If the sum of the
new roll is covered, it is the other player’s
turn.
6. Take turns playing. The goal is to be the first
player to make a trail across or down the addition table. The path may move up, down,
forward, backward, and diagonally, as long
as the path is continuous and connects the
sides of the table in the player’s designated
direction (vertically or horizontally).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-2B
Game 2B:
Multiplication Table Trail
Objective
Directions
During this game, players take turns covering
products across or down the game board (the
multiplication table) in an attempt to build a
trail. The first player to complete his or her trail
(from one side of the game board to the other)
is considered the winner.
1. Each player chooses which color counter
he or she will use (must be different).
Materials
3. Take turns rolling the dice. Only two dice
are rolled at a time. When it is a player’s
turn, select two of the four dice to roll. Any
combination of dice to roll may be chosen:
both labeled 0–5, both labeled 5–10, or one
of each.
• Multiplication Table 1–6 or 0–10
(Reproducibles 3 and 4), 1 per pair of players
• counters, 50 per pair of players
(25 of each color)
• dice (2 labeled 0–5, 2 labeled
5–10), 4 per pair of players
Players
2
2. Each player will be moving within the multiplication table in a different direction.
Decide who will move horizontally and
who will move vertically.
4. The numbers that come up are multiplied.
Cover the product that represents the roll
on the multiplication table with one of the
player’s colored counters.
5. If the product has already been covered,
the player may roll one of the dice again. If
the product of the new roll is covered, it is
the other player’s turn.
6. Take turns playing. The goal is to be the
first player to make a trail across or down
the multiplication table, from one side to
the other. The path may move up, down,
forward, backward, and diagonally, as long
as the path is continuous and connects the
sides of the table in the player’s designated
direction (vertically or horizontally).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-3
Game 3: Addition Tic-Tac-Toe
Objective
During this game, players take turns marking
the sum of two addends until one player has
connected five sums in a row, column, or diagonal. This player is considered the winner.
Materials
• paper clips, 2 per pair of players
• tiles, 24 per pair of players (12 of each
color)
• Addition Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board
(ReproducibleS 5 or 6), 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and Player 2 and
which color of tiles each player will use.
2. Player 1 selects two numbers from those
listed at the bottom of the game board and
places a paper clip on each (if using Reproducible 6, players must first fill in the game
board with numbers). These numbers become the addends. Player 1 covers the sum
of the two addends on the game board with
his color tile.
3. Player 2 moves just one of the paper clips
to another number, adds the two addends,
and covers the sum with her color tile.
4. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until a winner is declared. The winner is the player who has connected five sums by placing five color tiles in
either a row, column, or diagonal. Just as in
the classic game of tic-tac-toe, some games
will end in a tie.
Note: In some cases, both paper clips may be
placed on the same number.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-4
Game 4: Anything but Ten!
Objective
During this game, players take turns rolling dice
until they reach 100 on the game board. The
first player to reach 100 or beyond is the winner.
Materials
• Hundreds Chart (Reproducible A),
1 per pair of players
• dice (1 labeled 0–5, 1 labeled 5–10),
2 per pair of players
• counters, each a different color,
2 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Each player chooses a counter and places
it at 0, just before the square labeled 1 on
the hundreds chart.
2. Players take turns rolling both dice:
• If the number rolled is not a combination of ten, the player moves the total
number of spaces. The player then has
two choices: to end his or her turn or to
roll again.
• If the number rolled is a combination of
ten, the player must remain at or go back
to 0.
• If a combination of ten is rolled at any
point during the game, the player must
go back to 0.
3. The winner is the first player to reach 100
or beyond on the game board (hundreds
chart).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-5
Game 5: Build Ten
Objective
During this game, players take turns rolling the
die until they have built ten against their tens
rod. The first player to build ten is the winner.
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• base ten rods, 2 per pair of players
• base ten cubes, 20 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and Player 2. Both
players lay a tens rod on their workspace.
2. Player 1 rolls the die and collects the corresponding number of ones cubes. The
player carefully places the ones cubes
against the tens rod so that they are touching each other.
3. Player 2 rolls the die, collects the corresponding number of ones cubes, and places
them against his tens rod.
4. Players continue to take turns rolling the
die and placing the ones cubes against their
tens rods. The first player to build ten wins.
Note: Players try to roll exactly ten; however,
after three consecutive rolls they may go over
ten to finish a round. For example, if a player
has eight ones cubes, a roll of 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6
would complete the game.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-6
Game 6: Circles and Stars
Objective
During this game, players roll a die and draw
the corresponding number of circles and stars.
Each player then records the two number sentences (addition and multiplication) that the
model represents.
Directions
1. Players fold the paper three times so that
there are eight sections for recording:
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per player or pair of
players
• 12-by-18-inch sheet of white paper, 1 per
player or pair of players
• pencil, 1 per player or pair of players
Players
1 or 2
2. If there are two players, each player chooses
a side and writes Circles and Stars and their
name in the top left-hand box.
3. Roll the die. Draw the corresponding
number of circles in the first section of the
recording sheet. Make sure your circles are
big enough to draw stars inside of them (at
least the size of a quarter).
4. Roll the die again. Draw the corresponding
number of stars in each circle.
5. Record the corresponding multiplication
sentence.
6. Repeat Steps 3 through 6 until each player
has played seven rounds and recorded their
rounds in the corresponding sections of
the paper.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-7A
Game 7A:
Close to 0
Objective
In this version of the game, each player is dealt
eight numeral cards. Each player selects six of
his or her cards to make two, three-digit numbers. The objective is to have the two, threedigit numbers, when subtracted, give a difference that is as close to 0 as possible.
Materials
• pencil, 1 per player
• Numeral Cards 0–9 (Reproducible B) plus
four blank cards with Wild Card written on
each, 1 deck per player or group of players
• Close to 0 Recording Sheets
(Reproducible 7), 1 per player
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials,
plus four wild cards (blank cards
with Wild Card written on each).
Players
1, 2, or 3
Directions
1. Deal eight numeral cards to each player.
2. Each player selects any six of the cards in
his or her hand to make two, three-digit
numbers. For example, a 2, 6, and 5 could
make 256, 265, 526, 562, 625, or 652. Wild
cards can be used as any numeral. Try to
make numbers that, when subtracted, give
you a difference that is as close to 0 as possible.
3. Each player writes the two numbers and
their difference on his or her copy of the
Close to 0 Recording Sheet. For example:
652 2 647 5 5.
4. Each player figures out his or her score.
The score for the round is the difference
between the total and 0. In the example in
Step 3, the score would be 5.
5. Put the cards that you used in a discard
pile. Keep the two cards that you didn’t use
for the next round.
6. For the next round, deal six new cards to
each player (players should add these cards
to their hand of two cards for a total of
eight).
7. Repeat Steps 2–5. When you run out of
cards, shuffle the discard pile and use those
cards again.
