null  null
I
w
your purchase of a FISHER in\trument you have completed a chain of events that began n i a n y nionths ago, in our
rewnrch Inhoratories. For it is there that thc basic concept of the
equipment you have just acquired came into being - its appearance.
its functions, its quality of performance. its convenience of use.
Remember always that we want this equipment to give you the best
performance of which it is capable. Should you at any time need
our assistance toward that objective, please write me personally.
But the end step- your purchase- is merely ;i beginning. A door
h a s now opened, for you and your family, on virtually unlimited
years of musical enjoyment. Recognizing that one of the keys to
pleasurable ownership is reliability, we have designed this instrument to give long and trouble-free service. I n fact, instruments we
made over twenty-three years ago are still in use today.
Many hours have been spent by our engineers *andtechnical writers
to create this instruction book for your guidance and enjoyment.
If you want the musr out of your FISHER, there is only one way
to obtain it. With the e q u i p m e n t before you, please read this booklet carefully. I t will be time well spent!
ITH
AN IMPORTANT SUGGESTION
.
Fourider and President
1937
1931
1931
1938
1938
1939
1939
1939
1945
1948
1949
1952
1952
1953
First high-fidelity sound systems featuring a
beam-power amplifier, inverse feedback, acoustic speaker compartments (infinite baffle and
bass reflex) and magnetic cartridges.
First exclusively high fidelity TRF tuner, featuring broad-tuning 20,000 cycle fidelity.
First two-unit high fidelity system w i t h separate
speaker Prtclosure.
First coaxial speaker system.
First high fidelity tuner with amplified AVC.
First Dynamic Range Expander,
First 3-Way Speaker i n a high fidelity system.
First Center-of-Channel Tuning indicator.
First Preamplifier-Equalizer with selective phonograph equalization.
First Dynamic Range Expander w i t h feedback.
First FM-AM Tuner with variable AFC.
First 50-Watt, all-triode amplifier.
First self-powered Master Audio Control.
First self-powered, electronic sharp-cut-off f i l t e r
system for high fidelity use.
Milestones In the History of High Fidelity Reproduction
1953
1953
1954
1954
1955
1955
1955
1956
1956
1956
1956
1956
1956
1957
1957
First Universal Horn-Type Speaker Enclosure for
any room location and any speaker.
First FM-AM Receiver w i t h a Cascode Front End.
First low-cost electronic Mixer-Fader.
First moderately-priced, professional FM Tuner
w i t h TWO meters.
First Peak Power Indicator in high fidelity.
First Master Audio Control Chassis w i t h fiveposition mixing facilities.
First correctly equalized, direct tape-head master audio controls and self-powered preamplifier.
First to use Power Monitor i n a home amplifier.
First All-Transistorized Preamplifier-Equalizer.
First dual dynamic limiters in an FM tuner for
home use.
First Performance Monitor in a high quallty
amplifier for home use.
First FM-AM tuner w i t h TWO meters.
First complete graphic response curve indicator
for bass and treble.
First Golden Cascode FM Tuner,
First MicroRay Tuning Indicator.
1958
1959
1959
1959
7 960
1960
1960
1960
1960
1960
1960
1960
First Stereophonic Radio-Phonograph with M a g
netic Stereo Cartridge.
First high-quality Stereo Remote Control System.
First complete Stereophonic FM-AM Receiver (FMAM tuner, audio control, 40-watt amplifier).
First high-compliance plus high-efficiency freepiston speaker system.
First to use MicroRay for FM tuning and as a
Recording Audio Level Indicator.
First complete stereo FM-AM receiver with 60watt power amplifier and new 7591 output tubes.
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.,accepts
for i t s collection America’s first commercially
manufactured high fidelity radio-phonograph,
made by Avery Fisher in 1937.
First reverberation device. for use i n high fidelity
equipment - The Fisher Dynamic Spacexpander.
First stereo tuner with MicroTune.
First FM tuner w i t h six IF stages.
First FM tuner w i t h five limiters.
First front panel antenna selector switch, 72-300
ohm, Local-Distant positions.
I
I
I
L
THE FISHER 800-6
ST E REOPHONI C
FAA-AM and Multiplex Receiver
T
I ~ Ev i x y L A TE S T T E C H N I Q [ ~ E S in audio eiigiricering design have
ticen incorporated in the FISHER 800-23, resu!llng in a stereophonic rc-c.c.iver of t r u l y outstanding quality which i, \ irtually obsolescence-proof. With the addition of a pair o f Ypeakers and a
record player, the 800-B. with 65-watts of hlusic. Power, becomes
I paised in scope
the nucleus of a complete high-fidelity s p t e n i u ~ i w
of feature. and q u a l i t y of performance. T h e 1300.13 is capable of
reproducing both FhI-.4hl stereo broadcasts and tht. n e w FM multiples Ltcreo-icithout
the need for adding exlerritrl cidaptors of any
kind. I’hc F\I tuning indicator r a n also be used as a Stereo Beam
indicator. signalling instantly when the station tuned to broadcasts
n m u l t i p l e s ztertto program. A special noise filter i h included, which
has n o vffect on the freqnenc.y rangc of the riiiiltii~les program.
l’h e t i i g h 1: ;en si t 1ve I:i\I t 11n e r u t il i zcs w i de-t )a 11r i d t’ 1 g n t h rougho u t
t n c i ~ - i l l ~ uriparallelr~ti
~ t
irredniii from distortion nnci superb perfo: m a n w o n FJi multiplex programs. ‘rhv :\ 11 t i i i 1 t ’ i includes a
tuneci RF mi)lifier f o r estra sensitivity and eithc.1 broad or sharp
C.
handwidth for maximum fidrlity on local stations without sacrificing
selectivity and sensititsity when receiving conditions are more difficdt. T h e blaster ,4udio Control of the 800-8 includes the: full
range of functions found o n elaborate professional installations,
including such features as s h a r p cut-off Low and High filters, Tape!
hlonitor facilities. nnd a Phase Reverse switch. The final link in
this chain of superbly engineered, integrated audio components is
the dual-channel 65-watt power amplifier, capable of driving the most
inefficient loudspeakers to full room volume with ease.
The remarkable performance of the 800-B is assured for many
years to come l y the craftsmanship arid careful attention to every
detail of manufacture which have made FISHER quality famous.
We tire qure that y o u r appreciation of the 800-R will grow with
time, as i t handles P1er-y miisicnl assigriment with that degree of
perfection that only n top-quality electronic instrument con provide.
A NOTE ON STEREOPHONIC SOUND
S
a ginnt step forwutd in the history of high
fidelity music reproduction. This unique dual-channel system
offers a distinct ad\ antage over monophonic (single-channel) systems
becaiise of two iniportant audio characteristics: the dimensions of
direction and c l v p ~ h .These live sound qualities are for the most part
missing i n nionophonic systems because recoidings are made and reproduced over a single channel. This is somewhat analogous to listening to niusic with one ear. Stereophonic recording techniques, however. utilize two separate banks of microphones, positioned in the left
and right sections of the orchestra. In this arrangement, the microphones detect the musical sounds in much the same manner as the
two ears of a listener. The sound picked up by each bank of microphones is then ied to independent channels and recorded on disksor
tape, o r transmitted ovCr scporote channels of a stereophonic
broadcast.
IEH~.:OI~~IC
S o~ t~i R~ DI Cis
:
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
INSTALLING THE 800-6
FOR THE ‘MAN
IN A HURRY’
OPERATING THE 800-B
3
7
8
CUSTOM MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS
13
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
15
To reproduce stereophonic realism in the home, two separate sound
channel.; lire required to achieve the stereophonic effect. The stereo
sound output o f n rer*ord player, tape recorder or tuner is fed to two
sepnrate anniiliher c.hannel\. which in turn drive two separate speaker
q-stems-. ‘I‘Iiu+. instruments lorated on the left side of the orchestra
are h c a r t i [It cdominaritly i n the speaker to your left: instruments on
the right side of the orchestra are heard predominantly in the speaker
to pour right: Jvhile instruments located in the center appear to be
heard midway between the two speaker systems. T h e result is a startling sense of presence such as is normally experienced only a t a live
orchestral performance.
FM MULTlPLEX STEREO
F
M BROADCASTING has a frequency range
henring range. For esampIe, Fisher
frequency range which extends to 75 kc,
range does not exceed 17 kc. This extra
far in excess of the normal
wide-band tuners have B
while the normal hearing
“space” in the frequency
0
m
u
0
0
f
Y
c
Iy
UJ
LL
2
3
m
3
-5
c
8
ares. It has txrn found t h a t the aural CfTt‘vt of stereophonic sound
i - enhanced I+ 1 1 ~ 1 1 two itlrntic~slspeakcr
ti’nis are used. Although
111e5e p i incipivs c a n w r w as a geiirral s t i l l t ing point in placing
y o u 1 loridyeakei,i. w f i +trongIy re(mniiiiei1d that yoit experiment with
set era1 cliffercnt arriinpt~nrentstwfore d c c i d i t ~ gon n final placement.
l’lic iiripredirtable effects rcsuiting from 1 \ 1 1 niture arrangement and
irregularities i n room dimensions may In:iLrs ii~iorthodoxplacement of
t 11c 1o u d s pea k e I‘S 11e c c ssa ry .
After the i n i t i n l loc.atiuii of the loud*pr~,ihers has been decided
upon, make the followiiig connections:
4
t
ONE SPEAKER: If you are rising o n l y oiic speaker teniporarily,
connwt it to the LEFT SPKR terminal l t r p (one on each speaker
terminal strip with ordinary power cold or heavy-duty TV antenna
twinlead. Surh cables may be up to 50 feet in length. Then connect an 8- to 10-ohm resistor rated at a iiiiiiimum of 10 watts to
the C K D a n d “3” lugs on the Right SptAaker terminal lug. The
short wire proti iicling from the chassis 4iuuld lie connected to
the “4”, “8”, o r ”16” lug on the Left Speaker Impedance Selector
terminal strip. depending on the impcrlntice of your loudspeaker,
TWO SPEAKERS: Connec,t the speaker 0 1 1 your left ( a s viewed from
the listening a r e a ) to the terrniiial lug+ iu‘irkcd LEFT S P K R ( o n e
on each speaker terminal s t r i p ) , Detertiiiiie the impedance of your
speaker and ronnert the short wire pt‘otr uding from the chassis
to tlie corresponding terminal lug oti thc h i t Speaker Impedance
Selector terminal strip. The speaker on your right should be connected
to the Right Speaker terminal strip, t~ctween the GND lug and the
“S”, “8”, or “16” lug, depending on the impedance of the speaker.
Ordinary power cord or heavy-duty TV antenna twinlead up to
50 feet in length may be used for these connections.
Antennas
‘The 800-8 is supplied with a h i l t - i n ferrite loop antenna for AM
reception. ‘This antcnno provides supcrior rcjcction of noise and static
and should prove morc than adeqiiate for all but extreme longdistaiicv applications. Thc3 antenna shoi1ld be moved to the rear
a n d downward for best reception. Tlie foi ward position is used for
sliip1)in~only. Sincc this type of antenna is somewhat directional,
the 800-B chassis should be rotated to deterrninr the orientation
wiiirh proVide+ the [Jest reception. For long-distance reception, a
long wirt. antenna (‘an be added to the 800-B by removing the strap
a c r o s t h e A h I :Intenria terminals on the rent panel and connecting
the long wire to the left terminal.
A folded dipole FM antenna is included with the 800-B.The two
arms of this antenna should be horizontal and away from all large
metal objects and electrical wiring for best results. If the 800-B
is used in close prosimity to one or more powerful Fhl stations, the
two wires from this antenna should be connected to the LOC terminals on the FM AntenIw terminal strip on the rear panel. This
will prevent such stations from overloading the sensitive input
stages of the 800-B FM tuner. If an Fhl station is not located
nearby, the DIST terminals should be used. After the antenna has
been connected and the 800-€3 put in operation, the antenna should
be rotated horizontally, to determine the orientation for best reception. In apartment Iiuildings and other Luildings using steel structural supports. reception can be improved by placing the antenna
close to n window. If tacks or staples are used to fasten the
antenna i n p1ac.e. be sure that they do not contact the two conductors running along each edge of the antenna wire and avoid
fastening the antenna directly to a wall. If necessary. the antenna
may he placed under a carpet, but as a general rule, reception
improves as tlie height of the antenna is increased. T h e antenna
should never be folded or coiled,
FM multiples requires stronger signals for low noise levels than
ordinary monophonic programs. You may find, therefore, that place*merit of the antenna may have to be improved for good multiplex
reception. I n some cases, especially in fringe areas, a n outdoor
rooftop antenna or even a highly directional yngi type may be
ileeded for multiples rereption, even though the. iiidoor antenna
suffices for movoptioiiic transmisions. Outdoor antcnnas should he
connertrd to the DIST tcrniinals.
Record Players and Changers
hlngiietic or ceramic phonograph cartridges call IJCplayed through
the 800-R. The PHONO i n p u t jack5 are. us;rd for a magnetic
cartriclce a n r l the PILX i n p u t s ore used for ;i cc~rninic rcirtridge.
If you ciiiitiot ascertaiii whi,*li of the two leads from the' record player
is the (,hanncl A o u t p u t and which is ~ l i cChaiinr*l I? output, connect
tliern L O the 1300-8 nnd li?tprl for normal plncvtnc‘lit of the instruments 011 a symphonic stereo record. If the v i o l i i i .set-tion appears
to be lorated o n the right, reverse the leads from t h c b phonograph.
The (:Iiaiiiiel Reverse %witc*hniny bc used to c*hcc*k this listening
test. ’ I ‘ h c ~ instruments G I i n u l t l l)e properly plarcd \r 1 t h the Channel
Revers. switch i n the OFF position. (Spwial te.1 r w n r d s may also
be o1,tainerl from yoilr rword dealer.)
tapes while the); are being recorded, and to have the full use of all
the audio control facilities of the 800-B during ordinary playback
of previously recorded tapes. Connections ore as follows:
STEREOPHONIC TAPE RECORDER:
1-Connect the Channel A output of the tape recorder to the
A TAPE hION jack on the rear panel.
2-Connect the Channel B output of the tape recorder to the
R TAPE MON jack on the rear panel.
3- Connect the Cliuririel A input of the tape recorder to the
A RCRDR OUT jack.
4-Connect the Channel B input of the tape recorder to the
H KCRDR OUT jack.
MONOPHONIC TAPE RECORDER:
1-Connecl
tlw o u t p u t of the tape recorder to the Channel A
TAI’E hION jack on the rear panel of the 800-B.
2-(:onnec*t the i r i p u t of the tape recorder to the A RCRDR OUT
on the rear panel.
jii(*k
NOTE: During i i l i i ) 1)ac.k of your tapes, place the Mono-Stereo
$witch i n the R I O N O position for sound from hoth speaker systems.
T o monitor tapes through both speakers as the tapes are being
I-ccordcd (on recorders with separate record and playback heads
( J n l ) ’ ) , the o i i t ~ t i i t of the recorder n i w t lie conncctcd to both T.4PE
hlON input jacks. This can easily be done by obtaining a “Y“ connector o r IJY splicing together two shielded cables.
Tape Decks
A t a p e deck i- t h v 1:ipe transport mechanism without the electronic
preamplificrs found i n tape recorders. S u c h t a p det k~ m a y he played
through the 800-8 b y connecting the Channel A ( o r Left output
5
nil the tape derk to the jack on the
N W R 111i1rkedChannel A TAPE
HEAD. ’I’hc Channel H ( o r Kight)
O I I I ~ I ~ I from
L
the tape deck
should be cwnriected to the CIianneI 13 ‘l‘;\f’K HEAD jack. A monophonic, tape deck should be connectecl I O [hc Channel A TAPE
FI E AD jack.
Spacexpander
The FISI-IER St-’u(‘‘.t/-’ciri(ler. hIodel K- 10, Y U I I he connected to the
800-B hy u$ing t h e ppecial Spacc~xpcznder jn(7ks on the rear panel.
Before in.tiilli;lp the .?’pcicc.z.pnniler. remn\ t. 111(~ L W O jumper wires between the Spnce.ipnnder jacks hut retail1 tile jumpers for possible
future uhe. These jiinipcrs must he iiisertcd w h e n the Spncexpurider
i s not conriected or t h e 800-B will hr coriiplctclp inoperative. Make
the following connections to the ,Space~purtt/er:
6
I
l--Chatinel A TO RE\’ERB OUT javk o i i l l i e 800-B to the Channel A 0U’I‘PIJ”T‘ jack on tlw Sptrcesparicier..
2-Cliannel
D ‘1’0 REJ’ERR OU‘I’ jark
R OU‘TPU‘I’ jack
(311
t h o 800-B to the Channel
on tlic Spac~cxpiirrrlcr.
3--C:hanncl A ‘I’O KE\’ERB I N jnt\k on thr M I - B to the Chnnnel A
1N P U l jack on the ,Spnce,xpunder.
4-Channel
B TO REVERB I N jark
INPUT jack on the Spuceipander.
011
the 800-B to the Channel B
Center Channel
A center channel speaker nnd sel,uratr power tlmplifier may be
added to \ h e sound system of your 8017-H 115’ connecting the additional amplifier to the CENTER CH OU‘I‘I’UT jock on the rear
panel. Srich an amplifier should have n i.olume or input level
control, b u t tone controls are not necessary sirice these are provided
by the 800-B. After an initial adjustment of thc center channel
volume on the additional power amplifier, the Volume control on
the front panel of the 800-B can be used to v a v the volume level
of all three speak?‘ systems simultaneously. If the left and right
s p d e r s must he placed far apart in your listening room, resulting
in an apparent “hole-in-the-middle” of the stereophonic sound pattern, a renter channel speaker will be found particularly effective
in restoring a naturally balanced curtain of sound.
System Grounding
The screw t~rrmiiial marked GND on the upper (Left Speaker)
terminal niiiy he risetl to ground the motor and tone arm of your
rerortl player i n order 10 reduce hum. The ciinssis ground of other
components ma:< also lie connected to this terminal if desired.
Speaker Phasing
‘4ftt.r having read the wction on operation of the 8UU-B, perform
the following siic.aker phasing adjustment:
1-Play
i\
r n o r ~ o p h o n i crcc
~ orti with prominent bass material.
the I’haw Rc\c*rw Switch to ON and then to OFF, and
tliv
5oiiiicl of thr l)a+.;
ton^+ under each condition. You
m a y f i i l t l i t h ( ~ 1 p ~ t t to
I tiirn the Bass controls clockwise and the
1 retjic cotitrot+ ( criiriIrrc,loc.krvise during t h k test.
2-Slitlr
ronil)arc.
r .
%-If
thr IMC.; w i i i ~ i fl r~~ l l r rarid richer with the Phase Reverse switch
ofi t h r s power L O the 800-B and reverse the leads to the
left speaker. ’l’hen place the Phase Reverse switch in the OFF
posit io 11.
ON,
tirrri
&If
the has.; sor~nd is fuller w i t h the Phase Reverse switch OFF,
your speakers are ulrwrly in phase and no further adjustments
are n e w s i r g . Ketiirn the Phase Reverse switch to the OFF position.
5-If yoti are using a Center Channel speaker, perform the same
listening test while rcver4ng the center speaker leads. The Phase
Reverse switch has no effect on the center speaker.
A SHORT OPERATING GUIDE FOR THE'MAN IN A HURRY'
1
I
7
I
I
r
P
I
STEP 2
STEP 3
STEP 1
Set SELECTOR switch to the program
source you wish to hear.
PHONO to listen to a record.
I
Set MONO-STEREO switch to
r
I
.
MVNU tor monopnonic pro-
Turn on power by turn-
I
nrmmc
y'UII1.l.
I
~
MPX STEREO to listen to a multiplex
FM program.
FM for monophonic FM programs.
F M - A M STEREO for FM-AM stereo
I
I
I
~
A
L
~
A
STEREO for stereo programs.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
:.-- \ f f i I f r A A C l,,A,,,
1119
~ W L U I I I C LUllllUl
-l:-L+i.*
-I--L..,:ee
..-+:I
3 l l u l l l l ~L l U L K W I > G U l l l l l
U
I
:II
+
clicks. Adjust later for
desired volume.
p r o s rams.
A M for monophonic AM,
TAPE to listen to a tape recorder,
NOTE: Set all other switches a n d controls in the position shown.
I
I
I
'I'his adju.;trnent will assure that thr qlt5;ikers in your system
"push" and ''pull" i n unison, instead of in upposition--an important
consideration in achieving the maximtiin stcreo eflrct and good low
frequency sound.
OPERATING
Y
OI'R80O-B
is now ready for opcration, h u t like any other fine
piere of electronic equipment. i t niust IN: operated correctly in
order to deliLer its f u l l capabilities. Q'e iirge you to read these
instructions carefully in order to uchiet-ci optitiium results.
Volume Conirol
0
The: j'olume control regulates the total volume of sound from
the speakers. The AC Power switch is combined with this control,
and the power is turned off a t the estic~me left position. This
switch also controls the two power outlets on the rear panel. The
l'olurne control ctianges the sound I ~ v e lf r o m both channels simultaneously. t h u s making it unnecessary to tinlance the channels each
time you change the volume.
Loudness Contour Switch
The Loudness Contour switch is ~ist*(I10 add compensation for
the natural deficiency of the humaii eat i n the extreme bass and
trehle ranges a t low volumcs. With t h i q c w i t c h i n the ON position,
an increacing enipha3ir; of low Imss and high trehle tones is added
;is the \'oltinic control is turned couiiturr,luck,vise, resulting in a
more natural sound a t low volume levels,
Selector Switch
?'he nine positions of the Selector switch perform the following
functions :
TAPE HEAD: Selects a tape deck connected to the TAPE HEAD
jacks and provides rorrect equalization for tapes played at a speed
of 33; and 7!5 inches per second.
PHONO: Selects a record player connected to the PHONO jacks and
provides correct equalization ( R I A A ) for all records made since
1954.
MPX FILTER: Used for listening to FhI multiplex programs from
weak stations. T h e fiIter will climinate m u t h of the noise without
restricting the liequency range of the music signal. The Stereo
Beam tuning eye will automatically indicate when a multiplex
program is broadcast.
MPX STEREO: This position is used for Iistening to multiplex Lroadcasts from stronger stations. The Stereo Beam also operates witb the
Selector in this position.
FM: This
position is used 'for listening to monophonic FM broadcasts
and for tuning in an Fhl station.
FM-AM STEREO: This is the position for listening to Fh.1-AM stereo
programs. T h e FM station will be heard on the left speaker and
the Ah1 station will be heard on the right.
AM: hlonophonic ,4M programs may be heard by turning the
Selector to this position.
AUX: This position selects a component connected to the AUX
jacks on tht' iear panel.
TAPE: Selects a tape recorder for playback of previously recorded
tapes. This position is not used while making a recording.
Balance Control
This control is used to equalize the sound levels from both speaker
systems to achieve the optimum stereo effect. If the Channel A and
Channel R inputs are exactly balanced, you will hear equaI sound
levels from the left and right speakers with the control in the
AT-A-GLANCE OPERATING 'GUIDE
NORRI,4I, position. If, however. there is an i n i l ~ l n n c e in the program le\ el<. you can re-halarice the wurid lr\ C I S b y t u r n i n g the
Balaiice control either clockwise ( t o increaw ttic> sound level on
the right arid derrease the sound lebel 011 the left) o r counterclockw1.c.c ( t o i r i ( , w a w the left and decrease t h e r i g h t ) . The Balance
coiltrol is not a \olurne control qince the same oser-all volume is
1 I l ~ l ~ ~ l ~ a$
~ l ~i tJ is
~ Pal d~j u s t ~ d .with the Balance control fully counter, Ioc-Li+i*r. o n l y the left speaker will be h e a r d ; with the control
fililv r l o c k ~
I X . o n l y the right speaker will be i n operation.
Bass and Treble Controls
..1 tip 13,i- ( ~ ) n t i o l sinrrease o r decrease the aiiiount of Lass tones
I i ~ ~ t r1 1d: the sound output. R'itti the Bass controls iri the NORMAL
p m i t i o n , t h e t ) A \ s tones will .-outid esartly as thcj \+ere recorded at
t h v progruiii w u r t t e . If you wisli to increase the Lass emphasis h r a u s e
of a Lass ciehciency i n the record, tape o r radio broadcast you have
wlectcd. siniplj turn the Boss controls the de\irt:d amount toward
the 1 1 4 X pwition. To decrease the proiniriencr of the bass tones,
t t i i r i [hr Ila- controls toward M I N . Nornially, tlic Bass controls for
Left ant1 Right Speaker qystenis rotate together, h u t if you wish t o
arijiirr the Has\ serlarately for each channel. hold orie of the knobs
To
Listsn
To A:
( * l l i i t r i t l - tunaicl
J1 I X :
iirid
Mono-Stereo
Switch To:
FM-AM STEREO
STEREO
MPX STEREO or
MPX FILTER
STEREO
Stereo Progrom
FM Monophonic
FM
MONO
AM
MONO
PHONO
STEREO
FM-AM Stereo
Program
FM
~~~
Multiplex
~
Program
Ah4 Monophonic
Program
Stereo Record
(AUX for ceramic
cartridge)
w h i l ~ t i i r n i n p the othcr.
-1 lit> 'i'!talJltA I oritrol. adjiist the intensity of tlir. Irchle tone heard
i n th,. w i i r i c l oiitput. \ c with the I3ass rsontrols, t l i c NORhIAL posilion \ t i l l r v i i l t I N tht: \iitiic dcgrtle of tr~.l)letoiir as e\i>ts in the prog r a m ~ o i i r w .Tlie relciti\e ilniuunt of trehlc toris ~ ~ 1 1I 1Jincreased,
~
re3ulting I I I a m u r r l ~ t i l l i n i i t aiid rriq) \ o u r i d . I,!
turriinp the Treble
Monophonic Record
PHONO
(AUX for ceromic
cartridge)
MONO
Stereo Tape Recorder
TAPE
STEREO
TAPE
MONO
Stereo Tape Deck
TAPE HEAD
STEREO
Monophonic Tope Deck
TAPE H E A D
MONO
i t ( + a n IN> clrc'i~eci~e~l,
i . c s C i i l t i r i g in a m o r e
tnc~llo~+
' i i i d intinlute tone. I)? turning the cuiitrril t o w u , i d RIIN. T h e
'f'rvi)lts c~onLtoI+ ruay ai<o I J adjusted
~
indit.iciil~lly f o r each channel
Iq liolding one knob while rotating the other.
Turn Selector
To:
Monophonic
Tape Recorder
~~~~~
~
High and Low Filters
Thc High Filter is a h a r p cut-off circuit de4piicd to remove anno! iiig record bcratch. hiss and other high frequcricy noise without
i.
Low Filtcr
dul li n fr the t r t h l c portion of the music;il p ~ w g r ~ n The
is similarly de.signrcf to remove low f i q i i r n c ' y noise such a s turntable rumble, without weakening bass tulle' in the musical signal.
Mono-Stereo Switch
The MONO poqition of this switch
is usctf to blend together the
i n p u t rliunnels a i i t l to send this l ~ l ( ~ d signal
( ~ l to both loud.peakcr
I t is tioriiiaIIy used wlwn li~tc~rling
to nionophonic records
w i t h a sterco phoiio (*artridge. When i i h t h i j if1 this manner, any posqihle runible or rioise present i i i [lie record, or in the turntable,
i \ i l l he elertrically rnncellcd. This p o h i i t i c i t i should also be used
to play a monophonic coniponent c.onnrctcd to the AUX inputs
( o r a ~nonophoiiic tape recorder or t u i w deck) through hoth
speakel systems. l'hc STEREO position is used for a11 stereophonic
programs on records, tape or rodio.
t\\o
$,
10
Tape Monitor Switch
The Tape Monitor switch is used o n l y with stereophonic tape
rccorders with separate record uncl plu?~bnck heads. SIiding this
switch to the O N position permits listeiiiriR to the tape while it
is being recordrd, J'ou can compare the qiiality of your tapes with
the original program source hy switching hetween ON ond OFF
ivhilc recsording. The Tupe Monitor s w i ~ c his not used for playback
of previously rerordrtl tapes, and s h o ~ i l i i a l ~ u y sbe left in the OFF
position when a recording is not lieint, nude.
Channel Reverse Switch
The Chaririel Heverse switch will l i t , found useful when the
channels of the programs soiirt:e h a ~ e ,through some error, been
inadvertently crossed. This situation r-night arise. for example, during
n niultiples stereo program due to D mistrike a t the broadcasting
studio. in such cases, simply place the switch in the ON position
to restore the channels to their proper position (Channel A on the
left and Ctiannel B on the right J . Be sure to return the Channel
Reverse switch to OFF for normal listening.
Phase Reverse Switch
After performing the test on page 6, the sound from your
speakers w i l l he properly phaqed unless an aut-of-phase record, radio
program or tape is played through the 800-B. I n such a case, the
prograni to ~ r + i c h you are liztening may not seem to produce a full,
solid tone, c.~perinllyi n the hass region. T o restore correct phasing,
slide the f'hsse Revcrse 5wiic.h to ON. If the bass tone improves,
leave the switch in the ON position until the end of the program,
but be sure to return it to OFF afterwards.
FM and A M Tuning
The FM tuning knob selects FM stations in the 88 to 108 megacycle Imnd. The Ah1 tuning knob selects AM stations in the 530 to
1650 kilocycle band. Turning each knob will move its respective
pointer acres the dial scale and vary the individual FM or AM
Tuning Indicator, when the Selector switch is in the FM o r
A M position.
The Tuning Indicators have a logarithmic response to the strength
of broadcast %igriais; that is, they respond with greatest sensitivity
to weak signals. and with less sensitivity to strong signals, thus
guarding against overloading the indicators. Each station. whether
AM or FRI, should be tuned for minimum width of the dark band
in the center of the indicator. When this point is reached, optimum
reception is assured. For your added convenience, a logging scale
with linear divisions from 0 to 100 is included under each tuning
dial. By making a noie of the location of your favorite stations O R
this linear scale, you will be able to tune to them more quickly
and accurately.
F W S E INVERTER
cn
,:* L
iONF
A
1ONC
Vl6
CM B FOHER AMPLIFIER
P
CH
A PC)WER AMPIIFIER
11
a
FIGURE 2. lube layout.
In addition to its funrtion as a n FM Tuning Irldicator, the left
AlicroKiay is also uFed as the Stereo Ream i n d l c ator for FM
multiples reception. With the Selector switch in thr. AIPX FILTER
or h I P X STEREO position, the dark area in the center of this
indicator will become considerably narrower wheiie\ cr a multiplex
stereo program is broadcast. During ordinary rnoiiophonic transmissions. only the left and right edges of the inclivutor will be bright.
To find a multiplex progran~. place the Selwtor w i t c h in the
h l P X STEREO position and tune across the bnnd until the two
bright portions of the Stereo Beam widen, i n d i a t i n g a multiplex
program. For fine tuning, t u r n the Selector to FRI and turn the
FA1 Tuning knob until the dark Iinnd on the FM MicroRay Indicator
is narrowest. When this has been done, turn the Selector back to
the hiPX STEREO position to receive the multiplex program
stereophonically.
Due to the nature of the multiplex system, the noise level of a
monophonic program will he somewhat higher when the Selector is
turned to MPX STEREO or hlPX FILTER. For this reason, we
I
iI
I
i
i
I
,
I
SWIld 2
' VNNXNV
t
i
'
fl
I
I
j
- t-
I
I
E,
f
3
0
Y
fa-tr.tic.d
t o t h t \ floor of
the cabinet. For this installation, proceed as
follows:
1-Obtain a a t r i p of wood :!,; inch q i i a r e and 26 inches long. Cut
t h i s strip in half to form t w o 13-inch c*Ients.
?-Fasten the two c.le,~tsto the top of the mounting board with wood
screws i n tlip Iio5ition s h o w n in Figure 3. Screw heads should
he f l i i 4 1 w i t h the top of thr blvats. The11 locate and drill four
1 ;-inch Iiolr4 t l i i oiigti t h e mounting board arid cleats as indicated.
3-Saw a riitorit throiigli t l i ~ front panel of your cabinet to the
tliiiieii+ioii+ 4 i n t +11 i i i Figure 1. The distance betveen the top surfare of the niorintiiig hoard and the bottom of the cutout must be
the 5iinie ns the hvight of tht. cleats.
the 800-R (*hawis through the front of the panel cutout.
Slide the chassis into the cabinet until the back of the control
imnel is tight against the panel of the cahinet.
+---Insert
CUSTOM MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS
5-Insert the four I1h-inch scrtws supplied in the accessories bag
through the holes i n the hottoni of the mounting board and fasten
the chassis into place.
13
Flush Installation
I f the height of the custom c-ahinet will not permit you to mount
the 800-B Iiy n i r a i i + of cleats. a- described in the preceding section,
the rha.;sis nia! he mounted dirtwly on the cahinet shelf. If the
rhasqir is rnountrd in this way, howe\er. i t is essential that cutouts
tw made 111 the ihelf as shown i n Figure 3, and that the back
of t l i ~c-at)inct rcmnin conipletely open. i n o ~ d t - rto provide proper
veritilntion. For a fl usli-moiinted installation, proceed as follows:
Installation with Cleats
it
To jrrox idc. udcyucitc \c.iitil'ition to the t i i i d c ~ r ~ i d of
t ~ the chassis,
I < advisable to niourit the 800-B on ~ v o o d c ~cleats
i
which are
1-Locate and drill the f o u r */j-inc.h holes i n the bottom shelf of
the custom cahinet as indicated in Figure 3.
.;)-Saw
cutouts iii the liottom shelf following the outlines shown in
I
I
I
I
I1
FIGURE 4. Front panel cutout.
14
L T O P SIJRFACE OF SHELF
FOR CLEAT MOUNTING
Figure 3. It is absolutely essential thnl these cutouts be made as
indicated so that the necessary ventilation will he supplied to the
ROO-B chassis.
3-Saw a rectangular cutout through thc f r x n t panel of your custom
cal)inet to tlic dimensions shown i n Figiirc~-1. Note that the lmttoni
of the c u t o u t coirivides with the top of the nictunting shelf, since cleats
arc n o t u<ed i n this installation.
C-Insert tlir. c*hnssis through the custom c>ubinet front panel cutout.
Slide the chassiy iri all the way so that tht. rear of the 800-23 control
panel fits tightly against the front of t l l v custom panel.
j-Fasten the chassis to the shelf by nit'iiiis of four mounting wrews
and flat washers. The screws are insei.trtl l r o m the underside of the
shelf, through the holes and into the f o u r mounting holes formerly
used f o r attaching the plastic mounting feet. Use the four 1-inch
screws and washers furnished i n the accessories bag for this purpose.
A t Your Service
I t is our desire t h i t l your FISHER equipment operate to your complete satkfaction. We solicit your correspondence on any special p r o b
lems that may arise. After you have had an opportunity to familiarize
yourself with THE FISHER. we would appreciate hearing from you
on how it is meeting your requirements.
Your Fisher Dealer
Be sure to consult your FISHER dealer promptly if any defect is
indicated. He stands ready to assist you a t any time.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Response:
Over-a II
Power Amplifier Section
Harmonic Distortion:
Hum a n d Noise:
High Level Input
Low l e v e l Input
Channel Separation:
Bass Controls:
Treble Controls:
Low Filter:
High Filter:
THE FM TUNER
Sensitivity :
Hum and Noise:
Selectivity:
IF Rejection:
Distortion:
Frequency Response:
FM Channel Separation:
THE AM T U N E R
25-2'5,OOO
5 - 15,000
* 1.5 d b
+O.
- 2 dh
0.55
fat
db
d2,
dh
dl)
23 d b
12 d b
12 d b
below rated output
below rated output
80
66
50
23
rated output)
I5
total variation at 50 cps
total variation a t 10 kc
per octave below 35 cps
per octave above 6 kc
Input Sensitivity:
Sen s it i v ity :
Selectivity;
I m a g e Reiection:
IF Rejection:
PHONO
TAPE
AUX
3.3
my
'7.5
my
0s watts
total
for rated output
for rated o u t p u t
'730 mi. for rated output
P O W E R REQUIREMENTS
THE AUDIO SECTION
Music Power:
CPS
CPS
105-120 volts a t 50 to 60 cycles
Power Consumption: 200 watts
1
E
.yI
.-C
0
.-c0
0,
c
YI
c
0
5
C
3
c
01
.-
L
0
Y
c
Y
.-c
-
m
0
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement