4-jaw chuck - The Cool Tool

4-jaw chuck - The Cool Tool
&
PRODUCT INSTRUCTIONS
TA B L E O F C O NT E NT S
PART
NO.
1041
1044
1074
1075
1090
1160
118 5
1201
1220
1270
1291
2085
2090
2110
2200
2250
3001
3002
PRODUCT NAME
3-Jaw Chuck
4-Jaw Chuck
SteadyRest
4-Jaw Self Centering Chuck
Follower Rest
WW Collets and Sets
Vertical Milling Table
Adjustable Tailstock Tool Holders
Tailstock Spindle Extender
Compound Slide
Riser Blocks
WW Collet Adapter
Clockmaker´s Arbors
W.R. Smith T-Rest
Radius Cutting Attachment
Quick-Change Toolpost and Tool holders
Power Feed
Cut-Off Tool and Holder
PART
NO.
3004
3016
3038
3485
3052
3054
3055
3060
3100
3200
3420
3551
3700
3701
4335
4360
6100
-----
PRODUCT NAME
Knurling Tool and Holder
Rear Mounting Block
Wood Tool Rest
Vertical Milling Column
Flycutter (and #3065, Slitting Saw Holder)
Boring Head
Morse #1 Blank
Milling Collets and End Mill Holders
Thread Cutting Attachment
Indexing Attachment
2" and 2½" Resettable Handwheels
Mill Vise
4" Precision Rotary Table
Right Angle Attachment
10,000 rpm Pulley Set
Chip Guard
Horizontal Milling Conversion
Grinding Your Own Lathe Tools
3JA
W CHUCKS
3-JA
JAW
P/N 1040 (3.125") and P/N 1041 (2.5")
Three-Jaw Chucks are designed so that all three jaws
move together and automatically center round or hexagonal
parts or stock to within a few thousandths of an inch. These
chucks provide the quickest and easiest way of holding
work in the lathe.
Chuck is designed so that it can be used
The
to clamp externally on bar stock or internally on tube stock.
The P/N 1041 Chuck is designed to grip from 3/32" (2 mm)
to 1-3/16" (30 mm) diameter stock with the jaws in the
normal position. The P/N 1040 Chuck handles stock up to
1-1/2" (38 mm) in diameter. For larger diameter work, the
jaws must be reversed (See Figure 2). The reversible jaws
can grip to 2-1/4" (56.0 mm) for the P/N 1041 Chuck and
up to 2.75" (70 mm) for the P/N 1040 Chuck. The chucks
have a .687" (17 mm) diameter through hole with a 3/4"-16
thread.
Due to the nature of the design of a 3-jaw chuck, it cannot
be expected to run perfectly true. Even 3-jaw chucks
costing five times more than the one made for this lathe will
have a 0.002" to 0.003" runout. If perfect accuracy is
desired in a particular operation, the use of a 4-jaw chuck
or a collet is recommended. Both are available for your
Lathe.
FIGURE 1—Three-Jaw Chuck, standard jaw locations.
NOTE: DO NOT TURN THE LATHE SPINDLE
ON UNTIL THE CHUCK IS TIGHTENED.
The acceleration of the spindle can cause the scroll to open
the chuck jaws if not tightened!
To prevent permanent damage, finished, turned or drawn
stock should only be held with this chuck. For rough
castings, etc., use the 4-jaw chuck.
DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN THE CHUCK. Use only
moderate pressure with the Tommy Bars supplied.
FIGURE 2—
Reversing the
Chuck Jaws.
NOTE: Always start with position "A".
To reverse the chuck jaws, rotate the knurled scroll until the
jaws can be removed. They can be easily identified by the
location of the teeth to the end of the jaw (See Figures 1 and
2). To maintain chuck accuracy, the 2nd jaw must always
be inserted in the same slot even when the jaws are
reversed. This slot is identified by a punch mark next to the
slot. Always insert the jaws in the order and location shown
on the drawings. Turn the scroll counter-clockwise when
viewed from the face of the chuck until the outside start of
the scroll thread is just ready to pass the slot for the 1st jaw.
Slide the 1st jaw as far as possible into the slot. Turn the
scroll until the 1st jaw is engaged.
Due to the close tolerances between the slot and jaw, the
most difficult part of replacing the jaws is engaging the
scroll thread and 1st jaw tooth without binding. Therefore,
never use force when replacing the jaws, and if binding
occurs, back up the scroll slightly and wiggle the jaw until
it is free to move in the slot. Advance the scroll and repeat
for the 2nd and 3rd jaws. The scroll thread must engage
the first tooth in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd jaws in order.
A set of replacement jaws, P/N 1141 is available. Should
it become necessary, please return your chuck to the
factory so that we may replace the jaws and check the
alignment before returning it to you. In the case of a
damaged chuck body, replacement of the entire chuck is
usually more economical than attempting repairs.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
4-JAW CHUCK
P/N 1030 (3.125") and P/N 1044 (2.5")
Because of the varied uses of the 4-Jaw Chuck it would be
impossible to write a comprehensive set of safety rules to
cover every specific use, other than simply suggesting the
use of liberal amounts of "Common Sense". If you're not
sure of your set-up, it probably isn't good enough. Get a
machinist with more experience to advise on a safe set-up.
Be sure to remove the chuck key before turning the
spindle on. Work Safely!
The screws that move the jaws are 20 threads per inch
(T.P.I.). A complete revolution is .050". If you keep this
number in mind when indicating a part in, it can speed up
the process.
First, use the lines machined on the face of the chuck to
roughly align the part concentric with the chuck. With an
indicator, read the run-out. Move the jaw closest to the high
or low point 30% of the total indicator reading in the proper
direction.
NOTE: We recommend the 30% figure because the high
point of a part will very seldom line up with a jaw. Moving
a jaw too much can cause "chasing your tail", or simply
moving the high point around the chuck.
EXAMPLE
The indicator shows a .030" run-out. 30% of .030" is
approximately .010". If one revolution of the jaw feed
screw is .050", then a little less than a 1/4 turn will be .010".
Back the jaw out this amount and tighten the opposite jaw.
Do NOT tighten the jaws beyond "snug" until the part is
running within .005" T.I.R. (Total Indicated Reading).
Repeat this process until the part runs within your
specifications. Once the part is running within .002" T.I.R.
it can usually be "brought in" by a final tightening of the
jaws. It should also be noted that the chuck jaws are ground
with a slight angle to allow the jaws to apply equal pressure
to the tip and base when properly tightened. This angle
amounts to less than .001" on the jaw surface.
When reversing jaws, be sure not to force a jaw onto the
guide rails with the screw. "Wiggle" the jaw as the screw is
advanced until the jaw moves in unison with the screw
without binding.
If an off balance part has to be run, be sure to turn the motor
on at a low RPM setting and bring the speed up slowly;
never go past the point that the machine starts to vibrate.
JAW OPENING RANGES
The 3.125" 4 - Jaw Chuck (P/N 1030) opens from 3/32"
(2 mm) to 1-1/2" (38 mm) in standard position and up to
2-3/4" (70 mm) with the jaws reversed. The 2.5" 4-Jaw
Chuck (P/N 1044) opens from 3/32" to 1-3/16" (30 mm)
standard and to 2-1/4" (56 mm) with the jaws reversed.
Both chucks have a .687" (17 mm) through hole with a
3/4"-16 thread.
REPLACING WORN OR DAMAGED JAWS
Should the chuck jaws ever become worn or damaged, we
recommend you return your chuck to the factory where we
will replace the jaws and assure that the chuck is adjusted
within tollerances. If the chuck body is damaged, replacement of the entire chuck is usually more economical than
attempting to repair the body. If you wish to attempt the
replacement of a jaw or jaws yourself, measure the width
of the jaw you're replacing carefully with a micrometer (it
is usually .312–.315"), and give us the dimension so we can
assure a perfect replacement.
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
NO. PART
REQ. NO. DESCRIPTION
1 1144 Set of 4 Chuck Jaws*
1 1146 4-Jaw Chuck Screw*
* Both P/N 1030 and P/N 1044 chucks use same size jaws
and screw.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
STEADY REST
P/N 1074
All materials have a tendency to deflect away from the
cutting tools when you are turning them in a lathe. This
tendency is especially noticeable on long, slender parts and
long pieces of bar stock. It makes it quite difficult to hold
close tolerances. The best way to hold a long part is with
a center mounted in the tailstock. However, for one reason
or another this is not always possible. As an example, it
may be a piece of stock that you want to center drill so that
you can mount it between centers, or it may be a part where
a center drill hole would ruin the looks of the part. Whatever
the reason, steady rests provide a means of supporting the
part.
Steady Rest provides three adjustable
The
brass blades mounted in a holder that mounts on the bed of
the lathe. These blades can be set to the diameter of the part
to provide necessary support while it turns. (For small
diameter parts it may be necessary to cut or file off the
corners of the blades so they contact the part without
touching each other.) Another advantage of the Steady
Rest which is often overlooked is the fact that work which
is held in position by the rest must turn concentrically with
its outside diameter. This means that concentricity is
assured when working near the Steady Rest because at that
point it must be running perfectly true despite imperfections
in the way it is chucked or centered at either end.
The easiest way to set up a Steady Rest is to first mount the
part to be machined in a collet or 3-jaw chuck. Then mount
the Steady Rest onto the bed of the lathe and slide it over
the free end of the part and up as close to the chuck as it will
go. The three blades of the Steady Rest can then be adjusted
in until they just contact the part, supporting it but not
binding it. Once the blades are set and locked in place, the
Steady Rest can be slid back out to support the free end of
the part. If you want to check the accuracy of your set-up,
you can use a dial indicator mounted on the crosslide. Once
you are satisfied with the set-up, apply a drop or two of oil
where the blades come in contact with the part, and you are
Steady Rest will
ready to start machining. The
accomodate any size part up to 1.75" diameter.
NOTE: A Steady Rest Riser Block (P/N 1290) is now
available which makes it possible to use the Steady Rest on
the Lathe with the Headstock/Tailstock Riser Blocks in
place.
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
FIGURE 1—To drill a hole in the end of a long shaft, the
lathe is set up with a center drill in the drill chuck which
is mounted in the tailstock. The Steady Rest keeps the shaft
from wobbling and also assures that the hole will be
concentric with the outside diameter of the part.
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
3
1
1
PART
NO. DESCRIPTION
1174 Set of 3 Brass Pads
1175 Steady Rest Casting
1176 Steady Rest Bed Clamp
4051 10-32 x 3/8" Skt. Hd. Cap Screws
4066 #10 Washer
4069 10-32 x 3/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
CAUTION! DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN
CHUCK. Use only moderate pressure
with the Tommy Bars Supplied.
IMPORTANT! DO NOT TURN THE
LATHE SPINDLE ON UNLESS THE
CHUCK IS TIGHTENED. Accelleration
of the spindle can cause the scroll to
open the chuck jaws if they are not
tightened!
4-JAW SELF CENTERING CHUCK
P/N 1075
Self centering chucks are designed to have all the jaws
move in unison. The jaws are driven by a spiral scroll when
the knurled ring is turned. Self centering chucks will never
duplicate the accuracy that can be attained with jaws that
are moved independently, but they will usually “get the job
done”, saving a machinist much time and effort.
The main purpose of a 4-Jaw Self Centering Chuck is to
hold square stock. It can also be useful in holding thin wall
round tubing that will collapse easily. Round stock that is
held in this chuck must be perfectly round and can not be
at all elliptical or one of the jaws will not grip. The same is
true for square stock; it must be very square and not at all
rectangular to achieve a proper grip with all four jaws.
This chuck is designed so that the jaws can be removed and
reversed to hold larger stock. In the normal position, stock
from 3/32" (2.0 mm) to 1-3/16" (30.16 mm) can be
secured. With the jaws reversed, material up to 2-1/4" (56.0
mm) can be held. The hole through the center of the chuck
is .687" (17.46 mm).
REMOVING THE JAWS
When seen from the front, turning the scroll clockwise
backs the jaws out. Turn clockwise until all jaws can be
removed. The jaws can be identified by the location of the
teeth as noted in Figures 1 and 2.
REVERSING THE JAWS
When reversing the jaws, jaws 4 and 2 will go back into the
same slots from which they were removed. Jaws 3 and 1
will exchange positions. The order of installation to reverse
the jaws is 4-3-2-1. (See Fig. 1.)
To install the jaws in the reversed position, turn the scroll
counterclockwise (viewed from the top) until the outside
tip of the spiral scroll thread is just ready to pass the slot for
the first jaw to be inserted (jaw #4). Slide jaw 4 as far as
possible into the slot. Turn the scroll until the jaw is
engaged.
Due to close tolerances between the slot and jaw, the most
difficult part of replacing the jaws is engaging the scroll
thread and first tooth of each jaw without binding. Never
use force when replacing the jaws, and if binding occurs,
simply back up the scroll slightly and wiggle the jaw until
it is free to move in the slot. Advance the scroll
counterclockwise and engage jaw #3 next in the slot that
previously held jaw #1 (the slot marked with a punch).
continue to engage jaws 2 and finally 1.
When reinstalling jaws in normal position, the order of
insertion reverts to 1-2-3-4. (See Fig. 2.)
A set of replacement jaws is available as P/N 1177. Should
repair become necessary, please return your chuck to the
factory so that we may replace the jaws and check the
alignment of the chuck before returning it to you. In the
case of a damaged chuck body, replacement of the entire
chuck is usually more economical than attempting repairs.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
FOLLOWER
REST
P/N 1090
Purpose of a Follower Rest
The reason this tool is called a “follower” is because the
brass supports actually move along with or “follow” the
cutter. It is used to support a piece of round stock while it
is still being machined to keep the part from deflecting away
Follower
from the tool. In a normal setup, the
Rest will lead the tool. (See Figures 1 and 4.)
BRASS PAD
TOOL
PART
HOLD DOWN BLOCK KEEPS
DOWNWARD PRESSURE ON
FOLLOWER REST.
FIGURE 2-Cutting forces on a part and how they
are countered by the Follower Rest supports.
When using a center to support the free end, newer
lathes manufactured after mid-1996 have a
cutout in the tailstock to allow it to overlap the table. Older
machines may require the use of a tailstock spindle extension
(P/N 1220) for clearance. If you are using a tailstock
center, the pads should be set by moving the Rest as close
to the tailstock as possible, tightening and returning to
cutting position.
SET SCREW
TIGHTENS
ON SADDLE
Mounting the Follower Rest to the Saddle
FIGURE 1-Follower Rest installed on lathe. (Tool post
removed for clarity.)
A Follower Rest works because it counters the two main
forces applied by the tool. When a tool is cutting, the stock
wants to climb up on the tool as well as be pushed away.
The top brass pad will keep the stock from climbing up, and
the brass pad in the rear will keep the stock from being
pushed away. The stock will then be cut concentric with
the outside diameter because that is where it is supported.
It isn’t necessary to have the free end of the stock
supported by a center when using a follower, but it does
make for a better setup, especially for larger diameters.
Follower Rest attaches to the lathe saddle
The
with a flat ended set screw. Push down on the Follower
Rest as you tighten this screw so it is clamped flat on the
bed. The small block which mounts by means of the
crosslide “T” slot is positioned so that the nylon tip set
screw pushes down on the machined top surface of the
body of the Follower Rest.
NYLON TIP
ON SET
SCREW
HOLD DOWN BLOCK
FOLLOWER
REST BODY
CROSSLIDE
SADDLE
ATTACHMENT
SET SCREW
FIGURE 3-Follower hold down block in position.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
This screw holds down the follower rest to counter lifting
forces, and its nylon face can also slide on the flat surface
so the crosslide can be moved.
finish on the part will cause excessive wear on the pads.
This in turn can cause your part to taper. To minimize wear,
always lubricate the pads with oil when cutting. It would be
wise to set up with a piece of scrap of the same material
and diameter as your actual stock.
In actual use, the tool post should be positioned so only a
very small adjustment of the crosslide is required to get the
part to finished size.
When using a follower of this type, you will usually cut to
the finished diameter in one pass. If you need a close
tolerance part, it may be easier to turn it slightly oversize,
bring it to size with a good, flat mill file and polish it with 320
grit wet/dry paper. If you have a lot of pieces to make, it
pays to spend a little extra time getting the setup just right.
MAKING THE CUT
Run the follower rest down the part until the pads are near
the end and the tool is just off the end. Dial in the desired
depth of cut. If the end of the part is not supported by a
center, the part may tend to spring away from the pads a
little when not being pressed on by the tool. If the part isn’t
running perfectly true, it could cause a problem at the start
of the cut because the part isn’t in constant contact with the
brass pads. If this is the case, slip a loop of paper around
the part and pull back lightly until the part rests against the
pads.
FIGURE 4—Follower rest set up in normal position
with pads leading the cutting tool.
SETTING THE POSITION OF THE
SUPPORT PADS
To set the pad position, put the round piece you plan to
machine in the collet or chuck you will be using. Turn the
spindle by hand to make sure the part runs reasonably true.
Move the saddle (with the follower rest attached) close to
the spindle. Loosen the pad clamping screws, bring the
brass pads in contact with the part and retighten the screws
to lock them in place. Then move the follower rest back to
the position required for the cut and the pads will be aligned
with the headstock end of the stock. If you are dealing with
very small diameter part, it may be necessary to modify the
pad to assure contact. (See Figure 5.)
PULL PAPER LOOP
TO KEEP PART
AGAINST PADS
UNTIL CUTTING
FIGURE 5—Remove the
corners of the pad tips to
allow them to come closer
together for small parts.
FIGURE 6—Supporting
a long part with a paper
loop.
Now run the lathe at about 200 RPM and keep the part in
position with the paper loop until you begin cutting. If you
don’t do this, it could cause a problem if the cutter starts to
cut and the end of the stock is bouncing around because it
isn’t running straight or is bent. Take a heavy enough cut
to keep the stock firmly against the pads but still larger than
the final dimension. Cut about 1/8" (4mm) of length, stop
and measure the amount of error and then adjust the
crosslide accordingly. (The tool will move but the follower
will not.) If the diameter is correct, cut the distance
required. By cutting only 1/8" the pads are still supporting
the part if you take another cut.
With a small diameter rod held in the a chuck or collet,
transfer the center of the part to the side of each pad using
a scribe. Because of “tolerance buildup”, the line may not
fall on the exact center of the pad, but that will not effect
the function of the follower.
TIPS FOR USING THE FOLLOWER REST
The round stock you use with this attachment should be
very round and have a good finish. If the stock is not round,
the finished part will have the same shape because the part
rotates supported by its outside diameter. A poor surface
-2-
1090
The part size may vary as the pads seat in. Remember to
keep them oiled. Keep the RPM down and the feed rate up.
A slight radius on the tool tip will improve the finish. When
you stop cutting you may have to hold the stock against the
pads to prevent “undercutting” as pressure from the tool is
released.
BRASS PAD
TURNING STOCK OTHER THAN ROUND
If you need to turn a round end on material that isn’t round
(like hex or square stock), the tool must lead the pads so that
the pads are running on the round surface cut by the tool.
The tool can be mounted almost parallel with the bed to
accomplish this. (See Figure 7.) Take your initial (starting)
cut with the end of the part held close to the chuck for
support. Then move it out into position where the follower
rest pads are supporting the newly machined round surface
of the part and cut to size. I have found it best to always HEX OR SQUARE STOCK
start with a piece of scrap material identical to your final
part for experimentation with the setup. This accessory is
FOLLOWER REST BODY
not hard to use, but you really need to turn a practice part
first to get your speed and feed rates correct.
CROSSLIDE
HOLD DOWN
BLOCK
DIRECTION
OF FEED
TOOL POST
AND TOOL
FIGURE 7—Cutting non-round stock.
EXPLODED VIEW PARTS DIAGRAM
FOLLOWER REST PARTS LIST
REF. PART
NO. NO.
DESCRIPTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Follower rest body
Flat Point set screw, 10-32 x 1/4"
Brass pad (2)
#10 Flat washer (2)
Skt. hd. cap screw, 10-32 x 3/8" (2)
Set Screw w/ nylon head, 10-32 x 3/8"
Skt. hd. cap screw, 10-32 x 5/16"
Follower hold down block
Tee nut, 10-32 (Replacements
available as set of 4)
-3-
1087
4060
1088
4066
4051
1094
4077
1089
3056
1090
WW COLLETS AND SETS
P/N 1160
Collets provide a quick, easy method of mounting cylindrical parts or bar stock in a lathe with a great deal of centering
accuracy. A drawbar which passes through the headstock
and threads into the back side of the collet is used to draw
the collet tightly into the appropriate adapter. (See Figure
1) The adapter causes the jaws of the collet to close down,
Collet Adapter
gripping the part to be machined.
and drawbar (P/N 1161) holds collets with a shaft diameter
of .312" to .313". Since many collets are available with
now also
shafts of .315" (8 mm) diameter,
offers an adapter for that size as well. (P/N 1156)
accuracy beyond the tolerances of these collets be required, even more accurate collets are available from
other sources and cost not too much.
FIGURE 2-- Machining a precise
angle on a Collet Adapter
FIGURE 1
Installation of
collet into Lathe
Headstock.
WW Collets differ from Milling Collets (P/N 3060) in that
WW Collets have a hole completely through the collet and
drawbar. This is so long material can be passed through the
headstock and the appropriate portion machined. The
maximum diameter material that can pass through the WW
Collet is 3/16" for American size collets and 4.5 mm for
metric size collets. WW Collets in larger sizes are sometimes refered to as "Pot Collets". (See Figure 5.)
Collet accuracy may be improved by taking a light cut
across the entrance angle of the Collet Adapter with the
headstock set at 20° using a boring tool as shown in figure
2. (Refer also to the instruction manual on Taper Turning
and Boring.) In most cases, however, collets are accurate
enough and do not require this truing operation.
Note also that the collets available from
are accurate yet economically priced. Should extreme
FIGURE 3-- Collet Set with Drawbar, Adapter and Knockout Bar (P/N 1160, American-- P/N 1178, Metric).
FIGURE 4-- Deluxe Collet Set in Wooden Box (P/N
1162, American--P/N 1179, Metric).
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
POT OR STEP COLLETS
These collets are designed to hold larger and odd shaped
pieces. The collets are split and have a 1/8" hole through.
It is your job to bore them to fit your application. This is
accomplished by tightening the collet in the lathe on the 1/
8" pin supplied and boring the collet to the size needed. The
depth of the bore shouldn't exceed .200" (5 mm). The
diameter shouldn't exceed .625" (16 mm) on the 3/4" and
.875" (22 mm) on the 1" Pot Collets.
NOTE: Pot Collets are designed to hold material only on
the face end, not through the collet.
FIGURE 5-- "Pot" or "Step" Collets and Dowel Pins
(P/N 2101, 1" and P/N 2100, 3/4").
WW COLLETS--AVAILABLE SIZES
INCH
PART NO. FRACTION
2051*
2052
2053
2054
2055*
2056
2057
2058
2059*
2060
2061
2062
2063*
2064
2065
2066
2067*
1/16"
5/64
3/32
7/64
1/8
9/64
5/32
11/64
3/16
13/64
7/32
15/64
1/4
17/64
9/32
19/64
5/16
DECIMAL
.063"
.078
.094
.109
.125
.141
.156
.172
.188
.203
.219
.234
.250
.266
.281
.297
.313
PART NO.
METRIC
MM SIZE DECIMAL
2068
2069*
2070
2071*
2072
2073*
2074
2075*
2076
2077*
2078
2079
2080
2081
1.5 mm
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0
6.5
7.0
7.5
8.0
.059"
.079
.098
.118
.138
.158
.177
.197
.217
.236
.256
.276
.295
.315
* Indicates Collets included in set P/N 1178
* Indicates Collets included in set P/N 1160
NOTE: Special Collets can be ordered within the range of
.050" to .320". When ordering special sizes, please use
Part Number 2082 followed by the desired size in inches.
(Example: P/N 2082-.193")
PLEASE ALLOW AT LEAST 5 WEEKS DELIVERY
FOR SPECIAL ORDER COLLETS.
MILLING COLLETS, P/N 3060
Milling Collets are designed to be used
with Morse #1 internal taper that is standard on the
spindle of both the
lathe and mill.
Because of the shallow angle of the Morse #1 taper
when the drawbolt is tightened, greater clamping
force can be applied when compared to the clamping
pressure of WW Collets; therefore, we recommend
the use of these milling collets for holding miniature
size end mills, #1 and smaller center drills (1/8"
shank), and assorted other small cutters.
Collet Blanks (P/N 2050) are available. These can be
machined to any custom size you desire for special projects.
You may also order the Wooden Box and Insert only from
the Deluxe set to create your own custom set. Order Part
Number 1170.
-2-
P/N 1160
VERTICAL MILLING TABLE
P/N 1185 (Inch)
P/N 1184 (Metric)
Whether you're milling with the Vertical Milling Column or
the Vertical Milling Table, some of the same basic rules
apply. Here is a brief summary of those rules:
1. This is a small, light duty mill and shouldn't be used to
remove vast amounts of unnecessary stock that could
be easily removed with a hacksaw. Get stock as close
to size as possible before starting.
2. Loads involved for milling are a lot higher than lathe
turning. Vibration level is also a lot higher; therefore,
more attention must be paid to gib adjustments. They
should be kept snug, but not overtightened.
3. End mills must run true and must be sharp. Holding end
mills in a drill chuck is a poor method. Milling collets
should be used for this purpose. When cutting aluminum,
run the motor at top speed and take light cuts.
4. Fly cutting is an excellent way of cutting stock from flat
surfaces.
5. Learn to use a dial indicator.
6. Shims may be required to properly align the machine.
Normally, standard machine alignment will be good
enough for most work unless it is exceptionally large or
has to be extremely accurate.
7. A good vise is a must.
8. Often more time will be spent making fixtures to hold
work than doing the actual work. There aren't any short
cuts in this type of work. If your part comes loose while
it is being machined and is destroyed, more time is lost
than that saved in a quick set-up.
9. Always try to have one point to measure from. Don't
machine this point off half way through the job and leave
yourself with no way of measuring the next operation.
PLAN AHEAD!
10. A good rule for machining operations is, if the tool
chatters, reduce speed and increase feed.
It takes a long time to accumulate the knowledge, tools and
fixtures to do the tremendous amount of different types of
operations involved in milling. Don't get discouraged by
starting a job that is too complex.
Refer to
INSTRUCTION
GUIDE (P/N 5326)
for Milling Setup and Operations.
VERTICAL MILLING TABLE PARTS LIST
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
PART
NO.
1183
4005
4021
4025
4052
4073
4082
4088
4089
4098
DESCRIPTION
Milling Table Base
Handwheel, Inch (P/N 4105, Metric)
Slide Screw, Inch (P/N 4121, Metric)
Tee Nut
Cone Point Set Screw, 10-32 x 3/16"
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 x 2"
Gib Lock
Crosslide
Slide Screw Insert, Inch (P/N 4189, Met.)
Crosslide Gib
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
ADJUSTABLE
CHUCK HOLDER
P/N 1202
(Drill Chuck NOT
included.)
ADJUSTABLE CUSTOM
TOOL HOLDER
P/N 1203
Your own custom made
split collet 5/8" O.D.
(Not Included)
ADJUSTABLE
LIVE CENTER
P/N 1201
ADJUSTABLE TAILSTOCK
TOOL HOLDERS
P/N 1201, 1202, 1203
The
lathe has come a long way since its original
conception 25 years ago. It started out as a machine that
could be manufactured and sold at a very reasonable price,
but the accuracy was such that it had limited use.
When the company was purchased in 1974 and started to
produce these machines, we completely changed the
manufacturing methods and “tightened the tolerances”.
The biggest improvement in the machines came with the
advent of CNC machines (computer controlled) which is
how the machines have been manufactured for the last ten
years.
Along with the improved accuracy came another set of
tools to do
problems; customers are now using
work that, until now, could only be done on machines being
very expensive.
The weakest point of the
lathe design is also
the best one; that is, the headstock is removable. This
allows taper cutting, milling conversions, riser blocks and
numerous other set ups to be made that could never be
accomplished without this feature. The negative part of this
design is, it’s impossible to have perfect tailstock to headstock alignment. Engineering is always a compromise. In
manufacturing the adjustable tool holders we are also
admitting we don’t have perfect alignment which is the
reason for this explanation.
Only someone new to the machine trade would talk
“perfect” alignment. In the machine business you talk
tolerances even if you can’t measure an error because now
the error has to be assumed from the tolerances of your
method of checking. To maximize the use of the
lathe we are introducing a series of three tool holders.
Holders such as these have always been used in setting up
Turret Lathes, and Screw machines in the machine trade
to make up for the inaccuracies in machine tools or the lack
of room for drill chucks, etcetera.
The
holders have a Morse #0 taper to fit the
tailstock and a choice of three tool holders:
P/N 1201...ADJUSTABLE LIVE CENTER
P/N 1202...3/8-24 DRILL CHUCK HOLDER
P/N 1203...5/8" TOOL HOLDER
These holders are simple to use. The holders are divided
into 2 parts with flanges. These flanges are bolted together
with 2 screws. The clearance holes for these screws allow
the front to be adjusted in relation to the rear. The rear
section has a witness mark (hole). This hole should always
be located at the top so the holder is located the same way
in the tailstock.
The accuracy that is attainable is governed by the amount
of skilled effort you put forth. Before starting, it’s wise to
clamp your headstock square with the bed. This can
usually be accomplished by loosening the headstock and
pushing back evenly against the alignment key (located
under the headstock) and retightening.
To line up the tailstock chuck, put a scrap piece in the 3-Jaw
that sticks out approximately 3/4" and face and center drill
the end with your present Morse #O arbor and drill chuck.
The center drill will find center of the stock even though the
chuck may not be lined up perfectly.
Next, mount the drill chuck on the adjustable arbor with the
center drill still in it. Bring the tailstock up until the center
drill is in the just drilled hole with the screws loose.
Tighten when you feel it’s on center in the hole. Repeat this
process to assure alignment using the new adjustable
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
arbor. This should be close enough for a drill chuck
because drill chucks are only accurate within .003" when
new at best.
Accurate drill chucks cost approximately 4 times as much
and only run within .002". They might claim .001", but I
haven’t seen it unless you have brand new everything.
They are not a good investment for the home shop machinist.
With the drill chuck aligned you can use the same set up to
align the adjustable live center by putting the point into the
center drilled hole and tightening the screws to start.
Turn a test bar and correct any error. This can be time
consuming and adjustments can be made by never locking
the screws so tight that you can’t move it with a few taps
of a small mallet. When aligned to your satisfaction,
screws can then be tightened completely.
The adjustable tool holder allows larger drills and cutting
tools that can’t be held in our standard drill chuck. Tools
are held in a split bushing that can easily be made. The
outside diameter has to be .625" and the inside diameter to
fit the tool you wish to hold. The bushing is then split
almost through with a hacksaw or slitting saw in the
direction of the hole. The tool can now be clamped in the
holder using this split bushing.
We personally don’t believe a person should try and get
these any more accurate than you realistically need.
Machining is a process that takes place under high loads
and temperatures. A perfectly aligned machine doesn’t
produce a perfect part without the skill of an operator who
copes with the many variables. The skill of machining is
making parts that are of a closer tolerance than the machine
you are working with was built. If you cut a slight taper on
a lathe there is nothing wrong with straightening it with a
file (flat mill) and polishing with 320A Wet/Dry paper.
This should only take a couple of minutes. Trying to align
your machine could take hours only to find the machine
aligned satisfactory, but your cutter was dull and below
center. Please, don’t become a machinist that can never get
a job done correctly because of the equipment on hand.
We’ve seen beautiful parts produced in machine shops on
equipment they wore out 20 years ago; it’s the machinist
that build these parts not the machines!
PARTS DESCRIPTION
NO.
REQ.
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
-2-
PART
NO.
DESCRIPTION
1204 Adjustable Tool Back
1205 8-32 x 3/8" Skt Hd Cap Screw
1206 #8 Washers
1207 9/64" Hex Key
1208 Adjustable Live Center Face
1209 Adjustable Chuck Arbor Face
1210 Adjustable Tool Holder Face
1211 10-32 x 5/16" Skt Hd Cap Screw
1092 Live Center Point
1093 3/8" Bearing
1201,1202,1203
TAILSTOCK SPINDLE
EXTENDER
P/N 1220
A miniature Lathe by its nature and design must fit the
most function into the smallest space. This means that to
turn an 8" long part on a lathe only 15" long, the tailstock
cannot have too much overhang over the table. The Tailstock
Spindle Extender provides this overhang while retaining
the stability of the Tailstock Spindle by not requiring that
it be cranked out to its maximum extension to reach out
over the table.
Certain setups are made much easier by using the Tailstock
Spindle Extender because it adds 1-1/2" to the reach of the
Tailstock Spindle.
By using the extender, a part being held between centers
can be turned from end to end without having to move the
toolpost from one position to another to keep the Crosslide
Saddle from hitting the tailstock. Figure 1 below illustrates
how a piece of tubing held in a 3-Jaw Chuck and a Live
Center can be turned from end to end with one tool post
position.
You will no doubt find other occasions as well where this
simple tool pays for itself many times over in convenience.
LIVE CENTER
LONG PART
HELD IN
3-JAW CHUCK
3-JAW CHUCK
TAILSTOCK SPINDLE
EXTENDER
CROSSLIDE SADDLE
HEADSTOCK
Figure 1
Top view of Lathe with a part held
between centers.
The Spindle Extender moves the Live
Center out an extra 1.5" so the saddle
won't hit the Tailstock when machining from one end of the part to
the other in a single setup.
TAILSTOCK
TOOLPOST WITH
CUTTING TOOL
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
!! !"!
COMPOUND SLIDE
A Compound Slide is used to cut angles or tapers that cannot
be cut by “swinging the headstock”. (See the instruction
manual under the section on taper turning.) The slide has 11/2" of movement. The cutting tool can be held on either side
or across the end of the compound body.
Actual use of the compound is quite straightforward. Use a
properly sharpened tool bit which lines up with the center of
the part being cut as there is no adjustment other than
shimming to raise or lower the tool. The tool is mounted
“upside down” with the cutting tip downward and the
compound is used on the “back” side of the part.
Four T-nuts are provided to hold the base of the compound
to the table for a very secure mount without overtightening.
Make sure the base is mounted square to the table so the laser
engraved angle scale will provide accurate readings.
FIGURE 2—The compound can also be offset to allow cuts
to be taken close to the chuck. It would be more difficult to
hold this piece between centers and cut the taper by
offsetting the headstock as might normally be done. Take
light cuts when the compound overhangs the table like this.
FIGURE 1—Cuting a simple taper with the compound
slide eliminates the need to rotate the headstock.
Designing and manufacturing accessories for miniature
machine tools often requires a different approach, and the
compound slide is a perfect example of this. On a full-size
lathe, the compound would normally be mounted on the
crosslide and left in place. On a lathe the size of the Sherline,
the compound would not only be in the way for many
operations, it would add substantially to the initial purchase
price of the lathe. Mounting the compound to the front part
of the slide limits its movement because of interference with
the crosslide handwheel.
Mounting the compound to the rear of the crosslide not only
eliminated this interference, it created two additional
advantages. First, since cutting work on the “back” side
means the surface of the work is moving “up” past the tool
rather than down, the tool is mounted upside down with the
cutting tip facing downward. This makes the tool less prone
to “chatter”, because if the cut gets too heavy, the tool
is lifted rather than digging in. Secondly, by mounting
the tool only in the upside down position, the slide can
be made stronger because it is no longer necessary to
leave room for the additional 1/4" spacer required to
place the tool at the proper height when using it in the
right side up position. This allows the area under the tool
to be made thicker.
$%
The gib grips the dovetailed base of the compound slide
tool post and controls both side-to-side play and freedom
of movement. If the gib is too tight, the handwheel will
be difficult to turn. If the gib is too loose, the tool post
will have excess side-to-side play. To adjust the gib (see
reference number 7 in the exploded view below), first
loosen all three screws holding it down. (The center
screw is used to lock the base in place, but it must be
loose before the gib can be adjusted.) With one hand,
grip the rotating base and the gib and squeeze the gib firmly
against the dovetail of the slide tool post. While still holding
it, tighten the screws on either end of the gib. Try the
handwheel and see that the slide moves freely. If it is too
tight, loosen the two screws and adjust again, this time not
squeezing quite as hard on the gib. Clean and lubricate the
gib and dovetailed slide with light oil periodically.
!&%
When the base is rotated to the desired angle, lock it in place
by tightening the center screws on the gib and rotating base.
Loosen both screws to rotate the base.When locking the
base, do not overtighten the screws, as the design is quite
efficient and provides a large amount of surface friction area
on the clamp ring. Periodically lubricate the clamp ring and
base with light oil for smooth rotation.
Joe Martin, President and Owner
Sherline Products Inc.
!"#
#$%&'(&%
!"#$
%&'()*++,
!"$
*-.*&/'+0(**+.*'(
*-.*&/&(
*-.*&/&(1(0)
!"#$
*-.*&/203
*-.*&/3,'
$,/4%+5 ,!0'
$,/4%+5 ,!0'61(0)
&..('(')46 !"
*-.*&/'+0')4
*-.*&/'+0')41(0)
*-.*&/*(,(0/23,'
!"7$
/&(
+,-.0/2
LATHE TAILSTOCK
RISER BLOCK
P/N 1292
MILL RISER BLOCK
P/N 1297
LATHE HEADSTOCK
RISER BLOCK AND
RISER TOOL POST
P/N 1291
STEADY REST
RISER BLOCK
P/N 1290
RISER BLOCKS
P/N 1290, 1291, 1292, 1297
The purpose of the riser blocks is to extend the capabilities of
-Lathe and
-Vertical Mill.
the
The lathe was never designed to turn metal parts of the
diameters that can be accommodated with these accessories;
therefore, extreme care must be taken in the form of light cuts
and low RPM when turning large diameters.
Another point to be considered is accuracy. When you start
clamping several pieces together, alignment will suffer. In the
real world of machining, spindles are aligned by indicating,
not with pins or keys. This wouldn’t be the best way for
hobbyists to start, and I believe the methods we use give our
average customer machining capabilities they could never
have without experience. As your projects get more and more
complex, these methods may not be good enough. We
manufacture adjustable tool holders (for more information
read instructions for P/N 1201, 1202, 1203) to help eliminate
some of these problems caused by misalignment. If you
believe alignment could be a problem, machine a piece of
scrap as a test piece to get the machine lined up. Don’t risk a
part you may have a lot of work in.
You may have to use a little ingenuity when turning large
diameters because of the limited crosslide throw on standard
machines. The purpose of the mill riser block (P/N 1297) is
to get the spindle farther out from the column. This allows you
to work farther in from the edge. There isn’t any difference
between the lathe and mill riser block except the lathe P/N
1291 comes with a corresponding tool post.
INSTALLATION
Remove the headstock by loosening the screw that holds it
onto the lathe or mill and lift it straight off. Now install the
riser block using the keyway to align it. Do this by pushing the
riser block back towards the keyway without a twisting
motion. Put the headstock back with or without the keyway
depending on your next machining operation (taper cutting).
It is necessary to remove the handwheel at the end of the bed
to remove the tailstock. Install the Tailstock Riser Block.
You may have a slight problem fitting this up. It is a very
difficult part to make because dovetails can’t be measured or
machined easily. The biggest problem we have encountered
is the “tip” of the dovetail on the lathe bed may interfere with
the riser block. A couple of passes with a file (see figure #1)
should fix it. Riser Blocks made after 11/93 are of a two-piece
design that in most cases eliminates this fitting problem.
FILE CORNER
LIGHTLY
FILE CORNER
LIGHTLY
LATHE BED
Figure 1—Filing corners of bed dovetail for better fit of
Tailstock Riser Block.
When replacing the handwheel try and let the set screw pick
up the same indentation so you don’t “chew up” the end of the
lead screw shaft.
, hope you find these to be useful
We at
accessories.
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
1
1
PART
NO.
1293
1294
1295
1296
1298
1
1
1
1
1
–
1299
1391
1392
4025
4026
4033
1
1
2
1
4054
4066
4069
4073
DESCRIPTION
Tailstock Riser Body
Tailstock Riser Clamp
Headstock Riser Block Body
Spacer Block Tool Post Body
1/4-20 x 3/8" Flat Head Machine Screw
(1291, 1297)
Pivot Pin (1291, 1297)
Steady Rest Riser Body
Steady Rest Riser Clamp
Tee Nut (1291, 1297)
Head Key (1291, 1297)
10-32 x 5/8" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
(1290–1 req., 1292–3 req.)
5/16" -18 x 3/4" Cone Point Set Screw(1291,1297)
3/16" #10 Washer (1290, 1291)
10-32 x 3/4" Skt. Hd Cap Screws (1291)
10-32 x 2" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw (1291)
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
WW COLLET ADAPTER
P/N 2085 (
WW)
P/N 2086 (8MM WW)
The purpose of the WW Collet Adapter is to allow the use
of WW Collets in the Lathe Tailstock. We decided to add
this product to the accessory line based on the requests of
several watchmakers. They have a need to drill very small
holes with the accuracy only a collet can provide. A drill of
only a few thousandths of an inch in diameter is easily
broken if not perfectly centered. To accomplish this level
Lathe, a little extra time must
of accuracy on a
be spent to "perfectly" align the machine. When you
consider the alternative is to spend huge sums of money for
a Jeweler's Lathe that is far less versatile, we think you will
find it is time well spent.
ADJUSTABLE TAILSTOCK
TOOL HOLDER P/N 1203
(Not Included)
WW COLLET
(Not Included)
WW COLLET HOLDER BODY
WW, P/N 2088
8mm WW, P/N 2089
RETAINING RING, P/N 2087
ALIGNING THE HEADSTOCK
The first step is to align the Headstock with the Bed.
Loosen the Headstock and push it back evenly against the
alignment key (located under the headstock) and retighten.
Put a scrap piece of round material about 5/8" (16 mm)
diameter by 3" (76 mm) long in the 3-Jaw Chuck, turn the
outside diameter to round and face the end with a sharp
cutter. Measure the taper that has been cut and eliminate it
by moving the headstock with light taps from a mallet and
taking another test cut until any error is eliminated.
You now must make the choice of whether you want the
headstock to remain removable. A simple way to "lock it
in" is to use LocktiteTM on the keyway. Make sure the
alignment key and keyway are free from oil before aligning
the headstock. After alignment, turn the lathe on end and
place a few drops of thread locking compound into the
keyway. The Headstock can later be loosened by prying
with a screwdriver blade in the slot between the bottom of
the
Headstock and the Lathe Bed when viewed from
the Headstock end.
Another method would be to pin the Headstock to the Bed
with 1/8" dowel pins after alignment. To do this, carefully
remove the Base from the Lathe and drill and ream two 1/
8" holes about 2.5" (63 mm) apart through the bed and into
the Headstock. You must do this without moving the
Headstock on the bed. The Headstock can be removed this
way, although it is a little more difficult than using just the
keyway. When it is reinstalled, however, it should align
closer than with the standard keyway.
(Our personal opinion is that you will give up more than
you gain if you lock down the headstock, as most work can
be accomplished with standard keyway alignment.
However, if the ultimate in accuracy is your goal, the
choice is up to you.)
ALIGNING THE ADJUSTABLE TAILSTOCK
TOOLHOLDER
The Adjustable Tailstock Tool Holder, Part Number 1203,
is designed to allow minute adjustment of the tailstock
center. Complete instructions on how to accomplish this
adjustment are included with that accessory.
With the Headstock in alignment, a dial indicator can be
used to "indicate in" the WW Collet. (See "Use of a Dial
Instruction Guide.)
Indicator" section in the
Another method would be to turn a short length on the end
of the sample stock down to 1/16". Then chuck up a piece
of 1/16" material in a 1/16" WW Collet held in the
Adapter. Bring the ends of the two pieces of material right
up to each other and, using a magnifying glass, align the
ends by eye.
WW
The Collet Adapter comes in two sizes:
and 8mm. The difference between them is .002" diameter
WW is
on the barrel part of the Collet. The
.313" diameter and the 8 mm is .315" diameter.
We believe micromachinists and watchmakers will find
this accessory to be most useful. By using this simple tool
and a little time, you can duplicate the accuracy of a
machine costing many times more, yet still retain the great
versatility offered by your
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
Lathe.
CLOCKMAKER'S ARBORS
Arbors P/N 2090 through 2093
Gearcutting Arbors P/N 2094 through 2096
These arbors are not designed to be used on
lathes, but rather are specifically suited to the types of
lathes often used by jewelers and watchmakers. Though
highly accurate, these machines are often not very versatile.
The 3/4"-16 Arbors provide a way to mount a
3-Jaw or 4-Jaw Chuck to this type of lathe. The 3/8"-24
Arbors allow a 1/4" or 3/8" Drill Chuck to be mounted.The
ability to mount these chucks adds a great deal of versatility
to this type of special purpose tool. The P/N 2094
Gearcutting Arbor with its #1 Morse taper can be used on
Lathe. With use of a P/N 1156 8mm
your
Adapter, either of the 8mm Arbors can also be used on
lathes, although the normal system for
mounting chucks is recommended.
CLOCKMAKER'S ARBORS
P/N 2090
Clockmaker's Arbor
8mm to 3/4"-16
P/N 2091
Clockmaker's Arbor
10mm "D" to 3/4"-16
P/N 2092
Clockmaker's Arbor
8mm to 3/8"-24
P/N 2093
Clockmaker's Arbor
10mm "D" to 3/8"-24
CLOCKMAKER'S GEARCUTTING ARBORS
P/N 2094
Clockmaker's
Gearcutting Arbor
7mm to Morse #1 taper
P/N 2095
Clockmaker's
Gearcutting Arbor
7mm to 10mm "D"
Collet
P/N 2096
Clockmaker's
Gearcutting Arbor
7mm to 8mm WW
Collet
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
W.R
-R
est
.R.. Smith T
T-R
-Rest
P/N 2110
The Purpose of a T
-R
est
T-R
-Rest
This T-Rest was designed by world renowned watch and
clock maker William R. Smith. The only change we made
was to eliminate locking levers from the post and pedestal
base and replace them with 10-32 screws for production
reasons. The same 5/32" hex key that comes with your
lathe can be used to adjust them.
The T-Rest is used to support a metal cutting tool called a
"graver" which is hand held rather than held in a toolpost
like a conventional lathe tool. This is a traditional method
of cutting metal shapes that has long been used by watch
and clock makers. It is also used by some instrument
makers, modelmakers and machinists.
Because the tool is hand held, there is more "feel" for the
cut that is being made. Certain shapes like ball ends, curves
and special notches or ridges which would be difficult to
make with conventional tools can be done quickly and
easily with this technique. It can yield very precise results
in the hands of one skilled in this technique; however, a
certain amount of practice may be required for a beginner
to turn precise parts using this method. For more
information on making gravers and how to use them, click
here to go an article by William R. Smith on gravers.
Precautions for Hand T
urning
Turning
Do not use this tool on parts held in a 3-jaw or 4-jaw chuck.
A graver which inadvertantly hits a spinning chuck jaw
could be dangerous. Hold parts in a collet for hand turning.
Because the tool is hand held, it cannot be held as securely
as a tool held in a toolpost, so use it with appropriate
caution. The cutting angle, sharpness of the tool, position
of the tool point and feed rate of the tool are all critical to
how it cuts. In a nutshell, when the angles are right, the
FIGURE 1—The T-Rest
is set close up to the
work so that the overhang of the tool is
minimal. This gives you
better leverage on the
tool should it dig into
the part. (Tool is shown
being used on its side.)
tool cuts. When they're not, it doesn't. Experiment as you
find the best combination and get a feel for the process.
Turning Speeds and T
ool Angles
Tool
Mr. Smith suggests a turning speed of about 250-500 RPM
for turning a small diameter steel shaft. The speeds listed
in speed tables for conventional lathe cutting tools do not
really apply to cutting with gravers. The basic machining
rule does still apply, however and that is:
"If the tool chatters, reduce speed and increase feed."
Rest the tool shank on the T-Rest with the point of the
tool on the top side. (See Figure 2.) Slide it along on the
bottom pointed edge, holding the tool in one of the grips
shown in the graver instruction sheet. The tool can be
rotated and pivoted to be used in any number of ways to
achieve the type of cut you desire. The tool should be raked
downwards at the handle end about 5° to 7° for cutting
hard steels. For softer materials like brass, the rake angle
can be reduced to near 0° to keep the tool from biting too
deeply into the softer metal.
The angle of entry of the tool into the part varies. Start at
about the part centerline and move the tool up or down
slightly varying the angle until you find a position where
it cuts best. You can pivot the tool left and right using
pressure from your finger to swing an arc to cut a radius.
As the leading edge of the tool bites in, the heel rubs on
the part keeping the tool from digging too deeply. Using
this method you can achieve very subtle control of your
cut.
I suggest you "break" three of the sharp edges of your
graver slightly with a stone so they slide smoothly on the
top of the T-Rest. If the edges are left sharp they will bite
in rather than slide. Mr. Smith gave me a "crash course"
Leave this
edge sharp
Tool used “on edge” and
pivated to cut a radius. Tool
can also be used flat on its
side to make long,
consistant cuts much like a
conventional lathe cutting
tool.
(See Figure 1)
“Break” these three edges
slightly with a stone so
they slide easily on T-Rest.
FIGURE 2—Metal peels from the edge of the tool when
you find the right cutting angle.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
EXPLODED VIEW
on using gravers at his home in Tennesssee, but I still don't
feel I have the expertise to write complete instructions for
their use. Mr. Smith has kindly given permission to use
his instructions on making gravers which are included
along with this sheet. He is a superb craftsman and
gentleman and we appreciate the opportunity of working
with him on this project.
Where to Get More Information
If you are new to the technique of hand turning metal, I
suggest you get more information from Mr. Smith or other
experts in the horological field. He has published several
books and videos that show or describe the techniques
required. He may be reached by calling (423) 947-9671.
You may write him at: William R. Smith, 7936 Camberley
Drive, Powell, Tennessee 37849. His E-mail address is:
wrsmith2@aol.com.
If you are going to be making the precise parts required in
clocks, models and instruments, you will find that the
lathe along with the T-Rest will yield results
equal to those you would obtain on special jeweler's lathes
costing many times more.
REPLA
CEMENT P
ARTS LIST
REPLACEMENT
PARTS
NOTE: The small brass cylinder (Part Ref.No. 2 in
Exploded View above) is inside the hole in the side of the
T-Rest Pedestal (Ref.No. 11). It is tightened against the
shaft of the T-Rest and its soft material prevents damage
to the shaft. If the T-Rest is raised too high in its hole, the
brass cylinder can be pushed into the shaft hole, pre-venting
the shaft from being pushed back down. If this occurs,
remove the T-Rest and use a small screwdriver blade to
push the cylinder back into its hole from inside the shaft
hole. Then reinsert the T-Rest, adjust to proper height and
retighten the locking screw (Ref.No. 3).
-2-
REF
NO.
PART
NO.
NO.
REQ.
1
2
3
2120
2123
2127
1
1
1
4
5
6
2111
2115
2125
1
1
1
7
8
2116
2126
1
1
9
10
2114
6111
1
1
11
12
13
14
15
2117
2121
4051
2130
2112
1
1
2
1
1
DESCRIPTION
T-Rest
Brass spacer 5/32” O:D:x 3/16”
T-Rest Lock Screw
10-32 x 3/16” Skt. Hd Screw
T-Rest Pedestial Base
T-Rest Saddle Body
Cam Pivot Screw(Custom)
10-32 x 5/32” Skt. Hd. Screw
Cam Follower
Cam Mounting Screw
10-32 x 11/16” Skt. Hd. Screw
Hold Down Washer
Pedestial Hold Dawn Screw
1/4-20 x 5/8” Button Hd Screw
T-Rest Pedestial
Dovetail Block
10-32 x 3/8” Skt Hd Screw
Cam and Lever Arm
Cam Spacer Sleeve
2110
RADIUS CUTTING
ATTACHMENT
P/N 2200
Use of the radius cutting attachment
The radius cutting attachment allows you to put an accurate
convex or concave shape on a part with a Sherline lathe.
Unlike conventional radius cutting attachments that swing
the cutting tool parallel to the lathe table, the Sherline tool
moves from the center of the part to the top. The idea came
from the method toolmakers use to dress (shape) a radius on
a grinding wheel with a diamond tool. A ball can also be cut
using a two-part process described later in these instructions.
Diameters up to 1-1/2" can be cut. A handle is provided that
can be used on operations where the tool faces the long end
of the “U” shaped cutter body. On operations where the tool
faces the other way the handle is not used.
Center height reference numbers
You will notice numbers engraved on the side of each
support. These represent the actual distance from the table
to the center of the pivot pin for purposes of calculating the
center of your radius. The theoretical distance should be
.940", but because there is minor variation in that distance
due to production tolerances, so each one is measured and
the exact distance for that unit is engraved on the side.
Using the stop screw to avoid cutting past center
It is important to note that the cutting edge of the tool is set
to cut with the lathe turning in a particular direction depending
on which half you are cutting (top or bottom). As the tool
passes the centerline the tool cutting edge still faces the same
way, but now the work is rotating in the opposite direction.
This causes the tool to “drag”. To keep this from happening,
a stop screw is provided that will work in most setups. By
adjusting the stop screw to hit the table when the radius
cutter is at the center position, the tool can be prevented from
accidentally dragging on the work. By the same token,
always note the direction of rotation and make sure the
cutting tool is facing in the proper direction to make your
desired cut.
Setting up the tool to cut a convex radius or ball end
The most common application of a radius cutter is to put a
radius or ball end on the end of a part. The points of the
radius cutter are accurately located on the centerline of the
part. (See paragraph above on engraved center height
reference numbers.) This makes setting the cutting tool to
the proper radius a simple process. Here’s how it is done:
1. Mount the two uprights in the table T-slot closest to the
spindle. Pick out the center holes that will give you the best
location for the cutting tip of your cutting tool. This is
dependent on the final diameter of the ball. The center holes
are accurately drilled on .250" centers and only a rough
location is needed at this time.
ADJUST TOOL HEIGHT
PART
CENTER CUTTING EDGE OF
TOOL ON PART CENTERLINE
LEFT TO RIGHT
FIGURE 1—Setting the tool depth to cut a full radius on a
part already at finished diameter. Adjust the tool until it
just touches the top of the part. (Pivot supports not shown.)
2. The quickest way to set a cutting tool is by first turning
a finial diameter (twice the radius) on the part you are going
to work on with a standard lathe tool before mounting the
radius attachment. If the part is already turned to the finished
diameter and you wish a full radius on the end, simply raise
the yoke to the vertical position and lower the tool until it just
touches the top of the part. (See Figure 1.) This will establish
the proper radius. It would be safest to set the tool to a
slightly larger radius just to be safe and then “sneak up” to
the final dimension once most of the material is removed and
you can see how close the final cuts are coming to your
desired radius. Move the radius cutter away from the end of
9/7/99, Page 1 of 4
the part with the leadscrew. Rotate the tool (assembly) and
move the saddle towards the part until the tool is in a position
to take a light cut (approximately 0.020") on the top corner.
The first series of cuts are accomplished by rotating the tool
up and back. Then move the saddle and radius attachment
about 0.020" closer. As you get down to the final cuts you
will be able to see which way you are off and make final
adjustments with the crosslide handwheel to finish up exactly
on center to cut the full radius.
DISTANCE TOOL IS
ADVANCED
UNDERCUT (material
removed in first cut)
TOOL
FIGURE 2—The area
in black illustrates why
you don't want to cut
past top dead center
until you know you are
at final size.
The tool can also be set for cutting a small concave shape
using this method only the radius would be SUBTRACTED
from the 0.940" dimension rather than added for obvious
reasons. (See Figure 4.)
FIGURE 4—
Setting up a gage
PART
PIVOT POINT
block for a small
concave radius. In
this example, a
.75" radius is cut.
.75"
GAGE BLOCK
.19"
To cut a large concave radius, a height gage can be used to
set the tool height. The height gage is set to .940" PLUS the
desired radius as seen in Figure 5 below.
HEIGHT GAGE
3. Remember that the tool will cut the full amount it has been
advanced at the center but will not reduce the diameter at the
top and bottom of the part. (See Figure 2 above.) If you move
the tool past the top dead center before the tool is cutting at
its final position you will undercut the opposite side of the
ball. This makes it wise to stay back 10° or so from top dead
center until the tool has reached its final position. This
creates a “damned if you do and damned if you don’t”
problem. If you don’t cut over the top you can’t accurately
check the diameter of the ball, and if you do you may scrap
out your part. The easiest way out of this situation is to set
up on a scrap piece and get the tool set. The radius remains
set even if the attachment is removed and replaced on the
lathe as long as the tool isn’t moved in the radius cutter body.
4. Another way to set the tool would be to accurately cut or
mill a gage block to a dimension that is the center height of
the part over the table (.940" or the amount engraved on the
attachment) PLUS the desired radius of the part. Set this
gage block on the table and move your tool down to just
touch the top of it with the attachment in the vertical
position. (See Figure 3.)
ADJUST TOOL TO
LIGHTLY TOUCH
TOP OF BLOCK
DESIRED RADIUS
SPINDLE CENTERLINE
GAGE BLOCK
.940" (OR YOUR
SUPPORT BLOCK DIM.)
FIGURE 3—Using a gage block to set the tool height for
a convex radius. You can use this method when the material
has not been turned to the final size of the ball end.
.940" (or your gage's
calibrated dimension)
PART
PIVOT
POINT
1.5"
2.44"
.940"
FIGURE 5—
Using a height
gage to set up a
large concave
radius.In this
example, a 1.5"
radius is cut.
Correcting for an incomplete radius cut
When cutting a full ball end, if your first attempt measures
undersize, you will have to scrap out the part and start over.
That is why I suggest you start with what you know will be
a slightly oversize cut. Once you are near the final size, here
is how to adjust the cutting tool depth to get the exact size:
1. Measure the diameter of the ball you have cut. You can’t
reset the tool until you know the diameter it is actually
cutting.
2. If, for example, the ball is 0.010" oversize, the tool must
be moved in the cutter body 0.005" (half the desired distance)
closer to the part. To do this, first record the leadscrew
handwheel setting with the backlash taken up in the cclockwise
direction and the tool touching the end of the center of the
part. This should be done right after your last cut was made
so you know the tool is just touching the part.* Now use the
leadscrew handwheel to back the saddle/radius cutter
assembly up more than the correction needed. Turn the
handwheel clockwise again with the difference calculated
in. The tool should now be .005" from the part. Loosen the
set screws holding the tool in the body and move the tool until
it just touches the part*. Tighten the set screws and make
your final cut.
*NOTE: Whenever you move a tool up to touch a part to set
its position, don't push it into the part. Make sure it barely
touches. Pushing a tool into a part will cause it to take an
extra couple of thousandths off on the next cut, and your part
will come out undersize.
Cutting a concave radius
Full convex radii are easy to measure because you can use
a caliper or micrometer. A concave radius is more difficult
P/N 2200, Page 2 of 4
to measure. It is better to spend the time accurately clamping
the tool using a height gage than trying to check your radius
with a template you can’t view accurately. Some things in
machining have to be controlled with the setup rather than
with an inspection method and this is one of them. Concaves
up to about a 3" radius can be cut. (See Figures 4 and 5.)
Remember that when the cutting tool is extended a long way
from the support of the yoke, it can be more difficult to
control. Lighter cuts must be taken to achieve a good finish
and accurate size but the tool should be controlled in a
positive manner. Don’t let the tool set on the part without
cutting. Use the various pivot holes to try to keep the point
of the tool as close to the yoke as possible to maximize the
rigidity of your setup.
When cutting a concave radius you will use the holes nearer
the center or short end of the yoke. For smaller radii, the
cutting tool points into the “U” of the yoke. For larger radii
the tool can be reversed and pointed toward the outside of the
“U”. In deciding which center hole to use it will help you to
know that the center pivot hole is centered on the inside
surface of the “U” and that the pivot holes are located on
.250" centers.
Here is a simple formula that can also be useful when
working with concave shapes:
r =
c2 + 4h2
8h
where r = radius, c = diameter of pocket and h = height (depth
of pocket)
h
RADIUS
and epoxied to it. After the epoxy has hardened the ball can
be completed with light cuts. Once finished, the ball is
broken off the mandrel. By measuring the part with the anvil
of the micrometer on the previously machined surface and
the spindle of the micrometer on the surface you just
machined the completed dimension should be equal to the
diameter. A ball should always measure the same in any
direction.
MANDREL
PART OFF
A
B
EPOXY TO
MANDREL
C
FINAL CUTS
MEASURE
D
FIGURE 7—Cutting a complete ball using epoxy to attach
the ball to a mandrel to complete the second half of the ball.
A) Turn a little more than half the ball. B) Part off the piece
leaving enough to complete the ball. C) Epoxy the piece
into a mandrel with a tapered depression. D) Complete the
ball using light cuts. Measure across the first and second
turned portions of the ball to confirm the diameter.
Another method would be to center drill, drill and tap a hole
in the end of the half-completed ball. Using a cutoff tool, part
off the piece from the stock leaving sufficient material to
complete the ball. Make a mandrel with a threaded stud
centered on the end and screw your part onto it. Place the
mandrel in the chuck and use the radius cutting setup you
used to make the first half to complete the rest of the ball.
FIGURE 8—Using a threaded stud in the mandrel to hold
c (Diameter at pocket)
FIGURE 6—Measure the diameter of your pocket to obtain
dimension "c". Then measure the depth of your cut with a
depth micrometer or with the depth rod of your caliper
against a straight edge to obtain dimension "h". You now
have the dimensions you need to accurately calculate the
radius you have cut. The radius can be calculated to the
same level of accuracy as your measuring technique.
Making a complete ball
Using the radius cutter you can cut past the vertical point to
make more than a half of a circle. However, because the
cutter body will eventually hit the chuck, steady rest or some
other part of your setup, you cannot cut a complete ball.
(This is a problem for conventional horizontal-swing radius
cutters too.) You can still make a complete ball using this
tool, but you will have to do it in two steps.
First, turn half or a little more than half of the ball to the final
radius and cut it off leaving enough material to form the
opposite side. Make a mandrel with a diameter about 2/3 of
the final diameter of the ball. Cut an angle into the face that
will allow the completed half to be centered on the mandrel
A
B
C
D
the ball for the second operation. A) Center drill the end
and tap hole, then turn first half of ball. B) Part off. C)
Attach part to threaded stud in mandrel. D) Turn final half
of ball using light cuts and measure to confirm diameter.
The radius cutting attachment further extends the capabilities
of your Sherline machine shop. With it you can apply a
professional touch to your parts that would be difficult or
impossible any other way. Though I have shown just a few
examples here, I think you will find that, with a little
imagination, there are many more ways it can be used.
—Joe Martin, President and owner
Sherline Products Inc.
P/N 2200, Page 3 of 4
EXPLODED VIEW
31080
22130
22100
35620
42060
31080
11941
22111
31080
35620
32100
22120
30561
40690
31080
22110
30561
PART NUMBERS AND DESCRIPTION
PART
NO
NO
REQ
11941
22100
22110
22111
22120
22130
30561
31080
32100
35620
40690
42060
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
6
1
2
1
1
DESCRIPTION
1/4" Cutting tool
Radius cutter body
Radius cutter support (Left)
Radius cuter support (Right)
Radius cutter pivot pin
10-32 x 1" button head socket screw
10-32 T-nut
10-32 x 3/8" cone point set screw
10-32 hex nut
10-32 x 7/16" SHCS
10-32 x 3/4" SHCS
Plastic handwheel handle
FIGURE 9—The radius cutter shown in use cutting a ball
end on stock supported in a 3-jaw chuck.
P/N 2200, Page 4 of 4
9/7/99
TOOLPOST
Optional P/N 2295 carbide insert holder.
1/4" CUTTING TOOL HOLDER
(P/N 2280)
CUTOFF TOOL HOLDER
(P/N 2290)
QUICK-CHANGE TOOLPOST
AND TOOL HOLDERS
3/8" BORING TOOL HOLDER (P/N 2285)
Purpose of the the quick-change toolpost
In a modern production machine shop, time is money, so
being able to change tools quickly on a lathe becomes an
economic necessity. Years ago a dovetailed holder and cam
locking arragement was developed to make it possible to
quickly change tools while leaving the body of the toolholder
mounted to the table. For most users of tabletop size
machine tools, however, the economic factor is not the prime
reason for going to a quick-change tool system. Being able
to change tools quickly simply means more time is spent
doing the productive part of the job, and less time is wasted
changing tools. The Sherline P/N 2250 quick-change set
includes the toolpost and three holders: the P/N 2280 1/4"
tool bit holder, the P/N 2285 3/8" boring tool holder and the
P/N 2285 cutoff tool holder. An optional holder for inserted
tip carbide tools is available as P/N 2295.
Construction of the quick-change
toolpost and holders
The toolpost body and holders are machined from steel, case
hardened and coated with a black oxide finish. This provides
a very durable product that should provide generations of
service if cared for. Two dovetails are provided on the
toolpost so holders can be mounted in a choice of postions.
The individual holders are locked in place with a cam against
a dovetailed slide that is tightened using the same hex key
used for many other Sherline operations.
Mounting the toolpost and changing holders
The toolpost is mounted to the lathe table using the same
T-nut arrangement as the standard Sherline toolpost. A
secondary clamp is also provided and may be used to insure
the toolpost doesn't move. The horizontal flange of the angle
clamp goes in the groove around the base of the toolpost. The
tool holder is then slipped over the appropriate dovetail on
the toolpost. The height of the tool tip is adjusted using the
knurled handwheel. The cutting tip of the tool should be set
to the centerline of the lathe by bringing the tool tip up to a
Morse dead center in either the headstock or tailstock
spindle. Once the height is set, lock the knurled wheel in
P/N 2250 (And optional P/N 2295)
PART
CLAMP
A
B
C
FIGURE 1—The 1/4" cutting tool can be mounted in either
position. Figure A shows the positon for cutting and Figure
B shows the position for facing. Figure C shows the boring
tool positioned to bore the end of a piece of stock.
position with the hex nut. The holder can now be removed
and replaced and the tool will remain at the proper height.
The boring tool holder
The boring tool holder will accept any boring tool with a 3/
8" shank. This includes the 3/8" boring tools (P/N 3061and
3063) used with the P/N 3054 Sherline boring head. A
variety of boring tool sets are available that would also fit the
holder. These can be obtained from independent tool supply
companies. It is a good idea to grind a small flat for the
clamping screw to locate on. It isn’t necessary to clamp all
four screws to hold the tool. One or two will be sufficient.
The additional screws are there to clamp a tool when the
holder is used on the other dovetail.
Using a parting tool
After completing a part in the lathe it is frequently necessary
to separate the part from the excess material used for
chucking. This operation is best accomplished with the use
of a cut-off tool or “parting tool” as it is sometimes called.
The Sherline cut-off tool holder utilizes a very slender high
speed tool steel cutting blade.The thinness of the Sherline
blade (.040") enables it to feed into the part quite easily and
at the same time minimizes the amount of waste material. If
SHERLINE PRODUCTS INC. 3235 Executive Ridge Vista California 92083-8527
Toll Free Order Line: (800) 541-0735 International/Local/Tech. Assistance: (760) 727-5857
FAX: (760) 727-7857
Internet: www.sherline.com
FIGURE 2—The cutoff tool or
“parting” tool is held as shown. The
height of the cutting tip of the blade
should be adjusted using the height
adjustment wheel until it is exactly
on center with the spindle.
you use a non-Sherline blade, it is recommended that the
blade be no wider than 1/16" when used in this holder. The
turning speed for parting should be approximately one-half
the normal turning speed for any given material. One word
of caution; never use a parting tool on a part mounted
between centers. The part may bind on the cutter and result
in a scrapped part or a broken cutting tool.
Always try to lay work out so the cut-off tool is used as close
to the spindle as possible. Set blade height using the adjustment
wheel on the toolholder. It should be set so the tip is aligned
with the centerline of the part being cut.
NOTE: ALWAYS USE CUTTING OIL WHEN USING
THE CUT-OFF TOOL. The cut will be made much
smoother, easier and cooler.
Speed should be slower than normal turning speed and feed
rate should be a little heavy so the chip will not break up in
the slot. If speed and feed are correct, there will not be any
chatter, and the chip will come out as if it were being unrolled
from a spool. Coolant (cutting oil) plays a major roll in this
occurring properly.
If the tool chatters, first check to see if the work is being held
properly. Then decrease speed (RPM) or increase feed rate
or both. Once the blade has chattered, it leaves a serrated
finish which causes more chatter. Sometimes a serrated
finish can be eliminated by turning the spindle off, adding a
liberal amount of cutting oil, bringing the blade up so there
is a slight pressure on it without the spindle turning, and then
turning by hand or as slowly as possible with the speed
control to remove the chatter marks.
If you are sharpening the blade to “part off”, the blade
should have an additional angle of approximately 5° when
viewed from the top with the point on the right. (See Figure
4.) Normally the angle would be as high as 15° but the .040"
thickness of the blade would not be rigid enough and the
blade could bend. If you want to cut grooves, don't put any
angle on the blade when seen from the top.
If the cutting edges on the sides get dull, grind off the end of
the blade until you get into new material where the edges are
sharp to the cutting end. New blades are available as P/N
3086 from Sherline Products for $15.00.
Care of your toolpost and holders
The case hardened and black oxide-finished steel components
are very tough, but the corners and dovetail edges can be
chipped if dropped or banged together. They should be
protected from each other in your tool drawer. Because they
are steel, they should also be protected with a light coating
of rust preventative before putting them away.
Cutting tools available
Cutting tools are available from Sherline for the holders as
follows:
• 1/4" cutting tool blank (P/N 3005) or a package of five
blank 1/4" tools (P/N 3005B)
• 1/4" brazed tip carbide cutting tool set of 3 tools: left, right
and 60° threading (P/N 3006)
• 1/4" pre-sharpened HSS cutting tool set of 3 tools: left,
right and boring tool (P/N 3007)
• Cutoff tool blade ( P/N 3086)
• 3/8" diameter boring tool holder that takes 55° inserted
carbide tips (P/N 7635) or 3/8" diameter boring tool holder
that takes 80° carbide inserts (P/N 7638)
—Joe Martin, President and Owner
SHERLINE Products
Sharpening Instructions
To sharpen the blade, set the tool support on the grinder in
such a way that it will produce a 7° to 10° angle on the blade
(top to bottom). (See Figure 3.)
FIGURE 3—Side view of
blade.
SIDE VIEW
7° to 10°
FIGURE 4—Top view of 5°
blade (enlarged) when
ground for "parting off".
TOP VIEW
Using the optional P/N 2295
inserted tip carbide cutting tool holder
For those who wish to take advantage of thesuperior cutting
ability of carbide cutting tools, Sherline offers a tool holder
for 55° inserted carbide tips. The P/N 2295 holder comes
with one carbide insert which has 2 cutting edges. It is held
in place with a small screw. A special Torx wrench to tighten
the screw is also included. Like the P/N 2250 toolpost and
three dovetailed holders, the inserted tip holder is
manufactured from steel, case hardened and given a black
oxide finish.
P/N 2250 Pg. 2 0f 3
Replacement carbide inserts
Replacement inserts for this holder are available from
Sherline as well as from several other tool manufacturers.
Sherline's replacement number for a single carbide tip is
P/N 7605. They are also available in a box of ten as P/N
7605B.
FIGURE 5—The inserted tip
holder can be used for
cutting as shown or for
facing as shown in figure 1B
on the first page.
Riser block available
When using the quick-change tool post with the riser blocks
in place on the lathe, a 1.25" riser block is now available.
Ask for P/N 2251.
16
P/N 2295
EXPLODED VIEW
14
5
6
11
18
8
17
13
15
2
2255
13
21
12
7605
10
P/N 22580 T7 Torx key
also included with P/N 2295
1
9
22
3
23
19
5
4
20
7
6
QUICK-CHANGE TOOLPOST PARTS LIST
REF NO.
NO. REQ.
PART
NO.
DESCRIPTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
22510
22520
22530
22600
22620
22630
22650
22680
22700
22710
32100
40510
Toolpost body
Left hand cam
Right hand cam
1/4" tool bit holder
Cam spring pin
.120" x 7/16" springs
3/8" boring tool holder
Knurled height adjustment nut
Cutoff tool holder body
Cutoff tool holder clamp
10-32 hex nut
10-32 x 3/8" SHCS
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
3
4
REF NO.
NO. REQ.
PART
NO.
DESCRIPTION
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
40670
40340
22560
22570
40660
40540
40250
30860
40330
35580
30560
10-32 x 1/2" SHCS
10-32 x 1" SHCS
10-32 x 1" cone point set screw
4-40 x 1/4" SHCS
3/16" I.D. washer
5/16" x 3/4" cone point set screw
Extended toolpost T-nut
Cutoff tool blade (sold separately)
10-32 x 5/8" SHCS
Hold-down clamp
10-32 T-nut
7
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
P/N 2250 Pg. 3 0f 3
POWER FEED
P/N 3001 (120V
.)— P/N 3011 (240V
.)
(120V.)—
(240V.)
Reducing the diameter of a long shaft or a long part can be
a tedious task requiring a lot of turning on the feedscrew.
Obtaining a good finish on such a part requires slow, steady
movement on the cutting tool, something hard to achieve
Power
when feeding the tool by hand. The
Feed was developed to eliminate this problem. A clutch
mechanism permits quick disengagement of the motor so
that you can hand feed the cutter whenever you desire. The
power feed is from right to left at a constant (non-adjustable)
speed of approximately 1.00 inches per minute. This speed
was carefully selected and is appropriate for virtually all
jobs you might want to do, making an expensive variable
speed control unnecessary.
It is important to realize that the feed is an independent
drive with a constant speed; whereas the spindle speed can
vary. If spindle R.P.M. lowers, the cut becomes heavier,
which in turn lowers spindle R.P.M. even more. As you can
see, the end result could bind up the machine and bring it
to a stop. Always bear this in mind when using this unit. If
spindle speed starts dropping from too heavy a cut, disengage the feed drive first, then either take a lighter cut
(approximately .015" in aluminum) or speed up the motor.
MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS
1. Remove the headstock, the flat head socket screw
under the headstock, and the socket head cap screw
under the base.
2. Grease the shaft with flats on both ends (P/N 1509) and
slide shaft into the protruding lead screw support tube
situated directly below the main spindle pulley. Ensure
end with small flat enters first. Now slide shaft with a
single flat (P/N 1543) into the lead screw support tube.
To guarantee that the shaft is "home", turn shaft one or
two revolutions while applying gentle inward pressure
to end of shaft. (See Figure 1.)
FIGURE 1—Lead Screw engagement
shafts in place inside Lead Screw
Support Tube.
3. Replace screws removed in Step 1, making sure that
point of screw goes into machined groove, and check
that shaft from Step 2 is free to rotate.
4. Pull out black plug button (below nameplate) on side of
lathe and slide shaft of Engagement Lever (P/N 1542)
into hole, handle facing upward. It may be necessary to
rotate shaft about 30° backwards and forwards to get it
to engage properly.
5. Engage shaft of Power Feed unit and mount with bolts
or sheet metal screws to same base as Lathe so shafts line
up.
FIGURE 2—Power Feed
installed on base.
NOTE: If insertion or movement of the Engagement Lever
is difficult, try loosening the two screws on the bottom
of the machine that hold the bed to the base. Move
the bed slightly until a good fit occurs.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
POWER FEED PARTS LIST
NO. PART
REQ. NO.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1509
1541
1542
1543
4051
4052
4509
4510
4511
4512
4513
4514
4063
4064
4521
4525
DESCRIPTION
Sliding Shaft
"O" Ring
Engagement Lever
Fixed Shaft
Skt Hd Cap Screws, 10-32 x 3/8"
Cup Pt Set Screw, 10-32 x 3/16"
Sheet Metal Screw, #4 x 1/4"
Power Feed Bracket
Power Feed Cord w/Switch (U.S.A.)*
Power Feed Motor Case
Power Feed Motor (110V.)
Power Feed Coupler
Power Cord (U.K.)*
Power Cord (Europe)*
Rotary On/Off Switch (240V.)*
Power Feed Motor (240V.)
*NOTE: U.S. models (P/N 3001) come with a rocker type
on/off switch on the power cord, while U.K. and European
models (P/N 3011) come with a toggle type on/off switch
mounted on the side of the motor case.
-2-
3001/3011
CUT-OFF TOOL AND HOLDER
P/N 3002
After completing a part in the lathe it is frequently necessary
to separate the part from the excess material used for
chucking. This operation is best accomplished with the use
of a cut-off tool or "parting tool" as it is sometimes called.
Cut-off Tool and Holder consists of a very
The
slender high speed tool steel cutting blade mounted in a
special tool holder. The thinness of the blade (.040")
enables it to feed into the part quite easily and at the same
time minimizes the amount of waste material. The turning
speed for parting should be approximately one half the
normal turning speed for any given material. One word of
caution; never use a parting tool on a part mounted between
centers. The part may bind on the cutter and result in a
scrapped part or a broken cutting tool.
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
Always try to lay work out so the cut-off tool is used as
close to the spindle as possible. Set blade height by sliding
the blade in its slot in the tool holder. It should be set so the
tip is aligned with the centerline of the part being cut. An
unusual diameter may require a shim to be placed under the
front or rear of the holder to accomplish this.
NOTE: ALWAYS USE CUTTING OIL WHEN
USING THE CUT-OFF TOOL. The cut will be made
much smoother, easier and cooler.
Speed should be slower than normal turning speed and feed
rate should be a little heavy so the chip will not break up in
the slot. If speed and feed are correct, there will not be any
chatter, and the chip will come out as if it were being
unrolled. Coolant (cutting oil) plays a major roll in this
occurring properly.
If the tool chatters, first check to see if the work is being
held properly. Then decrease speed (RPM) or increase feed
rate or both. Once the blade has chattered, it leaves a
serrated finish which causes more chatter. Sometimes a
serrated finish can be eliminated by turning the spindle off,
adding a liberal amount of cutting oil, bringing the blade up
so there is a slight pressure on it without the spindle
turning, and then turning by hand or as slowly as possible
with the speed control.
SHARPENING INSTRUCTIONS
To sharpen the blade, use the tool support on the grinder set
in such a way that it will produce a 7° to 10° angle on the
blade (top to bottom). (See Figure 1.)
FIGURE 1-- Side view of
blade
SIDE VIEW
7° to 10°
FIGURE 2-- Top view of
blade (enlarged) when
ground for "parting off"
5°
TOP VIEW
If you are sharpening the blade to "part off", the blade
should have an additional angle of approximately 5° when
viewed from the top with the point on the right (See Figure
2). Normally the angle would be as high as 15° but the .040"
thickness of the blade would not be rigid enough and the
blade could bend. If you want to cut grooves, don't put any
angle on the blade when seen from the top.
If the cutting edges on the sides get dull, grind off the end
of the blade until you get into new material where the edges
are sharp to the cutting end. New blades can be
purchased as Part Number 3086 and are available
from
.
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
1
1
2
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
PART
NO.
DESCRIPTION
3085 Cut-Off Tool Holder
3086 Cut-Off Tool Blade
4025 Tee Nut
4066 3/16" Washer
4071 10-32 x 1-1/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
4074 10-32 x 7/8" Skt. Hd. Cap Screws
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
KNURLING TOOL AND HOLDER
P/N 3004
The knurling holder from manfred heindl is designed to be
lathe. The largest diameter
used only with the
that can be knurled is 1" (25.4 mm) and the smallest
diameter is somewhat dependent on the pitch on the knurl.
The higher the number of teeth per inch (TPI) the finer the
knurl will be and the smaller the diameter that can be
knurled.
includes a set of basic knurls (25 TPI)
that will produce a medium diamond knurled pattern. This
set is a left and right pair with a 30 degree helix with each
tool forming 1/2 of the diamond pattern.
A good knurl is produced by embossing; therefore, a
correct starting diameter on the work to be knurled can best
be determined by trial and error on a scrap piece of similar
material. When knurls are forming they should be
considered similar to one gear meshing with another.
Think what would happen if you tried to mesh a 25 tooth
gear with a gear that had 62 and 1/2 teeth. This is in effect
what happens if the initial diameter is wrong causing the
tools to take a second path every other revolution. This
produces an undesirable finish.
The good part is that knurls have an amazing tolerance for
wrong diameters when working with soft materials, and
you will have better than an 70% chance of success on any
given diameter.
Hard materials such as stainless and hardened tool steels
will have short tool (knurls) life. Never attempt to knurl
hardened material, such as piano wire.
The knurling holder is designed to mount directly to the
crosslide’s tee slot groove. The tee nuts that run in the
groove should only be tightened enough to eliminate
“play”, but not so tight as to keep the holder from moving
freely in the groove. This allows the holder to self center
on the part to be knurled. (We recommend using aluminum for your first practice knurl, approximately 1/2").
The part to be knurled or experimental part should be
running true with a chamfered corner at the end of the
knurled section. Adjust the top and bottom clamping bolts
so the knurls are lightly touching the part without the spindle
turning. The knurls should be located at the beginning of the
section to be knurled. Apply a liberal amount of cutting oil
to the knurls and have the spindle run at a slow speed
(approximately 500 RPM for 1/2" diameter of soft material).
Now start tightening the top and bottom clamping bolts
evenly, one at a time until the knurls are engaged with the
work in a positive manner. Back the knurls off the part with
the feed handwheel. Stop the spindle and carefully examine the quality of the knurl. It should be full depth,clean,
and sharp. The finished diameter should be approximately
(see chart) over the starting diameter. If not make the
necessary adjustments.
If the knurl isn’t full depth take in on clamping bolts with
the spindle running until it is full depth. ( If the knurls are
undercutting the finished diameter, the diameter should be
either increased or decreased by approximately .005" (0.1
mm) until the knurls are working properly.) Increasing the
diameter will add a tooth to the part. Decreasing the
diameter will eliminate the knurls from having to remove
so much material. If the knurl isn’t clean and sharp use
more cutting oil and turn the spindle slower and increase
the feed.
As you can see it isn’t an exact science because of the many
variables involved and that is why we recommend getting
good results on a scrap part before attempting knurling a
part you have a lot of work in.
Straight knurls have to be more carefully selected for the
job if they are to be used for enlarging a shaft diameter for
a press fit. In closer tolerance production work special
knurls have to be made to accomplish this so the finer the
knurl the better your chances of success are.
To complete the knurl the knurls are fed on to the part for
the proper distance using plenty of cutting oil. Back the
knurls off the part still using plenty of oil and you should
have a knurl you can be proud of.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
3606*
3606* (Std. Set of 2)
21 other patterns available,
see charts below.
-2-
3004
REAR MOUNTING BLOCK
(For P/N 3002 CUT_OFF TOL AND HOLDER)
P/N 3016
USE LONGER 10-32 x
1-3/4” SOCKET HEAD
SCREW PROVIDED
Purpose of the Rear Mounting Block
P/N 3002 CUT-OFF
TOOL AND HOLDER
PART
The rear mounting block is a simple spacer block that allows
you to mount the cut-off tool and holder to the table on the
back side of the part. Because the part is rotating "up" on
the back side, the tool must be flipped over in the holder.
The mounting block raises the tool holder the amount
needed to put the tip of the tool back at the right cutting
height. This will save you time by being able to leave the
cut-off tool holder mounted to the table while you use the
regular tool post in its normal position on the front side of
the part.
STANDARD
TOOLPOST
AND CUTTING TOOL
REAR
MOUNTING
BLOCK
Instructions for Use
LATHE CROSSLIDE
FIGURE 1—
(Looking from headstock toward tailstock) The rear
mounting block is shown in position under the cut-off tool
holder and mounted to the "back" side of crosslide table.
The cut-off tool holder can now be left mounted to the
table, ready for a parting operation at any time. There is
no need to remove the standard tool post in order to part
off the work.
NOTE: ALWAYS USE CUTTING OIL
WHEN USING THE CUT-OFF TOOL.
See P/N 3002 Cut-Off Tool instructions
for more details on use and sharpening
of the tool.
The mounting block is placed between the standard cutoff tool holder (P/N 3002) and the lathe crosslide. It is
mounted on the back side of the part, or the side away
from the crosslide handwheel. The longer 10-32 x 1-3/4"
socket head screw provided with the rear mounting block
is used to attach the unit to the crosslide table. (Use the TNut that came with the Cut-Off Tool Holder.) Note that
the hole in the mounting block is not in the center. Rotate
the block to find the position where the sides line up with
the sides of the cut-off toll holder.
Loosen the two clamping screws which hold the cut-off
tool blade in place. Turn the blade over so the cutting tip is
facing down and mount it as shown in Figure 1. Adjust
the tip of the tool to the desired height by sliding it back
and forth in its slot. Lock it in position with the two clamping
screws.
Refer to the instructions that come with the P/N 3002 cutoff tool for use. Even thought the tool is upside down, all
the same rules about its use still apply. The only difference
is that the crosslide table is now cranked toward the
operator to cut off a part.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
WOOD TOOL REST
P/N 3038
P/N 3047 (used with P/N 1291*)
The wood turning accessories are somewhat of an afterthought. A machine designed to cut metal can easily cut
wood using the same methods as cutting metal. The
machine can become a little cumbersome when used as a
wood turning lathe. The tool support is mounted on the
crosslide, and if you try to use it like a standard wood turning
lathe, the crosslide and handwheel would be in your way.
Work with your tool angled above center rather than below
center as shown in most instructions on wood turning.
LIVE CENTER
WOOD CUTTING TOOL
WOOD TOOL REST
SPUR DRIVER
FIGURE 1—Holding the wood cutting tool.
This can eliminate the problems of long handled wood
turning tools hitting the table.
Success will be determined by having good turning tools
and good hardwoods, such as maple, to work with as the
has a superior spindle to that on wood turning
lathes. There isn’t any reason you can’t cut wood with lathe
tools, but they have to be very sharp. If you have a lot to cut
you may have more success with more rake on your tools.
Again, the harder the wood the better it will cut.
We also manufacture a Spur Driver (P/N 3035) to work
between centers. A Live Center (P/N 1191) is also a must
for this. When working with small diameters you have the
advantage of holding work with the 3- or 4-Jaw chucks or
even with the collets.
We added this accessory to our production line because we
were constantly asked for something to make very small
wooden parts. I visualized these attachments making small
parts like doll house furniture when I designed it which is the
reason for an offset support. This design allows you to work
with the tailstock spindle close to the spindle and still get a
support in between them.
We made a trial run of parts and the first call I received was
the support arm was too short. The part he was making was
a fishing rod handle which is why there are now two support
arms included. The second one is for working on longer
parts.
The next call was for an extended tool support shaft to be
used with our Riser Blocks (P/N 1291 and 1292). A lamp
was the project this time. An Extended Wood Tool Rest is
now available as Part Number 3047.
For additional information on wood turning techniques,
there are many fine books written for reference.
We hope you find these to be useful accessories for your
lathe.
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
PART
NO.
DESCRIPTION
3044 Wood Tool Rest, 3" (use w/ P/N 1291)*
3045 Wood Tool Rest, 3"
3046 Wood Tool Rest, 5"
3048 Wood Tool Rest, 5" (use w/ P/N 1291)*
3039 Wood Tool Post Body
3056 Tee Nut
4069 10-32 x 3/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
4077 10-32 x 5/16" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
* P/N 1291 is a riser block kit. Parts No. 3044 and 3048
have extended shafts to accommodate the extra height.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
Refer to
INSTRUCTION GUIDE
(P/N 5326) for milling Setup and Operations.
Vertical Milling
Column mounted on
a
Lathe
VERTICAL MILLING
COLUMN
P/N 3050 (Inch), P/N 3053 (Metric)
P/N 3480 (Inch), P/N 3485 (Metric)
w/ Zero Adjustable Handwheel
With this attachment the
Lathe can be quickly
and easily converted into a small milling machine. The
attachment consists of a dovetailed vertical column with a
solid aluminum base that attaches to the bed of the lathe in
place of the headstock. The headstock then mounts to a
dovetailed saddle on the vertical column. The saddle is
raised and lowered to control the depth of cut by turning a
handwheel. Calibrations on the handwheel enable depth
control to .001 inch. Parts to be machined are mounted on
the lathe's 2.75" x 6.00" crosslide.The headstock may be
locked in position by means of a screw on the back of the
saddle. (See P/N 4517 and 4033 on the exploded view.)
This is a good way to get into milling. All standard vertical
milling operations can be performed with this attachment
with size being the only limitation. Conversion from the
lathe to the mill takes less than one minute. Just about all
-milling accessories may be used with
this setup. (NOTE: Due to the size and weight of the P/N
3200 Indexing Attachment and the P/N 3700 Rotary Table,
it is not recommended they be used with the Lathe and
Vertical Milling Column combination. We recommend
they be used with the
Machine or XYZ Base.)
Vertical Milling
NOTE: All Vertical Milling Columns manufactured after 1995 include
the modifications necessary to work with
's XY Base.
MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS
Remove headstock from lathe by loosening set screw
(P/N 4054) located below name plate. Lift the headstock
vertically from the bed.
Mount the Vertical Milling Column on the lathe pivot pin
(P/N 4024) on the lathe bed. Mount the headstock on the
pivot pin located on the saddle of the Vertical Milling
Column in the same manner as it is mounted on the lathe
bed. Angles can be milled by rotating the headstock with
the alignment key removed. Move headstock to desired
angle and tighten the set screw (P/N 4054).
HELPFUL HINTS
1. This is a small, light duty mill, and should not be used
to remove vast amounts of unnecessary stock that could
be easily removed with a hacksaw. Get stock as close to
size as possible before starting.
2. Loads involved for milling are higher than for lathe
turning. The vibration level is also higher, therefore,
more attention must be paid to gib adjustments. They
should be kept snug.
3. End mills must run true and must be sharp. Holding end
mills in a drill chuck is a poor method. Use milling
collets or our end mill holders. For cutting aluminum,
run motor top speed and take light cuts.
4. Fly cutting is an excellent way of cutting stock from flat
surfaces.
5. Normal machine alignment is good for most work, but
if the work is exceptionally large or has to be extremely
accurate, shims may be required to improve machine
alignment.
6. Learn to use a dial indicator.
7. A good vise is a must.
8. Often, more time will be spent making fixtures to hold
work than doing the actual machining.
9. Always try to have one point to measure from. Don't
machine this point off half way through the job and
leave yourself without a way of measuring the next
operation. PLAN AHEAD.
10.A good rule for all machining operations is,"if the tool
chatters, reduce speed and increase feed."
It takes a long time to accumulate the knowledge, tools and
fixtures to do the tremendous amount of different type of
operations involved in milling. Don't get discouraged by
starting with a job that is too complex or by using materials
that are extremely difficult to machine.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
EXPLODED VIEW
3402, 3403, 3408
3407 (3409)
4052
VERTICAL MILLING COLUMN
P/N 3050 (3053)
P/N 3480 (3485) w/ Zero
Adjustable Handwheel
(Metric part numbers shown
in parenthesis where different.)
3406
4520
4067
4017
(4117)
4059
4052
4501 (4551)
5024
4033
4504
4026
4519
4517
4518
4505
4503
4090
4099
4052
4082
4054
4034
VERTICAL MILLING COLUMN PARTS LIST
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
PART
NO.
3402
3403
3406
3407 (3409)
3408
3422
3425
3426 (3427)
3441
4017 (4117)
4026
4033
4034
4052
NO.
REQ.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
DESCRIPTION
"Z" Axis Handwheel Knob
"Z" Axis Handwheel Shaft
Thrust Bearing Set
"Z" Axis Handwheel Body (for P/N 3450)
Handwheel Plug
Lock Nut, Adjustable Handwheel (for P/N 3480/3485)
Lock Screw, Adjustable Handwheel (for P/N 3480/3485)
"Z" Axis Zero Adj. Hndwhl. Collar (for P/N 3480/3485)
"Z" Axis Zero Adjustable Handwheel Body (for P/N 3480/3485)
Saddle Nut
Head Key
Skt Hd Cap Screw 10-32 x 5/8"
Skt Hd Cap Screws 10-32 x 1"
Cup Pt Set Screws 10-32 x 3/16"
-2-
PART
NO.
4054
4059
4067
4082
4090
4099
4501 (4551)
4503
4504
4505
4517
4518
4519
4520
DESCRIPTION
Cone Pt Set Screw 5/16-24 x 3/4"
Washer, 1/4" I.D.
Skt Hd Cap Screw 10-32 x 1/2"
Gib Lock
Flat Head Screw 10-32 x 3/8"
Saddle Gib
Column Lead Screw
Column Bed
Column Saddle
Column Base
Column Saddle Lock
3/16" Ball Bearing
#10 Washer, Type B
Bored Column Thrust
3050
FLYCUTTER P/N 3052
FLYCUTTER AND
SLITTING SAW HOLDER
P/N 3052 AND P/N 3065
SLITTING SAW HOLDER P/N 3065
Both the Flycutter (P/N 3052) and the Slitting Saw Holder
(P/N 3065) are held in the spindle with a drawbolt that pulls
these holders up into the Morse #1 taper. This is a “sticking”
taper and it has to be removed from the spindle by backing
out the drawbolt a few turns (do not disengage) and giving
the bolt a few light taps with a hammer.
A Flycutter is a great way to machine flat surfaces. It can
be easily sharpened and is probably the most economical
way to remove material on a mill. The cutter is basically a
left handed lathe tool. We supply it with a carbide tip cutter,
but there is no reason a piece of 1/4" square high speed steel
wouldn’t work.
As with all machining operations, it is imperative the work
is securely held to the work table. A flycutter on the
can cut a path 2" (50 mm) wide by
.010" (.25 mm) deep in aluminum without even trying.
Flycutters exert lower machining stresses on the machine
than you may expect. This is because the cutter “peels” the
material off with very little crushing action. If possible the
cutter should swing a diameter larger than the part width.
The cutter will usually take a second cut with the back side
of the cutter even when the spindle is perfectly square with
the table.
Chips thrown off by the flycutter are HOT. Long sleeve
shirts are advisable and eye protection is a must!
If you’re machining aluminum, run the spindle at 1/2
speed, with steel use 1/4 speed, and use a feed rate that
creates curly chips about .002" (.05 mm) thick. You really
should have some understanding of cutting speeds if you
use high speed steel cutters on steels. It is very easy to
exceed the cutting speed of high speed steel with a large
cutter diameter. An example would be a H.S. cutter
swinging a 2" (50 mm) circle shouldn’t exceed 200 RPM
when cutting steel with a cutting speed of 100 surface Ft/
Min.
4 X CUTTING SPEED (Ft./Min.)
CUTTER DIAMETER (In.)
4 X 100 = 200 RPM
2
Note: The factor 4 used in this equation has been
rounded off to allow mental calculations, the actual
number should be 3.8
In metric a close approximation is:
300 X CUTTING SPEED (M/Min.)
CUTTER DIAMETER (MM)
Note: The factor 300 has been rounded off to simplify
calculations, the actual number is 318.
The reason we go into cutting speed in these instructions is
that they are such an important part of using slitting saws
correctly. You must realize that when you exceed the
cutting speed with high speed steels, the dulling process
can be instantaneous. It isn’t you get shorter tool life, you
get “no life”! This can be expensive in time and money
because slitting saws usually cost so much you don’t have
spares.
Another problem that happens with slitting saws is that one
edge gets dull before the other. This causes the blade to
deflect as it cuts. How much it deflects is somewhat a
function of the blade’s thickness.
A common error that can be made is putting a slitting saw
on the spindle upside down when they will only cut one
way.
Coolant should be used. It doesn’t have to be flooded, but
it should be applied liberally to keep the fine teeth from
loading up.
When cutting a slot that goes into a large hole, it is possible
to have the part clamp the saw blade as it cuts through. It
usually doesn’t cause any serious problems, just stop the
spindle and back it out.
There is always a question of the best approach to use when
cutting a slot with a blade that is less than .060" (1.5 mm).
You can cut in a series of passes, cut full depth in one pass,
or cut straight in. The method to use is up to you, experiment
with scrap until you’re confident you will not screw up a lot
of work.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
BORING HEAD
P/N 3054
Boring holes on a mill is very similar to boring holes on a
lathe except the cutting tool moves rather than the part. The
main advantage of boring over drilling is that the hole will
always come out in perfect alignment with the spindle
whereas a drill may “wander”. Larger holes must be bored
rather than drilled on a small mill because large drills
and it takes horsepower
cannot be chucked in a
to drill holes over 3/8" (10mm).
Figure 1
10-32 CAP SCREW—Tighten
enough to hold in place while boring
but loose enough to move bottom
slide with 4-40 screw dial.
4-40 CAP SCREW DIAL—Tighten
to increase diameter. To reduce
diameter loosen 10-32 and 4-40
screws and slide back.
Index bottom slide 180° for boring small
diameter holes. (See also Fig. 2.)
Tools put in the
boring head should be as short
as possible to keep set ups as rigid as possible. It is easier
to bore a hole completely through a part than to cut into a
flat bottom hole. The problem is tool chatter when you get
to the bottom. A hole has to be started with a drill to the full
depth of the finished hole. Many times the work will
require a special boring tool that usually can be made from
a standard boring tool.
Boring tools that are commercially available with a 3/8"
shank have a shank that is too long for our boring head. To
insure a rigid set up, cut part of the shank off. The shank of
the tool should not extend much below the boring head.
boring tools are ready to use without this cutoff
operation.
Boring holes over an inch deep can get difficult because it
takes long tools which compromises rigidity. If you need
a large flat bottom hole, consider doing it on a rotary table
with an end mill.
If you have to have a flat bottom hole, a good tip is to turn
the spindle off .002" (.05mm) from the bottom and rotate
the spindle by hand while feeding the spindle down the
remaining distance to eliminate chatter at the bottom. A
wrench on the boring head drawbolt can make it easy to
rotate while cutting.
If you have an existing hole’s location out of tolerance,
many times you can use a boring tool to correct the
location. A boring tool follows the spindle, not the hole. A
bushing can be made to press into the bored hole to correct
the diameter that has been bored oversize. This method can
also be used to correct shaft holes that have worn elliptically
in space plates.
Remember the rule: "If a tool chatters, reduce speed
(RPM), Increase Feed (Rate handwheel is turned) and take
lighter cuts (Boring head adjustment)."
CAUTION! WORK MUST BE SECURELY CLAMPED
TO THE TABLE.
ADJUSTMENT
DIAL
LARGER
OFFSET
CENTERLINES
OF
BORING TOOL
CENTERLINES
OF SPINDLE
SMALLER
OFFSET
Figure 2—Reversing lower portion of boring head for
large or small holes
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
Drill a hole as large as you can and still leave at least .060"
(1.5mm) to finish bore. Decide the configuration of the
boring head. The hole that accepts the boring tool can be
indexed for large or small diameter holes. Use the combination that will keep maximum engagement of the boring
head’s dovetail..
Clamp the boring tool into the boring head so the cutting
face of the tool is in alignment with the center of the
spindle.
Adjust the tool in or out to take approximately .020"
(.5mm) cut in aluminum.
If your tool needs sharpening, sharpen it before you get
near the finish diameter. You can’t bore a hole any more
accurately than you can measure it. Learn how to use small
hole gauges and telescoping gauges. If you only have dial
calipers, bore the hole and, if possible, turn the mating part
on a lathe to fit the hole if a good fit is required (lathes are
easier to hold tight tolerance diameters on).
From this point on it’s best to “sneak up” on the finish
diameter by taking half the cut required to get to the finish
diameter. Cuts will keep getting smaller, and when you get
to an error so small it would be hard to adjust the boring
head .001" (.02 mm), try feeding the tool in at a higher RPM
to bring the diameter to size.
Only the basics are written in these instruction and to make
these basics work, it requires a liberal amount of common
sense. If you have any doubts about a set up, it isn’t good
enough! The skill of machining is making accurate parts
first try. If this is your first attempt to use a boring head,
bore a hole .575" or 16mm through a piece of aluminum
approximately 3/8" (10mm) thick and see if you can come
within .0005" (.025mm) first try. This will be a good test
of your machining skills!
Each Mark = .001"
Figure 3—Fine
adjustments of
the Boring Head
.005"
.010"
One turn of the 4-40 screw dial
will produce an increase of .050"
in the bored diameter. Each
increment on the dial is 7° which
produces a rotation of the screw
equivalent to .001" in the bored
diameter.
Major increments are marked
on the dial at 10 (.010"), 20
(.020"), 30 (.030") and 40
(.040").
.020"
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
BORING TOOL
(3/8" Shank)
Not Included
NO. PART
REQ. NO. DESCRIPTION
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Note: Do not attempt to bore any metal other than aluminum or brass until you have the skill to hold exact diameters
on these easier to machine materials.
Be sure the boring head screws are tightened properly and
turn on spindle at approximately 1/4 speed. Take a cut by
feeding the tool into the part at a rate that keeps a continuous
chip. Feeding too slow can cause chatter. A small amount
of cutting oil will dramatically help the process.
Repeat this process until the hole is “roughed” out. Leave
about .030" (.7mm) for finishing.
Before going to the finish diameter, determine that you can
get a suitable finish with the tool you’re using. Take a light
cut and stop the spindle at the bottom and inspect the finish.
Start the spindle and back the tool out. Usually the tool will
take a light cut on the way out. Stop the spindle and inspect
the finish. What you should learn from this exercise is
where to stop your cut for the best possible finish; in or out?
-2-
3088
3107
3154
3155
3156
3157
4034
4057
4069
1/4-20 x 5-1/8" Drawbar and Washer
Gear Drive Pin
Boring Head, Primary (top)
Boring Head, Secondary (bottom)
4-40 x 3/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
Adjustment Dial
10-32 x 1" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
3/32" Hex Key
10-32 x 3/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
3054
MORSE #1 BLANK
P/N 3055
The Morse #1 blank is made from free machining steel and
is available so that you may make your own custom tool
holders. Below are some drawings suggesting ways to
make holders for end mills, fly cutters and slitting saws.
The proper taper fit is already machined onto the tapered
end. You need only drill, tap or slot the blank to fit your
special tooling needs.
SIDE VIEW
END VIEW
DRILL AND TAP
FOR 10-32 SET
SCREW
ROUND HIGH SPEED CUTTER
MAY BE GROUND FROM A
BROKEN CENTER DRILL
FIGURE 2--Making a Fly Cutte.
SLITTING SAW
DRILL AND TAP FOR
10-32 SET SCREW
TO HOLD END MILL
COUNTERSUNK 10-32
SCREW
FIGURE 1--End Mill Holder
MACHINED WASHER
FIGURE 3--Making a Slitting Saw Holder
.25
.125
DRILL .250
.40
THRUST WASHER
THRUST WASHER
SPINDLE
MORSE #1 BLANK
DRAWBAR
FIGURE 4--Cross-section of Lathe Spindle showing Morse Blank, Drawbar and Thrust Washer in position.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
MILLING COLLETS
Collet Sets P/N 3060 (Inch), P/N 3090 (Metric)
End Mill Holders, P/N 3079 (3/8"), 3078 (10mm),
6079 (1/4"), 6080 (3/16")
The milling collets (P/N 3060) used with the
Vertical Mill or Vertical Milling Column are designed to be used with the Morse #1 taper
common to all headstock spindles manufactured by
. The collets are held into the spindle
with a drawbolt. The set includes 3 collets and a drawbolt
with collar.
These collets have a shallow angle that give them high
clamping pressure making them ideal for holding cutters.
The shallow angle makes the collet “stick” after the collet
drawbolt is loosened. Back the bolt off a few turns (do not
disengage completely) and lightly tap the head of the bolt
with a hammer or mallet until the collet can be easily
removed.
Milling Collets are available in the following sizes:
P/N 3087
3/32" Mill Collet
P/N 3089
5/32" Mill Collet
P/N 3091
7/32" Mill Collet
P/N 3092
3.0mm Mill Collet*
P/N 3093
4.0mm Mill Collet*
P/N 3094
6.0mm Mill Collet*
P/N 3095
1/8" Mill Collet**
P/N 3096
3/16" Mill Collet**
P/N 3097
1/4" Mill Collet**
*Included with set P/N 3090
**Included with set P/N 3060
END MILL HOLDERS
Because the hole through the spindle is only a little over 3/
8" (10mm), a collet that would accept a 3/8" shank end mill
is impossible to make. End mills with 3/8" shank are very
common and in many cases cost less than the miniature
series. They are available in many sizes and shapes. To
, offers the
take advantage of this fact,
3/8" End Mill Holder (P/N 3079). (See Figure 1.) Metric
version of 3/8" End Mill Holder also available (10mm, P/N
3078).
FIGURE 1— End Mill
Holder.
The holder is manufactured on a modern CNC lathe
allowing the internal 3/4-16 thread to be single pointed and
without unchucking the part, accurately boring the 3/8"
hole. This fact allows us to have the end mill run very
accurately even though it is held on a threaded surface.
Also available are 1/4" bore (P/N 6079) and 3/16" bore (P/
N 6080) holders in this same style.
FLAT
FIGURE 2— Flat area for set screw on commercial
end mills.
The end mills are held with a set screw that goes into the
flat ground on the shanks of all commercial end mills. (See
Figure 2.) Another advantage is 3/8" end mills are available
with cutters on each end of the shank creating further
savings.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
3" LATHE
THREAD
CUTTING ATTACHMENT
P/N 3100
AN INTRODUCTION TO THREAD
CUTTING IN THE REAL WORLD
After designing and putting the enclosed screw cutting
attachment into production, we sat down and started reading what other people have written about cutting screw
threads before writing our own instructions. It amazed us
that we had been able to cut threads all these years knowing
so little. How and why we were able to do this is going to
be the subject of our instructions. There are sufficient books
available at any library to go into additional detail on the
subject if required. These instructions are based on using
sharp pointed 60° tools and cutting threads for your own
use.
The reason other books go into such great detail on the
precise methods used commercially is that they are telling
you how to cut threads from specifications for other people.
They have to have exact methods and standards to make
sure that a bolt made in California will screw into a nut
manufactured in New York. Fortunately, we have the
tremendous advantage of having both pieces at hand and we
can just “keep cutting until they fit”. It’s as simple as that!
You simply select the proper gear from the chart; put in a
60° threading tool and have at it.
A point to ponder about thread cutting is how a lathe
produces a thread. It doesn’t matter whether the lathe is a
20" or a 3". The principle is the same. The lead screw that
drives the saddle is geared directly to the spindle. When the
spindle turns, the saddle moves. If they were geared one to
one, the pitch cut would be the same as the pitch of the lead
screw. On the 3" lathe, this would be 20 Threads Per Inch
(TPI). If we turned the lead screw 180° while we turned the
spindle 360° (by using a 20 tooth to a 40 tooth gear
arrangement) we would cut 40 TPI. Please note that we did
not have to consider the stock’s diameter. The only
requirement is that the major diameter is at least twice the
depth of the thread plus enough material to support these
threads while cutting them. One gets used to hearing a
diameter called out with the threads, such as 1/4" - 20, 6 32, 10 - 24, etcetra, but while it’s unusual to think of 40
threads per inch cut on something 2" in diameter. Yet, in
some cases it may be entirely practicable to do so.
It may interest you to know how a metric thread can be cut
on a 3" lathe that has American National screw threads on
its lead screw. The 127 T conversion gear does this by
driving the lead screw at a ratio that converts 20 TPI to
1mm. Consider 100T on the spindle driving a 127T. The
ratio is .7874 to 1. The lead screw has 20 TPI: .050" P x
.7874 = .03937" = 1 mm.
Figure 1—Component parts of a thread cut with a
sharp pointed 60° vee tool.
MAJOR DIAMETER -
Largest diameter of the thread of
either the screw or the nut.
MINOR DIAMETER -
Smallest diameter of the thread of
either the screw or the nut.
PITCH DIAMETER -
The theoretical diameter that falls
on a point where the thread width and
the groove width are the same.
PITCH (P) -
The distance from point to point
measured parallel to the axis. Metric
threads are always expressed in Pitch
The distance a screw thread advances
axially in one turn. On a double lead
screw, the lead is twice the pitch.
LEAD -
NOTE: The same methods can be used in figuring dimensions
for American or Metric screw threads.
1 mm = .03937"
Pitch (Metric) x .03937" x .758 = depth of screw
thread in inches
Take the time to familiarize yourself with component parts
of the screw thread from Figure 1. The pitch diameter is the
important one to consider. Before going on, let’s take the
time to really understand why. The pitch diameter determines
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
Usually, you will be cutting both the screw and nut. This is
a case where two wrongs can almost equal one right. You
can rectify any error you may have had in cutting the first
one by compensating for it in the mating part.
Left-hand threads can be cut as easily as right-hand threads
on a lathe; the only difference being the addition of an idler
gear which reverses tool movement so that it travels left to
right.
It’s hard to appreciate just how much money an inexpensive
lathe like this, with a screw cutting attachment can save you,
until you have had to have a special part made that doesn’t
have a standard thread size. Even though there may be taps
or dies available, a left-hand 1"-32 would probably cost half
as much as your entire thread cutting attachment.
What we have tried to do in these opening remarks is to show
that screw-cutting is really easy, and to give you the selfconfidence it takes to do any job well. Too often, good
craftsmen are stopped from venturing forth because the
only information available shows the technically perfect
way to do things rather than the simple, practical methods
everyone really uses.
how a screw or thread will fit, not the major diameter.
Suppose you were cutting 20 TPI and the major diameter
was .010 undersize and the pitch diameter was correct.
About the only thing wrong would be that the flat on the
point of the thread would be a little wide, but it would still
have approximately 75 % of its strength and work well.
Now let us suppose we cut the pitch diameter undersize by
.010. We would end up with a nut that fits so loose and a
thread that was so weak that we would have to scrap it.
There is where “cutting to fit” comes in. You can compensate for some pretty bad errors on the major and minor
diameters by having the pitch diameter correct. To get it
correct, all you have to do is to keep trying it for size as you
cut. Don’t ever take the part out of the chuck to try it
because it would be next to impossible to re-chuck it in
exactly the same place. However, the entire chuck, along
with the part, could be removed from the lathe to try it for
size. Don’t force anything when trying the part for size,
because you might move the part slightly in the chuck, and
really “screw things up”.
Why have we made such a point about having the major or
minor diameter wrong and still making the part work?
Read on. You’re probably thinking we must really be a
“hacker” if we can’t cut a diameter within .010. Well, the
problem in many cases, is not how close you can cut to a
diameter, but what the diameter should be.
Example: Your buddy just heard you bought a nice new
shiny lathe complete with a screw cutting attachment, and
like all good friends, immediately goes to work trying to
figure out how you and your new lathe will be of some use
to him. It doesn’t take him long! He has a camera which
he tried to repair himself last year, but lost an important
part. Of course the missing part has metric threads, but
that’s a “snap” for a 3" lathe. A quick check with a thread
gauge indicates that it has .4 mm Pitch. No problem, yet. It
is an internal thread, so you will have to cut a screw to mate
with it. Here’s the problem: What is the major diameter?
You can measure the diameter of the hole, but you can’t be
assured that the thread form is perfect and that this is really
the minor diameter. You can only assume that it’s close.
Now you take this dimension and add to it twice the depth
of the thread, which should give you the major diameter. To
get the depth of one thread, multiply the Pitch x .6. (Note:
Pitch x 1.2 + Minor Diameter = Major Diameter). Total
depth of thread using a sharp pointed 60° tool = P x .65 =
.036" x .65 = .023".
The constant .6 is not used to figure depth of an external
thread, it is just one used to get you in the “ball park” in a
situation such as this.
At least we have a fairly reliable place to start now and can
probably get one cut that will work on the first try. Always
keep track of the total depth cut in case it comes out
undersized. At least you’ll know how deep not to cut it on
the second one!
The example we gave you was one of the more difficult
situations you may run into, not only because you had to do
the job for free to keep a friend, but also because you had
very limited information from which to work.
THREAD CUTTING CONVERSION KIT
This kit has been engineered to add additional versatility to
your 3" Lathe. With this attachment, a wide variety of
threads, both right-handed and left-handed may be produced. Most American Standard and Metric threads may be
cut with equal ease and precision. The accompanying charts
list the entire range from which you may choose. (See
Figure 5.)
CONVERSION INSTRUCTIONS (Refer also
to illustrations)
STEP 1.Carefully drive furnished small sheet metal screw
into hole located in spindle which extends from
the left side of the drive pulleys. Use a proper size
screwdriver for this operation and avoid install
ing the screw at an angle since it must seat
squarely against the spindle. After driving, re
move the screw and dress down the “burr” which
will be raised around the edge of the hole. A small
fine file is suitable for this. Next slide two thin
spacer washers over the tube and against the
pulley. Reinsert the sheet metal screw and tighten
firmly.
STEP 2.Remove the headstock and loosen the flat head
socket screw a few turns.
STEP 3.Remove cap screw under base and directly below
headstock.
STEP 4.Grease shaft with flats on both ends and slide
shaft into the lead screw support (situated directly
below pulley). Be sure end with small flat enters
first. Now slide shaft with a single flat into the
lead screw support. To guarantee that the shaft is
“home”, turn shaft one or two revolutions while
applying gentle inward pressure to the end of the
shaft.
STEP 5.Replace screw from STEP 3 making sure that
-2-
3100
Install “B” gear (100) and “C”
gear (20) onto primary support arm.
The drive pin is used not only to
drive the “C” gear, but also to hold
the “B” gear on the arm.
Install “E” gear (40) on secondary
support arm.
Slide lower split end of primary
support arm over the lead screw
support. Adjust until “B” gear
meshes properly with “A” gear
(100). When mesh is satisfactory,
tighten clamp screw.
Install “D” gear (28) and secure
with Allen head screw and small
washer. NOTE: This screw need
only be finger tight and should not
be used when it interferes with the
secondary support arm. Adjust secSIDE VIEW, THREAD CUTTING ATTACHMENT INSTALLED
ondary support arm and gear for
proper engagement with mating
point of screw goes into machined groove. Check
gears. When satisfactory, tighten retaining screw and
that shaft is free to rotate. Retighten the flat head
pivot screw.
socket screw and replace the headstock.
STEP 6.Pull out the black plug below the name plate and
Install crank wheel by sliding over spindle.
slide the remaining shaft (with handle) into the
Line slot up with protruding sheet metal screw head and
hole (handle upward). It may be necessary to
tighten down crank wheel set screw using Allen wrench. A
rotate the shaft about 30° backwards and
few drops of oil on moving parts will be helpful.
forwards to get it completely “home”.
NOTE: If insertion or movement of the Engagement Lever
is difficult, try loosening the two screws on the bottom of
the machine that hold the bed to the base. Move the bed
slightly until a good fit occurs.
STEP 7.It may be necessary to deburr parts for smooth
peration.
NOTE: The section below entitled "Cutting A Thread for
Practice" uses the example of cutting a 28 pitch right hand
thread on a 1/4" diameter piece of stock. The following
numbers are based on that setup.
Figure 4 Gear Setup Diagram for Example
STEP 8.Refer to chart (Figure 5) and select type of thread
to be cut. As an example, we have chosen
CUTTING A THREAD FOR PRACTICE
American Standard, 28 TPI, right hand lead.
We believe the time has come to “HAVE AT IT” and start
Figure 3
by chucking up a piece of aluminum and turning it to 1/4"
diameter. Let’s cut 28 TPI on it. Be sure to have a nut to
Setup for cutting 28 Threads Per Inch
check it with. Looking at the chart we see we need an “A”
GEAR
A
B C D E
100T on the spindle, driving a “B” 100T, which is attached
TEETH 100 100 20 28 40
to the “C” 20T, driving the lead screw “D” 28T, using the
idler “E” 40T that mounts on the swing arm. The gears
NOTE: Idler Gear "E" is used for Right Hand Threads, Idler Gears
should mesh so they run “free” and have a reasonable
"F" and "G" are used for Left Hand Threads and are, therefore, not
amount of backlash. NOTE: All gear trains have some
used in this example.
“backlash” and it will not effect the quality of the thread, but
it does have to be allowed for. This is why the tool has to be
Remove motor assembly (see OPERATING INSTRUCbacked out before the lathe spindle is reversed.
TIONS STEP 2).
Over 90% of the threads cut on a lathe of this type will have
Slide gear “A” (100) onto spindle engaging slot with
previously installed sheet metal screw head.
Figure 2
-3-
3100
EXAMPLE: To cut an internal 1-1/2"-28 TPI:
Major Diameter = 1.5
P = 1/28 = .036"
Major Diameter - (P x 1.083) = Hole Size
1.500" - (.036" x 1.083) = Hole Size
1.500" - .039 = 1.461
Hole size = 1.461
A double lead could be cut by picking change gears that are
one-half the pitch and indexing the “A” gear 180° after
cutting the first thread to depth.
a pitch less the .070, and be less than 3/8" long. Now and
then you may have to cut a fairly course thread (more than
.070" pitch) and a good idea is to “rough out” the thread by
moving the tool post slightly to the left between passes. This
keeps the tool from having to cut on both sides. On a
standard lathe, the tool is advanced by the compound rest
which is set at 29°. This allows only one side of the tool to
cut and lessens the load considerably. The final cut is then
taken with the crosslide being advanced to “clean up” the
thread. We can get the same effect by moving the tool post.
When cutting fine threads you can get away with cutting
“straight in”. The crank drive gives you the “feel” and a
precise method of stopping needed in single-pointing fine
threads. Cranking the spindle counter clock wise gives you
reverse. This allows you to cut the entire thread without
disengaging the lead screw.
Establish the depth of the first cut by bringing the tool in to
the point where it just touches the surface. Write the dial
setting down, and move the tool past the starting point of the
thread. Now engage the lead screw lever. The lead screw
may have to be turned while applying slight pressure on the
lever in order to get it to engage properly.
NOTE: There isn’t any way to check a double lead until it
is completely cut, therefore, the depth must be figured
mathematically. It has always been fun for us to do jobs like
this, not because the were needed, but just to see if we could!
SCREW CUTTING OPERATION
(Read detailed instructions before proceeding.)
STEP 1. Turn or bore stock to proper diameter.
STEP 2. Remove the motor assembly from the lathe by
unscrewing the two socket head cap screws that
hold the motor bracket to the headstock.
DO NOT DISENGAGE UNTIL THE THREAD HAS
BEEN COMPLETELY CUT.
STEP 3. Install thread cutting tool in post holder.
Now advance tool .003" for first cut. Turn the spindle
counter clockwise until the desired length of thread has been
cut. Back the tool out until it is completely clear of the part.
Crank spindle clockwise until tool is at the original starting
point. Advance the tool to its last point plus .002". We’ve
always found it useful to write these dial settings down too,
it is amazing how fast you can forget one! Now take the
second pass by cranking the spindle counter clockwise. The
amount the tool should be advanced from this point on
should be governed by the amount of force it took the last
pass. The cut will get progressively heavier each time the
tool is advanced. Remember, you can’t ruin your part by
taking too light a cut. To figure what the total amount the
tool should be advanced if you are using a sharp Vee form
tool (standard form of tool used in single pointing threads)
simply multiply the pitch times .758.
STEP 4. Place tool bit at starting point of thread and set for
.003" cut.
STEP 5. Engage lever at base of lathe by turning lead
screw support handle clockwise. Turn lead screw
handwheel until full engagement occurs.
STEP 6. Turn spindle crank wheel until tool bit has traveled
full length of intended thread.
STEP 7. Back crosslide out to clear tool from thread.
STEP 8. Turn crank wheel backwards until tool bit has
traveled past starting point of thread.
STEP 9. Return crosslide to its original position plus .002".
STEP 10.Repeat STEPS 6, 7, 8, and 9 until full depth of
threads has been cut. Cutting oil will make
cutting easier, and will give a better finish.
Example: Pitch of 28 TPI = 1/28
Pointed tool depth = P x .758 = 1/28 x .758 = .027
If you are not too good with math and don’t like to do it, just
keep cutting and looking at the flat on the top of the thread.
When the flat is 1/8 the pitch, the nut should fit. Either way,
check it long before you think it is finished to be on the safe
side until more experience is gained. The last two passes
should be repeats of previous dial settings to clean up
threads. Not too hard was it? No matter what type of threads
you may cut, the basic method will remain the same.
Internal threads are very seldom cut full depth. To figure the
hole size you should start with: take the pitch of thread you
are cutting and multiply it by 1.083 and subtract this from
the major diameter. To figure the total depth using a sharp
pointed 60° tool, multiply the pitch by .65.
-4-
3100
FIGURE 5—GEAR SELECTION CHART FOR THREAD CUTTING ATTACHMENT
ENGLISH THREADS
THREADS GEAR
PER IN. A
50
80
50
76
50
72
50
68
50
64
50
60
50
56
50
52
50
48
50
44
100
40
100
38
100
36
100
34
100
32
100
30
100
28
100
26
100
24
100
22
100
20
19R 100
100
19L
18R 100
100
18L
17R 100
100
17L
16R 100
100
16L
15R 100
100
15L
14R 100
100
14L
13R 100
100
13L
12R 100
100
12L
11R 100
100
11L
10R 100
100
10L
GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR
F
E
D
B
C
G
28
38
40
100
20
22
30
40
38
100
20
22
28
40
36
100
20
34
28
40
34
100
20
30
28
40
32
100
20
30
28
40
30
100
20
26
26
40
28
100
20
30
24
40
26
100
20
34
26
40
24
100
20
30
26
40
22
100
20
30
28
38
40
100
20
22
30
40
38
100
20
22
28
40
36
100
20
34
28
40
34
100
20
30
28
40
32
100
20
30
28
40
30
100
20
26
26
40
28
100
20
30
24
40
26
100
20
30
26
40
24
100
20
30
26
40
22
100
20
30
26
40
20
100
20
24
30
38
100
40
30
38
50
20
22
30
36
100
40
28
36
50
20
34
30
34
100
40
28
34
50
20
30
30
32
100
40
28
32
50
20
30
32
30
100
40
28
30
50
20
26
30
28
100
40
26
28
50
20
30
30
26
100
40
24
26
50
20
30
30
24
100
40
26
24
50
20
30
30
22
100
40
26
22
50
20
30
30
20
100
40
26
20
50
20
24
NOTE
When cutting right hand threads, Gear "E" is used in the vertical
slot of the Secondary Support Arm, Part Number 3103. When
cutting left hand threads, Gear "F is used in the vertical slot and
Gear "G" is used in the horizontal slot and Gear "E" is not used.
METRIC THREADS
PITCH
(mm)
.25
.3
.35
.4
.45
.5
.55
.6
.65
.7
.75
.8
.85
.9
1.R
1.L
1.1
1.2
1.25
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.75
1.8
1.9
2.0
GEAR
A
50
50
50
50
50
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
50
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR GEAR
C
G
F
E
D
B
20
22
28
30
40
127
24
22
26
30
40
127
28
22
26
30
40
127
32
22
24
30
40
127
36
22
20
30
40
127
20
22
28
30
40
127
22
20
28
30
40
127
24
22
28
30
40
127
26
22
28
30
40
127
28
22
26
30
40
127
30
22
24
28
40
127
32
22
24
30
40
127
34
22
20
30
40
127
36
22
20
30
40
127
40
30
20
127
20
24
26
20
127
22
26
24
40
20
127
24
26
22
40
20
127
30
26
22
38
24
127
26
24
22
40
20
127
28
24
22
38
20
127
30
26
20
38
20
127
32
26
20
38
20
127
34
22
20
38
20
127
22
20
38
20
127 35*
36
38
20
127
38
36
20
127
40
30
20
127
* Not included in Standard Set.
NOTE: Gear "E"
or "F" and "G" are
idler gears and are
used to transmit
power and control
direction of
rotation only.
To use this chart with the model 4100 (Metric) Lathe, use the 100 tooth
gear in place of the 127 tooth gear when cutting metric threads and the
127 tooth gear in place of the 100 tooth ("A" Gear) when cutting
American threads. Press the shaft out of the 127 tooth gear and into the
100 tooth gear. American threads finer than 40 TPI cannot be cut.
-5-
3100
Figure 6
EXPLODED VIEW
THREAD CUTTING ATTACHMENT
NOTE: Gears shown are for example
only. For other combinations, see
accompanying charts (Figure 5).
**3115 Gear Shafts are press fits in
3111 and 3127 Gears.
PARTS LIST, THREAD CUTTING ATTACHMENT
PART NO.
3101
3102
3103
3104
3105
3106
3107
3108
3109
3110
3111
4034
4051
4033
4066
3115
DESCRIPTION
PART NO.
HANDWHEEL
PRIMARY SUPPORT ARM
SECONDARY SUPPORT ARM
SMALL SHIM WASHER
LARGE SHIM WASHER (2)
GEAR BUSHING (2)
GEAR DRIVE PIN
10/32 x 3/8" SET SCREW
SHEET METAL SCREW, PAN
HEAD, NO. 6 x 3/16", TYPE A
100 TOOTH GEAR, 56 PITCH (w/ notch)
100 TOOTH GEAR, 56 PITCH
10-32 x 1" SKT HD CAP SCREW
10-32 x 3/8" SKT HD CAP SCREW (3)
10-32 x 5/8" SKT HD CAP SCREW
NO. 10 WASHER
GEAR SHAFT (2)
3120
3122
3124
3126
3127
3128
3130
3132
3134
3136
3138
3140
3150
1509
1542
1543
-6-
DESCRIPTION
20 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
22 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
24 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
26 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
127 TOOTH GEAR, 56 PITCH
28 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
30 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
32 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
34 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
36 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
38 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
40 TOOTH GEAR, 24 PITCH
50 TOOTH GEAR, 56 PITCH
SLIDING SHAFT
ENGAGEMENT LEVER
FIXED SHAFT
3100
INDEXING
ATTACHMENT
P/N 3200
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE
This Indexing Attachment has been designed to give the
average hobbyist an all-purpose method of dividing circles
into an equal number of segments to aid in cutting gears or
any other repetitive, circular machining operation. It is of
a price and size which makes it ideal for use with miniature
machines. The dividing head can be used in both horizontal
and vertical modes.
Although it has been designed to be used with the
Like any fine machine tool accessory, care should be taken
to keep your indexing attachment clean and free from rust.
Moving parts should be oiled periodically with sewing
machine oil. The indexing head can be easily taken apart
for cleaning when necessary.
, it can be adapted for use with other
types of equipment or used for different purposes described in this booklet.
Before attempting any machining operation, be sure your
set-ups use good machining principles and practices. Work
in a careful, professional, craftsmanlike manner, and
ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.
INDEXING HEAD
INDEX
LEVER
FACEPLATE
SPINDLE
LOCK
MORSE #1 CENTER
TAILSTOCK CENTER
BED
RACK
FIGURE 1--Parts of the Indexing Attachment
ADJUSTMENTS
End play can be removed from the head spindle by
unlocking set screw #3214 (Ref #16 on exploded view) and
turning clockwise to remove “play”. Turning the set screw
counter-clockwise reduces drag on the spindle.
TWO METHODS OF DIVIDING
1. INDEXED METHOD. This method is quite simple and
uses the indexing lever and the graduated scale on the
spindle. Internally the indexing lever engages with a 72tooth gear, and each tooth equals 5° of movement. Obviously
this method will only allow indexing of simple hole patterns
since you can only work in multiples of 5°; however, this
is usually sufficient for most jobs with the exception of
cutting gears. Since very few gears will work out in even
multiples of 5°, a second method of dividing called the
“calculated method” can be used. It is described below.
It is important to remember to lock the spindle before
attempting any machining. The indexing lever is NOT a
lock and is not intended for any use other than to locate the
index (Seee Figure 2).
2. CALCULATED METHOD. This method will yield an
infinite number of divisions but takes considerably more
time. To set up the head in this mode, the indexing lever
must be raised to its uppermost position. The rack gear is
then inserted from either side with the teeth towards the
spindle under the lever. It is important that the spindle lock
is loose so the spindle is free to move as the rack is inserted.
The theory behind the calculated method should be apparent now. As the spindle is rotated, the rack moves in a linear
motion which can be easily measured. If the total move-
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
edge of the faceplate with the indexing head mounted on its
bed. Before drilling be sure the rack is positioned in such
a way that one complete revolution can be turned and still
have the rack properly engaged. Make sure to lock the
spindle and accurately measure from the end of the rack to
the indexing head. After drilling, unlock the spindle and
rotate it one revolution using the hole and center drill to
index the spindle. Measure the rack again and subtract the
smaller number from the larger. The difference should
come out quite close to 4.712" or 119.685mm. Since the
accuracy of all your machining is dependent on the precision
of this measurement, it is suggested that you DOUBLE
CHECK your work!
Once you have this dimension, dividing a part into any
number of divisions is easy. Just divide 4.712" (or the
dimension for your attachment if different) by the number
of divisions you wish to make. This will give you the
distance the rack must move for each division. The math
is simple, but a small pocket calculator saves a lot of time.
EXAMPLE:
Say you want to cut an 83-tooth gear, 56 pitch (The size of
the blank can be arrived at from the Machinist’s Handbook
and a similar type gear can be used to arrive at the cutter
shape). The blank can be mounted on an arbor and held
between centers. The dog is clamped on the arbor in such
a way that it engages with the faceplate. Care must be taken
to eliminate all “play” where the dog engages with the
faceplate. Grind a tool bit that will give the desired tooth
shape and use this tool like a flycutter. Cutters can be
purchased that will generate an accurate shape, but the are
very expensive and hard to find. With a little practice
excellent results can be obtained with the “flycutter method”
(See figure 4).
Once the cutter is properly held in a holder and has been
located on center using the tailstock center for a reference
point, the indexing attachment is properly clamped to the
machine table and aligned with an indicator, and the rack
gear is located in such a way a complete revolution can be
turned, you are ready to begin.
FIGURE 2--INDEXED METHOD, Drilling a precise
hole pattern.
ment of the rack for one revolution is known, any number
of divisions can be made by dividing this dimension by the
number of divisions required.
The calculated linear dimension for one complete revolution
is 4.712 inches (119.685mm), but this dimension may vary
slightly from one indexing attachment to the next. For
utmost precision, it is suggested that you accurately measure
your particular indexing head and note the dimension for
future use. Use a precise vernier or dial caliper of at least 5
inches in length (6 inches is preferable) equipped with a
depth rod (See Figure 3).
To determine this dimension for your particular indexing
head, drill a small hole with a center drill on the very top
MAKING THE FIRST CUT
Before you begin “making chips”, look again at your set-up;
is it really SAFE? Also make sure you’re wearing safety
glasses. Remember, that cuts of this type require very rigid
set-ups because of the intermittent cutting action. If the
gear blank is thin it may require additional support by
sandwiching the gear blank between support pieces shaped
like a large washer and of a material which is easily
machined.
Turn on the machine spindle and move the “Y” axis toward
the cutter while moving the “X” axis back and forth until
the cutter just starts to touch the blank. Write down the dial
setting and calculate the total depth of the cut. (The information to calculate this can be found also in the Machinist’s
Handbook.) The first cut should be less than .010" (.20mm)
deep. Observe the cutting action carefully. Is the cutter
MEASURE DISTANCE HERE
USING DEPTH ROD PORTION
OF DIAL CALIPER.
FIGURE 3-- Calculated Method, measuring the rack
position.
-2-
3200
a careful manner you should be successful on the first
attempt.
Although the instructions given here have been related to
cutting a gear, the same approach must be used for any type
of indexed machining.
DRILL SMALL HOLE
HEREFOR
REFERENCE
FIVE BASIC RULES TO REMEMBER
1. Work ACCURATELY.
2. Determine the best possible way of holding the part
to be machined. This type of machining requires a
very secure set-up.
3. Carefully align the set-up with the machine.
4. Take cuts that the set-up you are using can easily
withstand.
5. Don’t try to rush the job! Successive machining
operations make some people lax; therefore, it is wise
to consider the amount of time and effort you will
lose if you destroy your part rather than how much is
left to do.
FIGURE 4-- Typical set-up for cutting gear teeth.
cutting properly? Is there excessive vibration in the set-up?
Is the cutting speed proper? There is no book written that
can give you the answer to these questions; this is where
experience and craftsmanship come into play. The best
way to make good parts is to work VERY CAREFULLY!
To cut an 83-tooth gear means you have to do 83 successive
machining operations correctly to make a good part...82
out of 83 is a waste of time!
Once your cutting speed and feed are to a point you’re sure
you can repeat the same operation over and over again with
excellent results, finish out your first cut to its final depth.
Now it is time to index for the next cut. Measure the
distance from the end of the rack to the index head carefully
before unlocking the spindle. Write down this dimension
(it will be referred to as “A”). From previous instructions
you have already figured the total throw of your indexing
head—say it is 4.712". You now divide this number by the
number of divisions, in this case 83 to get: 4.712 x 1/83 =
.056771", or rounding off, .057". This is now added to or
subtracted from dimension “A”. At first glance it would
appear that all you need to do is add .057" for each cut
because an error of only .000229" is so small it can be
discounted. But if you multiply this error by the total
number of teeth (in this case 83) you would end up with an
error of .019" which would make the last tooth you cut a
very “interesting” shape. This is what is known as “tolerance
buildup” and is the reason you must use your basic formula
at each step to calculate the next dimension rather than
simply adding rounded off dimensions. The second cut and
each succeeding cut are calculated as follows: 4.712 x 2/
83=.113542 or .114". Add this to or subtract from dimension
“A”, index and cut.
With each cut you make your understanding of the techniques involved will increase. By working and thinking in
INDEXING ATTACHMENT
SPECIFICATIONS
OVERALL LENGTH
DISTANCE BETWEEN CENTERS
MAX. DIAMETER HORIZONTALLY
GRADUATIONS
SPINDLE THREAD
-3-
12 INCHES
7 INCHES
3.50 INCH.
5 DEGREES
3/4-16
3200
INDEXING ATTACHMENT
EXPLODED VIEW
FIGURE 5
REF # PART #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
3201
3202
3203
3219
3220
3221
3222
3223
3224
3225
3226
4034
4050
3212
DESCRIPTION
REF # PART #
BED
LOCKING PIN
SPRING
SKT HD FLAT SCREW, 10-32 X 1//2"
INDEXING CASE COVER
SKT HD CAP SCREW, 6-32 x 3/8"
INDEXING GEAR, 72 TOOTH, 48 PITCH
SPINDLE
STEPPING LEVER
TAILSTOCK CENTER
TAILSTOCK CASE
SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 x 1"
SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-24 x 7/8"
RACK, 48 PITCH
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
-4-
3213
3214
4054
3114
3215
3216
3056
4033
3558
4007
4038
4009
3217
3218
DESCRIPTION
INDEXING CASE
SKT HD SET SCREW, CUP PT, 10-32 X 1/2"
SKT HD SET SCREW, CONE PT, 5/16-18 X 3/4"
#10 S.A.E. WASHER
SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-24 X 1"
10-32 HEX NUT
TEE NUT, 10-32
SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 X 5/8"
HOLD DOWN CLAMP
FACEPLATE
MORSE #1 CENTER
DRIVE DOG
GEAR TOOTH CUTTER HOLDER
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
3200
RESETTABLE HANDWHEELS
PART NUMBERS: 2" – 3420 (Inch), 3430 (Metric)
2½" – 3440 (Inch), 3450 (Metric)
2½" Assembly, "Z" Axis – 3455 (Inch), 3459 (Metric)
Most expensive full size machine tools allow the machinist to reset the handwheel to "zero" (or any desired setting)
at any time during a machining operation. Now that option
is available on
's miniature machine tools as
well.
INSTALLATION
The resettable handwheels easily replace any standard
handwheel. Simply loosen the set screw on the
standard handwheel and slide it off the shaft. Slide the new
handwheel onto the shaft. Align the hole in the engraved
collar with the set screw. Eliminate all "play" (backlash)
between the handwheel and column thrust and tighten the
set screw.
The larger 2½" handwheel is normally used on the "Z" axis
of the Mill or Vertical Milling Column and works best
when used with the thrust and bearing, because you are
actually "lifting" the weight of the column with this
handwheel when you crank it up. Handwheels turning on
the horizontal axis are not subjected to this stress and work
3422
3421
3423 (Inch)
3424 (Metric)
4052
3425
fine
without
EXPLODED VIEW
Later
model
PARTS LIST
4052
3425 3406* 4520*
3423 (Inch)
3424 (Metric)
*Optional Thrust Bearing and Thrust
3441
bearings.
Mills and Vertical milling Columns
include the "Z" axis thrust bearing as standard. If you are
upgrading an older Mill or Column that does not have a
thrust bearing on the "Z" axis, you will need to order P/N
3460 which consists of a handwheel, a bearing set and
bored column thrust. If your existing handwheel has a
thrust bearing in it, you will need to purchase P/N 3470
which includes a new resettable handwheel and a bored
column thrust. (You will use the ball bearing set from your
old handwheel.) Simply remove the bearings from your
old handwheel, set them into the new bored column thrust
and install it in place of the old column thrust.
RESETTING THE HANDWHEEL
At any time during your machining operation, you can now
simplify your calculations by resetting the handwheel to
"zero". To do so, gently hold the handwheel in position
with one hand while releasing the lock nut with the other.
Rotate the red anodized, laser engraved collar until the
"zero" setting is aligned with the scribed mark on the Mill,
Lathe or thrust bearing collar. Then retighten the locking
nut. Now you can crank in the exact amount of feed you
want by reading the number directly off the handwheel.
PART #
3422
thrust
3406
3420
3421
3422
3423
3425
3426
3440
3441
3455
4052
4520
3460
3470
DESCRIPTION
Thrust Bearing and Washers
2" Handwheel Assembly, Inch (Metric P/N 3430)
2" Handwheel body
Handwheel Locking Nut
Engraved Hndwhl Collar, Inch (Metric P/N 3424)
6-32 x 7/8" Pan Head Screw
"Z" Axis Hndwhl Collar, Inch (Metric P/N 3427)
2½" Handwheel Assembly, Inch (Metric P/N 3450)
2½" Handwheel Body
2½" Hndwhl Asby, "Z" Axis, Inch, (Met. P/N 3459)
10-32 x 3/16" Cup Point Set Screw
Bored Column Thrust
2½" Hndwhl w/Thrust & Bearings (Met. P/N 3465)
2½" Hndwhl w/ Bored Thrust (Metric P/N 3475)
recommended for "Z" Axis of Vertical
Milling Column and Mill.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
MILL VISE
P/N 3551
EXPLODED VIEW
Figure 1—
Pull-Down Feature
11, 12
APPROXIMATE ADJUSTMENT SLOTS
ADJUSTMENT RANGE:
46° TO 60°
INSTRUCTIONS
The advantages of this vise are obvious
when movement of the jaw is studied. (See
Figure 1 and look at the bottom of your
vice.) The tightening force (F1) produces
not only a force against the part (F2), but
also a force pulling the jaw downward (F3).
Therefore, angle "A" must exceed 45° in
order to make force F3 greater than F2. This
keeps the movable jaw from "tipping" back.
Also note that extreme clamping angles
beyond 60° start to apply much downward
pressure but not much horizontal force is
directed to holding the part. Moving the
pull-down barrel to the proper slot keeps the
adjustment within the most effective clamping range.
To clamp a part, place the jaw in approximate position and
start tightening the adjustment screw at an angle of 45° or
greater. (The back face of the moveable jaw is machined at
a 45° angle for reference.) If the angle of the adjustment
screw gets up to 60° or greater and you still haven't drawn
down on the part, loosen up the screw a little and move the
pull-down barrel to the next slot and retighten.
CAUTION! Extreme vertical adjustment angles can allow
the 10-32 x 1-3/4" adjustment screw to be driven into the
surface of the table, damaging both screw and table.
Therefore, the vice comes assembled with a 1-5/8" screw
which is usable for most settings. To enhance adjustment
to the longest ranges, change to the 1-3/4" screw provided.
Figure 2 shows the proper way to hold a part in the vise. If
the part cannot be centered, use a spacer to help keep the
jaws parallel. This vise has been designed to acurately
hold objects being machined. It is not recommended for
use as a bench vise or for clamping parts in such a way and
with such force as to adversely affect its accuracy.
WRONG
RIGHT
Figure 2—
Holding A
Work Piece
SPACER
MILL VISE PARTS LIST
REF
NO.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
PART
NO.
3511
3502
3503
3504
3512
3506
3507
3056
3558
4033
3513
4070
DESCRIPTION
Vise Body
Movable Jaw
Fixed Jaw Insert
Movable Jaw Insert
Pull-Down Bar
Convex Washer
Flat Head Screw, 6-32 x 3/8 (2)
T-Nut, 10-32 (2)
Hold Down Clamp (2)
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 x 5/8" (4)
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 x 1-5/8"
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 x 1-3/4"
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
RO
TARY T
ABLE
ROT
TABLE
P/N 3700
Products’ rotary table is 4" (100mm) in
diameter and has been designed to be used in conjunction
with their vertical mills; however, it can be easily adapted
to any equipment where size and configuration would make
it useful. It has a worm ratio of 72-1 making one revolution
of the handwheel 5° of table movement. The table has been
engraved with 5° lines identified every 15°, and the
handwheel has 50 graduations making each graduation 1/
10° allowing a circle to be divided into 3600 parts without
interpolating. The table can be locked by tightening set
screw ref. #24 of the exploded view.
angle tailstock. (See instructions on page 6 at end of rotary
table instructions.)
Optional
adjustable right angle
tailstock (P/N 3702)
allows for accurate
turning between
centers when the
optional right
angle attachment
(P/N 3701) is used.
10-32 T-nuts (P/N
The T-slots accept
3056 or 4025). The weight of the rotary table is 7 pounds
and it stands 2" (50mm) high; it has been built of bar stock
steel.
The following instructions have been written to show
what’s involved in doing a complex job accurately. We
believe if you truly understand the job we will describe in
detail, average jobs will be accomplished without filling
your trash can with mistakes. Remember, there are not
many people capable of making the complex machined
products used today, and if you can master the vertical mill
and the rotary table combination, you will have come a long
way at becoming a good machinist. You will find erasers
aren’t much good and no one has come up with a good
“putting on” tool when it comes to metal parts. Complex
parts are very difficult to make. When you’re making “oneof-a-kind” parts, don’t worry how long it takes; spend your
time planning and checking so you don’t have to worry
about starting over.
right angle attachment (P/
When a rotary table is put on a vertical mill you end up with
a machine that is theoretically capable of reproducing
itself. This means the capabilities of your
A right angle attachment (P/N 3701) is available. This has
been designed with an adjustment to align the table perfectly
vertical. (See separate instructions at end of rotary table
instructions.)
are governed by the size of the part and
the ingenuity of the operator. The purpose of these
instructions is to give you an insight into properly using this
accessory. An inexpensive calculator with trig functions is
a must for complex jobs.
An adjustable right angle tailstock (P/N 3702) is also
available to allow you to turn a part between centers using
the rotary table, right angle attachment, and adjustable right
Standard milling machine setups usually involve aligning
the work with the table and then with the spindle. This is
easily accomplished because the table can be accurately
Optional
N 3701).
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
moved with the handwheels. Aligning a part on a rotary
table can be very trying because the work has to be
clamped into position. When you consider the fact that the
part turns, a .001" (.03mm) error in location gives a .002"
True Indicated Reading (T.I.R.) run-out when checked
with a dial indicator.
square to work to, preferably a small precision square.
There is no adjustment for "X"-axis in relation to "Y", but this
has been machined accurately. The vertical slide should be
square with the table and the head and spindle should be
square with the vertical slide. Remember that the size of the
part has a lot to do with how square the machine has to be.
Many times it is advisable to start by doing the rotary table
work first which can eliminate precision aligning. A quick
way to align the milling spindle with the rotary table is by
indicating the hole in the center of the rotary table. Next,
prick punch or spot drill the center on the work you wish to
have line up with the rotary table. Put a pointer in the spindle
that runs true. Set the work under the spindle and lower the
head until it engages with the center mark, then clamp the
part down. You now have the work reasonably aligned
with the rotary table and spindle. At this time, rotate the
table with the spindle running and the pointer slightly
backed off. If the part is properly aligned, the pointer should
always line up with the center mark, and you should write
down your handwheel settings. It is also advisable to write
an “R” or “L” after the handwheel setting to remember
which way the backlash was set.
The first place to start to align your
is
to run an indicator on the work table to check for flatness.
Move the X- and Y-axes independently to determine any
error. These errors can be easily eliminated by placing a
shim under the rotary table so the table runs perfectly true.
Normally, this isn’t necessary, but we are talking about
“perfection”.
To align the vertical bed with the "X" and "Y" slide, clamp
something to the table that you are sure is square. With an
indicator mounted to the head, move the head up and down
a couple of inches with the indicator reading a known square
that is set up to read in the "X"-axis direction. With the four
screws that hold the steel bed to the column block, adjust the
bed until there is a minimum indicator movement. The "Y"axis direction can be corrected with a shim between the
column block and the mill base using the same method.
Enclosed with your rotary table is an adapter (P/N 3709)
With the vertical bed aligned with the base, the head can
bealigned to the rest of the machine by “sweeping” the
head in. The rotary table will give a good surface to
indicate in. Clamp the indicator in the spindle as shown in
the mill instructions that came with your mill. The head
should be fairly square but can be improved upon by using
the slight amount of play on the alignment key to square it
up on the "X"-axis and a shim between the head and saddle
(if needed) on the "Y"-axis.
chuck to be screwed
that allows a
directly to the table. This allows work that is of the correct
size and configuration to be quickly aligned with the rotary
table with reasonable accuracy. Be sure to consider the
fact that a mill cutter could unscrew a 3- or 4-jaw chuck
held on in this fashion (See Figure 1). Use only very light
cuts when this
In most cases the job can usually be done without going
through the process outlined and using the machine as it
comes. I’m only trying to educate you to what it takes to
work at a precision level of machining. Any toolmaker
worth his salt would not attempt to build a close tolerance
part without first squaring the spindle of a vertical mill.
MAKING ALLOWANCES FOR CUTTER DIAMETER
A close look at Figure 2 will start making you aware of the
complexities of working with a rotary table. Unless you are
doing a hole layout, you very seldom can work with the
angles and dimensions on your drawing because of the
cutter diameter.
FIGURE 1—Cutter and chuck directions of rotation.
adapter is used. If you believe this could be a problem with
your set-up, add a second clamp to eliminate the possibility
of the chuck unscrewing from the adapter.
The ball game changes when you want perfection and this
is true whether you are working with an inexpensive
tool or a $20,000 mill. You can’t expect
to work within .001" unless you have your machine square.
On the
a few shims and a dial indicator
should get your machine square if you have something
-2-
FIGURE 2—A demonstration of CPR or Cutter Path
3700
Radius.
Figures 3 and 4 show the relation of cutter and part. Start
considering what I refer to as CPR, which is where the
center of the cutter is from the center of the rotary table.
now offers adjustable “zero”Adjustable
handwheels for our lathes and mills.This makes calculation
of the feed much easier as the handwheels can be reset to
“zero” each time. If you do not have the resettable
handwheels, the job simply requires a bit of note-taking. If
you get into the habit of writing your handwheel setting
down and calculating movements, it’s really not bad. A
piece of tape stuck along the edge of the mill table and mill
base with a mark that shows starting and finishing points
can be of considerable help. Of course, you will still have
to use your handwheel numbers, but the marks will make
you aware they are coming up. Counting the turns of a
handwheel on long movements can have disastrous results
if you’re distracted and turn one too many. One of our
customers attached scales (rulers) to our mill on both the
"X" and "Y" axes which I always thought was a good idea.
If you have trig tables or a calculator with trig functions you
can take a lot of the guess work out of exact locations and
angles.
to build. When a customer buys his first rotary table,
chances are they either want to drill hole patterns which
shouldn’t require any instructions or make some kind of
wheel with spokes in it. Therefore, I will describe how to
“accurately” cut a wheel with spokes. I realize that in most
cases it is not necessary to work to this degree of accuracy
to do a job of this nature, but to accurately make a precision
part of this type is what a rotary table is all about. In most
cases, I will leave you to your own common sense as to the
depth of cuts and how much to leave from roughing and
The next problem you must be aware of is why the rotary
table must be offset to cut segments. Study Figure 6 and it
becomes obvious that allowing for the cutter diameter at
one end of the segment will not make any correction at the
other.
EXAMPLE: CUTTING A WHEEL WITH SPOKES
When one of our customers purchases their first metal
cutting tool, it is usually a lathe and somewhere in that
customer’s mind is a brass canon he now has an opportunity
-3-
3700
finish cuts. Remember, I have never seen a part scrapped
from taking too light of a cut.
axis the amount of the offset moving the table to the left.
Be sure to consider the backlash, and it may also be prudent
to allow for roughing and finish cuts. Now move the Y-axis
and the "Y" offset in (towards the column). This will allow
the first half of the segment to be cut so that it looks like the
diagram. Assuming the part is properly clamped to the
rotary table and held in such a way that you can’t
inadvertently cut into the table, it’s time to start. The
example has four equal segments which means a spoke will
be cut every 90°; therefore, a lot of confusion can be
eliminated if you start with your table at 0° (see Figure 8).
The center of the spokes will now lay out at 0°, 90°, 180°,
and 270°, and the halfway point will be at 45°, 135° etc.
Allowance for the cutter was taken care of when the
offsets were calculated. It is not necessary to caluclate the
value of angle “A” or other angles because you are only
cutting one-half the segment at a time.
Make an accurate drawing at the start showing offsets and
cutter paths (similar to Figure 7). The offsets can be
calculated as shown in the sample in Figure 7.
A good rule now is to take a very light cut (.001") and
convince yourself everything is correct. The real trick of
machining is to do something you have never done before
the“1st time” and you can’t be too careful. A one minute
check versus 3 hours or more to start over makes this a
good investment in time. The cut along the spoke is
accomplished by moving the "X" axis only back and forth
using the calculated points until you get through the part,
and again we remind you it may be wise to take a roughing
cut. Sometimes an undersize (resharpened) end mill is a
good way to rough cut and then change end mills for finish
passes. This allows the same handwheel number used for
roughing and finishing.
REMEMBER...the rotary table center must be precisely
located below the spindle when you start. Only one half
ofthe segment may be cut from the calculated point which
is why only one half of the spoke width is considered. Look
at the drawing again and be sure you truly understand why
you can only cut one half of the segment before proceeding
or your chances for success will be dismal.
Now we have the offsets calculated and the rotary table
“indicated in” in relation to the spindle. We move the "X"
-4-
3700
The rotary cuts are made with the X-axis in its proper
position, and the table rotated counter clockwise. One of
the real neat things in machining happens when using a
rotary table to feed work into an end mill, and I believe it
comes about because of the slow and precise feed that can
be obtained. If a hole you’re cutting requires a bottom,
great finishes can be had from end mills and rotary tables.
The rotary part of the segment only needs to be moved
slightly past the half way point for the remainder of the
segment will be cut with the Y-axis offset moved out from
the column and the table rotated in a clockwise direction.
It’s quicker to cut the first half of all four segments, then
move the Y offset and complete the segments. If you’re
going to try something like this for a first project, check your
entire plan out with .001" cuts and be positive you’re
correct before making cuts that could scrap your part (see
Figure 8).
CUTTING GEARS WITH A ROTARY TABLE
I’m going to leave it up to you to determine when you know
enough about gears to try and produce one. One of the best
sources for information on gears is Machinery’s
Handbook. Gears are built to a rigid set of rules, and they
are more complex than you might imagine.
FIGURE 9—A sample setup for cutting a gear. The
small inset shows the column moved back to the rear
hole to allow clearance for cutting larger diameters.
We will only try to explain how to cut a simple, low
tolerance gear. You will also have to determine the blank
size, depth of cut, RPM of the spindle and so on. If you
successfully cut a good gear on your first attempt, be very
proud of yourself. It can be frustrating if you are not
organized.
available, so it is a process worth learning. When the tool
is mounted in the holder, don’t allow it to stick out any more
than necessary. Figure 9 above shows a typical setup. A
tailstock isn’t always necessary. Remember, the gear
blank must run true before starting.
Gears can be cut using a rotary table with a reasonable
amount of precision. In many cases, gears--even inexpensive
ones—are very precise. Gears are usually produced by
“hobbing”. This method uses a cutter that is similar to a
worm gear. The teeth are generated with both the cutter
and the blank turning. In fact, the process looks just like a
worm gear running. Methods like this produce perfectly
shaped teeth that are perfectly spaced. It may be
theoretically possible to produce a perfect gear one tooth
at a time, but your odds of success are dismal if this is the
type of gear that is required. I suggest you stick with
“clock” type gears for your first few projects.
CALCULATING YOUR CUTS
To figure the amount to move between cuts, an electronic
pocket calculator is very helpful. Simply divide 360° by the
number of teeth you wish to cut. This will give you an
answer in degrees and tenths that can be used directly on
your rotary table without conversion to degrees, minutes
and seconds. Your rotary table is calibrated directly in
degrees and decimal divisions of a degree.
EXAMPLE: CUTTING A 29-TOOTH GEAR
Cutters can be purchased that will produce a fairly good
tooth form, but they are expensive and have a very limited
range. A cutter can be ground that works like a fly cutter.
Use our P/N 3217 for this. A 1/4" lathe tool blank is
provided which fits this holder. Use the damaged gear you
are replacing for a shape reference to grind the tip of the
cutter. The corners on a bench grinder wheel are used to
generate the shape on the tool blank. At first it may seem
almost impossible to do this, but it is not. Just keep checking
the tool to a gear that can be used for a gauge by holding
the two up to a light source. You’ll find that the final
grinding is done by “feel”. Lathe tool bits are cheap and
(Note: I have purposely used a number of teeth that does
not easily divide into 360° as this will normally be the
situation in which you will find yourself.)
Here are the calculations and handwheel settings you
would need to cut a 29-tooth gear. Remember that the table
is marked every 5° and one revolution of the handwheel is
5° which is divided into 50 parts. Therefore, each line on the
handwheel equals 1/10 of a degree. Figure 10 below shows
how the handwheel settings would look for the first four
cuts on the 29-tooth gear:
-5-
3700
both set at “0”.)
3. Press [+] key
4. Press [recall] key
5. Press [=] key (3rd cut)
6. Press [+] key
7. Press [recall] key
8. Press [=] key (4th cut)
etc.
MAINTENANCE
Keep oiled to prevent rust. A few drops in the oiler before
using will eliminate table wear. The worm gear is greased
at the factory.
Worm backlash can be eliminated by moving the worm
housing to compensate for wear.
If our instructions seem somewhat redundant, please
forgive me, for I could be living on a 60' yacht in the south
pacific if we could recover the money in scrapped parts
we’ve had employees produce by cutting first and thinking
later!
ADJUSTABLE RIGHT ANGLE TAILSTOCK
PART NO. 3702
(See also Figure 9 on page 5.)
Because of tolerance build-up, it would be just about
impossible to offer a tailstock that was perfectly on center
with the rotary table/right angle attachment combination.
The solution offered here is a modification of our standard
tailstock which allows it to be adjusted to exactly line up
with the center of the rotary table in order to allow for
perfect alignment between the rotary table and the tailstock
while holding long parts between centers.The base is
attached to the mill table with cap screws and T-nuts. The
two socket head cap screws go through elongated slots in
the side of the right angle piece and allow for minor
adjustments in height when making your setup.
The reason you should divide and then multiply each time
is if you “rounded off” on the first division is that otherwise
your error would build up by the number of teeth you were
cutting. If your pocket calculator has a memory function
there is an even easier method of calculating each cut.
Simply store the first in memory and add it to itself each
time. Because the calculator stores the number to even
more decimal places than it displays on the screen, the
answer is usually so accurate the 29th calculation should
yield almost exactly 360°.
1. First calculation: 360° = 12.4137931° (2nd cut)
29
2. Press “Memory” key (usually “M” or “M+”) to store
(Remember that the first calculation is actually for the
second cut, because the first cut is made with the handwheels
-6-
3700
EXPLODED VIEW
4" ROTARY TABLE
(Including optional right angle attachment)
PARTS LIST
REF# PART# DESCRIPTION
REF# PART# DESCRIPTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
1093
3056
3108
3558
3709
3710
3711
3712
3713
3715
3716
3717
3718
3719
3720
3/8" Bearing
T-nuts, 10-32 T-nuts
Set Screw, 10-32 X 3/8"
Hold Down Clamp
Chuck Adaptor
Rotary Table Base
Table
Worm Housing
Worm Gear
Oiler
Preload Nut
Lock Pin
Upright
Right Angle Base
Button Hd Skt Hd Cap Screw,
10-32 X 3/8"
-7-
3721
3722
4005
4067
4034
4042
4051
4052
4054
4066
4067
5012
Hold Down Tab
Button Hd Skt Hd Cap Screw, 6-32 X 1/4"
Handwheel Assembly
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 X 1/2"
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 X 1"
Headstock Bearing
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 X 3/8"
Cup Point Set Screw, 10-32 X 3/16"
Cone Pt Set Screw, 5/16-18 X 3/4"
Washer, 3/16" I.d.
Skt Hd Cap Screw, 10-32 X 1/2"
Pointer
3700
RIGHT ANGLE ATTACHMENT
FOR 4" ROTARY TABLE
P/N 3701
The
Right Angle Attachment has been designed to easily put the Rotary Table on a vertical plane and
still maintain rigidity.
INSTALLATION
Remove the hold down tab (see Rotary Table Exploded
view, part #16) from the worm housing and loosely bolt the
Right Angle Attachment base (part # 14) to the housing
with the Rotary Table base. Back out the vertical adjustment screw (part # 3) and start the vertical clamp screw
(part # 20), but do not tighten. Tighten the four Right Angle
Attachment base to worm housing screws and mount to
milling table with the Rotary Table indicated in with the
“Y” axis. The vertical plane can be aligned by moving the
indicator up and down with the “Z” axis while reading the
table. The vertical clamp and set screw can now be adjusted
for “0” indicator reading. The accuracy that must be attained
when indicating the Rotary Table in is somewhat determined
by the size of the part.
In many cases it is wise to align and clamp the part to the
table before bringing the Rotary Table to the vertical
position. In this manner you have the milling machine
spindle to help align the part. Aligning the milling machine
to the work with the Rotary Table in the vertical position is
usually accomplished by measuring in from a side of the
part with an edge finder or “touching off” with a cutting
tool. Fortunately, you would very seldom have to align the
spindle to the Rotary Table in both axes. If the need arises
and you don’t have a True (TIR) running surface to work to,
try and leave yourself a “machining pad” on your part to do
this. Once the Rotary Table has been aligned to the mill, use
an end mill to machine a flat on the “machining pad” with
the side of the end mill, moving the “Y” axis to determine
depth of cut and “X” axis for length of cut. Rotate part 180°
and cut to identical handwheel readings. Now measure
across these flats and move the “Y” axis one half of this
dimension plus one half the cutter diameter towards the
center with the cutter out of the way. Rotate 90° and “touch
off” the end of the cutter on a flat that was machined to
determine center. The “Z” axis can be lowered one half the
diameter to put the tools on center. If these pads are left on
the work, other cutting tools could be located in the same
manner and then be machined off when they are no longer
needed.
You will find this accessory interesting, but difficult to use
without a lot of planning.
Note: For information purposes, the exploded view
drawing that accompanies this part includes all parts for
the 4" Rotary Table as well, although they are not
included with the Right Angle Attachement when
ordered by itself.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
EXPLODED VIEW
RIGHT ANGLE ATTACHMENT
AND 4" ROTARY TABLE
PARTS LIST
REF #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
PART #
DESCRIPTION
1093 3/8" BEARING
3056 T-NUTS, 10-32 T-NUTS
3108 SET SCREW, 10-32 x 3/8"
3558 HOLD DOWN CLAMP
3709 CHUCK ADAPTOR
3710 ROTARYTABLEBASE
3711 TABLE
3712 WORM HOUSING
3713 WORM GEAR
3715 OILER
3716 PRELOAD NUT
3717 LOCK PIN
3718 UPRIGHT
3719 RIGHT ANGLE BASE
3720 BUTTON HD SKT HD CAP SCREW
10-32 x 3/8"
REF #
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
-2-
PART #
DESCRIPTION
3721 HOLD DOWN TAB
3722 BUTTON HD SKT HD CAP SCREW, 6-32 x 1/4"
4005 HANDWHEEL ASSEMBLY
4067 SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 x 1/2"
4034 SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 x 1"
4042 HEADSTOCK BEARING
4051 SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 x 3/8"
4052 CUP POINT SET SCREW, 10-32 x 3/16"
4054 CONE PT SET SCREW, 5/16-18 x 3/4"
4066 WASHER, 3/16" I.D.
4067 SKT HD CAP SCREW, 10-32 x 1/2"
5012 POINTER
3701
10,000 RPM Pulley Set
,--.11 --34!6
'
Over the years we’ve had several requests for a spindle that
would turn at higher RPM. The fact that we use a 6,000RPM DC motor made this a difficult task to accomplish and
maintain our present motor mounting hardware. The main
purpose of the high-speed spindle is for turning small
diameters on the lathe or for turning small diameter cutters
at a higher RPM, which makes them less prone to breakage.
We do not consider this an accessory to use like a standard
accessory. You have to take the drive system apart to add
it, and it will take about ten minutes to change over. There
is a second belt position; however, you also have to take the
drive system apart to change from high-speed to low-speed.
This is a design compromise needed to allow you to finetune your Sherline machine while still maintaining a
reasonable cost.
('
You have to realize that when you are dealing with highspeed spindles you are dealing with a different “animal.”
You have to consider the safety of your setup before you
turn the spindle on. An unsupported shaft turned at high
RPM may suddenly wobble and bend 90º. Having a part
come loose because of a poor set up and dance around your
workbench while still spinning at 10,000-RPM is dangerous.
Both ends of the spindle must be considered because the
work that may be sticking out the back end of the spindle
will be unsupported. As with all machining operations
safety glasses are a must. Do not spin large diameters or out
of balance setups at high RPM on a Sherline. Remember,
these are lightweight machines and cannot tolerate errors
of this type.
$
At the factory we set the endplay of the spindle at 0.0002".
We have found that this setting is too “tight” for use at this
high an RPM and increased it to 0.0003" for spindles that
are going to run continually for long periods. If you are
mounting the high-speed accessory on a spindle that may
have had considerable use, you may not have to change the
adjustment. In any case I’d run it and check to see if it gets
too hot before making any adjustments to the preload nut.
You can’t hurt the bearings on a Sherline spindle by letting
them get too hot for a few moments. If it gets too hot to hold
your hand on the headstock comfortably, back the preload
nut off less than 2º and give the pulley end of the spindle a
sharp tap with a mallet. One degree equals 0.00012". The
tap is to move the inner race of the bearing on the spindle
shaft increasing endplay. If you have a good indicator you
can check the endplay by putting around ten pounds of
pressure to both ends of the spindle, one end at a time, and
reading the total movement. You could also spin a free
running spindle with a flick of the wrist and if it makes less
than two revolutions with a 3-jaw chuck mounted on it, it
will probably need backing off to run for a long period at
10,000 RPM.
)'*
+.3...)4'
To remove the existing standard pulley set on your Sherline
headstock and replace it with the 10,000 RPM pulley set,
follow the instructions below. Refer to Figure 2 on page 4
of these instructions or to the exploded view in your
Sherline Assembly and Instruction Guide for reference to
the standard pulley and speed control parts.
Removing the standard pulley set:
Because the motor pulley diameter had to be larger than the
center distance of the motor mounting holes, a relatively
complex set of parts had to manufactured to replace the two
inexpensive motor standoffs. These parts have to be
assembled in the proper sequence in order to work properly.
1. Remove the two socket head screws and washers that
hold the motor in position on the mounting bracket. Slip
the drive belt off the spindle pulley, remove the motor
and speed control unit and set it down on a folded towel
or padded surface to work on it.
2. Remove the socket head screw that holds the speed
control housing in place and pivot the speed control
upward on its hinge pins to expose the motor pulley. Lift
out the cover mounting plate (P/N 43130), which is
FIGURE 1—Exploded view of pulley assembly on motor
shaft including belt guard location. (Part numbers shown
in bold face come with P/N 4335 set.)
,--77
8
,--7.
-
1
,--7
,--7
,--78
positioned between the two halves of the belt guard.
(Note its position before removal to aid in reinstalling
it later.)
3. Remove the two long screws (P/N 43170) that go through
the belt guard and take off the outer belt guard (P/N
43160). (Make sure you don’t lose the nuts [P/N 41080]
that are inset into the rear belt guard. They may stick in
the holes or they may fall out.)
4. Remove the drive belt. Using the smallest hex key
provided with your machine, loosen the set screw in the
motor pulley (P/N 43360) and remove it from the motor
shaft.
5. Using an adjustable wrench, remove the two motor
standoffs (P/N 43100). The inner belt guard (P/N 43180)
can now be removed.
6. Loosen the set screw and remove the spindle pulley
(P/N 43230) from the spindle shaft on the headstock.
Installing the new 10,000 RPM pulley set:
1. Slip the inner belt guard (P/N 43180) over the motor shaft
and align the two outer holes with the appropriate holes
in the end of the motor. See the exploded view for
orientation of the motor and which two of the four holes
to use.
2. Slip the inner standoff half (P/N 43366) over the motor
shaft and attach it to the motor using the two 8-32 screws
(P/N 20970). (Tighten using the 9/64" hex key provided
with the kit.) Make sure the bosses on the back side
register in the holes in the belt guard and are fully seated.
3. Put the drive belt over the motor pulley (P/N 43680) and
slip the motor pulley and belt over the motor shaft.
Tighten the set screw against the flat of the motor shaft.
The pulley should be positioned close to the standoff but
not touching it. Look at the exploded view in Figure 1
above for correct orientation of the pulley. NOTE: The
pulley position can be readjusted and the setscrew can be
firmly tightened in place after the motor is mounted to
the headstock to assure proper belt alignment.
4. Attach the outer half of the standoff assembly to the inner
half using the two 10-32 x 3/4" socket head screws
(P/N 40690). Make sure the drive belt exits in the proper
location, with the leg of the standoff going through the
center of the belt circle.
5. Register the outer belt guard (P/N 43160) over the raised
bosses on the outside of the standoff assembly and attach
it to the inner belt guard using the long screws (P/N
43170) going into the inset nuts (P/N 43180) in the back
of the inner belt guard.
6. Put the new spindle drive pulley (P/N 43367) onto the
headstock spindle shaft and secure it by tightening the
set screw located in the groove of the smaller pulley. See
Figure 1 for orientation.
7. Lift the motor assembly into approximate position. Make
sure the drive belt is correctly fitted over the larger of the
motor pulley grooves and is not binding, and then slip
the other end of the drive belt over the smaller of the two
pulleys on the spindle pulley.
8. Register the holes in the end of the outer standoff housing
with the slots in the motor mounting bracket and loosely
install the two mounting screws with two washers on
each 10-32 x 3/4" screw.
9. Push the motor assembly away from the spindle to put
sufficient tension in the drive belt and tighten the screws
in the motor mount to hold it in position. The belt does
not have to be extremely tight to work properly. Pressing
on the belt with your finger halfway between the pulleys,
you should be able to depress it about 1/4" when properly
tightened. Turn the motor by hand to make sure the belt
is not rubbing anywhere and whole assembly turns
easily.
10. Insert one of the speed control housing hinge pins into
one of the “ears” on the rear of the belt guard. Push to
bend the ear slightly until the other pin can be seated in
the other ear.
11. Install the mounting bracket (P/N 43130) in the slots in
the two halves of the belt guard by setting it atop the two
molded-in rails. It should slide back and forth slightly.
12. Pivot the speed control housing downward and attach
it to the mounting bracket with the socket head screw
and washer to secure it in place.
*+.6...)4'
If you need to change pulley speed ranges on the standard
pulley set, it is done by simply pivoting the speed control
out of the way, loosening the motor mount and slipping the
drive belt from one pair of pulleys to the other. The 10,000
RPM pulley set, on the other hand, has very little clearance
between the belt and the inside of the motor standoff pair.
Therefore, it is necessary to remove the outer belt guard and
outer standoff half and loosen the motor pulley to move the
belt to the lower speed position. Here’s how:
1. Loosen the cap screws that hold the motor and speed
control to the motor mounting bracket, remove the drive
belt from the spindle pulley and set the motor unit down on
a padded surface to work on it.
2. Remove the speed control mounting screw and pivot the
speed control box upward.
3. Slide the mounting tab from between the belt guard
halves, noting its position for later reinstallation.
4. Remove the long screws P/N 43170 that hold the two
halves of the belt guard together and take off the outer belt
guard.
5. Remove the two P/N 40690 socket screws from the outer
standoff (P/N 43365) and take off the outer standoff.
6. Loosen the set screw (P/N 31080) in the groove of the
motor pulley and slide it far enough down the motor shaft
so that the pulley can be switched to the smaller pulley.
7. Move the pulley back into position and retighten the set
screw.
8. With the drive belt in place on the smaller pulley,
reinstall the outer standoff (P/N 43365) making sure the
belt exits in the proper location.
9. Reinstall the outer belt guard (P/N 43160) using the two
long screws.
10. Slip the drive belt over the large diameter groove of the
spindle pulley and remount the motor/speed control unit to
the machine. Push the motor outward on the motor mount
to tension the belt as the two mounting screws are tightened.
11. Reinstall the speed control housing pins between the
“ears” of the two halves of the belt guard.
12. Reinstall the mounting tab and swing the speed control
housing down into place. Attach with the mouunting screw.
'
The standard pulley set offers a speed range of 70-2800
RPM in normal position and 45-1400 in the “hi torque”
position. The 10,000 RPM pulley set actually offers a speed
range of from about 1500 to 10,200 RPM in the high speed
position and 150 to 2200 RPM in the low speed position.
Maximum RPM in the high speed position can be affected
by the preload setting. If the preload is set to the original
factory setting of 0.0002" of runout, it may not be possible
to achieve an actual 10,000 RPM. Loosening the preload to
the recommended high speed setting of 0.0003" of runout
should make speeds of 10,000 RPM possible.
—Joe Martin
President and owner
)(
• Make sure speed control knob is in the slowest position
before turning motor switch on, then adjust spindle speed
as needed.
• Parts or chucks rotated at high speed must be in balance.
Do not operate at high speed in an out-of-balance condition.
Also, do not spin a chuck that is not tightened on a part as
the scroll could unwind allowing the chuck jaws hit the
lathe bed.
• Shafts at either end of the spindle should be supported if
rotated at high speeds. An unsupported shaft that is slightly
out of center can suddenly whip and bend 90° if speed is
high enough.
• If headstock becomes too hot to hold your hand on it, the
preload is set to tight. Refer to the instructions to back off
the preload nut slightly.
FIGURE 2—This exploded view shows the standard pulley
arrangement as it comes with the regular motor and
headstock. It can be used to help you when removing the
standard parts for installation of the 10,000 RPM pulley
set. See Figure 1 for the parts that are different in that
installation.
5
$,'(*)_''-3+^,/
1*(*1*&/(v,)_(
127(7KHVHWZRVWDQGDUGSXOOH\VDQGPRWRU
VWDQGRIIVDUHUHSODFHGE\WKHQHZSXOOH\VDQG
VWDQGRIIVZKHQFRQYHUWLQJDVWDQGDUGKHDGVWRFN
PRWRUVSHHGFRQWUROXQLWWRWKH530SXOOH\VHW
)(!(7
,(']*"61.&++^'(
$:;
:&3$(%(<
"7$!_^/*('%*4/
!"7$
!"7+,(.*0/('(')4
!"7$
&('(,/*]]%,+]
//'(,/*]]%,+]
61.0/+.&++^
611*(*.&++^
!"#)&..*0/('(')4
*"40(%%,'(*)_6-*(*,/)*/(*+,(%]*++*40/2.,('
5
-*(* w/ external brushes
/&(
//3+(2&,
.)*/(*+)*`-*&/(0/2.+,(
%!/&(
.)*/(*+%0/2.+,(
1*(*'(,/*]]
&(3+(2&,
! "#.,/%,')4
.)*/(*+(,36'-,++
.)*/(*+(,36+,2
.)*/(*++)(*/0)'
.)*/(*+),'
$:;
:&3$(%(<
.)*/(*+.*(/(0*-(
*(/(0*-(4,'%
.)*/(*+_/*340(%'(')4
/"*]]'40()%
40()%_/&+*&//&(
!"#$
"#4,'%
.)*/(*++,3+
.*4)*6j*6jmq6&*.
0`3+(
+*,/&(
$,'(*)_3,0/2
$,'(*)_),'
.0/+
v,0/24,'%
1*(*-*&/(
!"#$
!"#$
!"#)&..*0/('(')4
" !"#)*/.*0/('(')4
z!#]+,(%,'%(-(,+')4
+](,..0/2')4
CHIP GU
ARD
GUARD
P/N 4360
WARNING! THE CHIP GUARD IS NOT INTENDED TO
ELIMINATE THE NEED FOR SAFETY GLASSES.
Always wear safety glasses whenever
operating machine tools.
MOTOR BRACKET
CHIP GUARD
The Chip Guard was developed both as a safety feature and
to help keep your work area cleaner by containing flying
chips to a smaller area. (This will be a particularly welcome
lathe on the
feature for those who operate their
kitchen table or anywhere inside the house.) It mounts
easily and swings up out of the way for easy access to the
Headstock when setting up a job. It is molded from clear
polycarbonate material to make it as easy as possible to
see what you are doing yet still be protected while working.
This material is used because it is strong and resistant to
impact. However, solvents are very hard on it, so only use
mild soapy water to clean it. Material selection is always a
compromise, and we believe this to be the safest choice.
MOUNTING THE CHIP GUARD
From the Motor Bracket, remove the 3/8" Socket Head
Cap Screw closest to the Spindle end of the Headstock.
Place the Chip Guard Hinge between the flanges of the
Bracket and run the longer 5/8" Socket Head Cap Screw
provided through the hole in the Chip Guard Hinge and
back into the original hole in the Headstock. The clear Chip
Guard will now rotate on the pivot screw to move up and
out of the way when setting up a job or back into place
before turning on the motor.
CHIP GUARD HINGE
FIGURE 1—The Chip Guard mounted on a
Lathe. The guard pivots up out of the way for access to
the spindle area.
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
NO. PART
REQ. NO.
1
4361
1
4362
1
4033
1
4070
1
3210
DESCRIPTION
Chip Guard
Chip Guard Hinge
10-32 x 5/8" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
10-32 x 1-3/4" Skt. Hd. Cap Screw
10-32 Nut
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
HORIZONTAL
MILLING
CONVERSION
NOTE: Part Number 6101 is
not included in Conversion
set. It is an optional
modification of your existing
column. See explaination on
page 2.
P/N 6100
With the HORIZONTAL MILLING CONVERSION
(P/N 6100), the mill spindle (in the horizontal position) can
be aligned with the X and Y axis. There are three places the
column can be mounted to the HORIZONTAL
CONVERSION base. When the spindle is lined up with
the “Y” axis the outer most position is for drilling and
milling (see POSITION A).
position, that is, with the “Y” axis handwheel away from
the
label (see POSITION B).
FIGURE 2-- Horizontal
Milling Conversion set up
in Position "B" to use long
"Y" axis travel..
FIGURE 1-- Horizontal
Milling Conversion set
up in Position "A" to
machine large surface
areas using long "X"
axis travel..
The closest position is used for milling. The configuration
of the work has a lot to do with the choice to be made, but
remember when milling, the closer the end mills are
mounted to the spindle bearings, the more rigid the set up.
The spindle can also be mounted lined up with the “X” axis
by reversing the “XY” table on the horizontal base and
mounting the column in the single set of holes.
To configure the machine so the spindle is over the “X”
axis, the “XY” base must be reversed from its normal
The advantage of this set up is you have 9" of throw from
the spindle nose and you could drill and bore a hole 8" from
the clamped down edge. If the mill was in its vertical
configuration the same edge would interfere with the
column. A point to consider is that any axis that moves the
work in and out from the end of the spindle becomes the
“Z” axis and the up and down of the column will usually be
called the “Y” axis when the mill is in a horizontal configuration.
The 1/4" x 1/2" alignment bars are clamped against the
column base and “XY” table after the machine is aligned so
it isn’t necessary to align it every time the configuration is
changed. How close the machine has to be aligned is
dependent on the work to be performed. A machinist
square from the milling table to the column bed (dovetail)
will usually be good enough, but a dial indicator would be
helpful for close tolerance work.
It is possible to move the “Y” axis saddle to the point the
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
POSITION "A"
POSITION "B"
FIGURE 3-- Shows suggested position of Mill and alignment bars mounted to Milling Conversion Table for each position.
Note that in Position "A", the vertical column and drive can also be mounted further toward the back of the table should
your set-up require it.
lead screw will disengage from the nut without the column
being in place (normally, it would hit the column base
before it could disengage).
The advantage of modifying the column (P/N 6101) for this
attachment is to allow the spindle center to go below the top
of the table. This allows a piece of material to be clamped
directly to the table and machine the edge overhanging the
table. We also modify the column saddle with another
alignment groove in the horizontal position. All vertical
milling machines manufactured after 1991 will come with
the groove cut. The column base is modified by cutting 2"
off and making it a spacer block and retapping what’s left
over. This allows the column to be mounted with or without
the spacer in either the horizontal or vertical configuration.
If you have access to a saw and mill, you could make these
modifications yourself. The drawings are included for
these modifications.
A part held vertical with the right angle plate can have a 9"
x 6" area that can be machined without moving the work.
If you think about it, that’s a lot of movement for a machine
of this size.
We believe you will find this a useful accessory. The
RIGHT ANGLE PLATE (P/N 3701) will also be very
useful with the HORIZONTAL MILLING CONVERSION.
CLAMPING INSTRUCTIONS
To clamp the column to the HORIZONTAL MILLING
CONVERSION plate, use the 1" x 1/4-20 Socket Head
Cap Screw (SHCS) - (2 included)—use the 3" x 1/4-20
SHCS (2 included) when the spacer block is used.
To clamp the column to the “XY” base, use the 1-3/4" x 1/
4 - 20 SHCS (2 included). Use the 3-3/4" x 1/4-20 SHCS
(2 included) when the spacer block is used.
The alignment bars and the “XY” table are held to the base
with 5/8" x 1/4-20 SHCS (10 included).
HORIZONTAL MILLING CONVERSION
(P/N 6100) REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
NO. PART
REQ. NO.
1
4056
2
5022
1
6102
1
6103
2
6104
4
6110
10 6111
2
6112
2
6113
2
6114
1
6115
-2-
DESCRIPTION
3/16" Hex key
1-3/4" X 1/4-20 Skt Hd Cap Screw
Horizontal Mill Base
6.3" Alignment Bar
2.8" Alignment Bars
Rubber Feet with 1/2" x10-32 Skt Hd Cap Screws
5/8" x 1/4-20 Skt Hd Cap Screws
1" x 1/4-20 Skt Hd Cap Screws
3" x 1/4-20 Skt Hd Cap Screws
3-3/4" x 1/4-20 Skt Hd Cap Screws
Horizontal Milling Instructions
6100
Right Hand Left Hand
Cutting Tool Cutting Tool
Boring Tool
GRINDING YOUR OWN
LATHE TOOLS
As with any machining operation, grinding requires the
utmost attention to “Eye Protection”. Be sure to use it
when attempting the following instructions.
My first experience in metal cutting was in high school.
The teacher gave us a 1/4" square tool blank and then
showed us how to make a right hand cutting tool bit out of
it in a couple of minutes. I watched closely, made mine in
ten minutes or so, and went on to learn enough in one year
to always make what I needed. I wasn’t the best in the
class, just a little above average, but it seemed the below
average students were still grinding on a tool bit three
months into the course. I believe these students didn’t have
the confidence in themselves to work with their hands.
Grinding lathe tools is easy, and the only reason we sell
them is to help a beginner get started. If you are to be
successful in making metal parts on a lathe, you have to
teach yourself to grind tool bits.
Consider a Carpenter who didn’t have the confidence to
drive a nail because he was worried about missing the nail
and hitting his thumb. He/she wouldn’t be in the trade very
long! Some things you do in trades require a positive
approach and tool grinding is one of them. If you keep
stopping to see if you’re grinding it correctly you’ll not only
waste a lot of time, but will end up with a less than perfect
cutting edge. Set up the grinder correctly and do it! It
shouldn’t take but a few minutes to make simple cutting
tools and only a few seconds to resharpen them.
A bench grinder doesn’t have to be expensive to work well,
but it does require good “wheels” for high speed steels. Try
to find a source for grinding wheels from an industrial
supplier. Some of the wheels that come with inexpensive
grinders wouldn’t sharpen a butter knife. Sixty grit is a good
place to start. A wheel dresser is also a necessity. They
cost less and are readily available from good hardware
stores.
FIGURE 1-- A Wheel Dressing Tool and spare "star
wheel " sharpening insert.
Grinding wheels should be considered cutting tools and
have to be sharpened. A wheel dresser sharpens by “breaking
off” the outer layer of abrasive grit from the wheel with star
shaped rotating cutters which also have to be replaced from
time to time. This leaves the cutting edges of the grit sharp
and clean.
A sharp wheel will cut quickly with a “hissing” sound and
with very little heat by comparison to a dull wheel. A dull
wheel produces a “rapping” sound created by a "loaded up"
area on the cutting surface. In a way, you can compare what
happens to grinding wheels to a piece of sandpaper that is
being used to sand a painted surface; the paper loads up,
stops cutting, and has to be replaced.
For safety, a bench grinder should be mounted to something heavy enough so it will not move while being used.
The tool support must be used and should be set at approximately 7°. Few people have the skill to make tools without
a tool support and in essence it’s wasted effort. Tool
supports are usually made up of two pieces that allow you
to set your tool rest above or below center. It really doesn’t
matter whether its above or below as long as the support is
at 7°.
GRINDING WHEEL
7°
7°
TOOL REST
7°
FIGURE 2--Set tool rest at any height, but at 7° angle from
centerline of wheel.
The reason tool supports are designed like this is so they
can be used for a variety of uses, not just tool bits. What this
means is that if the tool support is above or below center it
must be adjusted as the wheel diameter changes.
Modellbauwerkzeug & Präzisionsmaschinen G .m.b.H.
Modelmaking & Precision Tools Ltd. Vienna / Austria
Fabriksgasse 15, A-2340 Mödling info@thecooltool.com
phone:+43-2236-892 666 fax: +43-2236-892666-18
(4mm) of side 1.
This is where the “positive approach” comes in. Unless
you push the tool into the wheel with enough pressure, the
tool will bounce around and you’ll never get a good flat
cutting surface. It isn’t necessary to worry about getting
the tool too hot. Modern day tool steels don’t anneal and a
little discoloration doesn’t effect the tool life in tool room
use. What you should worry about is not burning yourself
or grinding the tips of your fingers off! Concentrate on
holding the 10° angle while moving back and forth. We’ll
give this edge a final sharpening later; it’s time for side 2.
GRINDING SIDE 2 OF THE TOOL
Now it’s time to make a tool, and whether you turn this job
into a major project is up to you!
When working around grinders it is an absolute
necessity to wear EYE PROTECTION. Grinding
debris is thrown out at high velocities and can damage
not only eyes, but also expensive glasses. Wear
safety glasses or a full face shield.
If you’ve never sharpened a tool, take a close look at how
ours are sharpened. Let’s duplicate the right hand tool on
the opposite end of the blank. Be careful you don’t cut
yourself on the blank or the sharpened end while working
with it.
First dress the wheel by taking the dresser and setting it on
the tool support square with the wheel and while applying
a light pressure move the dresser back and forth with the
grinder running. Unless the wheel is in bad shape, it should
be ready to use in a few passes.
GRINDING SIDE 1 OF THE TOOL
Turn off the grinder and set the tool support for approximately 7° if you haven’t done it yet. If you’re not good at
tool to
guessing at angles use a presharpened
set the angle. Metal cutting tools are very tolerant on
angles. I’ve always found wood cutting tools more difficult to sharpen. Too little angle and the “heel” of the tool
will rub, too much angle will cause the tool to “dig in” and
chatter.
TOP OF TOOL
LESS THAN 90°
FIGURE 6--Grinding side 2.
The reason angle B is ground less than 90° is to allow the
tool to get into corners.
PART
TIP
TOOL
FIGURE 7--Properly ground tool
cutting into a corner.
Side 2 is ground the same way as side 1, moving the tool
back and forth until you have a point. After you get side
2 ground, cool the tool in the cup of water.
Now I want you to learn another aspect of tool grinding.
It’s important to know when you have ground the surface
up to the cutting edge, especially when resharpening lathe
tools. Take the tool you just ground and bring it up to the
wheel at a slightly different angle than you just ground for
this experiment. Watch the point that touches the wheel
first
HEEL
FIGURE 3-- Heel of tool.
Have a cup of water handy to cool the tool with and set the
blank on the tool rest and start grinding side 1.
GRINDING
WHEEL
10°
FIGURE 4--Grinding Side 1.
TOOL REST
SPARKS
A
1/4" -3/16"
(NOTE: Because of 7°
angle on tool rest, side of
tool is actually cut first.)
B
TIP
SPARKS AT
TIP OF TOOL
FIGURE 5--Properly TOP OF TOOL
ground side 1.
FIGURES 8A-- Tip not yet ground flat and 8B, Tool
ground flat all the way to the tip.
and you will notice that the sparks will bounce off the
Move the blank back and forth across the face of the wheel
until you have ground a 10° angle on approximately 3/16"
-2-
TOOL GRINDING
cutting edge only where the wheel has ground from top to
bottom.
This tells you when the tool has been sharpened without
taking it away to look which allows you to grind flat and
true surfaces. If you sharpen a tool for a SHERLINE lathe,
use a 1/4" square tool blank and keep the cutting edge up to
the top of the blank; the tool will come out on center
without shims. You will have to be precise grinding the
third side to accomplish this.
GRINDING SIDE 3
set against the wheel on the same plane as when you first
ground side 1. If the tool is held too rigid, it will not align
itself, too loose and it will bounce around.
"BREAKING" THE POINT
Use the same method on side 2. The tool should be ready
to use except for the point. I always put about a .010
(.2mm) "break" on the point by holding the tool with the
point aimed at the wheel face. Because two angles converge at the point, the angle in relation to the sides is
greater. Think about it!
ROTATE
TOOL
A
B
APPROX. 15°
FIGURE 11--Putting a
.010" "Break" on the
tip of the tool.
GRIND UNTIL SPARKS
JUST REACH TIP OF TOOL
ANGLES APPROX. EQUAL
TOP OF TOOL
This means that if you set the tool flat on the tool rest the
tool rest angle would have to be increased to get an even
flat. This wouldn’t be worth the effort, so the easy way is
to free hand it. I always start by touching the heel of the tool
first, and then change the angle until a slight flat is put on
the tip. Of course, the angle you’re holding it at has to be
close when starting to get desired results.
FIGURE 9--Grinding the "Hook" into side 3.
Use the skill you have developed grinding the second side
now. Set the blank on the support with the 10° (side 1) up.
The tool has to be brought up to the grinding wheel with a
slight angle so you don’t grind the tip below center. With
the tool setting on the rest, move the tool in and grind until
you see sparks bouncing off the cutting edge where the
corner of the wheel is lined up with the back part of the 10°
face. When this happens, slowly decrease the angle without pushing the tool in any more until sparks bounce all the
way to the tip. Stop as soon as this happens. You may
inspect it, and the surface should be entirely ground. The
recommended way is to put more “hook” on the tool than
I have suggested, but I have found that the slight increase
in performance is offset by the problems encountered
resharpening these tools.
A
B
SIDE
FRONT
SIDE
FRONT
FIGURE 12--Handholding the tool to "Break" the point
saves resetting the angle on the tool rest.
The purpose of this flat is to improve finish and tool life.
I don’t recommend a large radius on the tip of tools used on
small machines. These machines are not rigid enough to
get the desired results from this practice and cause “chatter”
problems.
The finished product should be a right handed tool, have
FIGURES 10A--Normally recommended "hook" ground
into tool and 10B, Simpler method suggested for Uniturn
tools.
To put the finishing touches on your tool, you have to “kiss
off” sides 1 and 2 again. You must carefully line up side 1
with the wheel and bring it to the wheel in a positive manner
with very little pressure; watch for the sparks on the cutting
edge. What you’re trying to accomplish is to make the tool
-3-
TOOL GRINDING
flat cutting surfaces (except for the radius caused by the
wheel), have a slight flat on the tip, and a tip angle of less
than 90°.
SHAPE OF PART
DESIRED
will do all their
Tools used on lathes such as the
cutting at the tip of the tool because they don’t have the
horsepower for 1/4" (6 mm) cuts.
I don’t recommend using oil stones to improve the edges.
After a few minutes use with an occasional dab of cutting
oil a properly sharpened tool will hone itself in.
I always believe the final sharpening to a tool should take
place with the wheel cutting the cutting edge of the tool
from the top of the tool to the bottom when using bench
grinders.
I realize I’ve given a great deal of information on how to do
what I call a simple operation, but these are very complex
instructions to write because I’m trying to tell you how to
control your hands, not a simple machine.
Incidentally, the reason we call a tool a right handed tool
when the cutting edge is on the left is because it is designated by which way the chip leaves the cutting tool.
Cutting tools such as left or right handed tin snips are also
designated in this manner because the cut-off falls to the
left or right.
The left hand tools are ground the same as right, in the same
order with the angles reversed.
BORING TOOLS
A
STEP 1
STEP 2
B
FORM
TOOL
FIGURES 14A--A Typical Form Tool made by a custom
toolmaking shop and 14B, a home shop method of achieving
the same finished shape in two steps with a tool that can be
ground on a bench grinder.
This type of tool is usually made by Tool and Cutter
specialists that have high shop rates using precision grinders, diamond dressers, and a large variety of wheels available to them.
All is not lost if we have a good pair of hands with a good
mind driving them! We can use the grinding wheel corners
on our grinder and generate the shape 1/2 at a time on each
side of the tool and still get our job done.
Form tools don’t need any top relief (hook) to work. Use
low spindle RPM and steady feed rates to prevent chatter.
The width of a form tool should never exceed three times
the smallest diameter of the finished part.
Like any skill, tool grinding is one that has to develop with
time. It is also the skill that allows you to go one step
beyond the average hacker.
SIDE VIEW
H.S. TOOL BITS AVAILABLE FROM
PART
NO.
1195
1196
1197
1200*
3005
3005B
3007
BOTTOM VIEW
FIGURE 13--Typical Boring Tool.
Boring tools are the most difficult to grind. They should
always be made as rigid as possible. Tool angles around
the “tip” can be the same as any cutting tool, but clearances
of the tool body have to be considered carefully. A tool
ground with enough clearance for a finished hole may not
have enough clearance to start with when the hole has a
smaller diameter. If you have to bore a hole in a part that
has a lot of work in it, have a tool ready to use that’s been
checked out on a piece of scrap.
FORMTOOLS
Form tools are used to create a shape the same as the tool.
To grind form tools, a pattern of the finished shape should
be at hand and there should be some possibility of success
with what you have to work with. You can’t grind a 1/8"
(3 mm) groove into your tool 1/4" (6 mm) deep with a 1/2"
(12 mm) wide wheel.
DESCRIPTION
H.S. STEEL CUTTING TOOL, RIGHT
H.S. STEEL CUTTING TOOL, LEFT
H.S. STEEL CUTTING TOOL, BORING
H.S. STEEL INTERNAL THREADING TOOL
H.S. STEEL 1/4" SQUARE TOOL BLANK
H.S. STEEL TOOL BLANKS (5-BULK)
H.S. STEEL SET (RIGHT, LEFT, BORING)
*NOTE, the Internal threading tool is very difficult to
make on just a bench grinder. If a precision thread is
required, I recommend you buy our P/N 1200 which is
preground.
-4-
TOOL GRINDING
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising