Energy Saving Guidebook (English version) - CEB

Energy Saving Guidebook (English version) - CEB
HE
G
N
LPI VE
A
S
TO
YOUERGY
EN
M
&
Y
E
ON
A SMALL CHANGE CAN
LEAD TO BIG SAVINGS
This guidebook contains simple tips to help you reduce your
electricity consumption and as a result, your electricity bill. We
would recommend that you read them carefully, so as to start
saving energy and money as from today.
At home, you have the power to save energy and money.
Saving energy reduces our nation’s overall demand for
resources, like coal and heavy oil, required to produce
energy; you therefore create less greenhouse gas
emissions, keeping the air cleaner for everyone, and
above all, reducing your electricity bill.
NT
S
NT
E
CO
Definitions
1
Electricity to your home
2
Your home energy use
3
Lighting
4
Refrigerator
8
Air conditioner
10
Laundry
12
Iron
14
Dishwasher
16
Cooking
18
Microwave
20
Standby power
22
Energy label
25
Real cost of an appliance
25
Spend a little more to save money
26
Reading an electricity bill
27
Track your energy consumption
29
DEfinitions
WATTS OR KILOWATTS
EXAMPLES
1000 W
All household appliances are rated in
watts or kilowatts. This indicates how
much electricity an appliance uses in
a certain amount of time.
1
hour
1 kW = 1,000 watts
The higher the rating of the appliance, the more
electricity it uses.
A vacuum cleaner of 1,000 W
used for 1 hour = 1 kWh
KILOWATTS/HOUR
All electricity consumption in your home
is measured in a unit called a kilowatt
per hour (kWh).
40 W
25
1 kWh = 1,000 W
hours
consumed in one hour
A 40 W light bulb that burns for
25 hours = 1 kWh
X
POWER
=
TIME
kWh
ENERGY
1
Electricity to your home
1
2
3
Power stations
Step up transformer
Transmission line
5
4
Distribution line
Step down
transformer
Electricity generated in power stations is stepped up to high voltage by step-up transformers.
It is then stepped down to low voltage by step-down transformers for distribution to
the customers.
Most of our electricity is produced from fossil fuels. Saving energy will reduce the burning of
fossil fuels and emissions of greenhouse gases.
2
Your Home’s energy use
A home energy assessment (sometimes referred to as an energy audit) shows
which part of your home uses the most energy and suggests the best ways to cut
down energy costs.
The diagram below shows the contribution of each appliance for a typical household
in an electricity bill.
Heating
Cleaning Appliances
(Electric Water Heater)
11%
3%
Entertainment
(TV/DVD/HIFI)
15%
Refrigeration
(Refrigerator/Freezer)
28%
10%
9%
Comfort
8%
(AC and Fan)
16%
Lighting
Computers
Cooking Appliances
3
G
N
I
T
H
LIG
4
WHAT YOU CAN DO
Instead of an incandescent bulb, you can use a LED one.
INCANDESCENT
LIG
NG
TIT
I
LIG HH
NG
LIGHT EMITTING
DIODE (LED)
ADVANTAGES
LED BULB
• It uses about 85% less electricity to produce same amount of light.
• It lights on instantly.
• It has a longer lifetime (approximately 50,000 hours).
• It has no mercury content and is safe for the environment.
5
WHAT YOU CAN DO
LIG HTI NG
Instead of a linear fluorescent tube (T8), choose a LED tube (T8 LED).
LINEAR FLUORESCENT
TUBE (T8)
T8 LED TUBE
The letter ‘T’ stands for ‘Tubular.’
The number coming after the letter ‘T’ indicates the thickness or diameter of the particular tube in
eighths of an inch.
• T8 = (8 x 1/8 of an inch) = 1 inch or 26 mm in diameter
• T5 = (5 x 1/8 of an inch) = 5/8 inch or 16 mm in diameter
• T8 LED
• It uses about 65% less electricity.
• It has a longer lifetime (approximately 50,000 hours).
• It lights on instantly.
• It has no mercury content and is safe for the environment.
6
WHAT YOU CAN DO
LIG HTI NG
• Turn the lights off when you leave a room.
• Make use of natural light by opening curtains and blinds during the day.
• Concentrate light where it is actually needed and reduce background light levels. This strategy is called task lighting.
• Use dimmers to control the level of light in a room, as you often do not need lights on at their full intensity to
be comfortable. The dimmer the light, the less electricity used.
• Use motion/occupancy detectors or timers for outside lighting. Using solar-powered lights for outside lighting
will increase energy savings.
• Clean light bulbs and fixtures regularly. Dust can block up to 50% of light output.
• Avoid having too many lights controlled by a single switch. This might lead to having more lights on than what
you actually need.
7
8
REFRIGERATOR
RE
FR
IG E
R
TO
RA
WHAT YOU CAN DO
• Do not put your refrigerator/freezer next to a cooker or in direct sunlight.
• A refrigerator/freezer operates efficiently when ¾ full.
• Set your refrigerator to 5°C and your a freezer to -6°C to -18°C.
• Make sure that air can circulate at the back of the appliance by keeping adequate distance (5cm -7cm) from
the wall.
• Never put hot food straight away in the refrigerator. It warms the whole refrigerator; so, let it cool first.
• Cover all liquids and moist food in the refrigerator to prevent them from releasing moisture. Moisture makes
the refrigerator works harder.
• Do not leave the refrigerator/freezer door open for longer than you need to.
• Check for gaps in the door seals. Leakage of cold air wastes energy and money.
• Test door seals by closing the door over a piece of paper so that it is half in and half out of the refrigerator. If you
can pull out the paper easily, it means that the door is not sealed properly and will be allowing cold air to escape.
• Avoid putting too many items in the refrigerator because they obstruct air circulation, reducing cooling capabilities.
• Unplug the refrigerator/freezer and clean its coils regularly.
• When buying a new refrigerator, choose an energy efficient one.
9
AIR
R
E
N
O
I
T
I
D
N
CO
10
AI
CO R
ND
IT
ION
WHAT YOU CAN DO
• Choose the right size of air conditioner .
• A bigger unit is not necessarily better. An oversized
air conditioner will cycle on and off frequently and
is less efficient. An air conditioner of the right size
running for longer periods of time will actually use
less energy and save you money.
• A space of 1m2 requires approximately a cooling
capacity of 680 Btu/h.
• Close windows and doors when the unit is running.
• Turn off the air conditioner in an unoccupied space.
• Set the air conditioner to a temperature of 24°C
to 26°C.
• Lowering the temperature by 1°C (for example to
23°C) increases the energy consumption by 10%.
• Set the timer of the air conditioner to avoid
the unit to run unnecessarily.
• Install the outdoor unit away from direct sunlight.
ER
• Keep the room as cool as possible by drawing the
curtains or blinds to block out the sun.
• Clean the air filter of the indoor unit every month.
A dirty air filter makes the air conditioner work
harder and uses more electricity.
• Carry out maintenance annually by a qualified
technician.
• Look for higher EER if you consider replacing your
old unit. Higher EER is more energy efficient.
• Use ceiling fans instead of air conditioners when
possible. Fans do not remove heat from the room,
but can provide a cooling effect by circulating the
air. Moreover, they use less electricity.
The cooling capacity is normally expressed in
British Thermal Units per hour (Btu/h).
The Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) indicates
the cooling capacity (Btu/h)/power (watts).
11
12
L AU
N DR
Y
WHAT YOU CAN DO
washing machine
• Wash full loads; one full load uses less energy
than two half loads
• Wash your clothes in cold water using cold-water
detergents whenever possible. 80% of energy is
used for heating the water during a wash.
• Soak heavily soiled items before washing.
Repeating a wash because of stubborn stains will
increase energy consumption.
• Use warm water when cold water will not do
the job. Instead of washing clothes at 400C, do
the washing at 300C and thus reduce electricity
consumption by 40%.
• Use hot water from solar water heater to save on
your electricity bill.
dryer
• Do not put dripping wet clothes into the dryer - it will
have to work harder and will use more energy.
Wring out the clothes or spin them in the washing
machine at highest speed first.
• Clean the filter before every load to ensure that
it is free from fluff. A clogged filter can increase
energy consumption up to 30%; the motor will
have to work harder to push the air through the
dryer and your clothes will take longer to dry.
• Dry full loads.
• Sort your clothes by thickness - if possible, dry the
thin, quick-drying items in one load and thicker
items such as towels in another.
• Do not overload your appliance to avoid damage
to the motor.
• Start your second load to dry as soon as the first
one is finished. The dryer will therefore still be
warm and you will save energy.
• When buying a new washing machine, choose an
energy efficient one.
• Do not over-dry your clothes. If your machine has
a moisture sensor, use it.
Consider air drying by hanging clothes on
clothesline or rack.
• Use the ‘cool down’ cycle. The heat is turned off
for the last few minutes while drying continues as
cool air is blown through tumbling clothes.
• When buying a new tumble dryer, choose an
energy efficient one.
13
14
I RO N
IR
ON
WHAT YOU CAN DO
• Check and wipe the face of your iron. Its clean and smooth surface will ensure quicker and easier ironing.
• Iron large batches of clothing at one time.
• Plan your ironing so that you do not have to keep changing the temperature. Start with clothes requiring the
lowest setting and end with clothes requiring the highest setting.
• Do not iron wet clothes.
• Use a steam iron for easier and faster ironing.
An iron uses the equivalent
of 30 bulbs of 40 W.
15
16
DISHWASHER
WHAT YOU CAN DO
• Run your dishwasher only when it is full.
• Do not rinse dishes before putting them in the dishwasher. Just scrape off the excess food and let the dishwasher
do the job.
• Clean the filter between washes.
• Select an energy-saving wash cycle. For a lightly soiled load, a ‘Light wash’ cycle will save energy by using less water
and operating for a shorter period of time.
• Select the no-heat drying cycle (also called ‘air drying’). For even more savings, you can turn off the dishwasher
once the drying cycle starts, and open it to let the dishes dry naturally.
• When buying a new dishwasher, choose an energy efficient one.
17
17
COOKING
18
CO
OK
I NG
WHAT YOU CAN DO
electric cooker
• Cook in batches and as much as possible in the oven
in one go to make sure that all the space and heat are
being used.
• Do not open the oven door too often to check your
food. Each time you open the door, the temperature
may drop by 250C. Watch the timer instead.
• Occasionally, check the seal on your oven door for
cracks or tears. A clean seal will prevent heat to escape.
• Use correct cookware. Use flat bottomed pans that
make full contact with the electric plates.
• Turn off the electric oven or hot plate a few minutes
before the food is ready. The heating element will stay
hot long enough to finish the cooking without using
more electricity.
• Choose a pan that matches the size of the hot plate. If
the diameter of the pan is much smaller, around 30%
of energy will be lost.
gas cooker
• Choose the right size of burner.
• Make sure the gas flame only heats the bottom of
the pan. This will help save gas and also stop the
handle from getting hot and burning your hand.
• A blue flame means the gas stove is operating
efficiently. A yellowish flame is an indicator that
the burner needs cleaning.
• Bring items taken out of the refrigerator (like
vegetables, milk etc) to room temperature before
placing on the gas stove for heating.
• Always put lids on pans to preserve the heat.
Without a lid , 2/3 of energy is lost.
Induction plates use around
electricity than electric plates.
40%
less
19
MICROWAVE
20
MI
WHAT YOU CAN DO
CR
OW
AV
E
• Defrost frozen food in the refrigerator overnight rather than in the microwave.
• Use the microwave oven to reheat food. It is more efficient than the hob or oven.
• Use the microwave oven as much as possible. It uses 75% less electricity than the electric oven.
• Keep the inside surface clean to allow more efficient microwave cooking.
• When buying a new microwave oven, choose an energy efficient one.
21
STANDBY POWER
Standby power is drawn by an appliance when it is not in operation but still connected to
the mains.
Standby power is used in appliances to light their LED displays or to keep them into sleep
mode, as they wait for remote control signals to start operating.
TO SAVE ENERGY
SWITCH OFF APPLIANCES ON THE MAIN SWITCH BOARD, INSTEAD OF
USING A REMOTE CONTROL TO SWITCH OFF THEIR DISPLAY COMPLETELY.
22
How much does it cost ?
The table below gives you an idea of how much it will cost you for 1 year to use your TV for 4 hours
and leaving it in standby mode for the remaining 20 hours per day.
ELECTRICITY
COST
4 HOURS USE DAILY
STANDBY FOR
REMAINING 20 HOURS
146 kWh/YEAR
37 kWh/YEAR
Rs 898
Rs 228
ENERGY ConsUmPTion OF APPLIANCES ON ‘STANDBY’
APPLIANCES
STANDBY POWER (WATTS)
TV
5
DVD
3
HiFi
3
Air Conditioner
1.5
Computer
3
Printer
5
Microwave
2.7
Mobile Charger
0.5
23
WHAT YOU CAN DO
standby power
• Turn off appliances at the socket and not just with the remote control.
• Unplug the battery charger as soon as the device is fully charged and when the charger is not in use.
• Switch computers/laptops to sleep mode when leaving for short periods of time but switch them off
completely for extended periods of time (e.g. more than one hour).
• Do not use screen savers because they use more energy than if you allow the monitor to dim. Instead,
turn off the monitor if you are away for a short period of time.
A
Power strip with
multiple switches
Use a power strip with multiple switches so that you can
turn off devices (such as printer, scanner, speakers...)
simultaneously which are on stand by.
B
Smart power strip
Use a Smart power strip which will automatically detect
appliances in standby mode and will turn them off.
24
ENERGY LABEL
The energy label provides information that is useful when choosing a new appliance. The more energy
efficient an appliance is, the less energy it consumes.
Product type
Energy
More efficent
A
A
B
MAKE THE
WISE CHOICE
C
D
E
Always choose an
energy efficient appliance.
Less efficient
Energy consumption
kWh/Year
X
Rated capacity (Watts)
Y
Example of an energy label
REAL COST OF AN APPLIANCE
When shopping for new appliances, you need to consider two price tags:
00
00.
0
Rs. 0
PURCHASE PRICE
Rs.
000
0. 00
LIFETIME ENERGY COST
Everyone is familiar with the first price tag: the sticker price, or the cost of buying an appliance. The
second price tag is the appliance’s lifetime energy (operating) cost.
Energy-efficient appliances cost slightly more at purchase than less efficient ones. But when you calculate
the second price tag, these appliances save you money by reducing your energy costs over their lifetime.
PURCHASE PRICE + LIFETIME ENERGY COST = REAL COST
25
is it worth paying a little more for an appliance that is more energy efficient?
Calculating the second price tag is easy. Simply multiply the appliance’s estimated annual energy
consumption (from energy label) by your CEB tariff of electricity to quickly estimate how much it will
cost to operate the appliance for one year:
Energy label rating
(kWh/year)
or
(kilowatts x hours of
operation for one year)
X
=
CEB tariff
(Rs/kWh)
Annual electricity cost
(Rs/year)
Now, multiply your annual electricity cost by the estimated lifetime of your appliance:
X
Annual electricity cost
(Rs/year)
Appliance lifetime
(years)
=
Lifetime
energy cost
Example:
PURCHASE
PRICE (Rs)
YEARLY ENERGY
CONSUMPTION
(kWh)
YEARLY ENERGY
COST (Rs)
ESTIMATED
LIFETIME
REAL COST
(Rs)
Class A refrigerator
20,000
300
1,845
10 years
38,450
Class D refrigerator
16,000
450
2,745
10 years
43,450
APPLIANCE
Deciding to buy the more energy-efficient Class A refrigerator over the lower purchase priced Class D
refrigerator will save you money over the refrigerator’s lifetime.
26
UnderstandING your electricity bilL
A
B
C
D
The energy meter of each customer is normally read on a monthly basis.
The amount claimed on an electricity bill corresponds to the energy consumed for a billing period
(refer to A).
27
For example:
DATE
21.05.2015
19.06.2015
34,236
34,031
READINGS
The energy consumption for a billing period (refer to B) is the difference in the monthly readings.
For example, the energy consumption for the billing period 21 May 2015 to 19 June 2015 is calculated
as follows:
= (34,031 – 34,236) = 205 kWh.
The energy consumed is then split into segments (refer to table at the back of your electricity bill) and
the amount corresponding to each segment is calculated according to the respective tariff (refer to C).
SEGMENTS (kWh)
PRICE/kWh
AMOUNT (Rs)
25
3.16
79
25
4.38
109.5
25
4.74
118.5
25
5.45
136.25
100
6.15
615
5
7.02
35.1
205
-
1093
The addition of other charges such as TV license fee and meter rental gives the final amount (refer to D)
28
Track your energy consumption
By putting into practice the various tips included in this guidebook, you will save on your electricity bill
and you will, at the same time, contribute to reduce the emission of greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide).
Your electricity bill will help you to determine the amount of savings.
Compare your monthly energy consumption using the table below.
For example :
MONTH
BILLING PERIOD
ENERGY
CONSUMPTION
(kWh)
DIFFERENCE IN
READINGS BETWEEN
TWO CONSECUTIVE
PERIODS
REMARKS
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
29
Adopt the good
energy-saving habits.
SAVE
ENERGY AND MONEY
30
Contact:
Corporate Office: P.O. Box 134, Rue du Savoir,
Cybercity, Ebène, Mauritius
Tel: (+230) 404 2000
Fax: (+230) 454 7630/7632
Email: [email protected]
Web: ceb.intnet.mu
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