8. After five rounds, every player totals their
score. The player with the score closest to 0
is the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-7B
Game 7B:
Close to 20
Objective
Directions
In this version of the game, each player is dealt
four numeral cards. Each player selects three of
the numeral cards and adds the numbers. The
objective is to have the three numbers be equal
or close to 20.
1. Deal five cards to each player.
Materials
3. Each player writes the three numbers and
their total on his or her copy of the Close to
20 Recording Sheet.
• pencil, 1 per player
• Numeral Cards 0–9 (Reproducible B) plus
four blank cards with Wild Card written on
each, 1 deck per pair or group of players
• Close to 20 Recording Sheets
(Reproducible 8), 1 per player
• optional: counters
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials,
plus four wild cards (blank cards
with Wild Card written on each).
Players
2 to 3
2. Each player uses any three of the five cards
in his or her hand to make a total as close to
20 as possible. For example, 8 1 7 1 3 518.
Wild cards can be used as any numeral.
4. Each player figures out his or her score.
The score for the round is the difference
between the total and 20. For example, if
you choose 8 1 7 1 3, your total is 18 and
your score for the round is 2.
5. After recording, each player takes the number of counters that equates to his or her
score.
6. Put the cards that you used in a discard
pile. Keep the two cards that you didn’t use
for the next round.
7. For the next round, deal three new cards
to each player (players should add these
cards to their hand of two cards for a total
of five).
8. Repeat Steps 2–6. When you run out of
cards, shuffle the discard pile and use those
cards again.
9. After five rounds, every player totals their
score and counts their counters. The two
numbers should be the same. The player
with the lowest score (and subsequently the
fewest counters) is the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-7C
Game 7C:
Close to 100
Objective
In this version of the game, players draw six
numeral cards and select four to make two
double-digit numbers. The objective is to have
the two double-digit numbers, when added,
equal a sum as close to 100 as possible.
Materials
• pencil, 1 per player
• Numeral Cards 0–9 (Reproducible B) plus
four blank cards with Wild Card written on
each, 1 deck per player or group of players
• Close to 100 Recording Sheet
(Reproducible 9), 1 per player
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials,
plus four wild cards (blank cards
with Wild Card written on each).
Players
1, 2, or 3
Directions
1. Shuffle the cards and place them face down
in a pile. Each player draws six cards and
places the cards face up in a row in front
of them.
2. Each player selects four cards from their
six to construct two double-digit numbers
that, when added, have a sum as close to
100 as possible. Wild cards can be used as
any numeral.
3. Each player writes the equation on his
or her copy of the Close to 100 Recording Sheet. For example, 42 1 56 5 98 or
46 1 59 5 103.
4. Each player figures out his or her score.
The score for the round is the difference
between the sum and 100. In the examples
in Step 3, 42 1 56 5 98 would result in a
score of 2 and 46 1 59 5 103 would be a
score of 3.
5. Put the cards that you used in a discard
pile. Keep the two cards that you didn’t use
for the next round.
6. For the next round, deal four new cards to
each player (players should add these cards
to their hand of two cards for a total of six).
7. Repeat Steps 2–5. When you run out of
cards, shuffle the discard pile and use those
cards again.
8. After five rounds, every player totals their
score. The player with the lowest score is
the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-7D
Game 7D:
Close to 1,000
Objective
In this version of the game, players are dealt
eight numeral cards. Each player selects six of
his or her cards to make two, three-digit numbers. The objective is to have the two, threedigit numbers, when added, equal a sum that
is as close to 1,000 as possible.
Materials
• pencil, 1 per player
• Numeral Cards 0–9 (Reproducible B) plus
four blank cards with Wild Card written on
each, 1 deck per player or group of players
• Close to 1,000 Recording Sheets
(Reproducible 10), 1 per player
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials,
plus four wild cards (blank cards
with Wild Card written on each).
Players
1, 2, or 3
Directions
1. Deal eight numeral cards to each player.
2. Each player selects any six of their cards to
make two, three-digit numbers. For example, a 2, 6, and 5 could make 256, 265, 526,
562, 625, or 652. Wild cards can be used
as any numeral. Try to make numbers that,
when added, give you a total that is close
to 1,000.
3. Each player writes the two, three-digit
numbers and the corresponding sum on
his or her recording sheet. For example:
742 1 256 5 998.
4. Each player figures out his or her score.
The score for the round is the difference
between the total and 1,000. For example,
if your total is 998, your score is 2. If your
total is 1,005, your score is 5.
5. Put the cards that you used in a discard
pile. Keep the two cards that you didn’t use
for the next round.
6. For the next round, deal six new cards to
each player (players should add these cards
to their hand of two cards for a total of eight).
7. Repeat Steps 2–6. When you run out of
cards, shuffle the discard pile and use those
cards again.
8. After five rounds, every player totals their
score. The player with the lowest score is
the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-8
Game 8: Compare
(Shake and Spill)
Objective
During this game, players take turns shaking
and spilling a select group of two-color counters. Each time, players record whether there
are more red counters, more yellow, or the
same amount.
Materials
• two-color counters, 10 per player
• pencil, 1 per pair of players
• Compare (Shake and Spill) Chart
(Reproducible 12), 1 per pair of players
Players
Directions
1. With your partner, decide how many counters to use: six, seven, eight, nine, or ten.
Also decide who is Player 1 and Player 2.
2. Player 1 shakes and spills the counters.
3. Player 2 records the results, placing a tally
mark in the corresponding column of the
chart.
4. Repeat Steps 3 and 4, alternating turns shaking/spilling and recording until you’ve collected twenty pieces of data (tally marks).
5. Extension: Record the addition sentences
that describe the data.
2
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-9
Game 9: Cross Out Singles
Objective
During this game, players fill in the nine
squares on their game boards with the numbers rolled. After all squares are filled in, players find the sums of the number strings (the
rows, columns, and diagonal). They cross out
any sums that appear only once, then total the
remaining sums. This is their score. The objective is to be the player with the highest score
out of three rounds.
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per player or group of
players
• pencil, 1 per player
• Cross Out Singles Game Boards
(Reproducible 13), 1 per player
Players
1 or more
Directions
1. If playing with more than one player,
decide who is Player 1.
2. Player 1 rolls the die. All players record
the number in a square on the first array
of their recording sheet. Remember, once
a number is written it may not be changed.
6. All players examine their sums. They cross
out the sums that appear only once (in only
one circle).
3
5
3
11
1
2
6
9
6
4
1
11
10
11
10
6
7. The total of the sums not crossed out is the
player’s score for that round. For example:
11 1 11 1 10 1 11 1 10 5 53
The player’s score for the above example
round is 53.
8. Repeat Steps 2–7. After three rounds are
completed, players review their scores. The
player with the highest score after three
rounds is the winner.
3. Another player rolls the dice. All players
record the number in a square on the first
array of their recording sheet.
4. Repeat Step 3 until all nine squares on
players’ arrays have been filled.
5. Players then find the sums of the number
strings (the rows, columns, and diagonal)
and write the sums in the corresponding
circles.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-10
Game 10: Cross Out Sums
Objective
During this game, players take turns drawing three cards from a deck. They form three
different equations using the numbers on the
cards, then cross off the equations’ sums on
their game board. The objective is to cross off
all sums on the game board or reach a point at
which no sums match those remaining on the
game board.
Materials
• Numeral Cards 1–10 (Reproducible B),
1 deck per pair of players
• Cross Out Sums Game Board, Version 1
(Reproducible 15), 1 per pair of players
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1.
2. Player 1 draws three cards from the deck.
3. Players work together to create three different equations using the numbers on the
cards.
4. Players then cross out the corresponding
sums on the game board.
5. Players take turns drawing three cards and
crossing out the sums of the equations on
the game board.
6. Play continues until either all sums are
crossed off the game board or there are no
sums that match those remaining on the
game board.
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials.
Players
1, 2, or 4
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-11
Game 11: Digit Place
(A Secret Number Quest)
Objective
During this game players try to figure out a secret number through a series of guesses. After
each guess, the player with the secret number
reveals whether the number guessed shares
a digit with the secret number. If it does, it’s
also noted whether the place value is correct.
The objective of the game is to share and gain
enough information to identify the secret
number correctly.
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1.
2. Player 1 chooses a secret two-digit number.
The two digits must be different.
3. The other player or players make a guess at
the number. The guess is recorded in the
first column of the recording sheet.
Materials
4. Player 1 records how many digits are correct in the Digits column and how many of
those digits are in the correct place in the
Place column.
• Digit Place Recording Sheet
(Reproducible 17), 1 per group of players
5. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 until the number is
guessed.
• pencil, 1 per player
6. Switch roles so that a different player now
chooses the secret two-digit number. Repeat
Steps 3 and 4 until the number is guessed.
Players
2 or 4
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-12
Game 12: Equation Building
Objective
Directions
During this game, players build equations
based on numbers rolled with the dice. Players then turn those cards face down that share
the same answer or answers as their equations.
The objective of the game is to be the first player to turn all twenty cards of his or her color
face down.
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
Materials
• dice (1 labeled 0–5, 1 labeled
5–10), 2 for each player
• playing cards (face cards and Jokers
removed; Aces remain to represent the
value of 1), 1 deck per pair of players
• paper and pencil, 1 per player
Players
2
2. Players sort their deck of cards into red and
black cards. Player 1 takes all the red cards
and places them in numerical order (or an
order that works for him), face up, on the
table. Player 2 takes all the black cards and
places them in numerical order (or an order that works for her), face up, on the table. Each player should have twenty cards.
3. Player 1 rolls the dice and creates equations
with the numbers rolled. He may use any
one of the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) as long
as the answer is a whole number. Player 1
records his equations for Player 2 to see.
4. Player 1 asks Player 2, “Do you agree with
my equations and answers?” If the answer
is no, Player 2 works with Player 1 until
they come to an agreement.
5. Player 1 goes back to his line of red cards.
He turns the cards face down that have
the same numbers as the answers of the
equations.
6. Alternate turns and repeat Steps 3–5.
7. Play continues; the first player to turn all
twenty cards face down is the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-13
Game 13: Fifteen-Number
Cross-Out
Objective
During this game, each player creates a list of
numbers. Players then take turns rolling the
dice. They add the numbers rolled and decompose the sum, then select either the sum or a
combination of numbers in the decomposition
to cross out on their lists. The objective of the
game is to be the first player to cross out all the
numbers on his or her list. Alternatively, both
players might reach a point when they can no
longer cross out numbers based on the sum;
the winner is then the player with the fewest
numbers remaining on his or her list.
3. Player 1 rolls the dice and adds the two
numbers rolled. The player announces the
sum to her partner.
Materials
6. Player 2 rolls the dice and adds the two
numbers rolled. The player announces the
sum to his partner.
• dice (labeled 1–6), 2 per pair of players
• Fifteen-Number Cross-Out Recording Sheet
(Reproducible 18), 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Determine who is Player 1 and who is
Player 2.
2. Using the recording sheet, each player
makes a list of ten additional numbers. Use
the three rules to guide your decisions.
Three Rules for Adding Ten
More Numbers
1.The ten additional numbers
may consist of any number 1–9,
including more 5s.
4. Both players now need to decompose the
sum. Record your work in the space provided under the list on your recording
sheet.
5. Now choose either the sum or one of the
combinations and cross the chosen numbers off your lists. Both players cross off
numbers; only one combination or sum
can be crossed off on each list.
7. Repeat Steps 4–5. The game continues as
long as a player is able to cross out a number or numbers on his or her list. If a player
cannot make the sum with any numbers
that remain on his or her list, that player
waits until the next roll.
8. The game is won in two ways:
a. The first player to cross out all the numbers on his or her list is the winner.
or
b.Both players reach a point when they
can no longer cross out numbers; the
winner is then the player with the fewest
numbers remaining on his or her list.
Note: Reproducible 18 has space for three
games to be played.
2.Numbers may be repeated.
3.Not every number has to be used.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-14
Game 14: Finding Factors
Objective
Directions
During this game, players take turns selecting numbers on the game board and identifying the number’s factors. The first player selects and circles the number using her colored
marker; the second player identifies and circles
the number’s factors using his colored marker.
The objective of the game is to be the player
with the highest score at the end. A player’s
score is the total of all the numbers circled in
his or her color.
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player
2. Each player chooses a different-color
marker or crayon.
Materials
• markers or crayons, 2 per pair of
players (each a different color)
• Finding Factors Game Board
(REPRODUCIBLE 20 or 21), 1 per pair
of players
Players
2
2. Player 1 chooses a number on the game
board and circles it with her marker.
3. Player 2 finds all the factors for the number
and circles those with his marker.
4. Player 2 chooses a number on the game
board and circles it with his marker.
5. Player 1 finds all the factors for the number
and circles those with her marker.
6. Players repeat Steps 2–5 until there are no
factors left for the remaining numbers, alternating who circles the number first.
7. Players tally their scores by adding all the
numbers of the same color together. Players show their work in the space below or
next to the game board.
8. The player with the highest score is the
winner.
GAME TIP
Selecting Numbers with
No Factors Left: An Illegal Move
Selecting a number with no factors
remaining is an illegal move and that
player loses his or her turn; the other
player gets to play twice in a row (meaning,
he or she gets to circle 2 numbers).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-15
Game 15: Greater Than,
Less Than, Equal To
Objective
During this game, players take turns drawing numeral cards and completing number
sentences. Together, players determine which
symbol (>, <, or =) goes with each sentence.
The player with the greater sum keeps all four
cards from the round. The objective of the
game is to have the most cards at the end (ten
rounds); this player is the winner.
Materials
• Numeral Cards 0–10 (Reproducible
B), 1 deck per pair of players
• Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To
Recording Sheet (REPRODUCIBLES 22,
23, 24, or 25), 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 draws two numeral cards from the
stack and records the numbers in the blanks
under Player 1 on the recording sheet.
3. Player 2 draws two more cards and records
the numbers in the blanks under Player 2
on the recording sheet.
4. Together, compare the sides of the equation. Ask each other, “Which symbol will
make the number sentence true?” Write
the symbol in the box.
5. Compare sums. The player with the greater
sum keeps all four cards from the round.
6. Repeat Steps 2–5 until all number sentences
are complete on the recording sheet (ten
rounds).
7. Together, complete the sentences on the
bottom portion of the recording sheet.
8. Count your cards. The player with the most
cards is the winner.
Symbols Key
= equal to
> greater than
< less than
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-16
Game 16: Hit the Target
(Mental Multiplication)
Objective
During this game, players choose a target range
and multiplicand. They then pick multipliers
that they think, when multiplied by the multiplicand, will get a product between the target
range numbers. The objective of the game is to
hit the target (get a product between the target
range numbers).
Materials
• paper and pencil, 1 per player
Players
2
Directions
1. Players decide who is Player 1 and who is
Player 2.
2. Players choose a target range and write it
on their paper.
Choosing a Target Range
There are three main ways a target
range can be decided:
1.The range can be chosen by the class.
2.The range can be chosen by rolling
a 1–6 die three times, then creating
the largest number possible from the
combination of three numbers, and
adding 50 to get the range. For example,
if a 4, 6, and 2 are rolled, the largest
number is 642. Then, add 50 to the
number to create the target range. In
this case, the target range is 642–692.
3. Player 1 picks a multiplicand—a number
between 3 and 29. Player 1 writes the number on the paper.
4. Player 2 picks a multiplier—a number that
he or she thinks, when multiplied by the
multiplicand, will get a product between
the target range numbers. Player 2 writes
the number sentence on the paper.
5. Players work together to solve the number
sentence. Compute mentally as much as
possible. Player 2 writes the product on the
paper.
6. Players discuss: Does the product hit the
target? Why or why not? Players then proceed with one of the following, depending
on the outcome:
a. If the product does not hit the target, repeat Steps 4 and 5, with Player 2 picking
another multiplier. Play continues until
a product is reached that hits the target
(lands within the range).
b.If the product hits the target, players
switch roles; Player 2 now picks a multiplicand and Player 1 picks the multiplier.
7. Players play ten rounds or for a predetermined amount of time like 20 minutes.
The Multiplicand and Multiplier
Remember, the multiplicand (the number
first picked) remains the same until the
target is hit; only the multiplier changes.
3.The range can be chosen by selecting
a target range from the target range
charts posted around the classroom.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-17
Game 17: How Close to 0?
Objective
During this game, players take turns rolling
the die, assigning the number rolled a ones
value or a tens value, and subtracting it from
the number rolled previously. The objective
is to get a number as close to 0 as possible by
Round 7. If a player reaches or goes below 0
before Round 7, the other player wins.
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• pencil, 1 per pair of players
• How Close to 0? Game Board
(REPRODUCIBLE 26), 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 rolls the die and assigns a ones
value or a tens value to the number rolled.
3. Player 1 subtracts the number from 100
and records her play on the game board in
the Player 1, Round 1 box.
4. Player 2 repeats Steps 2 and 3, recording his
computation in the Round 1, Player 2 box.
5. Player 1 now rolls the die a second time
and assigns a ones value or a tens value to
the number rolled.
6. Player 1 subtracts the number from the
difference she calculated in Round 1 and
records her play on the game board in the
Player 1, Round 2 box.
7. Player 2 repeats Steps 5 and 6, recording his
computation in the Player 2, Round 2 box.
8. Play continues for a total of 7 rounds. The
difference in Round 2 becomes the starting number in Round 3, the difference in
Round 3 becomes the starting number in
Round 4, and so on.
9. The player closer to 0 after 7 rounds is the
winner. If a player reaches or goes below 0
before Round 7, the game is over and the
other player wins.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-18A
Game 18A: Leftovers with 15
Objective
Directions
Player 1 rolls the die and distributes the 15 tiles
equally among the corresponding number of
plates. Player 1 records the problem and keeps
the tiles that are the remainder, and Player 2
starts off using only the tiles that were on the
plates. Players take turns modeling and recording division problems. The game continues until no tiles are left to divide. The objective is to
be the player at the end of the game with the
highest sum of remainders (leftovers).
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
Materials
• color tiles, 15 per pair of players
• cup (to hold tiles), 1 per pair of players
• paper plates or coffee filters,
6 per pair of players
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• pencil and ruled paper
Players
2
2. Player 1 rolls the die and lays out that number of paper plates.
3. Player 1 then takes the cup of tiles and divides the tiles equally onto the plates, keeping any leftover tiles aside.
4. Player 1 says and records the math equation that describes the plates and tiles. For
example, “Fifteen divided into two groups
is seven in each group, with a remainder of
one.” Player 1 records:
15 4 2 5 7 R 1
5. Player 1 initials the equation and returns
only the tiles that are on the plates to the
cup for the next player’s turn.
6. Player 2 repeats Steps 2–5. For example,
Player 2 might roll 4, thus distributing the
fourteen tiles among four plates and saying,
“Fourteen divided into four groups is three
with a remainder of two.” Player 2 records:
14 4 4 5 3 R 2
and returns the 12 tiles on the plates to the
cup.
7. Player 1 now continues with the 12 tiles.
Play alternates until all the tiles are gone.
8. Each player counts the number of tiles collected as remainders. The winner is the
player with the most remainders—referred
to as leftovers!
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-18B
Game 18B: Leftovers with 100
Objective
Directions
During this version of Leftovers, players start
by selecting and dividing a number 1–20 into
the start number 100. The remainder becomes
the first player’s score. The second player subtracts the remainder from the start number to
determine the next “new” start number. The
game continues until the start number is 0. The
objective is to be the player at the end with the
highest sum of remainders (leftovers).
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Write the numbers 1–20 across the top of
the paper and the words Start number near
the margin. The start number is 100.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Start number: 100
Materials
• pencil and ruled paper
Players
2
3. Player 1 chooses one of the numbers from
1–20 and crosses it out. Player 1 then divides the start number by that number. The
remainder becomes Player 1’s score. Player
1 marks the remainder with her initial.
4. Player 1 then subtracts the remainder from
the start number to determine the next
start number. An example of Steps 3 and 4
is shown here:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Start number: 100
100 ÷ 8 = 12 r 4 B.P.
96
5. Player 2 selects a different number from
numbers 1–20 and crosses it out. Player 2
then divides the new start number by it. The
remainder becomes Player 2’s score. Player
2 marks the remainder with his initial.
6. Play continues until the start number is 0.
7. Players add their remainders. The player
with the larger sum is the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-19
Game 19: Making Moves
on the Hundreds Chart
Objective
Directions
During this game, players roll a specially
labeled die to determine the corresponding
number of spaces to move on a hundreds chart.
The objective is to be the first player to land
exactly on the square numbered 99.
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
Materials
• Hundreds Chart (REPRODUCIBLE A),
2 per pair of players
• game markers (counters or interlocking
cubes of two different colors, for
example), 2 per pair of players
• die (labeled +10, +10, +10, –10, +1, –1),
1 per pair of players
• paper and pencil, 1 per pair of players
Players
2. Each player titles a piece of paper Making
Moves on the Hundreds Chart to record
their moves.
3. Each player places a game marker in the
margin next to the 1 square on his or her
hundreds chart.
4. Player 1 rolls the die and moves her marker
the corresponding number of spaces.
5. Player 2 checks Player 1’s accuracy. If the
move is correct, Player 1 records the move
as a number sentence.
6. Player 2 repeats Steps 3–5 using his hundreds chart.
7. The first player to land on square 99 exactly
is the winner.
2
Impossible Moves
Sometimes a corresponding move on the
hundreds chart will not be possible. For
example, if a –1 is rolled as the first roll of the
game, the player will not be able to move his
game marker. Or, if the player is on square
98 and rolls a +10, the player will not be able
to move his game marker. In the case of an
impossible move, the player loses a turn.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-20
Game 20: Missing Addend
or Factor (Salute!)
Objective
Directions
During this game, two players start by each
drawing a card and placing it on their forehead,
number side facing out. The third player studies both cards and announces the sum of the
two numbers. The other two players take turns
figuring out the number they have on the card
against their forehead. The first player to figure out his or her number wins both cards. The
game continues until all the cards have been
used. The objective is to be the player with the
most cards at the end; the player with the most
cards then plays the role of Player 3, the player
who calls out the sums. This game can also be
played as Missing Factor, using multiplication.
1. Shuffle the deck of cards and place the deck
face down on a table or desk.
Missing Factor
To practice multiplication, the cards
become factors and the third player calls
out the product of the two numbers.
Materials
• Numeral Cards 0–10 (REPRODUCIBLE B),
1 deck per group of three players
or
• playing cards, 1 deck per group of three
players (face cards and Jokers removed;
Aces remain to represent the value of 1)
2. Decide who is Player 1, Player 2, and
Player 3.
3. Players 1 and 2 each draw a card from the
stack and quickly place the card to their
forehead, number side facing out. Players
1 and 2 do not look at the number on their
cards.
4. Player 3 calls out the sum of the two numbers.
5. The first player to name the addend he or
she is holding to his or her forehead wins
the round and collects both cards.
6. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 until all cards have
been drawn.
7. The winner is the player with the most
cards. Rotate roles; the player with the
most cards now becomes Player 3 and calls
the sums.
8. Shuffle the cards and play again.
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck
of numeral cards is four copies of each
numeral card listed in the materials.
Players
3
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-21
Game 21: More!
Objective
Players are dealt equally all the cards from a
deck of playing cards. They each draw one card
from their pile and compare the face value of
the cards. The player with the greater value determines the difference between the two values
and connects the corresponding number of
interlocking cubes. As play continues, players
continue to connect cubes; each player has a
stick of cubes when all cards have been played.
Players then compare the lengths, count their
stick of cubes, and record the amount. The
objective of the game is to build and compare
visual representations of numbers.
Materials
• playing cards (Jokers removed; Aces are
optional and represent the value of 1), 1
deck per pair of players
• interlocking cubes, approximately 150 per
pair of players
• More! Recording Sheet (REPRODUCIBLE 27), 1
per pair of players
• pencil, 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 shuffles the deck of playing cards
and deals all cards so each player has 26
cards.
3. Both players stack their cards in a pile
neatly, face down, in front of them.
4. Both players take the top card from their
pile and turn it over.
5. Players compare the face value of the cards.
The player with the greater value represents
the difference in values by using interlocking cubes. For example, if the difference is
3, the player with the greater value takes
three interlocking cubes and snaps them
together.
(If the cards drawn happen to be the same
value, set the cards aside, draw two new
cards, and continue play.)
6. Repeat Steps 4 and 5, until all the cards are
played. Players should always add on to
their existing train of interlocking cubes so
that, at the end of the game, each player has
a stick of cubes.
Value of Face Cards
7. When all cards have been played, compare
the length of the interlocking cubes and
record the total of each and the difference
between them.
Ace = 1 (optional use)
8. Play the game a second time.
Jack = 11
9. After two games have been played, total
your points for both games, record the
sums in the TOTAL row, and again find the
difference.
Queen = 12
King = 13
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-22
Game 22: Odd or Even?
Objective
Players work in pairs using a deck of playing
cards. They start by taking the top two cards
from the stack and placing the cards face side
up, one overlapping the other. If the sum of the
two cards is an even number, players “win” the
cards and set them aside in their pile. Players
then take two more cards from the deck. If the
sum is odd, players take a third card from the
deck and place it face up, once again overlapping it on the top card. Now if the top two cards
are even, the players “win” these two cards and
remove them from play. Play continues in this
fashion, with players always looking at only the
last two cards played. After all cards have been
played, players count to see how many cards
are in their pile versus in the pile formed by
the deck. The winner (the players or the deck)
is the one with the most cards. The goal of the
game is to improve one’s understanding of
even and odd numbers while simultaneously
“sparring” with a deck of cards.
Materials
• playing cards (face cards and Jokers
removed; Aces remain to represent the
value of 1), 1 deck per pair of players
or
• Numeral Cards 1–10 (REPRODUCIBLE B), 1
deck per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Shuffle the deck of playing cards and place
them in a neat stack, face down.
2. Take the top two cards from the deck and
turn them over. Place them face side up,
overlapping, next to the deck.
3. Is the sum of the two numbers odd or even?
a.If the sum is an even number, remove
both cards from play and place them
aside in a pile. You are playing against the
deck and these are the cards you’ve won.
Then, take two more cards from the deck
and think: Is the sum of the two numbers
odd or even? Continue play accordingly.
The sum of these cards is the even number
8, so both would be removed from play.
b.If the sum is an odd number, draw a
third card from the deck and place it so
that it overlaps the top card. If the two
new top cards are even, you “win” them
again; place them in your pile. Draw another card from the deck and place it so
it overlaps the remaining card. The remaining card forms the beginning of the
deck’s pile of wins.
The sum of the first two cards was an odd number 7, so a
third card was drawn. The sum of the top two cards is now
even (3 + 9 = 12), so these two cards are removed from play.
The 4 card is placed in a separate deck.
4. Continue playing, repeating Step 3, until all
the cards in the deck have been played.
5. To determine the winner, count the number of cards you and your partner have in
your pile, then count the cards that remain
with the deck. If you and your partner have
more cards than the number of cards in the
deck, you win!
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-23
Game 23: Oh No! 20!
Objective
During this game, two players (or two teams of
two) play a hand of four cards each, adding or
subtracting card values strategically until one
player’s (or team’s) sum is or exceeds twenty.
The objective of the game is not to be the first
player (or team) to get to twenty or more.
Materials
• playing cards (6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and Jokers
removed; face cards remain; Aces remain
to represent the value of 1), 1 deck per pair
of players
or
• Numeral Cards 1–5 (REPRODUCIBLE B) plus
four cards marked –5, four cards marked
0, and four wild cards, 1 deck per pair of
players
Values of Face Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck of
playing cards is four of each number 2–5
(cards 6–10 removed) plus the face cards,
which are assigned the following values:
Ace = 1
Jack = –5 (subtract 5)
Queen = 0
King: wild card (any number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
–5, or 0)
Players
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
If playing in teams, decide who is on Team
1 and who is on Team 2.
2. Shuffle the deck of playing cards and deal
four cards to each player or team.
3. Player or Team 1 starts by selecting a card
from the hand of four cards and placing it
in the middle of the playing area.
4. Player or Team 2 then selects a card from
the hand of four cards, places it in the middle next to Player or Team 1’s selected card,
then announces the sum of the two cards.
5. Players or teams each draw one more card
from the stack so they have four cards each.
6. Now Player or Team 1 selects a card from
the hand of four cards, places it down, and
announces the sum by adding the value to
the existing sum.
7. Player or Team 1 then takes a new card
from the stack to continue to have four
cards in hand.
8. Player or Team 2 repeats Steps 6 and 7,
building on Player or Team 1’s new sum.
9. Play continues, alternating turns between
the players or teams until one player’s or
team’s sum is twenty or more.
Remember: The objective of the game is not
to be the first player or team to get twenty
or more!
2 or two teams of 2
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-24
Game 24: Order Up 21!
Objective
After drawing four cards or rolling the four
dice, players build an equation using all four
numbers and applying the order of operations
(parentheses, exponents, multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction). The objective
is to build an equation that totals twenty-one.
After each round, a player’s or team’s score is
determined by how far away their total is from
twenty-one. After ten rounds, the player or
team with the lowest score is the winner.
Materials
• playing cards (face cards and Jokers
removed; Aces remain and represent the
value of 1), 1 deck per pair of players
or
• Numeral Cards 0–10 (REPRODUCIBLE B), 1
deck per player, pair, or group of players
or
• dice (2 labeled 0–5, 2 labeled 5–10), 2 of
each per player, pair, or group of players
3. Each player or team builds an equation
using the four numbers and following the
rules for building equations. Players write
the equation on their recording sheet.
4. After each player or team has built an equation, determine the scores. The score for
each round is how far away the total is from
twenty-one. Players record their scores on
the recording sheet.
5. Play ten rounds. After ten rounds, total your
scores. The player or team with the lowest
score is the winner.
A Deck of Cards
For the purpose of this game, a deck of cards
is four of each number Ace (1)–10. If using a
deck of playing cards, the 0 is not available.
Game Rules for Building Equations
• Players may use any combination
of the four operations (addition,
subtraction, multiplication, division).
• Order Up 21! Recording Sheet (REPRODUCIBLE
28), 1 per player or pair of players
• The numbers may be used in any order,
but may only be used once. If a number
is drawn/rolled twice, the number
must be used twice in the equation.
Players
• Remember to use parentheses.
1, 2, or 4
• Numbers may be used as exponents.
Directions
• Numbers may also be used to form
factions equivalent to whole numbers.
1. If playing in pairs, decide who is Player 1
and who is Player 2. If playing in teams,
decide who is on Team 1 and who is on
Team 2.
2. Roll all four dice or draw four cards.
• Equations must be accurate mathematically.
Scoring
Points are determined by how far away the
total of the equation is from 21. A score of 0
point means the player got exactly 21. A score
of 1 point means the player got either 20 or
22. The goal is to have the lowest score.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-25A
Game 25A: Pathways
(Products Tic-Tac-Toe)
Objective
Players select factors, multiply them, and cover
the corresponding product on the game board.
The objective of the game is to be the first player
to complete a continuous pathway across the
game board, from one side to the other.
Materials
• paper clips, 2 per pair of players
• game markers, 2 sets of 10 (each set a
different color)
• Pathways Game Board
(REPRODUCIBLEs 30, 31, 32, or 33)
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player
2, and the color game marker each player
will use.
2. Look at the factors listed at the bottom of
the game board. Player 1 chooses two factors and places a paper clip over each.
3. Player 1 then multiplies the factors and
covers the corresponding product on the
game board with one of her game markers.
Remember: Both paper clips may be placed
on the same factor!
4. Player 2 moves just one of the paper clips to
another factor, multiplies the two numbers,
and places one of his game markers on the
product.
5. Repeat Step 4, alternating turns. The winner is the first player to make a continuous
pathway across the game board.
A Pathway
A pathway may include boxes that share a
common side or common corner. Pathways
move across the game board from left to
right, not from top to bottom (although
pathways will move up and down).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-25B
Game 25B: Times Ten
Objective
Players select factors, multiply them, and cover
the corresponding product on the game board.
The objective of the game is to be the first player
to complete a continuous pathway across the
game board, from one side to the other.
Materials
• paper clips, 2 per pair of players
• cubes, tiles, counters, or other game
markers (2 sets of 10, each set a
different color), 20 per pair of players
• Times Ten Game Board (REPRODUCIBLES
34, 35, 36, or 37), 1 per pair of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player
2, and the color game marker each player
will use.
2. Look at the factors listed at the bottom of
the game board. Player 1 chooses two factors and places a paper clip over each.
3. Player 1 multiplies the factors, determines
the product, and then multiples the product by ten. Player 1 then covers the final
product on the game board with one of her
game markers. Remember: Both paper clips
may be placed on the same factor!
4. Player 2 moves just one of the paper clips
to another factor, multiplies the two numbers, and then multiples the product by ten.
Player 2 places one of his game markers on
the final product.
5. Repeat Step 4, alternating turns. The winner is the first player to make a continuous
pathway across the game board.
A Pathway
A pathway may include boxes that share a
common side or common corner. Pathways
move across the game board from left to
right, not from top to bottom (although
pathways will move up and down).
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-26
Game 26: Roll 6 for 100
Objective
The objective of the game is to get to 100 or as
close to 100 as possible (but not over!) through
a combination of adding and multiplying the
numbers rolled using a die. The die may be
rolled up to six times. After each roll, players
record an addition equation/number string. At
any time up to six rolls, a player can decide to
end her participation in the round by recording a multiplication equation. The other player
may continue the round up to six rolls; the
player closest to 100 is the winner.
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• Roll 6 for 100 Recording Sheet (REPRODUCIBLE
38), 2 per pair of players
• pencil and ruled paper
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 rolls the die and records the number on his recording sheet.
3. Player 1 rolls the die a second time, adding
the number to the first and recording the
equation.
4. Player 1 repeats Step 3 until he feels he has
rolled a number that, when multiplied by
the previous sum, will get him as close to
100 as possible. After the player multiplies,
his round is done. The player has up to (but
not more than!) six rolls. On the sixth roll,
the player must multiply.
5. Player 2 repeats Steps 2–4, recording her
equations/number string on her recording
sheet.
6. After both players have completed a round,
they determine the winner—the player
with the total closest to but not more than
100. Players fill out the scoring sentence
frames on their recording sheets.
7. Each player plays four more rounds of the
game.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-27A
Game 27A: Roll for $1.00
Objective
Players take turns rolling a die, assigning the
rolled number a value of penny or dime, and
collecting that number of pennies or dimes.
When players accumulate enough pennies to
equate a dime, they must exchange their pennies for a dime. The objective of the game is
to form a collection of pennies and dimes that
totals exactly or as close to $1.00 as possible,
but does not go over $1.00. A round consists of
each player having seven turns (rolls).
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• 30 pennies and 20 dimes, per pair of players
• Roll for $1.00 Game Boards
(REPRODUCIBLE 40), 1 for each player
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 rolls the die, decides whether the
number rolled represents pennies or dimes,
and places the corresponding number of
coins in the appropriate space on his game
board.
3. Player 2 rolls the die, decides whether the
number rolled represents pennies or dimes,
and places the corresponding number of
coins in the appropriate space on her game
board.
4. Players continue to take turns rolling the die
and assigning a penny or dime value to the
roll. When players have ten or more pennies, they must exchange their pennies for a
dime. The dime can be placed in any space
on the game board in the Dimes column.
5. The game is over after each player has taken
seven rolls. Players total their coins. The
winner is the player who has exactly or the
closest to $1.00 (but not more!). Players
who go over $1.00 are out.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-27B
Game 27B: Roll for 1
Objective
Directions
Players take turns rolling a die and assigning
the rolled number a value of .1 or .01. At the
end of seven turns (rolls) per player, players
add up their hundredths and tenths to determine who is closer to (but not over!) the whole
number one. The closest player is the winner.
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
Materials
4. Player 2 follows Steps 2 and 3.
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
5. Play alternates until each player has had
seven turns (rolls).
• Roll for 1 Recording Sheets
(REPRODUCIBLE 41), 1 per player
• calculators (optional)
2. Player 1 rolls the die and decides if the
number rolled represents tenths or hundredths.
3. Player 1 records the play on her recording
sheet.
6. The winner is the player who is the closest
to (but not over!) one. Players who go over
one are out.
Players
2
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-28
Game 28: Spinning Sums
and Differences
Objective
Directions
Player 1 rolls the die and spins the place value
spinner. The die provides the number and the
spin determines the place value of the number
rolled. Player 1 rolls and spins a second time,
generating a second number. Player 2 does the
same thing—rolls and spins, rolls and spins—
creating two numbers. Using the numbers,
players write two equations—one addition
equation and one subtraction equation. Players solve both equations and check each other’s
sum and difference. The largest sum and difference each earn 1 point; the player with the
highest score at the end of ten rounds is the
winner.
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
Materials
6. Players solve both equations.
• die (labeled 1–6), per pair of players
7. Players check each other’s sum and difference; if there is disagreement, share your
thinking.
• Place Value Spinner (REPRODUCIBLE 42 or
REPRODUCIBLE 43), 1 per pair of players
• paper clip, 1 per pair of players
• Spinning Sums and Differences Recording
Sheet (REPRODUCIBLE 44), 1 per player
• paper and pencil
Players
2
2. Player 1 rolls the die and spins the place
value spinner. The die determines the number; the spinner determines the place value
of the number. Player 1 records the number
on her recording sheet.
3. Player 1 repeats Step 1 to create a second
number.
4. Player 2 follows Steps 1 and 2 to generate
his 2 numbers.
5. Each player uses the two numbers he or she
generated to write 2 equations—1 addition
equation and 1 subtraction equation.
8. Now determine the score of the round.
The largest sum and difference each win 1
point.
9. Continue playing for ten rounds.
10.Total your scores using the recording sheet.
The player with the highest total score is
the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-29
Game 29: Take Five, Make Ten!
Objective
Players draw five cards and use the numbers to
build five equations, each of which totals 10.
The equations can involve addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Players keep
track of their equations for each round. Each
player earns 1 point for each equation built.
Each round can be worth up to 5 points.
Directions
1. Shuffle the deck of cards and draw five
cards.
2. Using the numbers on the cards, build five
equations, each totaling 10. Follow the
game rules.
GAME RULES
Materials
• Addition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division operations can be used.
• playing cards (10s, face cards, and Jokers
removed; Aces remain to represent a value
of 1), 1 deck per player or pair of players
• A minimum of two and maximum of
five of the numbers can be used.
• Numbers cannot be repeated in
the same equation unless there are
two of the same number cards.
or
• Numeral Cards 1–9 (REPRODUCIBLE B), 1 deck
per player or pair of players
• paper and pencil
Players
1–2
3. Record the five equations on paper.
4. The end of the game is determined when
all cards have been played (typically six
rounds).
5. The winner is the person with the most
points (1 point per equation that equals 10).
EXAMPLE ROUND
If the cards Ace (1), 2, 3, 4, and 8 are drawn,
possible equations are:
8+2
8+4–2
8+3–1
8×1+2
1+2+3+4
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-30
Game 30: Target 300
(A Multiplication Game)
Objective
Players take turns rolling a die and multiplying
the number rolled by ten or multiples of ten
through fifty. The goal is to be the player with a
total sum of exactly or closest to 300 after five
rolls.
Materials
• die (labeled 1–6), 1 per pair of players
• Target 300 (A Multiplication Game)
Recording Sheets (REPRODUCIBLE 46),
1 per player
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide who is Player 1 and who is Player 2.
2. Player 1 rolls the die and decides whether
to multiply the number rolled by 10, 20, 30,
40, or 50.
3. Both players record the multiplication
sentence in the column Player 1 on their
recording sheets. For example, if Player 1
TARGET 300 (A MULTIPLICATION GAME) Reproducible 46
rolls a 4 and decides to multiply it by 20,
RECORDING SHEET
both players record:
Copy this recording sheet as needed to play the game, one sheet for each player for one game (five rounds).
ROUND
1
PLAYER 1
PLAYER 2
Name ____________________
Name ____________________
4 x 20 = 80
2
Multiplier Options
3 10
3 20
3 30
3 40
both3 50
4. Player 2 repeats Steps 2 and 3, and
3
players
record the mathematics in the column Player 2 on their recording sheets.
4 each player has had five turns, both
5. After
players add the products for all five rounds.
The5 winner is the player closest to 300.
Note that the total sum may go over 300.
TOTAL
Player 1
______ is ______ away from 300.
Player 2
______ is ______ away from 300.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-31
Game 31: Target
“Pick Your Sum”
Objective
To start, players decide on a target sum between
25 and 55. During each turn, a player covers a
number on the game board and adds it to the
previously covered number or numbers. Players or teams continue to add to the running total during every turn, attempting to be the first
to get to the target sum. The first player or team
to reach the target sum exactly is the winner.
Materials
• Target “Pick Your Sum” Game Board
(REPRODUCIBLE 47), 1 per pair or group of
players
• counters (discs, coins, beans, or tiles of any
color), 20 per pair or group of players
Players
2–4
Directions
1. If playing in pairs, decide who is Player 1
and who is Player 2. If playing in teams,
decide who is on Team 1 and who is on
Team 2.
2. Choose a target sum between 25 and 55.
Record it where all players can see it.
3. Player or Team 1 covers a number on the
game board with his counter.
4. Player or Team 2 covers another number
on the game board and adds that number
to the first number covered. Player or Team
2 announces the sum aloud. For example,
if Player or Team 1 places a counter on the
number 4 and Player or Team 2 places a
counter on the number 3, Player or Team 2
says, “Four plus three equals seven.”
5. Player or Team 1 covers another number
(for example, the number 5), adds that
number to the running total, and states his
thinking aloud. So, for our example, Player or Team 1 says, “Seven plus five equals
twelve.” Alternatively, Player or Team 1 can
also add all the covered numbers, “Four
plus three plus five equals twelve.”
6. Repeat Step 5, with players or teams alternating turns. The first player or team to
reach the target sum exactly is the winner.
If a player or team goes over the target sum,
they are out. If the remaining numbers on
the game board are all too low to reach the
target sum, players or teams must start the
game over.
Reminder: Each square may only be covered
once!
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-32
Game 32: Tens Go Fish
Objective
Players put aside pairs of cards that add up to
ten. Then, players take turns asking each other
for a number card they need to make a pair that
adds up to ten. Play continues until all the cards
in the deck are used up or until one player goes
out by having no remaining cards to play.
Materials
• playing cards (10s, face cards, and Jokers
removed; Aces remain to represent a value
of 1), 1 deck per pair of players
or
• Numeral Cards 0–10 (Reproducible B),
1 deck per pair of players
Players
2–4
Directions
1. If playing in pairs, decide who is Player 1
and who is Player 2. If playing in teams,
decide who is on Team 1 and who is on
Team 2.
2. One player or team shuffles and deals the
cards, five to each player. Place the remaining cards face down in the middle, either in
a stack or a “fishing pond” (spreading cards
face down in a pool-like array).
3. Players or teams examine their cards. Are
there any pairs in their hand that, when
added, make ten? If so, players or teams
place those pairs near them on the table
and draw two cards to replace the cards
played.
4. Now players or teams alternate turns. During turns, players or teams ask for a card
that will go with a card in their hand to
make ten. For example, if Player or Team 1
is holding an 8 but not a 2, he might ask the
other player or team for a 2. Two things can
happen in this case (and on every turn):
a. If Player or Team 1 gets the card requested to make ten, Player or Team 1 puts
the pair of cards aside. Player or Team
1’s turn then continues; Player or Team
1 asks for another card that makes a ten
with any of the cards in his remaining
hand.
b.If Player or Team 2 does not have the
requested card that makes a ten, Player
or Team 1 takes the top card from the
deck (or chooses a card from the fishing pond). If the new card makes a ten
with any of the cards in Player or Team
1’s hand, Player or Team 1 sets that pair
aside and continues to draw and pair
cards. Player or Team 1’s turn is over
when they no longer have a pair of cards
in hand that makes ten.
5. A winner is determined in two ways:
a. If a player or team has paired all their
cards and has no cards left in their hand,
they are the winner.
b. If all the cards are played and no more
pairs can be made, the player or team
with the most pairs of ten is the winner.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
GAME DIRECTIONS
Reproducible G-33
Game 33: Wipeout
(Fractional Relationships)
Objective
Both players begin with the same number (1, 2,
or 3) of hexagons (considered the “whole”) as
well as other pattern blocks (the “parts”): red
trapezoids, blue rhombuses, and green triangles. Players roll a special die labeled with fractions ( __21​   ,  __31​   ,  __31​   ,  __31​   ,  __61​   ,  __61​    )and have three options of
moves: (1) remove the pattern block represented by the fraction on the die, (2) exchange any
of your blocks for equivalent blocks, or (3) do
nothing. The objective is to be the first player
to discard all of your pattern blocks.
Materials
• pattern blocks (6 yellow hexagons, 12 red
trapezoids, 18 blue rhombuses, and 36
green triangles), 1 set per pair of players
• die (faces labeled __21​   ,  __31​   ,  __31​   ,  __31​   ,  __61​   ,  __61​    ), 1 per pair
of players
Players
2
Directions
1. Decide together how many yellow hexagons you want to play with—1, 2, or 3.
Place the corresponding number of hexagons in front of each player.
2. Take turns rolling the die. On his or her
turn the player has three options of moves
to make (see “Three Moves in the Game”).
3. The winner is the first player to discard all
of his or her pattern blocks.
Reminder: Equivalent parts may not be substituted. In the game of Wipeout, equivalent
parts may not be substituted. For example,
two triangles (each having the value of __61​    )
1
may not be removed if a __3​    (represented by the
rhombus) is rolled. Only a rhombus may be
removed.
Three Moves in the Game
Roll the die and:
1.Remove the pattern block that the
fraction on the die represents,
Pattern Blocks
Although 18 blue rhombuses and 36
green triangles allow for the most options
when playing this game, if you have a
limited supply of pattern blocks, 12 of each
(rhombuses and triangles) should suffice.
2.Trade in any of your remaining pattern
blocks for an equivalent portion, or
3.Do nothing.
Note that you can only choose one of
these moves on each turn. You may not
remove a pattern block (move 1) and trade
in pattern blocks (move 2) in one turn.
From Math Games for Independent Practice: Games to Support Math Workshops and More, Grades K–5 by Jamee Petersen. © 2013 by Scholastic Inc. Permission granted to
photocopy for nonprofit use in a classroom or similar place dedicated to face-to-face educational purposes. Downloadable at www.mathsolutions.com/mathgamesreproducibles.
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