Energy Use and Savings Guide

Energy Use and Savings Guide
Energy Use
and Savings Guide
For the residential customer
Table of Contents
Typical Energy Use in Your Home / Managing Your Energy Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Understanding This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Benefits of Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Direct Use of Natural Gas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Heating and Cooling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Water Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Major Appliances – Refrigerator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Major Appliances – Range / Oven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Major Appliances – Dishwasher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Major Appliances – Laundry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Electronics – Kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Electronics – Family Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Electronics – Office / Den . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Electronics – Bathroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
General Outdoor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Seasonal Outdoor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Electric Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Phantom Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Page 2
Typical Energy Use in Your Home
The energy bills for a typical U.S. single family home totals approximately
$2,200 per year. Where does all this money go? The cost of heating your
home can represent 40% to 60% of your total energy bill. The chart below
shows the breakdown of energy use by category and starts to give you a
sense of where savings can be found. Reducing energy consumption by just
15% could save you over $300 a year in energy costs.
11%
Heating & Cooling – 46%
Water Heating – 14%
4%
Lighting – 12%
Appliances – 13%
13%
46%
(Includes refrigerator, dishwasher,
clothes washer and dryer)
Electronics – 4%
(Includes computer, monitor, TV and
DVD player)
Other – 11%
12%
(Includes external power adapters,
set-top boxes, ceiling fans, vent fans
and home audio)
14%
Managing Your Energy Budget
Having a budget is always a good idea. But developing a budget starts with
understanding your resource needs. Each month, you need food, clothing,
transportation and energy to run your home. Understanding your energy usage is
the first step to creating that portion of your budget. Inside this booklet, you’ll find
many energy saving tips to help you manage your resources.
This booklet contains ideas and suggestions on how you can monitor— and
better control—your energy consumption. You may already be familiar with
some of our energy savings suggestions; some may surprise you though.
Individual lifestyle and energy use habits, number and age of occupants, as
well as the size, design, levels of insulation and heating system in your home,
all combine to determine how much energy you will use for heating.
The statistics in this booklet are based on national averages. The wattage or
energy usage and efficiencies of your appliances, your own use habits, as
well as the size of your family will vary. So, keep this in mind when you’re
reviewing your own energy use.
Page 3
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Understanding This Guide
Listed below are terms and definitions that will be used throughout
this guide. All numbers and costs included are a representation based on
national average use with average Avista rates.
Kilowatt Hours (kWh): We measure the amount of electricity in Watt hours.
One kilowatt hour equals 1,000 Watt hours. The kilowatt hours on your bill
equals the rate or speed of use (kilowatts) x the length of time electricity
was used. Running a 5,000-watt (5 kilowatt) clothes dryer for 1 hour uses 5
kilowatt hours of electricity. Burning a 100-watt light bulb for 10 hours uses 1
kilowatt hour.
Therms: Your use of gas is billed in units called therms. Therms identify the
heating value provided by gas. One therm equals the heating capacity of
approximately 100,000 wooden kitchen matches.
Approximate Watts: The wattage is the consumption rate of electricity a
device exhibits while operating. This energy consumption may occur when a
computer is turned on, when a kitchen mixer is in use or when light bulbs are
turned on in a light fixture.
Monthly kWh Usage: The monthly kilowatt hour usage for each device is
based on an assumed typical month of operation, estimating the hours the
device is operating in conjunction with its power consumption as noted in the
Watt rating.
Annual kWh Usage: The annual kilowatt hour usage is an estimate of
the yearly energy consumption in consideration of the Watts and hours of
operation assumptions. In some cases, the season often creates just a few
months of use per year.
Estimated Monthly Cost: The estimated monthly cost is based on the
energy consumption at $0.09 per kilowatt hour for electricity or $0.84 per
natural gas therm.
Page 4
Benefits of Natural Gas
1. Affordability: Natural gas costs less to use in your home than electricity. On
average, electricity costs more than twice as much as natural gas.
2. Convenience and Reliability: Natural gas is piped directly into your home. It’s
always there when you need it.
3. Comfort: Natural gas heat warms your home quickly compared to an electric heat
pump by moving a small volume of hot air versus a large volume of warm air that
can feel drafty.
4. Domestic Supply: Nearly 100% of the natural gas consumed in the U.S. is
produced in North America with 90% coming directly from the U.S.
5. Energy Efficiency: Natural gas is highly efficient. About 90% of the natural gas
produced is delivered to customers as useful energy. In contrast, only about 30% of
the energy converted to electricity from natural gas reaches consumers.
Where available, natural gas is increasingly the fuel of choice in today’s homes.
Natural gas compares very favorably to other fuels. Below is a current snapshot
of how natural gas compares to other fuels and some benefits to consider when
choosing how to heat your home.
BTU: The British thermal unit (BTU) is a measure of heat. MMBtu equals 1,000,000
BTU. A typical home uses 5 to 7 MMBTU’s per month in the heating season.
Heating cost per million BTU in Washington
and Idaho (April 2016)
Efficiency
Heating Cost
per Month
Natural gas furnace
80%
$63.75
Natural gas furnace
94%
$54.26
Electric resistance furnace or baseboard
100%
$158.22
Electric heat pump
175%
$90.41
Electric heat pump
225%
$70.32
Propane furnace
80%
$177.63
Propane furnace
94%
$151.18
Electric resistance costs 2.5 times more than natural gas, propane 2.8 times more
than natural gas, a heat pump backed by electric resistance heat is 1.4 times more
than gas.
Try our online Fuel Cost Comparison Calculator to estimate your annual space or water
heating costs compared to alternative energy sources.
Go to myavista.com/fuelcalc.
Page 5
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Direct Use of Natural Gas
You probably know about the comforts of natural gas—warm, even heat; precise
temperature control when cooking; consistent hot water; and the cozy ambience
of a natural gas fireplace. But did you know natural gas is the cleanest burning
fossil fuel? As such, it plays a central role in emerging initiatives to help protect our
environment. And while natural gas can be burned in turbines to produce electricity
for our region (about 40% efficient), delivering it directly to your home for heating
and cooking is the most efficient use of this resource (about 90 to 92% efficient).
Information is based on national numbers and figures.
Data source: Gas Technology Institute
MMBtu: MMBtu describes a defined volume of natural gas as a commodity,
essentially 1,000 cubic feet of the fuel in the pipe. Another common term for
natural gas usage is the therm, the unit used in residential billing. Ten therms
are equivalent to a single MMBtu of natural gas. For a typical home that
uses natural gas for space and water heat, about 50 to 70 therms, or 5 to 7
MMBtus of natural gas would be consumed in one month.
Page 6
Heating and Cooling
Energy Saving Tips
• On sunny winter days, open your draperies to get full benefit of sun shining
through the windows. In summer, close the draperies to help keep out
unwanted heat.
• Fireplace dampers should be kept closed when you’re not using the fireplace.
A chimney can draw off as much as 25% of the heated air in your house if the
damper is left open. Safely block off unused fireplaces when possible.
• When selecting an air conditioning unit, both room or central, check its
Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER). The SEER indicates a unit’s relative
energy efficiency. Most units are tagged with this information, or your dealer
can help you determine the SEER. The higher the SEER, the better. A SEER of
13 or above is preferred, 18 or above is exceptional.
• When selecting a heat pump, check its Heating Seasonal Performance Factor
(HSPF). The HSPF indicates a heat pump’s relative annual heating efficiency. A
higher HSPF of 8.5 and above will provide lower operating costs for heating.
• Turn down the heat in winter. Keep your thermostat at or below 68° F;
setting your thermostat three degrees lower in the winter can reduce your
bill by about 10%.
Reading Your Meter
Electric and natural gas meters are not difficult
to read and they can provide you with information
about your energy consumption.
Visit myavista.com/readyourmeter
to learn more about how to read your meter.
Page 7
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Heating and Cooling
Energy Saving Checklist
FF Block drafts. Check caulking and weather stripping around
windows and doors. If you see cracks, light, or feel a draft, make
repairs where needed.
FF Seal leaks. Ductwork exposed to outside air or in unconditioned spaces
should be wrapped securely with insulation; joints and connections should
be sealed with insulation tape.
FF Check furnace filter. Check filters at least once a month; clean or replace
them when dirty.
FF Bring in a professional. A qualified serviceman should check heating
and cooling equipment at the beginning of each season to ensure
efficient operation.
FF Use drapes or shade. Window coverings are one of the easiest ways
to help insulate your house. Keep them closed on cold days and open on
sunny ones.
FF Use fans in the summer. Try using fans in the summer before switching
on the air conditioning. Old A/C equipment can be equivalent to using
30 or more fans. If you must use your air conditioner, set it at 78° F; each
degree over 78° in the summer will save you approximately 3% on your
cooling bill.
FF Program your thermostat. Adjust temperature settings according to
a preset schedule. This way you can warm up or cool down your rooms
when you know you’ll be awake or at home. Consider a Wi-Fi enabled
smart thermostat that learns your settings.
Page 8
Heating and Cooling
Energy Use Guide – Electric
Average
Watts
Air purifier
Air purifier – ENERGY STAR
Monthly
kWh
Usage
70
51.1
Annual
kWh
Usage
613.2
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
$4.60
20
14.6
175.2
$1.31
Dehumidifier, room
350
25.6
306.6
$2.30
Dehumidifier, whole-house
142
103.7
1,243.92
$9.33
Dehumidifier, whole-house – ENERGY
STAR
111
81
972.36
$7.29
75
5.5
65.7
$0.49
®
Humidifier
100
7.3
87.6
$0.66
Room air conditioner 5 hours per day
Portable fan
1,500
225
562.5
$20.25
Room air conditioner 1 hour per day
1,500
45
112.5
$4.05
Space heater 1 hour per day
1,500
45
270
$4.05
Space heater 10 hours per day
1,500
450
2,700
$40.50
Energy Use Guide – Natural Gas
Therm
Monthly
Therm
Usage
Annual
Therm
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
Fireplace 75,000 BTU 10 hours per day
0.75
225
1,350
$191.25
Fireplace 25,000 BTU 10 hours per day
0.25
75
450
$63.75
Fireplace 25,000 BTU 10 hours per month
0.25
2.5
15
$2.13
Converting to
Natural Gas Can Save Energy
Upgrading to high-efficiency natural gas equipment
using rebates can save you money.
Visit myavista.com/getrebates to find available
rebates and incentives.
Page 9
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Water Heating
Energy Saving Tips
• Set water heater temperature at 120° F. If you have a dishwasher, check the
manufacturer’s instructions for suggested temperature setting. Generally,
residential water heaters should not exceed 140° F or be below 115° F.
• Turn off electricity at your circuit breaker/fuse box before adjusting
thermostats on the water heater for safety, or when you are going away
from home for three days or more to save energy.
• Turn gas water heater to pilot only if you are going away from home for a
week or more.
• Once every three months, drain a pail or two of water from the drain at the
bottom of your water heater. This removes sediment and mineral deposits,
which make your water heater less efficient.
• Always use a sink stopper or dishpan rather than washing or rinsing dishes
under running hot water.
• Showers generally take less hot water than baths and dishwashers generally
take less water than hand washing.
• Buy ENERGY STAR appliances.
• Consider a tankless natural gas water heater that reduces standby losses.
Energy Saving Checklist
FF Keep showers short. Try to keep your shower to no longer than
five minutes.
FF Adjust your temperature settings. Set your water heater at 120° F.
FF Replace washers on faucets that drip. A leaky faucet can waste 2,500
gallons of hot water per year at a rate of one drip per second.
FF Install a low-flow shower head. It can reduce your home water
consumption as much as 50%, and reduce your energy cost of heating the
water also by as much as 50%. No more than 1.5 gallons per minute.
Page 10
Water Heating
Energy Use Guide – Electric
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
Water heater, 50-gallon heat pump
182.9
2,195
$16.46
Water heater, 50-gallon high-efficiency
385.2
4,622
$34.67
Water heater, 50-gallon standard-efficiency
404.8
4,857
$36.43
Energy Use Guide – Natural gas
Monthly
Therm
Usage
Annual
Therm
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
Water heater, 50-gallon, natural gas
20
240
$17.00
Water heater, 40-gallon, natural gas
17.5
210
$14.88
Page 11
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Lighting
Energy Saving Tips
• Light bulbs differ in energy efficiency. Wattage measures only the amount of
energy needed to light the bulb. Light actually given off is measured in lumens.
The law now requires that manufacturers list the wattage, the lumen output
and the approximate life span of each bulb on the package. The most energy
efficient bulb is the one that gives off the most lumens per Watt. Compare bulb
ratings by dividing lumens by Watts.
• A 23-watt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) will produce more light than
a 100-watt incandescent bulb and can be used in kitchens, baths, laundry
and work areas.
• ENERGY STAR qualified CFL bulbs use 75% less energy than incandescents.
• Light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs use up to 90% less electricity to produce the
same amount of light as their traditional incandescent counterparts.
• Only use dimming CFLs or LEDs in dimming sockets.
• Light-colored ceilings reflect the light downward for better lighting efficiency.
• Security lights are a wise precaution. Outside post lights and floodlights can be
controlled by a photoelectric cell for automatic dusk-to-dawn lighting.
• Automatic timers to turn lights on or off when you’re not at home are available
at a reasonable cost.
Energy Saving Checklist
FF Turn it off. Turn off lights when you are not using them.
FF Make the switch. Change out all regular incandescent lamps with ENERGY
STAR qualified LED bulbs if they are used more than two hours per day.
FF Keep bulbs clean. Dust can cut light output by as much as 25%.
FF Dispose of your used bulbs properly. Recycle your old CFLs at a
participating recycling center near you.
Page 12
Lighting
Energy Use Guide
Approximate
Lumens
250
Type
Incandescent
CFL
LED
500
800
1.8
21.6
$0.16
7
0.6
7.6
$0.06
$0.02
0.3
3.2
1.7
20.5
$0.15
Incandescent
40
3.6
43.2
$0.32
CFL
10
0.9
10.8
$0.08
LED
6
0.5
6.5
$0.05
Halogen
32
2.9
34.6
$0.26
Incandescent
60
5.4
64.8
$0.49
CFL
15
1.4
16.2
$0.12
LED
9
0.8
9.7
$0.07
42
3.8
45.4
$0.34
Incandescent
75
6.8
81
$0.61
CFL
20
1.8
21.6
$0.16
LED
12
1.1
13
$0.10
$0.44
Incandescent
54
4.9
58.3
100
9
108
$0.81
27
2.4
29.2
$0.22
LED*
18
1.6
19.4
$0.15
Halogen
72
6.5
77.8
$0.58
150
13.5
162
$1.22
42
3.8
45.4
$0.34
Incandescent
CFL
LED*
25
2.3
27
$0.20
130
11.7
140.4
$1.05
Night Light, Incandescent
5
1.5
18
$0.14
Night Light, LED
1
0.3
3.6
$0.03
Halogen
Assumes “on” average of three hours a day. Page 13
20
3
CFL
2,500
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
19
Halogen
1,800
Annual
kWh
Usage
Halogen
Halogen
1,200
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Approximate
Watts
*Limited availability.
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Major Appliances
Refrigeration Energy Saving Tips
• Choose a well-insulated, energy-efficient refrigerator with a separate door for
the freezer compartment (that way, when removing an item from the freezer,
you avoid opening the refrigerator door unnecessarily).
• Don’t put warm foods directly into the refrigerator. Allow hot foods to cool, then
refrigerate. Cooked meats, however, should be refrigerated immediately.
• Cover all foods and liquids. In frost-free models, evaporation of the liquid will
force the unit to work harder to remove the moisture.
• Do not locate the unit near a heat source.
• Check the tightness of your refrigerator door gasket by shutting a piece of
paper in the door. If the paper slides out without resistance, your refrigerator
may be leaking cold air. Consider replacing the door seals.
• Every three months vacuum the condenser coils located at the bottom or rear
of the refrigerator to remove accumulated dust.
• Both the refrigerator and the freezer operate most efficiently when they are
full, but not overcrowded. It takes more energy to keep air cold than it does
to keep food or liquid cold. Be sure to allow enough space between foods and
containers for air to circulate freely.
Refrigeration Energy Saving Checklist
FF Adjust the temperature. Set your refrigerator between 37 to 40° F and
your freezer between 0 to 5° F.
FF Keep fridge door closed. Know what you want out of the refrigerator
before you open the door. An open door is wasted energy.
FF Defrost freezer. Defrost when ice is ¼" thick.
FF Clean refrigerator coils. Keep coils clean to keep your refrigerator in peak
operating condition. They may be behind or below the fridge.
FF Cover and wrap food. Uncovered foods and liquid release moisture, which
makes the fridge work harder.
FF Fill it up. A full fridge or freezer uses less energy. Fill with jugs of water to
take up space.
Page 14
Major Appliances
Refrigeration Energy Use Guide
Average
Watts
Monthly
kWh Usage
Annual
kWh Usage
Estimated
Monthly Cost
Chest freezer
46.5
33.9
406.9
$3.05
Chest freezer – ENERGY STAR
40.9
29.8
358.1
$2.69
Refrigerator, bottom-mounted freezer
(automatic defrost)
66.7
48.7
584.1
$4.38
Refrigerator, bottom-mounted freezer
(automatic defrost) – ENERGY STAR
52
38
455.6
$3.42
Refrigerator, bottom-mounted freezer
and through-door ice (automatic
defrost)
77.1
56.2
675
$5.06
Refrigerator, bottom-mounted freezer
and through-door ice (automatic
defrost) – ENERGY STAR
60.1
43.9
526.5
$3.95
Refrigerator with or without a topmounted freezer (automatic defrost)
61.9
45.2
542.5
$4.07
Refrigerator with or without a topmounted freezer (automatic defrost)
– ENERGY STAR
48.3
35.3
423.2
$3.17
Refrigerator-freezer or refrigerator only
(manual or partially automatic defrost)
55.7
40.7
488.3
$3.66
Refrigerator-freezer or refrigerator only
(manual or partially automatic defrost) –
ENERGY STAR
43.5
31.7
380.9
$2.86
Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer
(automatic defrost)
73.2
53.4
641.1
$4.81
Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer
(automatic defrost) – ENERGY STAR
57.1
41.7
500
$3.75
Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer with
through-door ice (automatic defrost)
77.7
56.7
680.7
$5.10
Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer with
through-door ice (automatic defrost) –
ENERGY STAR
60.6
44.2
530.9
$3.98
Upright freezer (automatic defrost)
75
54.8
657.3
$4.93
Upright freezer (automatic defrost) –
ENERGY STAR
66
48.2
578.4
$4.34
Upright freezer (manual defrost)
52.5
38.3
459.5
$3.45
Upright freezer (manual defrost) –
ENERGY STAR
46.2
33.7
404.3
$3.03
Page 15
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Major Appliances
Range / Oven Energy Saving Tips
• Each time you open the oven door you can lose up to 20% of the heat. If you
must look, do so through the oven window. Or rely on your own thermostat
and timer. (This will cut down on baking failures, too!)
• The oven is a very inefficient toaster. It costs three times as much to toast
bread in the oven as in a pop-up toaster.
• Match the size of your cooking pans to the size of the surface units on your
range so you won’t waste heat. Flat-bottomed pans receive heat directly and
conserve energy.
• When boiling water, bring the water to a boil on high heat, then reduce the
heat to your cooking temperature.
• Instead of heating water in an open pan, use a teakettle or microwave.
• Food should always be cooked on the lowest possible setting.
• Leave at least two inches between pans in the oven for proper heat circulation.
Pans should not touch each other, the oven doors or walls.
• If the kitchen is chilly, don’t use the electric range for heat. A small electric
heater will do a much better job.
• Thaw frozen foods before placing them in the oven. Putting a frozen roast
directly in the oven requires one-third additional cooking time (microwave
ovens can be used for quick thawing).
• When using glass or ceramic dishes, you can lower the oven setting 25° F.
• If your electric or gas range has a self-cleaning feature, clean it while the oven is
still hot after removing a meal. Since a self-cleaning oven must be well insulated,
it uses less energy for baking or roasting. Using the self-cleaning feature costs
about 15 cents per use.
Page 16
Major Appliances
Range / Oven Energy Saving Checklist
FF Keep racks clear. It’s tempting to line oven racks with foil to keep things
clean, but don’t do it. The hot air needs to be able to circulate to cook
food efficiently.
FF Use lids. When cooking, lids keep heat and steam in and help food cook
more quickly, which saves energy.
FF Clean the burner pans on your stove. When clean, burner pans will
reflect heat back up to pots and pans.
FF Don’t peek. You lose heat every time you open the door or lift the lid.
FF Use the smallest pans possible. It takes less energy to heat smaller pans.
Range / Oven Energy Use Guide – Electric
Approximate Monthly
Watts
kWh Usage
Annual
kWh Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
Range top 40 minutes/day (large
burner)
2,400
48
576
$4.32
Self-cleaning oven, 30 minutes/day
(1 clean cycle per month)
3,600
57.6
691.2
$5.18
Standard oven, 30 minutes/day
(non-self-cleaning)
3,300
49.5
594
$4.46
Range / Oven Energy Use Guide – Natural Gas
Monthly
Therm Usage
Annual
Therm Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
Range, 4 cooktop, natural gas (40 minutes/day)
1.83
21.96
$1.56
Oven, natural gas (30 minutes/day)
3.81
45.72
$3.24
Pilot light
5.48
65.76
$4.66
Page 17
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Major Appliances
Dishwasher Energy Saving Tips
• Hold dishes in your dishwasher until you have a full load. You’ll use less hot
water and save energy.
• According to ENERGY STAR, you can save 5,000 gallons of water each year
and $40 in energy costs using a dishwasher instead of washing dishes by
hand.
• One dishwasher load usually uses less hot water than three washings by hand.
Dishwasher Energy Saving Checklist
FF Fill it up. It costs exactly the same to wash one dish as it does to wash a
full load of dishes.
FF Scrape dishes instead of pre-rinsing them. Dishwashers made in the
past five to ten years can clean even heavily soiled dishes without prerinsing.
FF Use air-dry options. Keep your machine from using a heating element to
bake your dishes dry and opt to air dry your dishes instead.
Electric Water Heat
Approximate Monthly
Watts
kWh Usage
Annual
kWh Usage
Estimated
Monthly Cost
Dishwasher (including hot water from
electric water heater)
822.26
40.3
483.8
$3.63
Dishwasher (including hot water from
electric water heater) – ENERGY STAR
632.88
29.6
354.8
$2.66
Natural Gas Water Heat
Monthly
Therm Usage
Annual
Estimated
Therm Usage Monthly Cost
Dishwasher (including hot water from gas water
heater)
1.1
12.9
$2.27
Dishwasher (including hot water from gas water
heater) – ENERGY STAR
0.7
8.3
$1.79
Loads per year: 215
Page 18
Major Appliances
Laundry Energy Saving Tips
• Match detergent and water level to the load. If your washer doesn’t have a
partial load setting, let the machine fill to the desired water level, then turn
the dial manually to begin the wash cycle.
• When possible, wash and rinse clothes in cold water. However, hot water
may be necessary for some types of wash loads, like baby clothes.
• For heavily soiled clothes, use the soak cycle, or prepare the load for washing
and then let stand in the water for 10 to 15 minutes before starting the
wash cycle.
• Keep your dryer exhaust vent clean. If clogged, it can lengthen drying time
and increase energy consumption.
• Select the correct drying temperature and time. Don’t over dry; in addition to
wasting energy, over drying gives clothes a harsh feel and causes wrinkling.
• Sort clothes by thinness to avoid running an additional cycle for only one or
two slow drying items.
• Vent your clothes dryer to the outside to reduce buildup of excess heat,
moisture, and laundry chemicals.
• Don’t overload dryer because clothes will take longer to dry.
• Since an iron heats faster than it cools, first iron the fabrics that require
lower temperatures, then work up to fabrics requiring a hotter setting.
Laundry Energy Saving Checklist
FF Select cold water. Hot water only needs to be used for very dirty loads.
FF Only run full loads. The machine uses about the same amount of water
whether you wash a full load or just one item.
FF Hang it up. Instead of using the dryer, dry clothes outside in good
weather—sunlight is free.
FF Clean the lint filter after every load. Clogged filters drive up drying
time and costs.
Page 19
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Major Appliances
Laundry Energy Use Guide – Electric
Monthly
kWh Usage
Annual
kWh Usage
Estimated
Monthly Cost
Clothes dryer, compact (120-volt)
25.4
305
$2.29
Clothes dryer, compact (240-volt)
28.3
340
$2.55
57
684
$5.13
16.5
198.1
$1.49
6.3
75
$0.56
2.1
25
$0.19
31.2
374
$2.81
10.5
126
$0.95
Clothes dryer, standard
Clothes, iron
Clothes washer (excluding water heating
energy use)
Clothes washer (excluding water heating
energy use) – ENERGY STAR
Clothes washer (including water heating
energy use)
Clothes washer (including water heating
energy use) – ENERGY STAR
Clothes washer and dryer
75.1
901
$6.76
Clothes washer and dryer – ENERGY STAR
38.9
467
$3.50
2.8
33
$0.25
Monthly
Therm Usage
Annual
Therm Usage
Estimated
Monthly Cost
1.8
21
$2.00
Vacuum cleaner
Laundry Energy Use Guide – Natural Gas
Clothes dryer, standard
Page 20
Electronics
Kitchen Electronics Energy Saving Tips
• Use small appliances, such as your electric fry pan or toaster oven, whenever
possible to cook small amounts of food. Use your big oven to bake complete
meals, or to bake in quantity (perhaps to freeze for later).
• A pressure cooker and a microwave oven can cut down on cooking time and,
in many cases, on energy usage.
• Keeping the inside of your microwave clean allows your food to cook more efficiently.
Kitchen Electronics Energy Saving Checklist
FF Smaller is better. For small meals, utilize the microwave, toaster oven,
electric pans or other kitchen gadgets to avoid heating up the whole oven
for one toasted cheese sandwich.
FF Skip the oven. In warm weather, cook outdoors on a grill.
FF Shut off kitchen fans. While fans are great for removing smells from the
kitchen, they also suck heat out. Shut them off when you don’t need them.
FF Unplug it. Your toaster should only be plugged in when you are using it.
Kitchen Electronics Energy Use Guide
Approximate
Watts
Blender (3 minutes/day)
Can opener (3 minutes/day)
Monthly
kWh
Usage
300
0.45
Annual
kWh
Usage
5.4
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
$0.04
100
0.15
1.8
$0.01
Coffee machine (20 minutes/day)
1,100
11
132
$0.99
Cooktop (20 minutes/day)
1,200
12
144
$1.08
360
3.6
43.2
$0.32
Microwave oven (10 minutes/day)
1,100
5.5
66
$0.50
Popcorn maker (3 minutes/day)
1,400
Espresso maker (20 minutes/day)
2.1
25.2
$0.19
Stand mixer (3 minutes/day)
Standard oven (non-self-cleaning,
20 minutes/day)
Toaster (3 minutes/day)
100
0.15
1.8
$0.01
3,300
33
396
$2.97
1,100
1.65
19.8
$0.15
Toaster oven (3 minutes/day)
1,200
1.8
21.6
$0.16
Page 21
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Electronics
Family Room / Living Room Electronics
Energy Saving Tips
• Look for the ENERGY STAR label on consumer electronic products. These products
use less energy without sacrificing quality or performance.
• Electronics may continue to use power even when they appear to be off. The little
glowing light means they are using energy—up to 10% of your annual electricity
usage. You can make sure you’re cutting use by switching everything off with one
power strip switch.
• Don’t overload circuits by plugging too many electronics into one outlet.
Family Room / Living Room Electronics
Energy Saving Checklist
FF Unplug it. Battery chargers or power adapters for devices like cell phones,
eBooks and more may pull juice even when they’re not in use—don’t let them.
FF Use power strips. Plug your video game consoles, stereo, DVD players and
any other home electronics into a single power strip so you can switch it off
and cut all power to items at once.
FF Try “smart” power strips. They can help reduce your power usage by
shutting down power to products that are not in use or that go into
standby mode.
Check Out Your Energy Use by
Checking Out a Kill-A-Watt™ Meter
Avista has teamed up with local libraries to
make Kill-A-Watt™ meters available for checkout. Kill-A-Watt™ measures the energy usage
of household appliances and electronics. By
finding out how much energy your electric
devices are using, and then making energysaving adjustments, you can take charge of your
electricity use and lower utility costs year-round.
Page 22
Electronics
Family Room / Living Room Electronics Energy Use Guide
Approximate
Watts
Answering machine**
Apple TV streaming box**
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Annual
Cost
1
8.76
105.12
$9.46
3
26.28
315.36
$28.38
Blu-Ray player*
17
1.53
18.36
$1.65
Blu-Ray player – ENERGY STAR*
13
1.17
14.04
$1.26
7
0.84
10.08
$0.91
10
87.6
1,051.2
$94.61
CD player*
Clock radio**
Cordless phone**
3
26.28
315.36
$28.38
CRT TV, 45-inch*
298
26.82
321.84
$28.97
Digital photo frame, 7-inch*
DVD player*
DVD player – ENERGY STAR*
HD DVR set-top box**
HD receiver set-top box**
iPhone 4 charger*
1
0.46
5.48
$0.04
12
1.08
12.96
$1.17
6
0.72
8.64
$0.78
2
17.52
210.24
$18.92
1.5
13.14
157.68
$14.19
5
0.0075
0.09
$0.01
LCD TV, >60-inch*
190
17.1
205.2
$18.47
LCD TV, 45-inch*
110
9.9
118.8
$10.69
LED TV, 45-inch*
127
11.43
137.16
$12.34
LED TV, 55-inch*
155
13.95
167.4
$15.07
LED TV 75-inch 4K*
282
25.38
304.56
$27.41
1
8.76
105.12
$9.46
88
0.13
1.58
$0.14
Mobile phone, charging*
5
0.0075
0.09
$0.01
MP3 player, charging*
1
0.0015
0.018
$0.00
Microsoft Xbox 360 (2010), standby**
Microsoft Xbox 360 (2010), on*
Nintendo Wii (2010), standby**
2
17.52
210.24
$18.92
Nintendo Wii (2010), on*
14
0.02
0.25
$0.02
Plasma TV, 45-inch*
81
7.29
87.48
$7.87
Plasma TV, >60-inch*
Portable stereo (boom box)**
Rear-projection TV*
Page 23
190
17.1
205.2
$18.47
7
61.32
735.84
$66.23
200
18
216
$19.44
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Electronics
Family Room / Living Room Electronics Energy Use Guide
(Continued)
Approximate
Watts
Satellite dish**
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Annual
Cost
1
8.76
105.12
$9.46
Security system**
1.2
10.51
126.14
$11.35
Small stereo with remote*
24
2.16
25.92
$2.33
0.05
0.43
5.25
$0.47
1
8.76
105.12
$9.46
85
7.65
91.8
$8.26
Smoke detector (hardwired)**
Sony PlayStation 3 (2010), standby**
Sony PlayStation 3 (2010), on*
Standard DVR set-top box**
2
17.52
210.24
$18.92
Standard receiver set-top box**
1.8
15.77
189.22
$17.03
Stereo*
60
5.4
64.8
$5.83
Tablet, charging*
10
0.015
0.18
$0.02
VCR*
11
0.99
11.88
$1.07
*3 hours per day
**continuous use or plugged in
Page 24
Electronics
Office / Den Electronics Energy Saving Tips
• Laptops are far more efficient than desktop computers, especially ENERGY STAR
qualified models.
• Make sure your computer doesn’t turn on the printer or other external devices
as part of its routine start-up cycle. Those should be turned on separately only
when needed.
• Save energy and space with an ENERGY STAR qualified multi-function device
that combines several capabilities (print, fax, copy, scan). Make sure power
management features are enabled for additional savings.
Office / Den Electronics Energy Saving Checklist
FF Turn computers off. Sleep and hibernation modes may save energy, but
switching computers off at night is the difference between using some and
using none.
FF Use power strips. Plug your computer, printer, and any other home office
equipment into a single power strip so you can switch it off and cut all power
to items at once.
FF Try “smart” power strips. They can help reduce your power usage by
shutting down power to products that are not in use or that go into
standby mode.
Save Energy with ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR qualified products use less energy,
save money, and help protect the environment. Their
Product Finder is an online tool that provides access
to a list of their products and arms you with the
information you’ll need to make purchasing decisions
based on energy efficiency.
Learn more at
www.energystar.gov/productfinder
Page 25
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Electronics
Office / Den Electronics Energy Use Guide
Battery charger (AA batteries)
Color copier (1 to 49 images per minute)
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
0.79
9.48
$0.07
46.06
552.72
$4.15
Color copier (1 to 49 images per minute) – ENERGY STAR
42.8
513.6
$3.85
Copier (26 to 50 images per minute)
25.2
302.4
$2.27
Copier (26 to 50 images per minute) – ENERGY STAR
12.6
151.2
$1.13
19.89
238.68
$1.79
Desktop computer – ENERGY STAR
13.5
162
$1.22
Digital camera
0.25
3
$0.02
External computer speakers
1.67
20.04
$0.15
Fax (inkjet)
2.33
27.96
$0.21
Fax (inkjet) – ENERGY STAR
1.17
14.04
$0.11
13
156
$1.17
Desktop computer
Fax (laser)
Fax (laser) – ENERGY STAR
6.5
78
$0.59
1
12.01
$0.09
6.27
75.24
$0.56
4.3
51.6
$0.39
Modem (cable)
4.38
52.56
$0.39
Modem (DSL)
4.09
49.08
$0.37
Monitor
5.52
66.24
$0.50
Monitor – ENERGY STAR
4.34
52.08
$0.39
Multifunction device (inkjet)
2.25
27
$0.20
Multifunction device (inkjet) – ENERGY STAR
0.92
11.04
$0.08
iPad 2
Laptop computer
Laptop computer – ENERGY STAR
Multifunction device (laser, color)
Multifunction device (laser, color) – ENERGY STAR
75
900
$6.75
53.42
641.04
$4.81
Printer (inkjet)
1.75
21
$0.16
Printer (inkjet) – ENERGY STAR
1.33
15.96
$0.12
Printer (laser)
62.25
747
$5.60
Printer (laser) – ENERGY STAR
46.67
560.04
$4.20
Scanner
3.67
44.04
$0.33
Wireless router
3.86
46.32
$0.35
Page 26
Electronics
Bathroom Electronics Energy Saving Tips
• The bathroom vanity is one of the highest-use fixtures in the average home.
ENERGY STAR qualified CFLs or LEDs provide bright, warm light, use less energy,
and generate less heat than standard lighting.
Bathroom Electronics Energy Saving Checklist
FF Unplug it. Hair dryers, curling irons and other beauty items may pull juice
even when they’re not in use—don’t let them.
FF Shut off bathroom fans. While they’re great for removing excess steam,
they also suck heat out too. Shut them off when you don’t need them.
Bathroom Energy Use Guide
Approximate
Watts
Curling iron*
Hair dryer*
Monthly
kWh Usage
90
1.35
Annual
kWh Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
16.2
$1.46
1,500
22.5
270
$24.30
Shaver**
1.4
0.12
1.51
$0.14
Toothbrush**
1.4
0.12
1.51
$0.14
* 1/2 hour per day use
** charging
Page 27
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Outdoor
General Outdoor Energy Saving Tips
• Heat your spa to 102° F or lower to save money without sacrificing comfort.
• The American Red Cross recommends that swimming pool temperature be 78 to
82° F.
• You can save up to 90% on heating costs by simply using a pool cover. Besides
helping to minimize nighttime heat loss, pool covers also help prevent chemical loss
and water evaporation.
• Installing a solar water heating system can reduce the cost of energy used for
heating water by more than half.
General Outdoor Energy Saving Checklist
FF Heat it when you need it. Heat the spa only when you plan to use it,
allowing time for warm-up.
FF Cover it. Cover the spa or pool when not using it and when warming it.
FF Check your thermostat. An accurate spa thermostat can save you hundreds
of dollars each year.
FF Plant it. Plant shade trees on the south and west sides of the house to cool in
summer and protect in winter. Plant shrubs around the foundation.
General Outdoor Energy Use Guide
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Average
Watts
Electric dog fence
Garage door opener
Hot tub
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
1
8.76
105.12
$0.79
350
5.25
63
$0.47
4,500
337.5
4,050
$30.38
Power tool (cordless)
33.7
3.03
36.4
$0.27
Well pump (1/2 HP, 1 hour/day)
375
11.25
135
$1.01
Page 28
Seasonal Outdoor
Seasonal Outdoor Energy Saving Tips
• Decorative LED bulbs use up to 90% less electricity to produce the same amount
of light as their traditional incandescent counterparts. The energy used by one
traditional C9 light bulb could power 140 LED bulbs.
• LED lights function just as well outdoors as they do indoors. They are constructed
in such a way that they are impervious to moisture, heat and cold.
• Energy efficient holiday LED lights only add about two cents a day to your
energy bill.
• In addition to saving energy, ENERGY STAR qualified LED lights contain up to
50,000 hours of use, are cool to the touch which reduces the risk of fire, and are
more durable than glass incandescent lights which means less risk of electrical
exposure from broken bulbs.
• Popular fan-driven inflatable lawn decorations ranging in size from 4' to 12' can
add from $1.11 to $1.68 to your monthly bill if run for eight hours a day, or when
used for 24 hours a day, the additional monthly cost would be from $3.34 to $5.05
per inflatable.
• Be aware and watch for overhead power lines when installing outdoor lights.
Seasonal Outdoor Energy Saving Checklist
FF Check decorations. Before decorating, check all light sets for frayed wires,
damaged sockets, or cracked insulation. If you find any defects, replace the
entire set.
FF Upgrade to LEDs. Replace your old holiday lights with LED light strings.
Although they cost more initially, LEDs use a fraction of the energy of
traditional holiday lights. Plus, they contain up to 50,000 hours of use.
FF Use a timer. Plug your indoor and outdoor lighting displays into a timer set
to run during the earlier evening hours. If you don’t use timers, unplug your
lights when you go to sleep or leave home.
FF Safety first. Unplug lights before watering the tree and keep cords and light
sets away from the water.
Page 29
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Seasonal Outdoor
Seasonal Outdoor Energy Use Guide
Average
Watts
Monthly
kWh
Usage
Christmas lights, 100 C7 bulbs (360 hours)
400
72
144
$12.96
Christmas lights, 100 LED bulbs (360 hours)
96
17.28
34.56
$3.11
Insect Killer Light (6 months, 12 hours/day)
40
14.4
86.4
$7.78
Seasonal inflated decoration (360 hours)
Stock tank heater (4 months)
Swimming pool heater (3 months)
Annual
kWh
Usage
Estimated
Monthly
Cost
90
16.2
32.4
$2.92
1,000
720
2,880
$259.20
24,000
5,760
17,280
$1,555.20
Seasonal Outdoor Energy Use Guide –
Natural Gas
BTU/hour
Swimming pool heater
81,912
Monthly
Therm Usage
245.74
Annual
Therm Usage
Estimated
Monthly Cost
737.21
$626.63
Use Less with LEDs
The energy used by 1 traditional bulb could power 140 LED bulbs!
1
Incandescent
140
LEDs
Page 30
Electric Vehicles
Electric Vehicle Tips
• Fuel cost for operating electric vehicles (EVs) is less than $1.00 per
gallon equivalent.
• EVs have zero tailpipe emissions. All upstream generating sources of Avista’s
electricity generate 80% fewer emissions to power an EV, compared to driving a
conventional gasoline vehicle.
• In an effort to make EVs more affordable, the Federal Government offers tax credits
and Washington State waives sales tax on EV purchases. Amounts vary by vehicle
type. Make sure to check with a sales associate for more details.
• We recommend that you program your charger to recharge overnight between the
hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., when the grid is usually less heavily loaded.
• If you would like to know more about EVs, charging at home, or have any other
questions, please visit our website at myavista.com/transportation, or send an email
to [email protected]
Why Support Electric Transportation?
The number of people and companies adopting electric transportation is growing,
and it couldn’t happen sooner. Plug-in electric vehicles benefit the economy and
the environment by saving on fuel costs and lowering air pollution. When equally
compared to gasoline, the cost of driving on electricity is less than $1 per gallon.
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are also reduced by 80 percent.
Avista strongly supports the growth of electric transportation and is working hard to
minimize electric costs for all our customers. We’re also committed to partnering with
government and community groups to realize the benefits of electric transportation.
Together, we can bring electric transportation to the forefront sooner.
Comparison of annual
transportation fuel costs
per household
Annual tons of C02
emissions
Gasoline @ $3/gal
$2,808
Electricity @ 9¢/kwh $495
Gasoline ICE Vehicle
PEV
5
1
Source: Avista Corp (2015). Electric Integrated Resource Plan. August 31, 2015.
Page 31
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Phantom Loads
What are Phantom Loads?
Energy consumed when the appliance is not being used while in the off or
sleep/ready position.
Energy Use Guide
Product / Mode
Air Conditioner / Off
Heating, furnace central / Off
Computer Display, CRT / Off
Computer Display, CRT / Sleep
Average
Watts
Minimum
Watts
Approximate
Watts
0.9
0.9
0.9
4.21
0
9.8
0.8
0
2.99
12.14
1.6
74.5
3.5
Computer Display, LCD / Off
1.13
0.31
Computer Display, LCD / Sleep
1.38
0.37
7.8
Computer, desktop / Off
2.84
0
9.21
83.3
Computer, desktop / Sleep
21.13
1.1
Computer, notebook / Off
8.9
0.47
50
4.42
0.15
26.4
15.77
0.82
54.8
Modem, DSL / Off
1.37
0.33
2.02
Modem, cable / Off
3.84
1.57
6.62
Modem, cable / Standby
3.85
3.59
4.11
Computer, notebook / Power supply only
Computer, notebook / Sleep
Speakers, computer / Off
1.79
0
5.6
USB, hub / Off
1.44
0.95
1.81
Copier / Off
1.49
0
2.97
Fax, inkjet / Off
5.31
0
8.72
Fax, laser / Off
0
0
0
Fax, laser / Ready
6.42
6.42
6.42
Multi-function Device, inkjet / Off
5.26
0
10.03
Multi-function Device, laser / Off
3.12
0
4.7
Printer, inkjet / Off
1.26
0
4
Printer, laser / Off
1.58
0
4.5
Scanner, flatbed / Off
2.48
0.27
8.2
1.27
Caller ID Unit / Ready
1.27
1.27
Charger, mobile phone / Power supply only
0.26
0.02
1
Telephone Answering Device / Off
2.01
1.31
2.55
Telephone Answering Device / Ready
2.25
1.42
2.83
Page 32
Phantom Loads
Energy Use Guide
Product / Mode
Average
Watts
Minimum
Watts
Approximate
Watts
Telephone, cordless with answering machine /
Ready, handset
Telephone, cordless with answering machine /
Ready, no handset
Telephone, cordless with answering machine /
Off
4
2.15
7.4
2.82
1.72
4.7
2.92
0.9
7.4
Telephone, cordless / Ready, handset
2.81
1.05
4.89
Telephone, cordless / Ready, no handset
1.58
0.59
3.09
Telephone, cordless / Off
0.98
0.54
1.8
DVD Recorder / Off
0.75
0
1.5
DVD Player / Off
1.55
0
10.58
DVD/VCR / Off
5.04
0.09
12.7
Game Console / Off
1.01
0
2.13
23.34
2.12
63.74
Television, CRT / Off by remote
3.06
0.3
10.34
Television, CRT / Off by switch
2.88
0
16.1
Television, rear projection / Off by remote
6.97
0.2
48.5
Television, rear projection / Off by switch
6.6
0.2
48.5
Television/VCR / Off by remote
5.15
2.15
13.3
Television/VCR / Off by switch
5.99
2.15
13.11
VCR / Off
4.68
1.2
9.9
Set-top Box, DVR / On, no recording
37.64
25.95
49.2
Set-top Box, DVR / Off
36.68
23.3
48.6
Set-top Box, digital cable with DVR / Not
recording, TV off
Set-top Box, digital cable with DVR / Not
recording, TV on
Set-top Box, digital cable with DVR / Off by
remote
44.63
44.38
44.87
44.4
44.2
44.6
43.46
43.3
43.61
Set-top Box, digital cable / Off by remote
17.83
13.24
30.6
Set-top Box, digital cable / Off by switch
17.5
13.7
26.3
28.35
25.8
30.9
31.37
24.2
36.3
Game Console / Ready
Set-top Box, satellite with DVR / Not recording,
TV off
Set-top Box, satellite with DVR / Not recording,
TV on
Set-top Box, satellite with DVR / Off by remote
27.8
22
33.6
Set-top Box, satellite / Off by remote
15.66
6.58
33.05
Set-top Box, satellite / Off by switch
15.47
6.58
32.7
Page 33
Energy Use and Savings Guide
Phantom Loads
Energy Use Guide
Product / Mode
Average
Watts
Minimum
Watts
Approximate
Watts
Audio Minisystem / Cassette, not playing
13.85
1.67
33.14
Audio Minisystem / CD, not playing
13.99
1.67
36.95
Audio Minisystem / Off
8.32
0.3
24.58
CD Player / Off
5.04
2
18.4
Cassette Deck / Off
0.54
0
1.08
Stereo, portable / CD, not playing
4.11
1.29
6.83
Stereo, portable / Cassette, not playing
2.42
1.16
5.92
Stereo, portable / Off
1.66
0.7
5.44
Tuner, AM/FM / Off
1.12
0
3.37
Garage Door Opener / Ready
4.48
1.8
7.3
Low-voltage Landscape Lights / Ready
1.13
1.1
1.17
Night Light, interior / Off
0.05
0
0.34
Night Light, interior / Ready
0.22
0
1.2
Power Tool, cordless / Ready, charged
8.34
1.82
14
Power Tool, cordless / Ready
1.74
0
4.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
Timer, irrigation / Off
2.75
1.5
5.9
Timer, irrigation / Ready
2.84
1.5
5.9
Coffee Maker / Off
1.14
0
2.7
Microwave Ovens / Ready, door closed
3.08
1.4
4.9
Microwave Ovens / Ready, door open
25.79
1.6
39
Amplifier / Off
0.27
0
1.8
Musical Instruments / Off
2.82
1.2
4.2
Receiver (audio) / Off
2.92
0
19.7
Surge Protector / Off
1.05
0
6.3
Turntable (audio) / Off
0.2
0
0.6
Security Systems, home / Ready
Page 34
1-800-227-9187
www.myavista.com
© 2017 Avista Corporation. All rights reserved.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement