BSP-02-STANDARD-1628 - PERSONAL PROTECTIVE

BSP-02-STANDARD-1628 - PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sendirian Berhad
Unrestricted
BSP-02-Standard-1628
HSE STANDARD
MODULE 02
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
THIS
DOCUMENT DESCRIB ES THE STAND ARD
FOR PERSONAL PROTECT IVE EQUIPMENT FOR
BRUNEI SHELL PETROLE UM COMP ANY
Revision
7.4
Owner:
Dr Siti-Haziah Abidin (HSE)
Author:
Alice Sim (HSE/411)
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Revision Record
REV
1.0
REVISION DESCRIPTION
First Issue
DATE
August 1998
2.0
Second Issue
September 2000
2.0
Second Issue – converted from pagemaker to MS-Word format – no other significant
changes
May 2001
3.0
Update British Standard references, Safety boots, coveralls and gloves
May 2005
4.0
Update BS EN Standards for Hand Protection
October 2005
5.0
Update rerlecting HSE PPE & Safety Equipment Technical Review Panel Team Update
of Standards for Arc Flash protection requirements and Fire Protection - NFPA
October 2009
Updating requirements for Working at Height (100% tie off)
6.0
Update new technical specification for Body Protection
October 2011
7.0
Update inline with revised Policy On Use of Mandatroy PPE; changes made in section
3.7 and 3.7.1.
August 2012
7.1
Updating reference of BSP-JV to BSP (Brunei Shell Petroleum Co)
Sept 2012
7.2
 Minor updated Section 2.3 and reference section - Section 2.3 to include Hierarchy
of Control to manage Personal Protective Equipment use as per Shell HSSE & SP
Control Framework and deleted BSP-02-Standard-1644- Scaffolding & Access (Mod
06, Rev. 3.2) from References Section as that is now withdrawn.
Feb 2014
 Updated Section 3.6, Impact Resistance Glove picture and Enforcement of using
Impact Resistance Gloves at high impact hazard activities area are included.
 Updated Section 3.9 to include guidance on acceptable WAH anchor points.
7.3
 Added Section 3.8 Covering Personal Flotation Devices and Life Jackets
Dec 2015
 Updated Fall Protection Equipment (re-numbered 3.10) to include competency
requirement for people using Fall Protection PPE (Section 3.10.1) and to clarify
inspection frequencies and competencies of inspectors of Fall Protection PPE
(Section 3.10.3)
7.4
Updated the document to provide additional information on PPE issue and
replacement, clarity on types of PPE selection and added 2 standard references (ie.
Australian_New Zealand (AS/NZS) & American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
standards). Other key changes include;
- No dark safety spectacles allowed.
- Use of ‘Impact Resistant’ gloves as the default gloves at worksite
- Use of only self-righting life jackets
- Employee must use the PPE provided by employer
- Use of only flame resistant Tudong (headscarf for Muslim lady) at worksite including
non-hydrocarbon areas
- Use of only flame resistant balaclava or bandana
Feb 2017
This document has a maximum validity of five years from the last revision date. Within this period it must
be assessed for relevance and re-validated in accordance with the Document Control Procedure
Suggestions for further improvement in this document should be sent to the Document Owner.
Distribution
The document owner is responsible for distribution control. The original electronic version is stored in
LiveLink and accessible via BSP OnLine web site. Paper copies are only controlled if they are physically
stamped “Controlled Hard Copy” and signed by the related remote location document receiver (see
Section 2.6 of Document Control Procedure)
Page 2 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Notice and Warning
Copyright  2012, Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sendirian Berhad
The copyright in this document is vested in Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sendirian Berhad (BSP),
Seria KB3534, Negara Brunei Darussalam. This document or any part of it must not be copied, stored in
any retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, reprographic,
recording or otherwise) or modified for any purposed other than that for which it is supplied, without the
prior written authority of BSP.
Except where expressly agreed otherwise in writing, BSP disclaims any responsibility or liability for any
use or misuse of all or any part of the document or of any information contained in it by any person and
makes no warranty as to the accuracy, suitability or freedom from infringement of third party rights of the
document or information or any part of it to any third party.
Page 3 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
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CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1.0
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................... 5
1.1
Purpose
5
1.2
Scope
5
CHAPTER 2.0
RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................ 6
2.1
PPE & Safety Equipment Technical Review Panel Team
6
2.2
Common Responsibilities
6
2.3
Managers
7
2.4
Asset Holders
7
2.5
Supervisors
7
2.6
All Personnel
7
CHAPTER 3.0
REQUIREMENTS.................................................................... 8
3.1
Introduction
8
3.2
Head Protection
8
3.3
Eye and Face Protection
12
3.4
Hearing Protection
16
3.5
Respiratory Protection Equipment (RPE)
19
3.6
Hand Protection
27
3.7
Body Protection
33
3.8
Personal Flotation Devices (PFD)
39
3.9
Foot Protection
47
3.10 Fall Protection Equipment
49
CHAPTER 4.0 REFERENCES ................................................................................. 64
NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) Standards
64
Applicable Standard Codes
64
Appendix 1 - Assigned Protection Factors for RPE
72
Appendix 2 - Guide to Selection of Filters for Filter Respirators
74
Appendix 3 - Flame Retardant/Resistant (FR) fabrics that are NFPA 211 certified 75
Appendix 4 – CE Marking
76
Appendix 5 – PPE Task Matrix
77
Appendix 6 – Other References
79
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
CHAPTER
1.1
1.0
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INTRODUCTION
Purpose
To manage the RISK to people where Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is used.
Although personal protective clothing and appliances are not substitutes for good safe working conditions
and intelligent behaviour on the part of all employees, they do have an essential part to play in the
protection of these employees. Its use does not eliminate the hazards in the workplace but it does help to
control individual exposure by preventing injury and other adverse effects. It must be remembered that in
ensuring the safety of personnel the Hierarchy of Control must be used to manage the Personal Protective
Equipment use;
1.
First: Eliminate the Hazard or exposure.
2.
Second: Substitute materials or equipment to reduce the Hazard or exposure.
3.
Third: Use engineering Control of the Hazard or exposure.
4.
Fourth: Use procedural Control of the Hazard or exposure.
5.
Fifth: Use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
This document sets the standard for personal protective equipment in BSP operational activities. A
consistent pattern has been adopted for the Requirements section; for each type of PPE, starting with
head protection and progressing down to fall protection, there is:
1.2

a brief description of the hazards to be protected against.

a description of the different types of protection and the considerations required during the
selection of a type for a particular application.

a set of requirements for proper use of the equipment.

a set of requirements for the care and maintenance of the equipment.
Scope
The scope of this document applies to;

staff, Contractors and visitors at BSP Assets, facilities, operations, projects and activities.
It does not apply to;

diving equipment, this is covered by Diving Operations.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
CHAPTER
2.1
2.0
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RESPONSIBILITIES
PPE & Safety Equipment Technical Review Panel Team
The PPE & Safety Equipment Technical Review Panel Team is responsible to ensure efficient and
systematic review prior to acceptance of new PPE & Safety Equipment. The team panels will ensure
proposed goods from suppliers/vendors, conformed to the specifications in this module. The Panel team
members will consist of but will not be limited to;
1.
BSP PPE Technical Authority
2.
Representative from HML/4 (Occupational Health)
3.
Representative from BLNG HSE
4.
BSP PPE Contract Holder
There may be futher support from various disciplines Technical Authorities (depending on equipment
supplied) to assist in technical evaluation where needed.
2.2
Common Responsibilities
Certain responsibilities associated with personal protective equipment are common to both Asset Holders,
Contract Holders & Contractors. Their common responsibilities arise out of the fact that they are both
employers of personnel, in a line management capacity in the case of Asset/Contract Holders, and directly
in the case of contractors. The principle involved is that of employers being directly responsible for their
workers, even where the Asset Holder has overall responsibility as the “owner” of a facility in which
contractor personnel are working. The common responsibilities are as follows:

Identify and assess the risks to which personnel may be exposed in order to determine the most
appropriate types of PPE required.

Where possible, eliminate the need for PPE by adopting other more effective safeguards, for
example fixed screens to protect against airborne debris instead of individual eye protection or
noise reduction measures applied to machinery instead of individual hearing protection.

Make PPE readily available or provide clear instructions on how to obtain it. Provide PPE
including repair, replacement or loss
-
without any charge whatsoever to employees.
-
in a variety of sizes to enable a correct fit to be achieved.
-
that causes minimum discomfort to wearers.
-
which is correct for the particular risks involved and the circumstances of its use

Stock sufficient spare parts for adequately maintaining PPE.

Provide suitable information, instruction and training to enable employees to make the most
effective use of PPE provided.

Specify methods for making people aware of when and where Personal Protective Equipment
must be used.

Specify how to issue, inspect, maintain, store and replace Personal Protective Equipment.

Guideline for PPE issue: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is a company asset and
should therefore be treated with care. PPE should only be replaced if their condition
compromises their ability to act as a last defence for the wearer against the
consequences of a top event.

Guideline for PPE replacement: Personnel should approach his or her Supervisor for
PPE replacement. The Supervisor will inspect the PPE and inform the department’s
PPE custodian or storekeeper of the approval for PPE replacement.

Document the arrangements for people to have fitness evaluation prior to the use of Respiratory
Protection in line with Fitness to Work.

Make arrangements that enable employees to report losses and defects, and repair or replace
PPE before work resumes.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
2.3
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Managers
The Manager is ACCOUNTABLE (as per Shell HSSE & SP Control Framework) to;
1. Apply the following Hierarchy of Control to manage Personal Protective Equipment use.
1.1. Eliminate the Hazard or exposure.
1.2. Substitute materials or equipment to reduce the Hazard or exposure.
1.3. Use Engineering Control of the Hazard or exposure
1.4. Use Procedure Control of the Hazard or Exposure.
1.5. Use Personal Protective Equipment.
2. Verify that PPE remains effective when the Hazard, exposure or Controls change.
3. Establish and maintain a Procedure to manage the use of Personal Protective Equipment.
3.1. Specify where and when Personal Protective Equipment must be used.
3.2. Specify the types of Personal Protective Equipment to be used.
3.3. Specify methods for making people aware of when and where Personal Protective Equipment
must be used.
3.4. Specify how people are fitted for Personal Protective Equipment.
3.5. Specify how people are trained to put on and use Personal Protective Equipment and trained in
the limitations of its use.
3.6. Specify how to issue, inspect, maintain, store and replace Personal Protective Equipment.
3.7. Document the arrangements for people to have fitness evaluation prior to the use of Respiratory
Protection in line with Fitness to Work.
2.4
Asset Holders
Responsibilities exclusive to Asset Holders are:
 To arrange the display of appropriate safety signs for identified PPE requirements.
 To ensure emergency procedures are in place for occasions where PPE fails to protect personnel.
2.5
Supervisors
It shall be the responsibility of supervisory personnel to ensure that:
 workers under their supervision are aware of the hazards in the workplace.
 controls are in place for tasks requiring the use of PPE.
 appropriate PPE is used for carrying out specific tasks.
 when different types of PPE are to be used simultaneously, they are compatible.
 workers under their supervision are trained in the correct use and maintenance of PPE.
 they carry out regular checks on the extent of correct use and maintenance of PPE.
 they periodically examine the condition of PPE being used by workers under their supervision.
 they authorise valid requests by their workers for replacement of lost, worn or damaged PPE.
 they set a good example by always wearing the correct PPE when required.
2.6
All Personnel
It shall be the responsibility of all personnel to ensure that they and all others working on BSP facilities
wear PPE which is:
 of an approved type
 suitable for the tasks to be carried out
 in good condition
 of a suitable size
 worn properly
 properly maintained
Personnel shall ensure that they use only the PPE provided by their employer.
Personnel shall ensure that specific, site PPE requirements such as are contained in site rules and
displayed on safety signs are observed at all times.
Personnel shall report any losses and defects in PPE to their supervisor immediately they occur and shall
request the replacement of lost, worn or damaged PPE.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
CHAPTER
3.0
UNRESTRICTED
REQUIREMENTS
3.1 Introduction
The use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is to reduce employee exposure to hazards when
engineering and administrative controls are not feasible or effective in reducing these exposures to
acceptable levels. This document gives a guideline in determining which PPE should be used to protect
personnel.
Risk or hazard assessment on the work activity to determine the PPE requirements shall be carried out
during work planning and PPE sourced. Depending on the nature of work or activity, additional PPE may
be required. Safety data sheets shall also be referred to ensure the appropriate types of PPE are used.
Where PPE is used, the selection, maintenance, the training of employees on the use of PPE and
limitations of the use of PPE have to be considered to ensure its ongoing effectiveness.
PPE shall be selected to conform with the standards specified in this standard or its equivalent.
The following information on types of PPE to be used in the workplace.
3.2 Head Protection
The head is the part of the human body most susceptible to disabling injury from impact of dropped
objects. Head injuries have extreme danger potential, are often severe and the effects can persist for a
long time. Safety helmets are intended to give the wearer protection against impact and penetration
damage and are designed not to fracture when struck nor transfer the force of the blow to the wearer’s
skull immediately below the point of impact.
Safety helmets are constructed of the following components:

a hard shell with a smoothly finished outer surface and lugs for the attachment of a chin strap. The
most common shell materials are High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Acrylonitrile Butadiene
Styrene (ABS). There are other types of shell materials such as polycarbonate (PC),
polycarbonate/ABS blend, reinforced fibreglass and resin-impregnated textiles.
NOTE: The use of an aluminium shell is NOT permitted within BSP.

a harness or suspension system which encircles the head. It is usually made of plastic, adjustable
to a variety of sizes. The harness is a major component in absorbing energy from impact.

a headband which contacts the wearer’s head at the forehead area.
Brim
Sweatband
Harness or
suspension
Peak
Chin strap
Headband
3.2.1 Selection
A safety helmet shall be of an appropriate shell size for the wearer and have an easily adjustable
headband and chin strap.
It is important for safety helmets to be comfortable to wear and this can be achieved by ensuring that:

the headband is wide enough and contoured to fit the head properly

sweatbands are absorbent and easily cleaned or replaced
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chin straps do not cross the ears, have smooth, quick-release buckles which do not dig in to the
skin, are made of non-irritant material and can be stowed on the helmet when not in use.
Accessories such as ear muffs/defenders and face shields can be fitted to safety helmets and care shall be
taken when fitting them that the shell is not weakened or its electrical protection impaired.
No.
Types
a
Safety
helmet
(vented)
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 397:2012
 AS/NZS 1801:1997
 ANSI/ISEA Z89.12014 (Class C)
Examples of work activities
 For wide range of industrial
applications.
 Not suitable for electrical
protection.
Description
Vented safety helmet will help minimize heat buildup under its shell. Vents allow
rising heat to escape, keeping a worker much cooler.
However, they are not suitable for electrical protection, since they cannot guarantee
electrical insulation.
b
Safety
helmet
(unvented)
 EN 397:2012
 AS/NZS 1801:1997
 ANSI/ISEA Z89.12014 (Class G or E)
 For wide range of industrial
applications.
 Suitable for electrical
protection.
Description
If electrical protection is needed, an unvented helmet that provides electrical insulation
shall be used (ie. helmet approved to EN 397 with electrical optional requirement 440 V
AC or ANSI Z89.1 with Class G or E).
c
Industrial
bump cap
 EN 812:2012
 Helicopter refuelling
Description
Bump caps are non-impact head protection that have reinforced shell inside and are
ONLY appropriate for work situations where protection against minor bumps and scalp
lacerations in areas with low head clearance is needed.
NOTE: Bump caps NOT to be used to protect against impact to the head.
d
Abseiler
helmet
 EN 397:2012
 AS/NZS 1801:1997
 ANSI/ISEA Z89.12014
 Abseiling
Description
Safety helmets for abseiling shall be without a peak and shall be fitted with a retaining
strap with two points of attachment on each side of the helmet. Common colours used
are white, yellow and red.
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No.
Types
e
Fire
fighter
safety
helmet
f
Safety
helmet
shade
extension
g
Picture Example
UNRESTRICTED
Standards
 EN 443:2008
 BS EN 14458:2004
 AS/NZS 4067
 ANSI/ISEA Z89.12014
Examples of work activities
 Fire fighting
 NFPA 2112 (flame
resistant material)
 To help protect wearer's
ears and neck from sun's
rays.
NOTE: The use of this is
prohibited in area where it is
likely to be entangled with
rotating equipment.
 NFPA 2112 (flame
resistant material)
Tudong or
veil
 Use by muslim ladies to
cover their head and hair
area
Description
Ladies must wear company approved tudong made of inherent flame resistant
material at BSP worksites (ie. onshore and offshore, both hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon facilities). Loose end of the tudong and long hair must be properly secured
and tucked into coveralls especially where there are entanglement hazards.
Silk tudongs must not be used due to the nature of silk to instantly ignite upon
exposure to fire.
3.2.2 Use
Safety helmets shall be worn where required at mandatory PPE zones, at any time where there is a
potential risk of head injury and when the appropriate PPE sign is displayed at a work place.
In order to provide maximum protection, the helmet must fit securely on the head and the harness or
suspension must be adjusted to a snug fit.
Safety helmets shall not be worn back-to-front, dropped, thrown, used as seats or supports, used for
carrying objects or subjected to any other form of abuse.
On boarding vessels and during swing rope transfers between boats and platforms, the chin strap must
be used to ensure the safety helmet does not fall off from the user (refer to BSP-14-Procedure-1625 - HSE
Module 29 - Travelling Offshore). Chin strap shall also be used if job involves work at height, in windy
condition, or repeated bending or constantly looking upwards action.
Use of Green Helmet
The objective of the green helmet directive is to ensure that people who are unfamiliar or new to the
worksites are easily identified. This is important as people who are not familiar with the new work
environment may unknowingly place themselves and others in harms way. The green helmet scheme
provides a means for more experienced worksite supervisors to closely supervise and monitor their
activities and provide the right level of support and guidance.
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Green Helmet
Green Helmets are mandatory for;
a)
personnel who have worked for less than three months in the type of BSP facility (eg.
offshore/rigs, onshore tankgroups, fabrication yard, barge/vessels).
b)
visitor & other personnel (eg. BSP or non-BSP staffs, vendors, consultants) who are unfamiliar to
the worksite environment.

Example 1a: Personnel working for more than three months in a BSP facility (eg. West offshore)
moving to another similar BSP facility (eg. East Offshore) are not required to use green helmets.

Example 2a: Personnel working for more than three months in a BSP facility (eg. offshore) moving
to a different type of BSP facility (eg. onshore tankgroups) are required to use green helmets.
3.2.3 Care and Maintenance (include storage & replacement)
Safety helmets shall be properly cared for and maintained by:
 storing them in a dry environment away from direct sunlight or high heat area when not in use
 visually examining them regularly for signs of damage or deterioration
 replacing defective harness components
 regularly cleaning or replacing the sweatband
 or get a new one for replacement
The shell or harness of a safety helmet must not be altered or modified in any way, nor interchanging
of harnesses between helmet types attempted.
All safety helmets are susceptible to loss of strength and impact resistance from ultraviolet light,
temperature extremes and chemical degradation. Not only chemical or physical damage but material
of manufacture and environmental conditions are criteria to be considered in any replacement
programme.
The date of manufacture is moulded into the safety helmets typically on the underside of the helmet’s
brim. This date does not indicate a helmet’s service life. A helmet’s service life starts when it is placed
into service.
Manufacturing Date: The large number inside the circle indicates the year of
manufacture. The arrow inside the circle points to the outer ring of numbers that
represents the month of manufacture. This example reads July (7th month) of 2012.
The helmet recommended maximum shelf life (storage time before helmet is put into service) is 2
years from the date of manufacture.
Practical experience suggests the following replacement periods from the date of issue (i.e., when the
helmet is put into service):

ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) helmets
3 years

Polyethylene or HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) helmets
3 years

Polycarbonate (PC) helmets
5 years

Resin impregnated textile and fibreglass helmets
10 years
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The replacement periods for the helmet are subject to usage and environmental conditions. Damage
noticed during a regular inspection may determine that an earlier replacement of the helmet is
necessary.
Safety Helmets should not be used and replaced immediately when:
1. it has been subjected to a heavy blow or impact, even if there is no visible sign of damage,
2. there are apparent damages (ie. splits, cracks, chips, dents, distortion or excessive abrasion) and
discoloration to the helmet,
3. damage caused by UV can be identified as the helmet will lose its glossy finish and eventually take
on a chalky or dull appearance
Harnesses must also be inspected regularly as perspiration, hair oils and normal wear can effect their
integrity. Squeeze the helmet and listen for cracks and unusual noises, which could be signs of
deterioration.
Safety helmets shall not be painted or decorated with adhesive stickers, as the paint or solvents in the
adhesive can damage the helmet shell. Embossed tape (e.g. Dymotape) identification labels, pressuresensitive stickers or water based adhesives stickers are acceptable. Solvent based stickers can degrade
the thermoplastic material of the helmet shell over time.
3.3 Eye and Face Protection
Many industrial operations create hazards to the eyes and face of the person carrying out the work and
to the eyes of other people in the vicinity. Typical examples of eye and face hazards include the handling
of dangerous chemicals, metal cutting and grinding, high pressure jetting, paint spraying, welding and
flame cutting, non-ionising radiation and the use of lasers.
3.3.1 Selection
To protect against hazards to the eyes and face, the basic types of protection are as follows.
No.
a
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337.6:2012
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Prescription
safety
spectacles
Examples of work
activities
 Personnel requiring the
use of corrective lenses
(sight defects) for
prolonged period at
worksite.
Description
BSP staff requiring prescription safety spectacles can contact their PPE supply focal
point who shall be responsible to raise a Work Order (WO), approved by line
manager/supervisor and provide necessary arrangements. Prescription safety
spectacles are to be provided only by qualified optician.
Prescription safety spectacles incorporate side shields to give lateral protection to the
wearer. To protect against impact, the lenses are made from tough optical quality
plastic such as polycarbonate. Use of photochromic lenses or safety glasses are
acceptable.
b
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Clear safety
spectacles
 For working at day or
night, indoors (e.g.
workshops or
warehouses), inside
confined spaces or at
open areas which are
covered, enclosed or
shaded.
Description
Clear safety spectacles are generally light in weight and are available in several styles,
but these must not be mistaken with on the shelf commercial branded glasses as their
lenses and frames may not conform to the required safety standards.
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No.
c
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Tinted
safety
spectacles
UNRESTRICTED
Examples of work
activities
 For working at day where
exposed to hot sun.
Description
Under BS EN 166:2002, below is the acceptable sunglare filter that shall have;
 code number 6 (ie. sunglare protection with infrared protection) and
 shade number between 1.1 and 2.4 (ie. medium tint, that allows range of light
transmission from over 29% to 80%).
d
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Safety
goggles
 Can be worn over
prescription safety
spectacles.
 Tasks that could expose
the worker to flying
particles
Description
These are like safety spectacles but are designed with a frameless, one piece moulded
lens. They also have side panels but do not seal against the skin, so they are less
protective to chemical splashes than chemical safety goggles. Some safety goggles have
deep design which allow it to be worn over prescription safety spectacles.
e
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Chemical
safety
goggles
with
indirect
ventilation
 Working in dusty condition
 Tasks that could expose
the worker to flying
particles
 Chemical handling
Description
Chemical safety goggles give better protection than safety spectacles because they seal
to the face, keeping the eye area fully protected. They are worn when carrying out
tasks that could expose the worker to flying particles or chemical splashes.
Indirect ventilation goggles are not perforated, but are fitted with baffled ventilators to
prevent liquids and dust from entering.
Goggles are more prone to misting than spectacles and double-glazed goggles or those
treated with an anti-mist coating may be more effective where misting is a problem.
Anti-fogging treatments should be applied to reduce fogging in high humidity
environment.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
No.
f
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 166:2002
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Chemical
safety
goggles
with direct
ventilation
UNRESTRICTED
Examples of work
activities
 Working in dusty
condition
 Woodworking
Description
Where strenuous work is done in hot condition, ‘direct ventilation’ goggles may be more
suitable. However, these are not suitable for protection against chemicals and gases.
Goggles are more prone to misting than spectacles and double-glazed goggles or those
treated with an anti-mist coating may be more effective where misting is a problem.
Anti-fogging treatments should be applied to reduce fogging in high humidity
environment.
g







Welding
goggles
BS EN 166:2002
BS EN 169:2002
BS EN 175:1997
BS EN ISO 4007:2012
AS/NZS 1337:2010
AS/NZS 1338:2012
ANSI Z87.1-2015
 Welding, cutting
Description
Welding goggles give complete enclosure of the eyes and can be fitted with lenses for
gas welding or metal cutting. They cannot be worn over prescription safety spectacles.
h
 BS EN ISO 4007:2012
 AS/NZS 1337:2010
 ANSI Z87.1-2015
Clear face
shield
 Grinding, buffing
 Chemical handling
Description
Face shields are fitted with an adjustable head harness or mounted to a safety helmet
using a designed carrier attachment. They are usually hinge mounted to allow swivel
up when not required. Face shields protect the face but do not fully enclose the eyes
and therefore do not protect against dusts, mist or gases entering from below. They
may be worn over safety spectacles and are generally not prone to misting.
i







Welding
screen or
shield
BS EN 166:2002
BS EN 169:2002
BS EN 175:1997
BS EN ISO 4007:2012
AS/NZS 1337:2010
AS/NZS 1338:2012
ANSI Z87.1-2015
 Welding, cutting, gouging
Description
Welding screens protect the welder’s eyes, face and neck from particles, welding fume,
flash, infra-red and ultraviolet radiation. They are mounted on a hinged head harness
which allows swivel up when not required. Interchangeable filters are available for
different types of gas and electric welding operations.
Page 14 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
No.
j
Types
Balaclava/
Bandana
Picture Example
Standards
 NFPA 2112 (flame
resistant material)
UNRESTRICTED
Examples of work
activities
 Working under hot sun
Description
Balaclava is used for protection of the face against sunburn especially for those
working under direct sun for long period.
Bandana is usually worn on the head to keep the sweat out of the eyes or face.
When used, they must be made of flame resistant material at BSP worksites (ie.
onshore and offshore, both hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon facilities). Loose end
must be properly secured and tucked into coveralls especially where there are
entanglement hazards.
Safety helmet must fit properly when balaclava or bandana is in use.
3.3.2 Use
The type of eye protection used shall be appropriate to the job/task to be performed and shall comply
with the requirements of work instructions, work permits and area rules as displayed on safety signs.
In BSP, safety spectacles must be used at all times in operating facilities, drilling rigs, workshops, and
construction sites. They must be worn where the appropriate signage are displayed, or where
instructions are given.
Contact lenses are not classified as a type of eye protection, and shall not be worn when performing hot
work activities.
NOTE: Dark safety spectacles are not allowed at BSP worksites.
Conditions of use:
1. Where the possibility of the face being splashed, a face shield shall be considered. Goggles shall be
used in combination with a face shield for work involving chemicals very hazardous to the eye.
2. Where exposure to irritant vapours may occur, gas/vapour tight goggles shall be worn.
3. Work with equipment where there is the potential for LNG to come into contact with the eyes and
face requires the wearing of a face shield to provide protection to both the face and the neck.
4. Welding and flame cutting requires the use of welding goggles, face shield or welding screen.
Welder’s mates and helpers shall be issued with appropirate eye protection when working adjacent
to welding operations.
Optical Filters:
1. Optical filters for welding shields and goggles are designed to reduce the radiation intensity to a
safe level. They may attenuate all wavelengths or bands of wavelengths, or have very specific
properties, e.g. laser filters and plane polarising filters. The filter specification shall indicate the
wavelength of radiation to which they apply. The safe level of intensity varies with wavelength.
2. The optical properties of the filters differ and it is essential that the correct optical filters are used,
e.g. some blue glass or tinted lenses do not protect against infra-red radiation. Welding lenses
protect the eyes from visible and infra-red radiation as well as ultra-violet. Replaceable clear glass,
polycarbonate covers or ‘tear off’ acetate lens covers shall be used to protect the optical filters from
damage due to impact, molten metal, flux, etc.
Consideration should also be given to the use of suitable shields, screens or by restricting access to
hazard areas, to provide protection for bystanders and passers-by.
Page 15 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3.3.3 Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
The lenses of eye and face protection must be kept clean as dirty or scratched lenses restrict vision,
causing eye fatigue and may lead to accidents. Eye protection is recommended to be stored in a case or
pouch when not in use.
There are two methods for cleaning eye and face protection:
1. Glass, polycarbonate and other plastic materials can be cleaned by thoroughly wetting both sides
of the lenses or shield and drying with wet strength absorbent paper. Anti-static and anti-fog
cleaning fluids may be used if static or misting is a problem.
2. Materials can be “dry” cleaned by removing grit and dust with a brush and using silicon treated
non-woven cloth. Plastic and polycarbonate material, however, should not be “dry” cleaned as the
cloth used in this method may scratch it.
Where there are any deep scratches, cracks or chemical deterioration of the lenses or broken frames then
eye protection must not be used and replaced. Pitted lenses shall also be replaced as they may impair
vision and their resistance to impact may be impaired. Clear face shields shall be replaced when warped,
deeply scratched or brittle with age.
Where there are headbands used in eye protection (eg. chemical safety goggles), they shall be replaced
when worn out or damaged.
3.4
Hearing Protection
Sound is picked up by the ear in the form of acoustic pressure waves. These pass through to the inner
ear where thousands of extremely fine hair cell nerves react and send corresponding messages to the
brain. Short periods of exposure to excessive noise levels can produce temporary hearing loss which may
initially be reversible. Repeated exposure to high noise levels can result in the destruction of hair cell
nerves and once destroyed, they do not recover and hearing becomes permanently impaired.
3.4.1 Selection
The choice of hearing protection depends on the conditions under which the noise exposure will occur as
well as the characteristics, duration and intensity of the noise exposure. There are two basic types of
protection used in BSP (but selection is not limited to these designs) are ear plugs and ear muffs. The
types of hearing protection are illustrated and described as follows:
No.
Types
a
Disposable
ear plugs
b
Re-usable
corded ear
plugs
Picture Example
Standards
Description
 EN 352-2:2002
 AS/NZS 1270:2002
 ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016
Ear plugs manufactured from either
plastic or fibre material can achieve
satisfactory reduction in levels of
noise reaching the ear. The plastic
type is made of spongy polymer foam
which is tightly rolled between the
fingers and inserted in the ear where
it expands to form an effective
acoustic seal. They are comfortable
to wear over long periods, especially
in hot working environments. Corded
ear plugs reduce the chance of ear
plugs falling into work area and
allows for easier in/out application.
 EN 352-2:2002
 AS/NZS 1270:2002
 ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016
These are re-usable ear plugs that
normally come with a
handy storage container that keeps
ear plugs clean when not being worn.
Corded ear plugs reduce the chance
of ear plugs falling into work area and
allows for easier in/out application.
Page 16 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
No.
c
d
e
Types
Standards
Description
 EN 352-2:2002
 AS/NZS 1270:2002
 ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016
The moulded ear plugs are a
personally moulded and vented
earplug. It is a silicone rubber
moulding which is moulded to each
individual concha bowl and ear canal.
The plug incorporates a central
drilled channel in which a filter is
placed which allows pressure
equalisation but prevents a finite
impedance to the passage of audio
frequency sounds.
Helmet
mounted
ear muffs/
defenders
 EN 352-3:2002
 AS/NZS 1270:2002
 ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016
Standalone
ear muffs/
defenders
 EN 352-1:2002
 AS/NZS 1270:2002
 ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016
Ear muffs, also known as ear
defenders, are rigid plastic cups
designed to completely enclose the
external ear and prevent sound
pressure waves entering the ear.
They are held in place by springy
headbands or are attached to the side
of a safety helmet by swivels so that
they can be raised away from the ears
when not required. Each ear cup has
a cushion round its edge to ensure a
good seal with the head and the
inside of the cup is filled with
acoustic absorbent foam. Fabric
covers over the cup seals make them
more comfortable to use in hot
working environments.
These are ear muffs where they are
not attached to safety helmet and are
used independently which may be
needed in certain situation or task.
Custom
Moulded
ear plugs
Picture Example
UNRESTRICTED
Page 17 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
The accompanying table lists the relative advantages
EAR PLUGS
Advantages
 Small and easily carried.
 Can be worn conveniently and effectively with no
interference from eye protection, head- wear, ear
rings or hair.
 Do not impede head movement in restricted
areas.
 Except for some pre-formed and moulded plugs,
cost of ear plugs is much less than ear muffs.
 Relatively comfortable in hot environments.
EAR MUFFS
Advantages
 The noise attenuation provided by good ear muffs
is generally greater and less variable than that of
good ear plugs.
 One size fits most heads.
 It is easy to monitor groups wearing ear muffs
because they can be seen from a distance.
 At the beginning of a hearing conservation
programme, ear muffs are usually accepted more
readily than ear plugs.
 Ear muffs can be worn despite minor ear
infections.
 Ear muffs are not easily misplaced or lost.
 Conversation while wearing ear muffs is easier
because attenuation is specific to frequencies
which do not cover speech.
UNRESTRICTED
and disadvantages of ear plugs and ear muffs.
Disadvantages
 The level of protection provided by good ear
plugs may be less and more variable between
wearers than is provided by good ear muffs.
 Dirt may be introduced into the ear canal if
plugs are inserted with dirty hands.
 It is difficult to monitor persons wearing ear
plugs because they cannot be seen from a
distance.
 Ear plugs can only be worn in healthy ears.
 Moulded ear plugs need more time to fit.
Disadvantages
 Ear muffs can be uncomfortable to wear in hot
environments.
 They are not easily carried or stored.
 They are not convenient to wear without their
interference with eye protection, headwear, ear
rings or hair.
 Usage or deliberate bending of suspension
bands may reduce protection to substantially
less than expected.
 Ear muffs may impede head movement in
restricted areas.
 Ear muffs are more expensive than ear plugs.
3.4.2 Use
All personnel shall wear suitable hearing protection at all times when working in, or visiting, actual or
potentially high noise areas (>85dB(A)) or where a safety sign requiring hearing protection is displayed.
Noise surveys are carried out using a sound level meter across the noise frequency spectrum, and then
presented as a set of point figures using a weighting convention. It is usually presented as a contour map
and confirmed by noise dosimetry. A hearing conservation program is required whenever employee noise
exposures equal or exceed an 8-hour Time-Weighted Average sound level (TWA) of 85 decibels.
Disposable ear plugs consist of a foam plug which is rolled tight and inserted into the ear canal. The plugs
expand and fill the canal.
Disposable ear plugs shall be made readily available for use by personnel at the entrances to all facilities
in BSP where actual or potential high noise levels exist.
The use of tissue paper, cotton wool, fibreglass wool or other non-standard methods of attempted
protection is NOT effective, and is prohibited.
3.4.3 Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
Disposable ear plugs (exception to moulded personal ear plugs) are intended to be disposable and
although they can be cleaned and reused, it is not recommended.
Re-usable corded ear plugs are washable with water and allow them to air dry completely before using
again.
Ear muffs must be regularly examined for signs of damage (such as crack or chip) or deterioration to the
cushions, linings and headband, they should be replaced. Regular cleaning of the contact seals with a
damp cloth will prevent discomfort and ear infection. Ear muffs should be stored in a cool, dry place
when not in use.
Ear muffs have a maximum lifespan (including shelf life) of 5 years from date of manufacture and should
be disposed of and replaced with new after this time. Shelf life means the storage time before the ear
muffs are put into service.
Page 18 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3.5 Respiratory Protection Equipment (RPE)
Devices to protect the respiratory system are designed to guard against dusts, fumes, gases, oxygen
deficiency and vapours. The design of a respiratory protection device is based on one of two distinct
principles, namely:

the filtration and/or absorption of contaminants from the local atmosphere which allows the wearer
to breathe the local air safely.

the provision of a source of breathing air which is independent of the surrounding atmosphere.
There are two separate classes of RPE for protection against respiratory hazards, as described below.
i.
Respirators
This class of RPE purifies the surrounding air being breathed into the lungs through the nose and
mouth. The contaminated air is drawn through a filter, chemical, or combination of filter and chemical
that removes the harmful substances before they can cause harm to the health of the wearer. The
amount of protection offered to the wearer depends upon the efficiency of the filter.
ii. Breathing Apparatus (BA)
Breathing Apparatus (BA) has its own supply of air from an uncontaminated source. The air that is
breathed by the wearer is supplied either from cylinders direct to the wearer or by a compressor and/or
cylinders that are situated well away from the hazardous substances causing the respiratory hazards,
via an airline to the wearer.
3.5.1 Selection
Before selection of RPE can be made, an assessment shall be made to identify any potential sources of
breathing hazard in the planned scope of work. If any is found, the following actions shall be taken:
The risk to health from the hazardous substance likely to be in the air shall be determined. The risk
assessment shall be based on the toxicity of the substance and the likely duration of exposure.

If the hazard is likely to cause ill effects to the health of workers, the method of work or substance
proposed shall be examined to determine if a different method of work or type of substance can be
used to reduce, or eliminate, the hazard.

If the work method or substance cannot be changed, the use of mechanical extraction or ventilation
equipment to reduce the amount of hazardous substance in the air, shall be considered.
Once these actions have been taken, the type and quantity of hazard assessed the method and duration of
work examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of the various types of RPE considered, the
selection of appropriate RPE can be made.
NOTE: Breathing apparatus shall always be selected where there is a risk of oxygen deficiency.
i.
Respirators
Filter respirators are devices in which ambient air passes through a filter before being inhaled. They can
be unassisted or powered and there are several different types of filter respirator. The most common
types of respirator are described below along with a description of some of their advantages and
disadvantages.
NOTE: Filter respirators are only filters. They must not be used in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
1. Disposable Filter mask respirator
This is a simple filtering respirator. The filter is shaped to form a mask that covers the nose, mouth and
chin and is supplied with adjustable straps that fit around the head. It should also have an adjustable
nose piece that helps provide a seal between the mask and the wearer’s face.
Each model and type of respirator is designed to protect from certain hazard so, for example, a nuisance
dust mask should not be used for organic vapours.
Advantages:
 Maintenance free
 Requires very little training of the wearer
 Light and easy to wear
Disadvantages:
 Requires frequent replacement
 Only protects against low level hazards specified by the manufacturer
Page 19 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 149:2001
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Disposable
filter mask
respirator
UNRESTRICTED
Examples of work
activities
 Working in dusty
condition
2. Half face mask or full face mask respirator
This type of respirator has a rubber or neoprene mask with head straps and threaded attachments for
fitting filters or cartridges. The masks are obtainable in two styles, half-mask which is similar in design
to the filter mask and only covers the nose, mouth and chin, and full-face which consists of a half mask
fitted inside another mask with a clear visor and face seal that extends to the forehead of the wearer.
This provides eye protection as well as breathing protection.
Advantages:
 Can be used frequently with only the filters or cartridges requiring replacement.
 Can be used for protection against many breathing hazards when fitted with different filters or
cartridges.
Disadvantages:
 When used with a full-face mask, provides eye protection.
 Requires maintenance and a higher degree of wearer training.
May be heavier than a filter mask and therefore not so suitable for prolonged periods of use.
Types
Half mask
respirator for
particle
filter
Half mask
respirator for
gas/vapour
filter
Full face
mask
respirator for
particle
filter
Full face
mask
respirator for
gas/vapour
filter
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 140-1999
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Examples of work
activities
 Handling of
hazardous
substances
 BS EN 140:1999
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
 Handling of
hazardous
substances
 BS EN 136:1998
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
 Handling of
hazardous
substances
 BS EN 136:1998
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
 Handling of
hazardous
substances
Page 20 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3. Powered respirator
These types are very similar to the filter respirator with the addition of a battery-driven fan, after the
filter(s). Some manufacturers make Helmet Powered Respirators where the fan and the filter are built in
to the back of a safety helmet that is provided with a clear visor extending down the front of the helmet to
below the wearer’s chin. This provides a constant flow of breathable air to the nose and mouth.
Powered respirators put less load on the lungs, and have the additional advantage (along with breathing
apparatus) of maintaining a positive pressure inside the facemask, so any leakage will be outwards rather
than inwards.
Advantages:
 Can be used frequently with only the filter and batteries requiring replacement.
 Can be used for protection against many breathing hazards when fitted with different filters.
 Provides eye protection and a greater degree of visibility as filters are away from the face.
 Not as tiring to wear as cartridge type respirators.
 Helmet Powered Respirators provide eye and head protection as well as breathing protection, and
provide a cooling effect with the airstream.
Disadvantages:

Requires a lot of maintenance and a higher degree of wearer training.
NOTE: These units must only be used in non-flammable or hydrocarbon free areas, unless certified
for use in a Hazardous Area.
Types
Powered
respirator
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 12942:1988
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Examples of
work
activities
 Handling of
hazardous
substances
Page 21 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
ii.
UNRESTRICTED
Breathing Apparatus (BA)
There are several different types of BA and they all enable the wearer to breathe independently of the
surrounding atmosphere by providing a pressure-fed air supply that comes from an uncontaminated
source. Used correctly, BA will provide protection from all breathing health hazards.
All BA used in BSP operations shall be of the Positive Pressure type and shall maintain a pressure inside
the mask or hood that is above atmospheric pressure at all times when worn. This prevents the entry of
toxic or hazardous atmospheres to the breathing zone of the wearer should the mask become dislodged
or the mask not form a total seal against the contours of the wearer’s face.
The most common types of BA are described below along with a description of some of their advantages
and disadvantages.
1. Air-Fed Hoods and Helmets
Air-fed hoods consist of simple hoods of clear plastic material that cover the whole head to the shoulders.
Beneath the hood is attached a strong fabric collar that covers the shoulders and upper chest. Air is
constantly fed from a breathing air supply, via a hose and cooler unit, directly into the hood. The air
supply will be direct from a compressor which is capable of supplying breathing quality air. Air-fed
helmets are very similar, but use an industrial standard helmet with a clear visor, that protects the whole
head and face, instead of the plastic hood.
Advantages:
 May be used for very long periods or for jobs that require daily breathing protection.
 Air-fed helmets provide head protection, and may provide a limited amount of hearing protection as
well as breathing protection.
 Provides a cool air stream to the wearer.
Disadvantages:
 Requires maintenance.
 Requires wearer training.
 Distance of wearer travel limited by length of airline.
 Requires the use of an air compressor that is capable of supplying breathing quality air.
 Breathing air compressors require regular maintenance by trained and competent personnel.
Types
Air-Fed
Hoods and
Helmet
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 14594:2005
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Examples of work activities
 Abrasive blasting
 Spray painting
Page 22 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
2. Air-line Breathing Apparatus
This type of BA is very commonly used in the petroleum industry. It consists of a Full-Face mask similar
in design to that of filter/cartridge type respirators. The face mask is fitted with a demand valve which
allows a supply of air to be breathed by the wearer when he inhales. The demand regulator is fitted to a
long airline that leads to a pressurised supply of breathing quality air. The air supply will be either direct
from a compressor which is capable of supplying breathing quality air or from cylinders that have been
filled from such a compressor.
Personnel carrying out operational activities where breathing apparatus is required for extended duration,
use air-line equipment rather than cylinders or Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), to relieve
physical stress.
Advantages:
 May be used for long periods.
 Provides protection from all respiratory health hazards whether known or unknown.
Disadvantages:
 Requires regular maintenance by trained and competent personnel.
 Requires a high degree of wearer training.
 Needs close supervision and control.
 Distance of wearer travel limited by length of airline.
Types
Air-line
Breathing
Apparatus
with full face
mask, fitted
with demand
valve
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 14593-1:2005
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Examples of work
activities
 Confined space activity
like vessel entry.
 Carrying out hot work
activities in a confined
space.
Page 23 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3. Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)
Self-contained breathing apparatus is equipped with a similar mask to airline breathing apparatus but
the air supply to the demand regulator comes from a compressed air cylinder that is attached to a back
plate carried on the wearer’s back. It is also equipped with a pressure gauge from the compressed air
cylinder so that the wearer may check the cylinder contents.
Advantages:
 Provides protection from all respiratory health hazards whether known or unknown.
 Unrestricted by trailing air lines.
Disadvantages:
 Requires regular maintenance by trained and competent personnel.
 Requires a very high degree of wearer training.
 Needs close supervision and control.
 Wearer time restricted by compressed breathing air cylinder contents.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 137:2006
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
SelfContained
Breathing
Apparatus
(SCBA)
Examples of work
activities
 Confined space activity
like vessel entry.
 Fire-fighting
 BS EN
12245:2009+A1:2011
(for the composite
cylinder)
4. Escape Breathing Apparatus
This is a smaller version of a self-contained breathing apparatus set. It is equipped with a mask or hood
with an air supply from a small compressed air cylinder. The cylinder is not normally mounted on a back
plate but is contained in a bag or has straps so that it may be carried by the wearer. It is only intended for
short duration use for emergency escape from areas where breathing hazards exist, or are likely to exist.
NOTE: It must only be used for escape purposes and not for any type of work or rescue.
Advantages:
 Provides protection from all respiratory health hazards whether known or unknown.
 Light and easy to wear.
Disadvantages:
 Requires regular maintenance by trained and competent personnel.
 Requires a very high degree of wearer training.
 Needs close supervision and control.
 Equipped with a small air cylinder so can only be used for periods of a few minutes.
Types
Escape
Breathing
Apparatus
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 137:2006
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Examples of
work activities
 For emergency
escape
 BS EN
12245:2009+A1:2011
(for the composite
cylinder)
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
5. Other Escape Devices
Types
UNRESTRICTED
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 403:2004
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ASTM E2952-14
Smoke
hood
 EN 13794:2002
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
Chemical
Re-breather
Escape Set
Examples of
work activities
 For fire escape
from offshore
accommodation
 For H2S escape
Types of filters for filter respirators
There are three main filter types:

Gas/vapour filters which remove specified gases and vapours

Particle filters which remove airborne solid and/or liquid particles

Combined filters which remove solid and/or liquid particles, and specified gases and vapours
Refer to Appendix 2 for guide to selection of filters for filter respirators
Types
Gas/vapour
filters
Particle filters
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 14387:2004
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
 EN 143:2000
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
Examples of work
activities
 For respiratory
protection against
specified gases and
vapours.
 For respiratory
protection against
airborne solid and/or
liquid particles.
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Types
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 14387:2004
 AS/NZS 1716:2012
Combined
filters
UNRESTRICTED
Examples of work
activities
 For respiratory
protection against solid
and/or liquid particles,
and specified gases
and vapours.
Compressed Breathing Air
Breathing air systems shall as far as possible be dedicated solely to that purpose. General service or
tool air systems shall not be used.
Air supplied for breathing shall meet the internationally recognised standards such as OSHA
1910.134(i) (Breathing Air Quality and Use) or EN 12021:1999 (Compressed Air for Breathing
Apparatus). It is unlikely that single stage compressors will achieve this standard.
Arrangements shall be made for the supply of breathing air from compressors to be tested at regular
intervals using digital gas analysis meter or an equivalent air purity test kit. These intervals shall, as
a minimum, be those specified by the manufacturer, and upon the changing of filters or mechanical
maintenance.
Instrument air should not be used as breathing air, unless it can be positively assured that it meets the
quality requirements specified in Table below and controls prevent contamination from source to user.
Breathing Air Specification (from DEP 80.10.10.31-Gen.) – extract from Shell HSSE & SP
Control Framework PPE guide for RPE
Oxygen content
19.5 % to 23.5 %
Carbon monoxide (max.)
10 parts per million (ppm)
Carbon dioxide (max.)
1,000 ppm
Condensed hydrocarbon (max.)
5 mg/m3 Note (1)
Dew point (max.)
At atmospheric pressure, at least 5 °C (10 °F) below the
ambient temperature
Taste or odour
Lack of noticeable, pronounced, undesirable or objectionable
taste or odour
NOTES:
1. Detectable oil/hydrocarbon/particulate above 0.1 mg/m3 is abnormal and should be investigated.
2. A dew point temperature of 18.3 °C (65 °F) corresponds to 24 ppm.
Airline hoses for mobile air supply systems should only be made up one or two lengths of hose, i.e. one
coupling in the total hose length. This is to avoid excessive pressure drop through the supply system.
Hose twisting should be prevented to avoid fit, or performance, or hose connection issues. At least one
swivelling coupling should be fitted adjacent to the wearer. The design of the couplings should be such
as to prevent unintentional interruption of the air supply. Some manufacturer’s specifications will also
define the maximum allowable length of airline hose to avoid excessive pressure drop.
3.5.2
Use and Training
Before any work that involves the use of RPE, wearers and supervisors of the work shall be informed of
the breathing hazards likely to occur throughout the duration of the work. They should have received
appropriate instructions to enable them to carry out the work safely and shall be trained in the use of
RPE where required.
For wearers of Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and Air Line Breathing Apparatus,
attendance at the Confined Space Entry training is required, which may lead to approval by the
concerned line manager/BSP Contract Representative following demonstration of competence.
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Breathing Apparatus (BA) wearers are required to undergo a Fitness to Work evaluation by BSP’s
approved medical examiners (available both inside and outside Brunei Darussalam) who are certified to do
fitness to work medical evaluations. Refer to BSP-HML4-Approved Medical Examiners. NOTE: This
requirement should be applied if BA use is an integral part of the job and not for use of BA
(including SCBA) for escape purposes.
Refer to Functional Health Specifications - Medical Evaluation
HEMS.GL.2000.04 for frequency of Fitness to Work evaluation.
3.5.3
of
Fitness
to
Work
Report
Fitting
Face masks require a good seal between the face and the edge of the mask in order to stop leakage round
the mask. RPE cannot protect the wearer if it leaks. A major cause of leaks is poor fit. Tight-fitting face
pieces need to fit the wearer’s face to be effective. This can be difficult to achieve, and several types of
mask may need to be tried to find the one that fits best. The material of the mask, particularly those with
a rubber seal, can make a big difference.
3.5.4
Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
All respirators and associated consumable items shall be stored in a clean and dust free environment,
away from sources of direct sunlight and extremes of heat and humidity.
New filters and cartridges refills shall be stored in their original packing. They shall remain sealed in
that packing until they are to be used. If the seal is broken prior to use, it shall be disposed of according
to the manufacturers’ recommendations. All filters and cartridges refills bear a date printed by the
manufacturer indicating their maximum shelf-life. Items that are beyond this recommended shelf-life, or
where the shelf-life is not clearly visible, shall not be used for any reason whatsoever.
All RPE used shall be maintained, as a minimum, in accordance with manufacturers’ requirements and
carried out by trained personnel where appropriate. Only manufacturers’ approved spare parts and
consumable items shall be used in the maintenance of RPE.
All RPE is to be inspected by the wearer prior to use to ensure that it is in full and complete working
order, and any RPE showing any defect at all shall be rejected for use and removed from the worksite
until it has been repaired or replaced.
Records shall be kept of the maintenance and inspection of RPE which show the identifying mark of the
individual item of equipment, the reason for inspection or maintenance, the result of the maintenance or
inspection, the name of the person performing the maintenance or inspection, and the date. These
records, or copies of the records, shall be available wherever the equipment is to be used.
Refer to BSP-02-Standard-1666 for selection, care and maintenance of SCBA.
When to replace particle filters?
 When it becomes difficult to breath comfortably (ie. particle filters become clogged),
 When it becomes visibly contaminated and physical damage occurs,
 When the shelf-life expiry date on the filter has passed.
When to replace gas/vapour filters?
Gas/vapour filters start to let contaminant through once their sorbents become saturated and this is
called breakthrough. When breakthrough occurs, it offers no protection.
The service life (ie. how long it will last) of gas/vapour filters is affected by many factors (eg.
concentration and identity of contaminants, breathing rates, humidity levels, ventilation). The following
are recommended.





3.6
Change gas/vapour filters as instructed by the manufacturer,
When it becomes visibly contaminated and physical damage occurs,
When the shelf-life expiry date on the filter has passed,
When contaminant can be smelled or tasted, or
Change in accordance with your established filter change schedule.
Hand Protection
Gloves are used to protect the hands against chemical, physical, biological and other hazards. There is
no single type of glove that suits every purpose, conditions, processes and materials vary so much that a
given situation may require its own individual type of hand protection.
Use of Impact Resistance Gloves as the ‘default glove’ for BSP Staff and contractors, including
visitors at all BSP work sites (ie. assets, facilities, operations, projects and activities) is mandatory.
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Hazard or risk assessment shall always be carried out before work is executed to ensure the right glove
protection for the specfic job. If the outcome from such an assessemnt specify different gloves, personnel
shall change to the appropriate gloves prior to executing the specific job. Where personnel have
discontinued or completed the specific job, the Impact Resistance Gloves shall be worn.
3.6.1 Selection
Gloves or other hand protection must be capable of giving protection from hazards, be comfortable
and fit the wearer. The choice of protection shall be made on the basis of suitability, compatibility
with the work and the requirements of the user. Also to be considered is the ability of protective
gloves to resist abrasion and other industrial wear and tear.
Manufacturer’s instructions and markings for appropriate use and level of protection shall be
observed. When selecting gloves for chemical protection, reference shall be made to chemical
permeation and resistance data provided by manufacturers.
Hazard types and the means of protecting against them are:
1. Protection against mechanical hazards
Gloves manufactured to BS EN 388 are rated against four categories:
A. Abrasion resistance (0-4)
B. Blade cut resistance (0-5)
C. Tear resistance (0-4)
D. Puncture resistance (0-4)
Mechanical Hazards
Each of these categories carry protection ratings respectively; the higher
the number the greater the protection in that particular category, e.g. a
glove rated BS EN 388 4.2.2.1, highest number giving the most
protection in that category i.e. Abrasion (4) and Puncture resistance (1)
lowest protection in this category.
Identify the hazards associated with the task prior to selecting the right glove protection. E.g. where
work activities have high cutting risk such as handling objects with sharp edges or swarf, selecting the
glove that has higher cut resistance rating would be more appropriate.
In general, leather gives protection against abrasion. Gloves made from
knitted Kevlar protect against cuts and penetration. Those
manufactured from Kevlar needle felt gives good puncture resistance.
This category of glove is also best suited for work involving food
preparation in kitchen and gallery where there is high risk of fingers
cuts from knifes and other sharp objects. These types of gloves can
also be rated to provide ‘Anti-Static’ protection suitable for certain
working environments.
Impact cut
Static electricity
Palm dip coating gloves offer different degrees of grip in different conditions and breathability. The
greater the coating dip, the less breathable the glove will be; i.e. a full dip coating has the greatest level
of protection against chemicals however they have the lowest breathability. Palms of gloves should not
have stitching through them as this creates a direct leak path to the skin from any chemicals that the
user may be working with to soak through the glove that may result in harm to the user.
Cut resistant gloves are made of tougher material and give better protection than general purpose
gloves. Newer technology has reduced the thickness of the cut resistant materials which has improved
their dexterity.
Impact resistant gloves have additional rubber or polymer padding on the back of the hand, fingers and
thumbs to reduce the force of the impact on the users hand. The padding does have an effect on the
dexterity of the gloves. Generally to make the gloves waterproof there is an intermediate lining
constructed into the glove which adds bulk and reduces dexterity.
No.
a
Types
Gloves for
Grip &
dexterity
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
 BS EN 388:2003
 AS/NZS 2161
 ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
Examples of work activities
 Electrical & Instrument (E & I)
work eg. cable termination or
glanding
 Brush painting
 For small parts handling
Page 28 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
b
c
Cut
resistant
Gloves
Impact
Resistant
gloves
(with
dexterity
super grip,
oil & slip
resistant,
cut
resistant,
rigger grip
cut)
UNRESTRICTED




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 388:2003
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
 Metal sheets or glass handling




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 388:2003
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016










Scaffolding
Metal cutting & grinding
Chipping
Lifting, rigging & slinging
Excavation
Pipe/spool/valve/flange
handling
Bolt tightening/loosening
Anchor handling & mooring
Electrical cable pulling
Manual handling/manual
lifting
d
Steel mesh
or chain
mail gloves




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
EN 1082-1:1997
AS/NZS 2161.7.2:2005
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
 Food cutting (meat & poultry)
in kitchen/galley
e
Chainsaw
gloves





BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS-EN 388: 2003
BS EN 381-7:1999
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
 Tree cutting / Use of chain saw
Chainsaw
protection
2. Protection against heat and fire (thermal hazards)
Depending on their weight and construction, terrycloth gloves will protect against heat and
cold. Gloves manufactured from other materials such as Kevlar, glass fibre and leather
can give protection at elevated temperatures.
Chromed leather gloves are fire retardant and protect against sparks and hot slag.
Welders gauntlets are a typical form of hand protection made from leather.
No.
Types
a
Welding
Gauntlets
b
Fire Fighting
glove
Picture Example
Standards





BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 12477:2001
BS EN 407:2004
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
 BS EN 659:2003
 AS/NZS 2161
 ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
Examples of work
activities
 Welding, flame cutting,
gouging
 Blasting & Spray
Painting
 Fire-fighting
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3. Protection against cold hazards
Gloves made from neoprene are good for handling fluids such as oils in low temperatures.
Cold hazard
Cryogenic gloves worn over surgical silicone gloves protect against cold burns from LNG
(Liquefied Natural Gas). They can be used for handling liquid helium, liquid oxygen and
liquid nitrogen.
Waterproof cryogenic gloves should be selected to protect the user from cryogenic liquids
and vapors.
No.
a
Types
Picture Example
Standards




Cryogenic
gloves
BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 511:2006
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
Examples of work
activities
 Handling of cryogenic
liquids and vapors (eg.
liquid Nitrogen, liquid
helium, liquid oxygen)
4. Protection against electrical hazards
For working on live electrical equipment on high voltage environment, gloves made of
raw natural or synthetic rubber, or a combination of the two, give protection against
electric shock.
Live working
symbol
No.
a
Types
Insulating
gloves for live
electrical
working
Picture Example
Standards




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 60903:2003
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
Examples of work
activities
 Working on high
voltage environment
5. Protective against chemicals and micro-organisms
Chemical protective gloves are available in a range of
materials including natural rubber (latex), neoprene,
nitrile, PVA (Polyvinyl Alcohol), PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride),
butyl and viton.
The degree of protection against chemical permeation
depends on the glove material, its thickness and method
of construction.
Chemical
hazards
Low chemical
protection
Micro-organism
hazards
As a general rule, gloves for use in handling toxic liquids should be chosen on the basis of
breakthrough time, i.e. the duration of use not to exceed the breakthrough time quoted by the
manufacturer of the glove for the chemical substance concerned.
When handling dry powders, any chemically resistant glove may be used. The durability of the gloves
in the work environment shall also be considered, remembering that some glove materials are
adversely affected by abrasion, cuts, tear or punctures. A glove with excellent permeation resistance
may not be adequate if it tears or punctures easily. Always factor in the physical performance
requirements of the job or application.
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UNRESTRICTED
Disposable gloves are used for tasks which need tactility with limited protection. They are used mainly
in laboratories, for food preparation, medical inspection or cleaning.
Rubber gloves are waterproof but have limited chemical resistance. Polymers such as nitrile and
neoprene are more chemically resistant but stiffer and less tactile.
Always refer to the chemical’s safety data sheets to select the most suitable type of glove.
NOTE: Do no use latex gloves if user is susceptible to or have a latex allergy.
No.
a
Types
Chemical /
Oil resistant
gloves
[materials
range from
natural
rubber
(latex),
neoprene,
nitrile, PVA
(Polyvinyl
Alcohol), PVC
(Polyvinyl
Chloride),
butyl and
viton].
b
Disposable
Vinyl, Latex
or Nitrile
Gloves
Picture Example
Standards







BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 374-1:2003
BS EN 374-2:2003
BS EN 374-3:2003
BS EN 374-4:2003
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
BS EN 455
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
Examples of work
activities
 Laboratory work &
sampling
 Chemical handling
 Refueling/defueling of
engines/machines
 Spill Clean-up
(onshore)
 Tank cleaning
 Kitchen cleaning
 Food handling
 Medical/
pharmaceutical use
 Food preparation
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6. Protection against ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination
To protect from ionizing radiation, the glove has to contain a certain
amount of lead or equivalent metal, quoted as lead equivalence. This
lead equivalence must be marked on each glove.
Ionizing
To protect from radioactive contamination, the glove has to be liquid proof
radiation
and needs to pass the penetration test defined in EN 374 (Protection from
chemicals and micro-organisms). For gloves used in containment enclosures,
the glove shall pass in addition to a specific air pressure leak test.
No.
a
Types
Ionizing
radiation
gloves
Picture Example
Standards




BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
Particulate
radioactive
contamination
Examples of work
activities
 Ionizing radiation
EN 421:2010
AS/NZS 2161
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
3.6.2 Use
During swing rope transfer, the use of gloves is not mandatory. Where gloves are worn, they must
not be wet and should be free from dirt/oil and allow the palm to fold easily around the swing rope just
above the knot on the swing rope. Refer to BSP-14-Procedure-1625, Travelling offshore (HSE Module 29).
NOTE: The wearing of gloves during the operation of rotating machinery such as lathes, pillar
drills, etc is strictly prohibited. There is a greater potential danger to the operator from the possibility
of a glove becoming entangled with the machinery, than the degree of protection offered by gloves being
used in such service.
When wearing gloves offering chemical protection, avoid touching other exposed parts of the body,
equipment or fittings as contamination may be transferred to them.
Gloves used for handling chemicals shall be decontaminated regularly during use, by washing.
Contaminated gloves may need to be washed off with a suitable cleaner before being removed so as to
prevent spread of contamination. They should be removed without the skin touching the glove and may
be replaced on the hands by sliding the hands into gloves as far as they will go then using the joint of the
thumb to hold one glove secure while wriggling the fingers into position.
Care must be taken to avoid contaminating the lining or inside of the glove. Not all chemicals can be
easily removed and immediate disposal of contaminated gloves without re-use may be required,
especially where highly toxic materials have been handled.
Most gloves do not provide protection during prolonged immersion in chemicals.
3.6.3 Fitting
Badly-fitting gloves are liable to premature wear. The greatest part of the wear and strain is taken by the
thumb joint to the hand. If gloves are too small they tend to ridge between the index finger and the
thumb and this leads to cracking of the joint. If too large, the palms tend to ridge and cause localised
excessive wear. If too tight, they may be difficult to remove without resulting in contamination. Correct fit
is of more importance with less flexible glove materials.
3.6.4 Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
Rubber gloves for electrical work shall be issued in a protective container free from oil and grease. They
must be checked by thorough visual examination before they are used and if either of a pair of gloves is
thought to be unsafe, both shall be replaced. Gloves which are kept in toolboxes should be stored in a
plastic box or pouch.
Where tests show that penetration through a glove can occur, a control system of regular glove checking,
cleaning and replacement shall be put in place.
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UNRESTRICTED
Glo
ves shall be regularly examined for cuts, punctures, abrasion, cracks, contamination, etc. Areas between
the fingers and other flex points shall be carefully examined. They may be tested for leaks by inflating with
low pressure air (200 kPa) and immersing in a water bath while still under pressure, care maintenance and
testing methods are normally available from the glove manufacturer.
Although it may be practical to decontaminate and re-use gloves in certain situations, the cleaning process
usually does not remove all the toxic material, thus reducing breakthrough time for subsequent use.
Discarded and contaminated gloves shall be destroyed, in order to prevent unauthorised retrieval and use
(this is especially important for gloves that may have been in contact with very toxic substances.)
Gloves shall be stored at ambient temperatures away from light, moisture, solvents and chemicals. Each
person should be issued with protective gloves on a personal basis to prevent the spread of contagious skin
infections.
If rubber gloves for electrical work become dirty or soiled, they can be cleaned by washing with soap and
water at a temperature not exceeding the glove manufacturer’s recommended limit, then thoroughly
dried and dusted with talcum powder. If insulating compounds such as mastic or paint continue to
stick to the gloves, the affected parts should be sparingly wiped with a suitable solvent and recleaned.
They can then be returned to their storage box or pouch.
3.7
Body Protection
Body protection ranges from one piece coveralls for general use to specialist aprons to protect against
chemicals and other hazards. Items worn on the body on top of clothing, for example high visibility
garments are also included. All protective clothing is designed to protect the individual for the specific
purpose intended and should be selected on this basis. The different types of protective clothing are
specified in the table below.
3.7.1 Selection
1. Flame Retardant/Resistant Coverall
Exposure to fire/extreme heat frequently results in serious injuries and in some cases, death.
All coveralls used for activities executed for all BSP locations, facilitates and worksites shall be long
sleeved one piece coveralls and will have reflective stripes to ensure visibility at low light or dark
areas.
Coveralls made from ‘INHERENT FLAME RETARDANT/RESISTANT’ NFPA 2112 materials shall be
used. This is enforced for BSP Staff and Contractors working in all BSP worksites (onshore and offshore)
and where PPE sign-posted.
Materials used for undergarments must be of natural fibres (the use of synthetic material would defeat
the flame resistant coverall protection and could cause serious injury in case of flash fire).
Refer to Appendix 3 for Flame Retardant/Resistant (FR) fabrics that are NFPA 2112 certified.
Types
One piece
long
sleeved
inherent
flame
retardant/
resistant
coverall
Picture Example
Standards
 NFPA 2112
Examples of work
activities
 For BSP Staff and
Contractors working in
BSP worksites (onshore
and offshore) and where
PPE sign-posted.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
 NFPA 1971
 EN 343:2003
 EN 469:2005
Fire
Fighting
jacket &
pant
UNRESTRICTED
 Fire-fighting
2. Electrical Arc Flash protective suit
Exposure to an arc flash can result in serious injuries and in some cases, death. Workers have been
injured even though they were three meters away from the spot where arc flash had occurred.
Personnel involved in invasive electrical activities shall wear Fire Resistant (FR) coveralls with an Arc
Rating of at least HRC 2 (8 cal/cm²) as per NFPA 70E, or equivalent (such as EN 1149-5).
When working on equipment where arc flash is possible, wear a PPE system rated to a cal/cm² rating
greater than the potential arc flash energy of the equipment.
Note: For High voltage, Category 4 (NFPA) protection is required.
Arc Flash Hazard Risk Category (HRC) chart based on NFPA 70E
Hazard/Risk
Category (HRC)
Types
Electrical Arc
Flash
protective
suit
Clothing Description
(Typical number of clothing layers is given)
Required Minimum Arc
Rating of PPE cal/cm²
Arc-rated FR shirt and FR pants or FR coverall
(1 layer)
4
Arc-rated FR shirt and FR pants or FR coverall
(1 or 2 layer)
8
Arc-rated FR shirt and FR pants or FR coverall and
arc flash suit selected so that the systems arc
rating meets the required minimum (2 or 3 layers)
25
Arc-rated FR shirt and FR pants or FR coverall and
arc flash suit selected so that the systems arc
rating meets the required minimum (3 or more
layers)
40
Picture Example
Standards
 NFPA 70E
 EN 1149-5:2008
Examples of work
activities
 High voltage or invasive
electrical activities
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UNRESTRICTED
3. Lab coats and Aprons
Protection shall be achieved with chemical resistant clothing, e.g. laboratory coats with a water resistant
finish.
Where heavier protection is required, this can be afforded by aprons made from neoprene or polyurethane
coated nylon, or Terylene or rubber aprons.
For welders, further protection against sparks, flames and weld splatter shall be achieved by wearing an
apron made of leather.
Types
Lab coats
Apron
Picture Example
Standards
Chemical resistant
clothing with water
resistant finish
 BS EN ISO 11611:2015
 Kitchen handlers
 Chemical handling
 Grasscutting
 BS EN ISO 11611:2015
 Welding, flame
cutting, grinding,
gouging
(impervious)
Welding
apron
(leather)
Examples of work
activities
 Chemical handling in
laboratory
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UNRESTRICTED
4. Disposable Coveralls
Protection shall be achieved by wearing suits made from bonded olefin that forms a dense shield which
keeps out fibres and dust particles.
Disposable coveralls are made from a tough but thin polymer material such as
polypropylene/polyethylene laminate film. They are designed for single shift use in environments where
they may be contaminated with oil, grease or other types of tenacious dirt which will not easily wash off.
They should be discarded as waste after use. In areas where flame retardant clothing is required,
disposable coveralls should also be flame retardant clothing to ensure the outer layer of clothing is flame
retardant, unless a chemical resistant material is required by the nature of the work.
They are also used when handling equipment contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material
(NORM). In this case, contaminated coveralls have to be disposed of as NORM waste.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN ISO 13982-1:2004
(Type 5 - Protection against
Disposable
coveralls
airborne solid particulate
chemicals)
Examples of work
activities
 Working with
hazardous
substances such as
asbestos, lead dust or
radioactive dust.
 EN 14126:2003 (for
biological protection)
 EN 1073-2:2002 (Class 2 –
Protection against
particulate radioactive
Contamination)
5. Weather Suits
Jackets, trousers and leggings made with PVC coated cotton or nylon offer protection against rain and
these materials are also resistant to abrasion, cracking and tearing and protect against most oils,
chemicals and acids. ‘Breathable’ waterproof fabrics such as Goretex keep out water while allowing body
perspiration to escape.
In areas where there are risk of fire, flame resistant rainwear shall be used.
Types
Rainwear
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 343:2003
Examples of work
activities
 For use during rain
 ASTM F2733-2009
(for flame resistant
rainwear)
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6. Chemical Suits / Vapour Suits
Protection against stronger chemicals or that can generate hazardous vapours shall be achieved by the
use of totally encapsulating suits which are vapour-proof and liquid-splash proof and are fed with
breathable air.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 943-1:2015
Chemical
suit/
vapour suit/
HAZMAT suit
Examples of work
activities
 Handling of chemicals
that are strong, toxic
and very corrosive
acids, alkaline and
other substances.
7. Cryo Suits
Protection against the effects of contact with cryogenic substances, e.g. LNG, liquid nitrogen, shall be
achieved with a PVC coat worn over a cryogenic apron, and PVC leggings.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 943-1:2015
Chemical
suits/vapour
suits
Examples of work
activities
 Handling of Liquefied
Gases
8. Chain Saw Protective Legging
Due to the vulnerability of the front leg when using the chainsaw, protective legwear incorporates
layers of loosely woven long synthetic (kevlar) fibres. On contact with the saw chain, the fibres are
drawn out and clog the chain saw sprocket, causing the saw to stop. Legwear can be all round, which
offers the greatest protection, or for the front of the legs only. Jackets with inserts of the same
construction are also available.
The special clothing described here shall be worn during chain sawing operations for all BSP
operations and not limited to during rescue operations.
Types
Chain Saw
Protective
Legging
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 381-5
Examples of work
activities
 Chainsaw activity
Page 37 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
9. High Visibility Vest
High Visibility Vest is worn on the body on top of other clothing, made from PVC impregnated with
fluorescent pigments. They shall be worn by people engaged in activities where it is important to be
seen to be safe, e.g. road workers, helideck personnel and crane banksman.
In areas where there are risk of fire, flame resistant high visibility vest shall be used.
Types
Picture Example
High visibility
vest
Standards
 BS EN ISO 20471:2013
 AS/NZS 460
 ANSI/ISEA 107-2015
Examples of work
activities
 Banksman for lifting
activity
 Road workers
 EN ISO 14116 (for
Flame resistant high
visibility vest)
3.7.2 Use
BSP enforces the use of Long Sleeve One Piece Inherent Flame Retardant Coveralls for BSP Staff and
Contractors working (including visitors) in all BSP locations, worksites and facilitates where PPE signposted and including the transportation of hydrocarbon products.
Coveralls should be zipped up, with sleeves rolled down and worn over the boots (i.e., must NOT be
tucked into the boots) to avoid chemical spillage and other hazards or contamination into the boots
which may cause injury.
3.7.3 Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
Coveralls shall be regularly laundered separately to prevent cross contaminations with the daily clothing.
Chemical suits shall be washed in warm water and a mild soap whenever they have come into contact
with chemicals. Suits shall be hung up to dry before being stored in cases or hung on hangers.
Chemical suits have a life expectancy of three to four years and shall be inspected and tested every three
months, even if not in use. The inspection and testing shall include an air test with examination of all
seams for leakage. Vapour suits shall be air tested, after use and cleaning, with the manufacturers test
kit before being stored in a protective case. Where available and when necessary, the manufacturer’s
testing and repair services shall be used.
All types of body protective clothing and equipment shall be maintained in good condition and checked
regularly. Coveralls which are damaged or torn shall be repaired or replaced.
When to replace coveralls?

Worn appearance. Coveralls that have thin spots, holes, or excessive wear and abrasion, such as
elbow or knee areas that can no longer be repaired.

Torn or frayed. Evidence of cuts, rips, tears, open seams that can no longer be repaired.

Heavily soiled with large or numerous hydrocarbon or chemical stains which cannot be washed
out. These stains can compromise the fire retardant properties of the coverall.

Heavily faded or extensive discoloured coverall.
Any contamination should be washed or wiped off immediately where practicable but in any event on
completion of the job or work day. Any protective clothing which becomes contaminated with
hydrocarbons or chemicals shall be removed immediately to minimise skin irritation and fire hazard.
Clothing which is so heavily contaminated that it cannot be properly cleaned shall be disposed of in
accordance with BSP-02-Procedure-1636 BSP Waste Handling Procedure.
Page 38 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
3.8 Personal Flotation Devices (PFD)
The wearing of a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) is required when a risk assessment determines there is
an evident danger of falling into the water.
In determining the correct level of protection required for personnel, the Manager is accountable for:

Identifying activities when a risk of falling into the water exists.

Completing risk assessments.

Specifying, establishing and maintaining rules and procedures to manage the use of PFD’s.

Defining the type/choice of PFD.

Making people aware of when and where a PFD must be used.
3.8.1
Use
BSP enforces the use of Personal Flotation Device (PFD) with self-righting characteristics.
Except where the risk assessment has determined that an appropriate level of protection can be reached
by wearing an approved PFD with reduced characteristics, a PFD should be able, in the prevailing
environmental conditions to:
 Lift the mouth of an exhausted or unconscious person clear of the water.
 Turn the body of an unconscious person in the water from any position to one where the mouth is
clear of the water in not more than 5 seconds.
 Provide sufficient comfort and flexibility in movement for personnel (this will be dependent on
activity and/or work requirements).
Risk assessments for common activities carried out within BSP have been completed to determine the
type of flotation device / life jacket that must be worn for those activities and are tabulated below:
Page 39 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Risk Assessment for selection of Personal Flotation Device (PFD), Page 1 of 4
Weather conditions benign (light winds,
good visibility, calm seas) and
continuous monitoring
Fall restrained harness being worn
Appropriate communication
arrangements in place and understood
by all parties
Blank3
Operation undertaken in daylight
Blank2
Personnel transferring has undergone
Bosiet/Travel Safely by boat training
Vessel rail, bulwark or barrier >1m in
height
Close supervision in place during the
transfer
Life saving appliances readily available
(life-buoy with line/light) and portable
ladder
Fast rescue can be launched
immediately
3rd party rescue / first aid readily
available
Description
Barriers
Area or deck space cluttered with
equipment
Access / egress constraints that would
Increase the risk of falling into the
Task entails line handling and / or
equipment under tension?
Activity
Slip/Trip Hazards
Rigid ≥ 98N * Inflatable
Self-Righting
≥ 150N
Capability Self-Righting
Capability
Personnel required to work on the
exposed side to water edge of a defined
barrier
Personnel on land working close to
waterways, ditches or excavations with
no barriers
Threats
Comments
Conclusion
Personnel Transfer
Personnel transfer in harbour:
- Jetty to a vessel/vessel to Jetty
- Between two vessels tied up to
one another at a jetty
Transfer occur at Jetty with
Boat Landing Officers to
assist transfer via Gangway
with handrail in place.
Self Righting PFD Required

Personnel transfers offshore - Using
swing ropes:
- Crew/Area/Standby boat to/from
Workboat or Workbarge
- Crew/Area/Standby boat to/from
Platform Boat Landing
Transfers occur at boat
landings with Boat Landing
Officers to assist transfer
via swing rope.
Personnel transfers - using
Conventional gangway:
- From Workboat/Workbarge
to/from platform
Transfers occurs with
Gangway Watchkeeper
monitoring and controlling
the transfer from mobile
platform on barge placed
closed to the edge of the
fixed gangway suspended
from platform.
Personnel transfers - using heave
compensated gangway:
Transfers occur with
Trained Gangway operators
to monitor and control the
of personnel transferring
via the heave compensated
gangway.
- From Workboat/Workbarge
to/from Platform
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** BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
Self Righting PFD Required
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
Self Righting PFD Required
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
The Height of the Gangway and
platform position is adjusted by
Gangway watch prior transfer.
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
- Trained Gangway Operators to
operate the equipment.
- Onboarding on Gangway transfer
procedure to all personnel
transferring
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Note:
In accordance to DEP 80.80.00.14,
Sect 3.2.2, the use of PFD is not
required however in case on an
emergency requiring escape y boat
landing PFD's would be required.
Page 40 of 79
Self Righting PFD Required
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Risk Assessment for selection of Personal Flotation Device (PFD), Page 2 of 4
Weather conditions benign (light winds,
good visibility, calm seas) and
continuous monitoring
Fall restrained harness being worn
Appropriate communication
arrangements in place and understood
by all parties
Blank3
Operation undertaken in daylight
Blank2
Personnel transferring has undergone
Bosiet/Travel Safely by boat training
Vessel rail, bulwark or barrier >1m in
height
Close supervision in place during the
transfer
Life saving appliances readily available
(life-buoy with line/light) and portable
ladder
Fast rescue can be launched
immediately
3rd party rescue / first aid readily
available
Description
Barriers
Area or deck space cluttered with
equipment
Access / egress constraints that would
Increase the risk of falling into the
Task entails line handling and / or
equipment under tension?
Activity
Slip/Trip Hazards
Rigid ≥ 98N * Inflatable
Self-Righting
≥ 150N
Capability Self-Righting
Capability
Personnel required to work on the
exposed side to water edge of a defined
barrier
Personnel on land working close to
waterways, ditches or excavations with
no barriers
Threats
Comments
Conclusion
Personnel Transfer
Personnel transfers - using heave
compensated gangway:
- From Workboat/Workbarge
to/from Platform
Transfers occur with
Trained Gangway operators
to monitor and control the
of personnel transferring
via the heave compensated
gangway.
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
- Trained Gangway Operators to
operate the equipment.
- Onboarding on Gangway transfer
procedure to all personnel
transferring

Personnel transfers - using heave
compensated gangway:
- From Crew-boat to/from
Workboat/Workbarge
- From Crew-boat to/from Platform
Personnel transfer - Using Pilot
Ladders
Personnel transfer via FROGS /
Personnel transfer basket
Transfers occur with
Trained Gangway operators
to monitor and control the
of personnel transferring
via the heave compensated
gangway.
However the crew boats
station holding capability is
limited in comparison to
the bigger vessels
(Workboats and Barges)
Pilot transfers occurs
between GP boat and
tankers using a pilot ladder
off Seria SBM and BLNG by
SMR marine captains.
FROGS transfer are used for
tranfering warranty
surveyors from modules to
the achor handlers under
controlled conditions.
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Page 41 of 79
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Self Righting PFD Required

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
Note:
In accordance to DEP 80.80.00.14,
Sect 3.2.2, the use of PFD is not
required however in case on an
emergency requiring escape y boat
landing PFD's would be required.
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
Trained Gangway Operators to
operate the equipment.
Onboarding on Gangway transfer
procedure to all personnel
transferring
Self Righting PFD Required
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply.
Self Righting PFD Required
Due to mobility required for climbing
the ladder only self inflating PFD's
are permitted.
Additional Lifting TA approval
required for this means of transfer.
BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply.
Self Righting PFD Required
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Risk Assessment for selection of Personal Flotation Device (PFD), Page 3 of 4
Weather conditions benign (light winds,
good visibility, calm seas) and
continuous monitoring
Fall restrained harness being worn
Appropriate communication
arrangements in place and understood
by all parties
Blank3
Operation undertaken in daylight
Blank2
Personnel transferring has undergone
Bosiet/Travel Safely by boat training
Vessel rail, bulwark or barrier >1m in
height
Close supervision in place during the
transfer
Life saving appliances readily available
(life-buoy with line/light) and portable
ladder
Fast rescue can be launched
immediately
3rd party rescue / first aid readily
available
Description
Barriers
Area or deck space cluttered with
equipment
Access / egress constraints that would
Increase the risk of falling into the
Task entails line handling and / or
equipment under tension?
Activity
Slip/Trip Hazards
Rigid ≥ 98N * Inflatable
Self-Righting
≥ 150N
Capability Self-Righting
Capability
Personnel required to work on the
exposed side to water edge of a defined
barrier
Personnel on land working close to
waterways, ditches or excavations with
no barriers
Threats
Comments
Conclusion
Jetty/ Wharf/ On Land/ On a vessel
Working within 1.5m at the edge of
the jetty/wharf
- Handling vessel mooring ropes,
- Handling of hoses, etc.
These work activities are
always carried out with
other personnel and
supervisors in attendance.
However fast rescue cannot
be guaranteed and is
dependent on availability
of vessels within the
vicinity of the jetty/wharf.
Working on vessel deck
- e.g. anchor handling, jacket
launching, towing, mooring, etc.
These work activities are
always carried out with
other personnel and
supervisors in attendance.
Launching of Fast Rescue Craft (FRC)
- e.g. for drills/recovery (PFD
requirement is for the FRC
personnel)
Stand by Vessels with FRC’s
must launch the FRC within
5 mins as per SOLAS
requirements during any
MOB Drill with the
installation.
Personnel on land working close to
waterways, ditches or excavations
with no barriers
These work activities are
always carried out with
other personnel and
supervisors in attendance.
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Page 42 of 79

1. Fall Restrain Harness (when
working over water)
Self Righting PFD Required
** BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
Self Righting PFD Required
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BSP 14.05 - Procedure -103
Self Righting PFD Required
SUPPORT CRAFT OPERATIONS - 103
REV. 3
The launching of the FRC on a Stand
by Vessel is weather dependant and
any sea state above 1.5m may be
hazardous to the stand by vessels
crew
** BSP/SMR MOPO limits apply
Any PFD must be worn in
conjunction with safety
harness, so PFD needs to
be light weight and unobstructive.
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Risk Assessment for selection of Personal Flotation Device (PFD), Page 4 of 4
Weather conditions benign (light winds,
good visibility, calm seas) and
continuous monitoring
Fall restrained harness being worn
Appropriate communication
arrangements in place and understood
by all parties
Blank3
Operation undertaken in daylight
Blank2
Personnel transferring has undergone
Bosiet/Travel Safely by boat training
Vessel rail, bulwark or barrier >1m in
height
Close supervision in place during the
transfer
Life saving appliances readily available
(life-buoy with line/light) and portable
ladder
Fast rescue can be launched
immediately
3rd party rescue / first aid readily
available
Description
Barriers
Area or deck space cluttered with
equipment
Access / egress constraints that would
Increase the risk of falling into the
Task entails line handling and / or
equipment under tension?
Activity
Slip/Trip Hazards
Rigid ≥ 98N * Inflatable
Self-Righting
≥ 150N
Capability Self-Righting
Capability
Personnel required to work on the
exposed side to water edge of a defined
barrier
Personnel on land working close to
waterways, ditches or excavations with
no barriers
Threats
Comments
Conclusion
Working Over / By Water
Working overhead platforms
- scaffolding, mooring, etc.
These work activities are
always carried out with a
buddy as a minimum.
Rescue will be launched
from the platform as first
rescue responders. Fast
rescue is only dependent
on availability of vessels
within the vicinity of the
work location.
Other standby duties are covered
with “assigned area boats”; their role
is to provide a Tier 2(Medical)
response, or in the case of over side
work standby, to response in 10
minutes for man overboard recovery.
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Self Righting PFD Required
Any PFD must be worn in
conjunction with safety
harness, so PFD needs to
be light weight and unobstructive.
Refer BSP-14.05-Procedure-103 Support Craft Operation
DEP 80.80.0014, Sect 3.2.2
stipulates the requirement
DEP 80.80.0014, Sect 3.2.2 stipulates for WAH and above water
the requirement for WAH and above require twin-lobe auto
water require twin-lobe auto
inflation jacket
inflation jackets
Threats
Barriers
1. Regular drills carried out
to test MOB emergency
response.
2.Transfer always takes
place under supervision.
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*Refer DEP Specification; Offshore Facilities Life Saving Appliance Requirements (DEP 80.80.00.14 –Gen)
**BSP/SMR General MOPO
***Refer Maritime Position NoteGuidance On Personal FlotationDevices
Reviewed by:



Weather conditions benign (light winds, good
visibility, calm seas) and continuous monitoring
Fall restrained harness being worn
Appropriate communication arrangements in
place and understood by all parties
Operation undertaken in daylight
3rd party rescue / first aid readily available
Fast rescue can be launched immediately
Life saving appliances readily available (life-buoy
with line/light) and portable ladder
Close supervision in place during the transfer
Blank3
Vessel rail, bulwark or barrier >1m in height
Personnel transferring has undergone
Bosiet/Travel Safely by boat training
Access / egress constraints that would Increase
the risk of falling into the water
Task entails line handling and / or equipment
under tension?
Blank2
Offshore emergency evacuation
Area or deck space cluttered with equipment
Description
Slip/Trip Hazards
Activity
Personnel on land working close to waterways,
ditches or excavations with no barriers
Self-Righting
Capability
(meeting
with SOLAS
and LSA
Code)
Personnel required to work on the exposed side
to water edge of a defined barrier
Emergency Response
Comments
In emergency situations it is critical
that maximum protection be
provided by PFD. PFDs must be
designed for extended survival in
rough open water.

Approved by:
_________________
Mahesh Tiwari, SMR/4
_________________
SMR
_________________
Dedy Helmi Mahmod, HSE/41
_________________
Douglas Cairns, HSE/4
Page 43 of 79
Conclusion
Self Righting PFD Required
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Activities not covered in the tabulated risk assessment require additional risk assessment to be carried
out. The risk assessment should consider such things as: weather, sea state, location, barriers,
activity, stop work limits, communications, daylight, supervision, rescue equipment. Refer to Guidance
on Personal Flotation Devices - Maritime Position Note which contains more information on PFD as
well as risk assessment template.
When using a PFD with other equipment such as Working at Height harnesses, the user must don
them correctly to ensure PFD will operate correctly.
3.8.2
Selection
A PFD is a lifejacket or buoyancy aid that will, depending on construction, either keep the wearer
afloat without requiring independent action or merely provide assistance to the wearer in keeping
them afloat. The choice/type of PFD should fit the risk exposure, local legislative requirements and
advice from local supervisors. When worn a PFD must be fitted in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
Life Jackets - Lifejackets vary both in design and buoyancy but in general they are constructed to
keep the wearer afloat without requiring independent action. The following are the different types of
life jackets:
1. Rigid
Designed with inherent buoyancy provided with integral foam or other suitably buoyant material, this
style of lifejacket has no inflation chambers and is therefore robust and easier to maintain than the
inflatable lifejacket.
The rigid lifejacket is bulky and does not allow flexibility of movement and comfort during extended
work activities, however, it is recommended where flexibility in movement is not critical and adequate
maintenance of an inflatable lifejacket is difficult to achieve.
This PFD is designed for extended survival in rough, open water. It usually will turn an unconscious
person face up and has over 15 kg of buoyancy.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 USCG approved Type I
 BS EN ISO 12402
 NZS 5823:2005
Offshore
Life Jacket
(Rigid)
Examples of work
activities
 Offshore emergency
evacuation
With SOLAS/M.E.D
approved and LSA 2010
Buoyancy: minimum 150 Newton
(with Self-Righting capability)
 USCG approved Type I
 BS EN ISO 12402
 NZS 5823:2005
Offshore
Life Jacket
(Rigid)
 Personnel transfer
in harbour (ie. jetty
to vessel)
 Personnel transfer
using swing rope
and gangway (both
conventional &
heave compensated)
 Working within
1.5m at the edge of
the jetty/wharf
Buoyancy: minimum 98 Newton
(with Self-Righting capability)
Page 44 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
2. Inflatable
An inflatable life jacket is one that has inflatable chambers to provide buoyancy when inflated. This
type of life jacket is inflated automatically on contact with water but can also be manually inflated by
either a ‘toggle’ pull or orally. NOTE: Inflatable life jackets that have auto-inflation, with twin
chambers and self-righting capability shall be used in BSP.
When worn (deflated) this life jacket provides comfort and unrestricted movement during work. It is,
however, critical that this type of lifejacket is maintained in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
Inflatable life jackets come in a variety of performance types. The specific type of life jacket is
determined by characteristics such as its amount of buoyancy, its in-water performance and its type
of inflation mechanism with many designed to turn an unconscious person face-up in the water. All
inflatable life jackets contain a backup oral inflation tube (which also serves as the deflation tube).
These lifejackets provide a good support to unconscious people and will turn their body over in the
water protecting their airways in rough waters too. They must be clearly marked to indicate that they
are manufactured to meet relevant standards.
Special use PFD includes work vests, deck suits and hybrids for restricted use. Hybrid vests contain
some internal buoyancy and are inflatable to provide additional flotation and may turn an
unconscious person face-up in the water depending on the device used.
The requirements for life jackets to be used in helicopters are covered in other codes and standards.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 USCG approved Type I
 BS EN ISO 12402
 NZS 5823:2005
Inflatable life
jacket
Examples of work
activities
 Working on vessel
deck
 Lauching of Fast
Rescue Craft (FRC)
 Working overhead
platforms e.g.
scaffolding, mooring,
etc.
 Pilot transfer (ie.
personnel transfer
using pilot ladder)
Buoyancy: 150 or 275 Newton
(with Self-Righting capability &
auto-inflation with 2 chambers)
Special use
device life
jacket (rigid/
inflatable)
 Civil Aviation
Authority (CAA) Spec 5
approved
 Helicopter travel
Buoyancy: 275 Newton
(with Self-Righting capability)
Page 45 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Where inflatable life jackets are required, the following should be considered as a minimum:
A 150N lifejacket provides 15.0 kg buoyancy lift is recommended for use in all but
the most severe conditions.
A 275N lifejacket provides 27.5 kg buoyancy lift and is recommended for offshore
installations and terminals where it is considered that greater protection than that
provided by the standard 150N lifejacket is required.
3.8.3
Fitting
Personal flotation devices (PFD) must be worn with all straps, zippers, and buckles fastened properly.
Adjust the straps so that the fit is snug but not binding. Tuck in any loose strap ends to avoid getting
hung-up. A proper fit is important to the effectiveness of PFDs. It is worth spending time to adjust the
buckles to obtain the best possible fit.
3.8.4
Care and Maintenance
Personal flotation devices (PFD) should be carefully inspected before each use. Some of the pre-wear
check includes the following;
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
Check for rips, tears, holes, and to see that seams, fabric straps and hardware are satisfactory.
Check that they are no damage to straps and that the buckles are working correctly.
Ensure accessories like whistle are attached.
 For inflatable life jacket where there is a clear plastic window, check the Service Indicator that is
visible to make sure the status is green. Green means cartridge is charged and safe to use. Red
means the life jacket must be inspected or cartridge replaced.
The check should include any expiry and/or next service date which should be available to the user.
Any faulty equipment should be rejected and sent for proper repair immediately.
All PFDs should be subject to a robust inspection regime to ensure that they will provide the
protection to personnel for which they are designed.
In the case of an inflatable life jacket there will be a requirement to follow manufacturer’s
recommendations with respect to servicing and inspection of the critical parts. Typically inflatable
life jackets are required to be serviced every 12 months. To help manage inspection and
maintenance requirements a register of all inflatable life jackets’ in use should be retained.
When to replace a life jacket?
-
Torn layer of the life jacket
damage or broken straps or buckles
missing accessories like whistle
shrinkage or loss of the buoyant materials
buoyant material that has become hardened, permanently compressed, waterlogged or oil-soaked.
extensive discoloration/fading material which could indicate loss of strength.
where there is doubt about the serviceability of the lifejacket, it should either be replaced or
returned to an authorized service centre immediately for testing and repair.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
3.9
UNRESTRICTED
Foot Protection
Safety footwear protects against hazards ranging from dermatitis to crushing injuries. Within this
broad range of hazards, consideration needs to be given to the possibility of contact with chemicals,
extremes of heat, slippery surfaces, punctures from nails or other sharp objects, and electrical hazards
both live and static. Safety footwear in general use in BSP operations includes:

Safey Boots and safety shoes: these are the most common type of safety footwear and normally
comprise rubber soles and leather uppers with integrated steel toecaps. They may also have
features such as slip resistant soles and composite midsoles.

Wellington boots: these protect against water and wet conditions and are useful in jobs where
the footwear needs to be washed and disinfected for hygienic reasons, such as in food
handling. Usually made from rubber, they are also made from polyurethane and PVC which
have greater chemical resistance. Wellington boots are available with steel toecaps and instep
guards.
3.9.1 Selection
The selection of protective footwear depends primarily on the hazard(s) but comfort and durability
shall also be considered. The choice shall therefore be made on the basis of suitability for protection,
compatibility with the work and the requirements of the user.
Generally, safety footwear shall be flexible, wet resistant and absorb perspiration. Boots shall be
selected where ankle protection is required. The ability to resist corrosion, abrasion and industrial
wear and tear shall also be considered. Manufacturer’s instructions and markings for appropriate use
and level of protection shall always be observed.
No.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
Examples of work
activities
 For fire-fighters
a
Firemen’s
Safety
Boots




b
Wellington
Boots
 BS EN ISO 20345:2011
 AS/NZS 2210
 ASTM F2413:2011
 Excavation
 Grass-cutting
 Kitchen wash-down
(safety
rubber
boots)
NFPA 1500
BS EN 15090:2012
AS/NZS 4821: 2014
ASTM F2413:2011
c
Safety
Shoes
 BS EN ISO 20345:2011
 AS/NZS 2210
 ASTM F2413:2011
 For use at certain
onshore area like
laboratory.
d
Mid-cut
Safety boot
 BS EN ISO 20345:2011
 AS/NZS 2210
 ASTM F2413:2011
 For use at certain
onshore area.
(Pull-on or
lace up)
Page 47 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
e
High-cut
Safety boot
 BS EN ISO 20345:2011
 AS/NZS 2210
 ASTM F2413:2011
Pull-on
UNRESTRICTED
 For use at wide range
of worksite, both
onshore and offshore.
(Pull-on,
lace-up, or
lace-up
with zip)
Lace-up
Lace-up with zip
Specific requirements for protective footwear are as follows:
Soles
Boots and shoes shall have treaded soles for slip resistance. Soles must
be heat and oil resistant, shock resistant, anti-static or non-conductive,
as required for the work being carried out. Footwear intended to
protect against oils, solvents or liquids shall have soles that are
moulded or bonded to the upper. Footwear with composite midsoles
shall be used where there is a risk of the sole being pierced by nails and
similar objects. The soles of footwear used for abseiling work shall have
a substantial instep to enable a firm footing when climbing.
Steel/Composite toe caps
These shall be capable of resisting a heavy sharp object falling from a
considerable height.
Burn protection
Footwear made of leather (non-porcine origin) shall be used to protect
against burning by sparks and slag.
Waterproofing
People working in places where it is wet underfoot shall wear safety
footwear impervious to water. Rubber and PVC are suitable waterproof
materials for footwear but are not permeable and prevent the escape of
perspiration. For people whose work requires prolonged wearing of
waterproof footwear, items made of ‘breathable’ material shall be
considered.
Anti-static
Anti-static footwear offers protection against the hazard of static
electricity and gives some protection against mains electric shock. Antistatic footwear shall be worn where there is both a hazard from static
build up and the possibility of contact with mains electricity. The soles
shall have a resistance low enough to allow static electricity to leak
slowly away while maintaining enough resistance to protect against a
240 V mains electric shock.
Page 48 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
3.9.2
UNRESTRICTED
Use
All personnel working in or visiting, potentially hazardous areas such as process areas, construction
sites, workshops, etc. shall wear safety footwear at all times while in the area.
Lace-up safety boots (recommended minimum 6 inches in height) with composite toe caps and
mid sole protection are highly recommended. Generally, they offer a better ankle protection when
working in places where slipping on wet floors, working on uneven surfaces, climbing, entering or
exiting trucks or in areas where the risk of ankle injury is greater. Composite materials make the
boots lighter and more comfortable to the user.
Personnel engaged in activities in which there is a risk of foot injury, for example chain sawing, grass
trimming, kitchen wash-down, etc., shall wear appropriate protective footwear.
3.9.3 Care and Maintenance
Safety footwear shall be maintained in good condition, checked regularly. Stitching shall also be
checked for loose, worn or cut seams.
When to replace?
- discard if soles are torn, worn out or deteriorated.
- boot laces shall be checked and replaced if necessary. Materials lodged in the sole tread shall be
removed without further damaging the tread.
- excessive tear or deep cut to the leather or noticeable burns on the leather.
Protective silicone sprays or waxes may be used to give protection against wet conditions. Chemically
impregnated footwear shall be disposed of in accordance with BSP-02-Procedure-1636 - BSP Waste
Handling Procedure:
3.10
Fall Protection Equipments
If after the hazard identification and risk assessment, and with due consideration of the hierarchy of
controls for working at height, it is decided that it is necessary to choose fall protection equipment, it
is then necessary to choose the correct type of personal fall protection system and equipment to be
used. Working at height is generally defined as work at height from which people can fall more than 6
feet or 1.8 metres.
100% tie-off means that at least one lanyard is attached at all times and this is required when people
are working outside a protected area or when exposed to a fall of more than 1.8 metres (6 feet) or
working near holes and openings.
NOTE: It is prohibited to work alone while utilizing fall protection equipments.
Full body Safety Harnesses, Lanyards and Inertia Reels are some of the commonly used items of safety
equipment in the oil and gas, constructions workplace however it has become apparent that some
personnel may not be fully aware of "best practice" to be employed with these basic but essential
items.
10 considerations for the use of fall protection equipment
1. Suitability – have you got the right equipment and is it fit for purpose?
2. Condition – has the equipment suffered any damage and is it fit for use?
3. Traceability – do you know the history of the equipment and has it been cared for properly?
4. Compatibility – does it function effectively with other products?
5. Security – is the equipment (both the individual item and the system) fastened properly to prevent
release?
6. Anchorages – are proper anchors available for the intended method and have you considered their
strength and position?
7. Fit – does the equipment fit you and are you the right size and weight according to the
manufacturer’s specification?
8. Age – has the equipment exceeded it recommended lifespan?
9. Clearance – is there a safe working height to allow equipment to deploy properly?
10. Selection – is the product suitable for the particular situation?
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
3.10.1
UNRESTRICTED
Selection
When an individual is required to work at height where there is no fall protection i.e., without physical
barriers or protection and exposed to a fall of 1.8 metres (6 feet) or more, the person shall use suitable
fall protection systems and equipments to reduce personal injury in the event of such a fall.
The selection of fall protection equipment should be based on;
 the work situation or condition,
 the anchorages available and their strengths,
 whether life lines can be used, and
 possible fall distances.
Types of fall protection system
This may be either a system that prevents a fall or one that arrests a fall. Wherever possible, a
personal fall protection system that prevents a fall should be used in preference to a fall arrest system.
1. Fall restraint system (travel restriction)
Restraint systems are used to prevent users from reaching zones where the risk of a fall exists. They
involve the connection of the user to the structure by means of a lanyard or an anchor line, the
position and length of which is such that, irrespective of the user’s movements in a broadly horizontal
plane, they can never get into a situation from which a fall can occur.
A fall restraint system consists of;
 a body-holding device, comprising a waist belt
 a fixed anchor point e.g. an eyebolt, or a mobile anchor point, running along a horizontal rigid or
flexible anchor line
 a fixed length lanyard or anchor line, connected between the body holding device and the anchor
point
 connectors, for joining the lanyard or anchor line to the anchor point and to the body-holding
device
2. Fall arrest system
A fall arrest system arrests the free fall of the user should a fall occur. There are two main types of fall
arrest system.
2a. Fall arrest system with energy absorbing lanyards. It consists of;
• full body harness
• energy absorbing lanyard
• anchor,
• connector
For a fall arrest system with energy absorbing lanyard to function correctly, it is essential that there is
adequate fall distance (i.e. free space) beneath the anchor point to prevent the user from hitting the
ground or structure in the event of a fall. Refer to BSP-02-standard-16xx Working at Height for more
details on the fall distance calculation.
A safety harness and lanyard that would allow the person wearing it to contact the next lower level in
the event of a fall shall not be considered adequate fall protection. A retractable type fall arrester (i.e.
Inertia Reels, Self-Retracting Lifelines, Personal Fall Limiter or fall arrest block) is an alternative if
personal fall protection is to be used in this situation.
2b. Fall arrest system with retractable type fall arrester. It consists of;
• full body harness
• retractable type fall arrester (such as inertia reels, Self-Retracting Lifelines, Personal Fall Limiter
or fall arrest block)
• anchor,
• connector
Page 50 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Types of fall protection equipments
1. Harness
1.1 Full Body Harness
Full body harness incorporates buttock straps designed to absorb the forces on a falling person, and
must always be used in conjunction with a shock absorbing lanyard or retractable type fall arrester
(such as Inertia Reels, Self-Retracting Lifelines or Personal Fall Limiter) but NEVER WITH BOTH.
Only full body harness shall be used in a fall arrest system.
Types
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 361:2002
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Full body
harness
Examples of work
activities
 Scaffolding
 Working at height
1.2 Sit Harness with full body harness
Sit harness with full body harness comprises of straps, fittings and buckles or other elements in the
form of a waist belt with a low attachment element, connected supports encircling each leg with full
body harness. A sit harness may be fitted with shoulder straps and/or may be incorporated into a
garment. Sit harness used in conjunction with a chest harness that is firmly attached to the sit
harness.
Types
Sit harness
with full
body
harness
Picture Example
Standards





EN 361:2002
EN 813:2008
EN 358:2000
AS/NZS 1891
ANSI/ASSE Z359
Examples of work
activities
 Working at height related
activity
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
1.3 Waist belts
Waist belts shall be used only for restraint system (travel restriction), to prevent a person reaching a
position where the risk of a fall exists or to prevent from getting too near the edge of an elevated
surface.
NOTE: Waist belts shall NOT be used as fall arrest equipments.
Types
Waist belt
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 358:2000
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Examples of work
activities
 Fall restraint
system (travel
restriction)
2. Lanyard
Single lanyard system: This means that a single energy absorbing lanyard is used in the fall arrest
system. Where this system is used, the user’s range of movement is limited by the length of the
lanyard. To move beyond this point the user would need to disconnect the lanyard, move to the other
position and then reconnect the lanyard. No fall protection would be provided during the period
between disconnection and reconnection of the lanyard. NOTE: This does not provide 100% tie-off
and is not acceptable in BSP.
Double lanyard system: This means that either a “twin-tailed energy absorbing lanyard” or “two
single energy absorbing lanyards” are used in the fall arrest system. Where user requires a range of
movement greater than the lanyard length, this system is to be used to enable the user to move safely
with at least one lanyard is attached at all times, achieving 100% tie-off. NOTE: BSP enforces 100%
tie-off to ensure user remain clipped on continuously when exposed to the risk of a fall.
Twin-tailed energy absorbing lanyard or sometimes referred to as a “double lanyard with a common
energy absorber” shall be used in a fall arrest system. Using two single energy absorbing lanyards may
be less effective and increase the loads transferred into the body.
Example of a double lanyard with a common energy absorber (twin-tailed
energy absorbing lanyard)
It is important to be aware of safety critical aspects of using twin-tailed energy absorbing lanyards.
When using only one of the twin-tailed energy absorbing lanyards, user shall NOT wrap the spare
lanyard around their body or attach it back to the full body harness or tool belt, as this could reduce
the effectiveness of the energy absorber and increase the load transferred into the body. Incorrect
attachment might prevent the energy absorber from opening fully in the event of a fall.
Page 52 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
The spare lanyard, when not in use, should either,
 be clipped onto the same anchor point,
 hang free or
 be clipped to a purpose designed “sacrificial” lanyard parking point on the full body harness
(Figure 70).
2.1 Energy absorbing lanyards
Lanyards are made from synthetic fibre webbing or rope (eg. polyester or polyamide) or steel wire rope.
They are generally connected to the D ring on the back of the body harness. Lanyards are available in
varying lengths. e.g. A SALA lanyard has 1.8 meters (6 feet), 1.5 meters (5 feet) and 1.2 meters (4 feet)
long.
NOTE: Maximum allowable total length for an undeployed energy absorbing lanyard, including
its connectors for use in a fall arrest system is 2 meters. (BS EN 354). See figure below.
The maximum length of an energy absorbing lanyard
including its connectors.
Lanyards for use in fall arrest system must have the energy absorber component. There are two most
common types of energy absorbing lanyards;


Pouch style which consists of additional webbing in a small pouch which progressively tears open
in the event of a fall.
Elastic type which is constructed of so-called “bungee” rubber where it is designed to stretch as it
receives the user’s falling weight and breaks the fall.
The energy absorber component of the lanyard consists of additional length. NOTE: Maximum
allowable total length for energy absorber to extend is 1.75 metres. (BS EN 355). Therefore a
lanyard of 1.8 metres with energy absorber will have a total length of 3.55 metres in the event of a fall.
NOTE: Energy absorbing lanyards MUST not be used in combination with a retractable type fall
arrester (such as inertia reels, self-retracting lifelines or personal fall limiter). The rebound effect
caused by stressing the rubber lanyard may disengage the locking pawl of the inertia reel, allowing
second phase falling of the person.
Page 53 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
Types
Picture Example
UNRESTRICTED
Standards
 Lanyards should
conform to
BS EN 354: 2010.
Double
lanyard
that shares
a common
energy
absorber
(i.e. twintailed
energy
absorbing
lanyard)
 Energy absorbers
must conform to
BS EN 355: 2002
Examples of
work activities
 Working at
height related
activity
 Scaffolding
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
 Lanyards should
conform to
BS EN 354: 2010.
Double
lanyard
with two
separate
energy
absorbers
 Energy absorbers
must conform to
BS EN 355: 2002
- elastic
type
 Working at
height related
activity
 Scaffolding
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
2.2 Positioning lanyards
These are lanyards without energy absorber, normally use in Fall restraint system (travel restriction).
Types
Fixed length
positioning
lanyard
Adjustable
length
positioning
lanyard
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 354: 2010
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
 BS EN 354: 2010
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Examples of work
activities
 Working at height for a
Fall restraint system.
 Working at height for a
Fall restraint system.
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
2.3 Extension lanyard
In the case of a full body harness for use with a retractable type fall arrester, a short extension lanyard
(of up to 400mm in length) can be used for convenience as it is difficult to reach behind the back to
attach the hook of the retractable type fall arrester to the rear attachment point on the full body
harness. By attaching a short extension lanyard to this point before donning the full body harness, the
free end of the lanyard becomes an extended attachment point, to which it is relatively easy to
connect.
Types
Picture Example
Extension
lanyard with
snap hook
and D-ring
connection
Standards
 BS EN 354: 2010
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Examples of work
activities
 For use with a
retractable type fall
arrester
3. Retractable type fall arrester (Inertia Reels, Self-Retracting Lifelines, Personal Fall Limiter or
Fall Arrest Block)
3.1 Retractable type fall arrester
Retractable type fall arresters are also known as inertia reels, Self-Retracting Lifeline (SRL),
Personal Fall Limiter (PFL) or fall arrest block.
Retractable type fall arrester is a device that typically contains a drum-wound line which can be slowly
extracted or retracted. The drum is under slight tension during normal movement and automatically
locks the drum when the line is extracted too rapidly and has a self-braking function. The lanyard
extends as necessary to allow the user to move about the work area, but retracts as necessary to
maintain slight tension, preventing slack when in use. This minimizes the potential free fall distance
and consequently reduces the Fall Distance. Thus the Fall Distance (ie. free space beneath the anchor
point) requirement is smaller. Most retractable type fall arresters are designed for use only where the
anchorage is directly above the user.
They provide a greater range of movement but their use is limited by the maximum working length of
the retractable lanyard. Some retractable type fall arresters have a coloured indicator mechanism
which will show if the equipment has been subjected to shock loading such as a fall. If the indicator
has been activated, the device must not be used, but returned for servicing.
NOTE: Energy absorbing lanyards MUST not be used in combination with a retractable type fall
arrester (such as inertia reels, self-retracting lifelines, personal fall limiter or fall arrest block).
The rebound effect caused by stressing the rubber lanyard may disengage the locking pawl of the
inertia reel, allowing second phase falling of the person.
Page 55 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
Types
Picture Example
UNRESTRICTED
Standards
 BS EN 360:2002
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Inertia
Reels, SelfRetracting
Lifelines
(SRL) or
Personal Fall
Limiter (PFL)
Examples of work
activities
 Working at height
related activity
Lanyard
material is
either web or
steel cable
4. Anchorage
Refer to BSP-02-standard-16xx Working at Height for more information on anchorage.
4.1 Anchor devices
Anchorage systems normally include, at a minimum, a building structure and an anchorage device to
which the personnel will tie off. Anchors shall be fixed to a strong structural member because anchors
are not effective if they are attached to weak materials or inappropriate location.
Types
Improvised
Anchors
Picture Example
Standards
 BS EN 795:2012
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Examples
of work
activities
 Working at
height
related
activity
Page 56 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
Engineered
Anchors such
as Horizontal
Lifeline,Verticla
Lifeline,
Eyebolt,
Anchor Beam
UNRESTRICTED
 BS EN 795:2012
 AS/NZS 1891.2
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
 Working at
height
related
activity
Page 57 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
 BS EN 795:2012
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI/ASSE Z359
Anchor
Systems such
as Dead
Weight
anchorage,
Tripod Anchor
System
 Working at
height
related
activity
5. Connectors
5.1 Connectors
Connectors are openable components used to link together other components in a fall protection
system. There are five classes of connector, which are suitable for use in fall protection systems, as
follows;
Class B – Basic connectors. Connectors for general use.
Class M – Multi-use connectors. Connectors for general use which may be loaded on the major and
minor and minor axis.
Class T – Termination connectors. Connectors with a captive eye.
Class A – Anchor connectors. Connectors intended to be linked directly to a specific type of anchor.
Class Q – Screwlink connectors. Connectors which are closed by a screw-motion gate. Most suitable to
be used where connections are infrequent.
When selecting a connector, users should take note of the type of closing and locking mechanisms and
should consider how and where the connector will be used in the fall protection systems. This is with a
view to protecting against the possibility of “roll-out”.
When using a Carabiner to secure the anchorage, the Carabiners must be of the secure locking type
i.e. screw gate or autolock to avoid any potential for "rollout".
Types
Class B –
Basic
connector
Picture Example
Standards
 EN 362:2004
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI-ASSE Z359
-autolock or
screwgate
Page 58 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
 EN 362:2004
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI-ASSE Z359
Class M –
Multi-use
connector
-autolock or
screwgate
Carabiner
(autolock)
Carabiner
(screwgate)
 EN 362:2004
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI-ASSE Z359
Class T –
Termination
connector
-autolock or
screwgate
Small
snaphook
Captive eye
carabiner
(autolock)
(screwgate)
 EN 362:2004
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI-ASSE Z359
Class A –
Anchor
connector
large snaphook
(autolock)
Class Q –
Screwlink
connector
 EN 362:2004
 AS/NZS 1891
 ANSI-ASSE Z359
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BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Compatibility of Connectors
Use only connectors that are suitable to each application and are compatible with connecting
elements.

Connectors must be compatible with the anchorage or other system components.

Connectors must be compatible in size, shape, and strength.

Non-compatible connectors may unintentionally disengage
E.g. An aluminium connector should not be connected to a steel anchor point. Steel connectors should
be used instead.
Connectors are considered to be compatible with connecting elements when they have been designed
to work together in such a way that their sizes and shapes do not cause their gate mechanisms to
inadvertently open regardless of how they become oriented.
3.10.2 Fitting and Training
The user must be familiarised in the correct fitting and use of the full body harness. A safe and
effective full body harness will fit (i.e., be the correct size) and is adjusted so that all straps are snug.
Dangling leg straps or arm straps are signs that the harness is not being worn correctly and this could
be dangerous to the user.
Refer to BSP-02-Standard-1672 – Working at Height, for further information on training requirements
working at height personnel (eg. scaffolders, rope access personnel, working at height rescuer).
3.10.3 Care and Maintenance (includes storage and replacement)
When necessary, clean webbing or metallic items with a mild soap solution (maximum temperature
40°C) and remove excess moisture with a clean cloth. Seawater should not be used for cleaning. Allow
items to dry naturally away from direct heat. Do not force dry with heat.
Fall protection equipments should be stored in a clean, dry, shaded, ventilated area away from direct
heat or sunlight.
Any fall protection equipment considered to be defective should be permanently cut or broken up
before being disposed of, to ensure that it cannot be retrieved and used again. Equipment that has
been used to arrest a fall should never be reused. It should be withdrawn from service immediately
and destroyed or returned to the manufacturer.
Lifespan - Some fall protection equipments are given a lifespan by the manufacturer. Equipment that
has reached such a limit, which has not already been rejected for other reasons, should be withdrawn
from service and not used again, unless or until confirmed by a competent person, in writing, that it is
acceptable to do so.
3.10.4 Inspection
All fall protection equipments must be on a register, have a unique identifier and be manufactured to
an acceptable Standard. Each company or department using fall protection equipments shall have an
inspection regime in place. The manufacturer’s recommended maintenance and inspection regime
should be followed. The regime should include;
 the equipment to be inspected (including their unique identification)
 the frequency and type of inspection (pre-use checks, detailed inspection and where appropriate,
interim inspection)
 designated competent persons to carry out the inspections
 action to be taken on finding defective equipments
 means of recording the inspections
 training of users
 a means of monitoring the inspection regime to verify inspections are carried out accordingly.
Good record keeping is essential to establish the age and conditions of use for the fall protection
equipments.
Certificates of inspection should always be available with the equipment, especially where equipments
are moving from one place of work to another. Equipment should not be issued or used without
physical evidence that the last inspection has been carried out. Physical evidence can take the form of
a tag, label or document.
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UNRESTRICTED
 Full body harness inspection
Points to look out for are cuts, abrasion and broken stitching and chemical contamination. If in any
doubt, return the harness to the stores and request for a replacement Any harness which has been
involved in a fall should be taken out of service for inspection.
Fall arrest equipment shall be of approved manufacture and carry labels showing year of manufacture.
 Lanyard inspection
It is important that lanyards are clearly marked as to their length. If the marking is hard to read, remark it. The whole lanyard should be subject to the check, by passing it slowly through the hands
(e.g. to detect small cuts of 1 mm in the edges, softening or hardening of fibres, ingress of
contaminants).
Inspect the energy absorber to determine if it has been activated. There should be no evidence of
elongation. Ensure energy absorber cover is secure and not torn or damaged. Energy absorbing
lanyards that have suffered a shock load (impact force) should be scrapped (i.e. never reuse). If an
energy absorbing lanyards shows signs of damage or partially deployed, it should also be removed
from service and scrapped.
When conducting checks on lanyard, rope (fibre or steel wire) and webbing, inspect the entire length.
Fibre rope
 crushing – flattened or bent section of fibre rope
 abrasion – localised wear
Webbing
 abrasion – localised wear
 chemical attack – flaking of the surface, colour change
 contamination (e.g. heaving paint buildup, grit, dirt, sand)
 frayed, torns, nicks or cuts
 damaged or broken stitching
 Ultraviolet (UV) degradation (e.g. fading, discoloration)
 Mold, burns
Steel Wire rope
Always wear protective gloves when inspecting steel wire rope.
 crushing - flattened or bent section of wire rope
 cutting - damaged strands and broken wires
 abrasion - localised wear; where outer strands appear flattened and with brighter appearance
 strand core protrusion (“bird-caging”) - the central core showing with the outer strands swelling out
 kinking - deformation of wire rope
 corrosion - roughness and pitting with broken wire propagating from cracks or pitting
 electric arcing or heat damage - bluing of surface, fusion of the wire, weld spatters
 damaged thimbles and ferrules - check secure and free from damage
All the above factors are known to reduce webbing and rope strength.
Webbing
Steel wire rope
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 Retractable type fall arrester inspection (such as Inertia Reels, Self-Retracting Lifelines,
Personal Fall Limiter, fall arrest block)
Retractable type fall arrester must be serviced, inspected and re-certified by the manufacturer, or an
approved company, at least every 12 months, or less if deemed.
Note: Retractable type fall arrester which are fitted with a rescue winch mechanism fall under the
definition of lifting equipment and must be included in the 6 monthly thorough examination process.
Before a retractable type fall arrester is used, hang the device to a suitable anchor point. Make sure it
is hanging vertically. Then carry out the following:






If there is an indicator present, check to see it has not been activated. Do not use the device if the
indicator mechanism shows signs of having previously arrested a fall.
Extend the lifeline fully and inspect it for damage. Do not allow the lifeline to retract into the
device unrestrained as this may lead to the brake mechanism locking. If the device locks, consult
the manufacturer. Allow it to retract slowly through gloved hands, inspecting it as you go.
Check connector between the device and the anchor point, the connection to the harness and
swaging of the cable end or the webbing stitching for signs of damage.
Check the locking mechanism is operating correctly by pulling the lifeline end sharply. The
lifeline must lock instantly.
Check the hook/carabiner gate opens and closes smoothly and fully engages.
Check the device is within its inspection interval.
There are several mechanisms which may be used to indicate a fall has occurred. Activation of these
requires immediate withdrawal of the item from use and the item should be destroyed or returned to
an authorised service centre. These indicators include:




Hook Indicator – a coloured band visible at the top of the hook after a fall or shock load occurs.
Stitching indicator - sewn into the hook end of a webbing lanyard. To indicate a fall, the thread
(usually red) will tear apart.
Window indicator - has two visible colour zones, located in a small window on the block:
o Safe Zone (blue/green): suitable for continued use.
o Danger Zone (red): immediately remove from use and return to manufacturer/service agent
to repair and recertify.
Button indicator - usually red in colour. Can be flush with casing or slightly recessed, but will
protrude from the casing after a fall.
Note: Some retractable type fall arrester may not contain an indicator mechanism.
 Connector inspection


Ensure the connecting hooks work properly. Hook gates must move freely and lock upon closing.
Check for any signs of corrosion, worn, cracked, deformed, distorted, dented, and has sharp
edges or other damages.
Pre-use checks
Pre-use checks are essential and should be carried out each time by the user, before the fall
protection equipments are used. Pre-use checks should be tactile and visual. A visual check should be
undertaken in good light and will normally take a few minutes.
Detailed Inspection
These more formal, in-depth inspections must be carried out by a competent person periodically at
minimum intervals specified in the manufacturer’s inspection regime. Detailed inspections are to be
carried out at 6 monthly intervals (or 3 monthly for frequently used fall protection equipments
particularly when the equipment is used in arduous environments, e.g. demolition, steel erection,
scaffolding, steel skeletal masts/towers with edges and protrusions). Detailed inspections should be
recorded in appropriate register log and tagging with unique identifier code.
Interim inspections (including inspection following “on-demand” use of equipment)
These are also in-depth inspections and may be appropriate in addition to pre-use checks and detailed
inspections. Interim inspections may be needed between detailed inspections because the employer’s
risk assessment has identified a risk that could result in significant deterioration, affecting the safety
of the PPE before the next detailed inspection is due. These inspections must be carried out by a
competent person. The need for and frequency of interim inspections will depend on use and the
environment. Examples of situations where they may be appropriate include:
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UNRESTRICTED
 risks from transient arduous working environments involving paints, chemicals or grit blasting
operations,
 Acidic or alkaline environments if the type of fabric the lanyard is made from cannot be
determined (some fabrics offer low resistance to acids or alkalis),
 Where equipment has been used to arrest a fall from heights, including activation of inertia reel.
The results of interim inspections should be recorded and kept.
Inspection Frequency and Competence Requirements
Test Type / Frequency
Inspector Requirements
Detailed Inspection - 6 monthly
interval
Competent Person
(or 3 monthly if equipment is used
in arduous environment)
Annual Inspection – required for
certain fall protection equipments
such as retractable type fall
arrester
 Must be serviced, inspected and re-certified by the
manufacturer, or
 Competent company
[Note that persons carrying out annual inspection must
have completed the necessary inspector training as
specified by BSP’s Scaffolding Subject Matter Expert - Pg
Anuar Pg Hj Hamid (AED/211)]
Competent Person
BS EN 365 for periodic examination defines a competent person as a “person who is knowledgeable of
the current periodic examination requirements, recommendations and instructions issued by the
manufacturers applicable to the relevant component, subsystem or system”.
BS EN 365: 2004 Clause 3.3 also states “This person should be capable of identifying and assessing
the significance of defects, should initiate the corrective action to be taken and should have the
necessary skills and resources to do so”.
A competent person is also someone is sufficiently independent and impartial to allow them to make
objective decisions, and have appropriate and genuine authority to take the appropriate action. This
does not mean that competent persons must necessarily be employed from an external company.
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CHAPTER
4.0
UNRESTRICTED
REFERENCES
NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) Standards
NFPA 2112 - Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel
Against Flash Fire
This standard specifies the minimum performance requirements and test methods for Flame Resistant
(FR) fabrics and components, and the design and certification requirements for clothing developed to
protect workers from flash fire hazards. It requires FR fabrics to pass a comprehensive series of
thermal tests.
NFPA 70E – Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace
This standard addresses electrical safety requirements for employee workplaces that are necessary for
the practical safeguarding of employees relative to the hazards associated with electrical energy during
activities such as the installation, inspection, operation, maintenance, and demolition of electric
conductors, electric equipment, signaling and communications conductors and equipment, and
industrial substations; Installations of conductors and equipment that connect to the supply of
electricity, Installations used by the electric utility, such as office buildings, warehouses, garages,
machine shops, and recreational buildings, that are not an integral part of a generating plant,
substation, or control center Not Covered.
Applicable Standard Codes
To ensure consistent performance, personal protective equipment must be manufactured to meet the
requirements of certain standards. Many countries set their own standards, and items of equipment
are usually manufactured to meet national standards in their country of origin.
To list all acceptable and applicable worldwide standards for personal protective equipment would
require many pages of information. Therefore, 3 common standards used in this region have been
listed and they are:
British Standards (BS), European Standards (EN) or British Standards also meeting European
Standards (BS EN)

Australian/New Zealand Standards (AS/NZS)

American National Standards Institue (ANSI)
Other equivalent standards are also acceptable. If needed, further information on equivalency and
acceptability may be obtained from BSP HSE/4 section (i.e. HSE/411).
HEAD PROTECTION
BS EN 443:2008
Helmets for fire-fighting in buildings and other structures.
BS EN 397:2012
EN 14052:2012+A1:2012
BS EN 14458:2004
EN 812:2012
Industrial Safety Helmets
High performance industrial helmets.
Personal eye-equipment. Faceshields and visors for use with firefighters and
high performance industrial safety helmets used by firefighters, ambulance
and emergency services.
Industrial bump caps
AS/NZS 1800:1998
AS/NZS 1801:1997
AS/NZS 4067:2012
Occupational protective helmets - Selection, care and use
Occupational protective helmets.
Protective helmets for structural firefighting
ANSI/ISEA Z89.1-2014
American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection
type 1 - helmets offer protection from blows to the top of the head
type 2 - helmets offer protection from blows to both the top and sides of the
head
Class G - reduce the force of impact of falling objects and to reduce the danger
of contact with exposed low-voltage electrical conductors (2,200 volts)
Class C - reduce the force of impact of falling objects but offer no electrical
protection.
Class E - reduce the force of impact of falling objects and to reduce the danger
of contact with exposed high-voltage electrical conductors (20,000 volts).
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EYE AND FACE PROTECTION
BS EN 166:2002
Personal eye protection. Specifications
BS 7028:1999
BS EN 169:2002
Eye protection for industrial and other uses. Guidance on selection, use and
maintenance.
Filters for welding and related techniques
BS EN 170:2002
BS EN 171:2002
BS EN ISO 4007:2012
Specifications for Ultraviolet filters
Specifications for Infrared filters
Personal protective equipment. Eye and face protection. Vocabulary
BS EN 166:2002
Personal eye protection. Specifications
BS EN 172:1995
BS EN 175:1997
BS EN 379:2003+A1:2009
Specification for sunglare filters for industrial use.
Eye and face protection during welding and allied processes
Personal eye-protection. Automatic welding filters
AS/NZS 1336:2014
AS/NZS 1337.1:2010
Eye and face protection - Guidelines
Personal eye protection - Eye and face protectors for occupational applications
AS/NZS 1337.2
AS/NZS 1338.2:2012
Personal eye protection - Part 2: Mesh eye and face protectors for occupational
applications
Personal eye protection - Prescription eye protectors against low and medium
impact
Eye and face protection - Guidelines
AS 1067.1 Sunglasses and fashion spectacles:
Part 1 - Safety requirements and
AS 1067.2 Sunglasses and fashion spectacles:
Part 2 - Performance requirements.
Filters for eye protectors
Filters for eye protectors - Filters for protection against radiation generated in
welding and allied operation
Filters for eye protectors - Filters for protection against ultraviolet radiation
AS/NZS 1338.3:2012
Filters for eye protectors - Filters for protection against infra-red radiation
AS/NZS 1337.6:2012
AS/NZS 1336:2014
AS/NZS 1067:2003
AS/NZS 1338:2012
AS/NZS 1338.1:2012
ANSI Z87.1-2015
Occupational And Educational Personal Eye And Face Protection Devices
Impact rated eye protection must meet specified high mass and high velocity
tests, and provide continuous lateral coverage. Impact rated eye protection will
have a plus symbol (+).
- Z87+ impact rated flat lenses
- Z87-2+ impact rated prescription lens
- Z87 non impact flat lenses
- Z87-2 non impacted rated prescription lens
The ability of lenses to protect against various types of radiation is indicated by
a letter designation, which is sometimes followed by a rating number. The
marking are:
- Welding Filter - “W” followed by a shade number in the range of 1.3 to 14.
- Ultra-violet (UV) Filter - “U” followed by a scale number in the range of 2 to 6.
- Infra-red (Heat) Filter - “R” followed by a scale number in the range of 1.3 to
10.
- Visible Light (Glare) Filter - “L” followed by a scale number in the range of 1.3
to 10.
- Clear lens – no marking
- Variable tint - “V”
- Special purpose - “S”
HEARING PROTECTION
BS
BS
BS
BS
EN
EN
EN
EN
352-1: 2002
352-2: 2002
458:2004
352-3: 2002
AS/NZS 1269.0:2005
AS/NZS 1269.1:2005
AS/NZS 1269.2:2005
Hearing
Hearing
Hearing
Hearing
protectors - Ear muffs
protectors - Ear plugs
protectors: Selection, use, care and maintenance
protectors - Ear mufs attached to a safety helmet
Occupational
Occupational
emission and
Occupational
noise management- Overview
noise management-Measurement and assessment of noise
exposure
noise management-Noise control management
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AS/NZS 1269.3:2005
Occupational noise management-Hearing protector program
AS/NZS 1269.4:2005
Occupational noise management-Auditory assessment
AS/NZS 1270:2002
Acoustics - Hearing protectors
ANSI/ISEA S12.42-2010
Methods for the Measurement of Insertion Loss of Hearing Protection Devices in
Continuous or Impulsive Noise Using Microphone-in-Real-Ear or Acoustic Test
Fixture Procedures
ASA S12.6-2016
American National Standard Methods for the Measuring the Real-Ear
Attenuation of Hearing Protectors
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
EN
EN
EN
EN
EN
EN
132:1998
133:2001
134:1998
135:1998
136:1998
137:2006
BS EN 14593-1:2005
BS EN 14593-2:2005
BS EN 14387:2004
Glossary of RPE terms.
Classification of RPE.
Nomenclature of RPE components
List of equivalent terms in English, French and German.
Full face masks. Class 1, 2 or 3.
Self-Contained open-circuit compressed air breathing apparatus with full face
mask.
Respiratory protective devices. Specification for fresh air hose breathing
apparatus for use with full face mask, half mask or mouthpiece assembly.
Compressed air line breathing apparatus with demand valve - full mask.
Compressed air line breathing apparatus with demand valve - half mask.
Gas filters and Combined filters
BS EN 143:2000
Particle Filters
BS EN 12941:1988
Powered filtering device with helmets/hoods
BS EN 12942:1988
Power filtering device with full, half or quarter masks
BS EN 149:2001
Filtering half masks to protect against particles
BS EN 13794:2002
Self contained closed-circuit Breathing Apparatus for escape
BS EN 402:2003
BS EN 403:2004
BS EN 142:2002
Self contained open-circuit compressed air escape Breathing Apparatus
Respiratory protective devices for self-rescue. Filtering devices with hood for
escape from fire.
Respiratory protective devices for self-rescue. Filter self-rescuer from carbon
monoxide with mouthpiece assembly.
Respiratory protective devices. Recommendations for selection, use, care and
maintenance. Guidance document.
Respiratory protective devices. Self contained open-circuit compressed air
breathing apparatus with escape hood.
Respiratory protective devices. Mouthpiece assemblies.
BS EN 136:1998
Respiratory protective devices. Full face masks. Class 1, 2 or 3.
BS EN 140:1999
Respiratory protective devices. Half masks or quarter masks.
BS EN 405:2001
Valved filtering half masks for use against gases or gases and particles.
BS EN 1827:1999
Filtering half masks without inhalation valves
BS EN 14594:2005
Continuous flow compressed air line breathing apparatus
BS EN 14529:2005
Self-contained open circuit compressed air breathing apparatus with half mask
designed to include a positive pressure lung governed demand valve for escape
purposes only.
AS/NZS 1715:2009
AS/NZS 1716:2012
Selection, use and maintenance of respiratory protective devices
Respiratory protective devices
Respiratory protective devices - Methods of test and test equipment Determination of breathing resistance
Respiratory protective devices - Methods of test and test equipment Determination of field of vision
BS EN 138:1994
BS EN 404:2005
BS EN 529:2005
BS EN 1146:2005
AS ISO 16900.2:2015
AS ISO 16900.11:2015
AS ISO 16900.3:2015
Respiratory protective devices - Methods of test and test equipment Determination of particle filter penetration
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UNRESTRICTED
AS ISO 16900.4:2015
Respiratory protective devices - Methods of test and test equipment Determination of gas filter capacity and migration, desorption and carbon
monoxide dynamic testing
AS ISO 16972:2015
Respiratory protective devices - Terms, definitions, graphical symbols and units
of measurement
ANSI/ISEA 110-2009
ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015
American National Standard for Air-Purifying Respiratory Protective Smoke
Escape Devices
Practices respiratory protection
Filter respirators provide protection against particulate matter such as dust,
fumes, mists, smoke, microorganisms and asbestos.
chemical cartridge/canister respirators provide protection against certain gases
and vapours up to a particular concentration, do not provide protection against
oxygen deficiency or particulate matter.
air supply respirators dependent on the type. Can provide protection against
particulates, chemical vapours and gases, as well as oxygen deficiency.
ASTM E2952-14
Standard Specification for Air-Purifying Respiratory Protective Smoke Escape
Devices (RPED).
HAND PROTECTION
BS EN 420:2003+A1:2009
Protective gloves. General requirements and test methods.
BS EN 388:2003
Protective gloves against mechanical risks.
BS EN 421:2010
Protective gloves against ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination.
BS EN 381-7:1999
BS EN 511:2006
BS EN 659:2003+A1:2008
Protective clothing for users of hand-held chain saws. Requirements for
chainsaw protective gloves.
Protective gloves against cold.
Protective gloves for firefighters.
BS EN 12477:2001
BS EN 407:2004
BS EN 455-2:2015
Protective gloves for welders.
Protective gloves against thermal risks (heat and/or fire).
Medical gloves for single use. Requirements and testing for physical properties.
BS EN 374-1:2003
Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms. Terminology and
performance requirements.
BS EN 60903:2003
Live working. Gloves of insulating material.
BS EN 455-3:2015
Medical gloves for single use. Requirements and testing for biological evaluation.
BS EN 374-2:2014
Protective gloves against dangerous chemicals and microorganisms.
Determination of resistance to penetration.
BS EN 374-3:2003
Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms. Determination of
resistance to permeation by chemicals.
BS EN 374-4:2013
Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms. Determination of
resistance to degradation by chemicals.
Protective clothing. Gloves and arm guards protecting against cuts and stabs by
hand knives. Chain mail gloves and arm guards
EN 1082-1:1997
AS/NZS 2161.1:2016
Occupational protective gloves - Selection, use and maintenance
AS/NZS 2161.2:2005
AS/NZS 2161.3:2005
Occupational protective gloves - General requirements
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against mechanical risks
AS/NZS 2161.4:1999
AS/NZS 2161.5:1998
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against thermal risks (heat and fire)
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against cold
AS/NZS 2161.7.1:1998
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against cuts and stabs by hand
knives - Chainmail gloves and arm guards
Insulating gloves for electrical purposes
Occupational protective gloves - Protective gloves for structural firefighting Laboratory test methods and performance requirements
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against cuts and stabs by hand
knives - Gloves and arm guards made of material other than chainmail
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against cuts and stabs by hand
knives - Impact cut test for fabric, leather and other materials
AS 2225:1994
AS/NZS 2161.6:2014
AS/NZS 2161.7.2:2005
AS/NZS 2161.7.3:2005
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AS/NZS 2161.8:2002
AS/NZS 2161.10.1:2005
AS/NZS 2161.10.2:2005
AS/NZS 2161.10.3:2005
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016
NFPA 801-2014
UNRESTRICTED
Occupational protective gloves - Protection against ionizing radiation and
radioactive contamination
Occupational protective gloves - Protective gloves against chemicals and microorganisms - Terminology and performance requirements
Occupational protective gloves - Protective gloves against chemicals and microorganisms - Determination of resistance to penetration
Occupational protective gloves - Protective gloves against chemicals and microorganisms - Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals
American National Standard for Hand Protection Classification
Standard for Fire Protection for Facilities Handling Radioactive Materials, 2014
Edition
BODY PROTECTION
BS EN 1149-5:2008
BS EN ISO 11612:2008
BS EN 469:2005
BS 1771-1:1989
BS 1771-2:1990
BS EN ISO 11611:2015
BS EN 367:1992
BS EN ISO 6942:2002
Protective clothing. Electrostatic properties. Material performance and design
requirements
Protective clothing. Clothing to protect against heat and flame.
Protective clothing for firefighters. Performance requirements for protective
clothing for firefighting.
Fabrics for uniforms and workwear. Specification for fabrics of wool and wool
blends.
Fabrics for uniforms and workwear. Specification for fabrics from cellulosic
fibres, synthetic fibres and blends.
Protective clothing for use in welding and allied processes.
Protective clothing. Protection against heat and fire. Method for determining
heat transmission on exposure to flame.
Protective clothing. Protection against heat and fire. Method of test: Evaluation
of materials and material assemblies when exposed to a source of radiant heat.
BS 5426:1993
Specification for workwear and career wear.
BS EN ISO 340:2013
Conveyor belts. Laboratory scale flammability characteristics. Requirements and
test method.
Requirements for chainsaw protective leg protectors (including trousers and
chaps/over trousers).
Specification for protective clothing for use where there is a risk of entanglement
with moving parts.
BS EN 381-5
BS EN 510:1993
BS EN ISO 20471:2013
High visibility clothing.
BS EN
14605:2005+A1:2009
Protective clothing against liquid chemicals. Performance requirements for
clothing with liquid-tight (Type 3) or spray-tight (Type 4) connections, including
items providing protection to parts of the body only (Types PB [3] and PB [4]).
Protective clothing against liquid chemicals. Performance requirements for
clothing with liquid-tight (Type 3) or spray-tight (Type 4) connections, including
items providing protection to parts of the body only (Types PB [3] and PB [4]).
BS EN
14605:2005+A1:2009
BS EN 943-1:2015
Protective clothing against dangerous solid, liquid and gaseous chemicals,
including liquid and solid aerosols. Performance requirements for Type 1 (gastight) chemical protective suits.
BS EN
14605:2005+A1:2009
BS EN ISO 11611:2007
Protective clothing against liquid chemicals. Performance requirements for
clothing with liquid-tight (Type 3) or spray-tight (Type 4) connections, including
items providing protection to parts of the body only (Types PB [3] and PB [4]).
Protective clothing for firefighters. Performance requirements for protective
clothing for firefighting.
Protective clothing for use in welding and allied processes.
BS EN ISO 11612:2008
Protective clothing. Clothing to protect against heat and flame.
BS EN ISO 14877:2002
Protective clothing for abrasive blasting operations using granular abrasives.
BS EN 13911:2004
Protective clothing for firefighters. Requirements and test methods for fire hoods
for firefighters.
AS 3765:1990
AS/NZS 4399:1996
Clothing for Protection Against Hazardous Chemicals
Sun protective clothing - Evaluation and classification
AS/NZS 4453.3:1997
Protective clothing for users of hand-held chainsaws - Protective legwear
AS/NZS 4602.1:2011
High visibility safety garments - Garments for high risk applications
BS EN 469:2005
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AS/NZS ISO 13994:2006
AS/NZS ISO 22608:2007
AS/NZS ISO 2801:2008
AS/NZS 4501 Set:2008
UNRESTRICTED
Clothing for protection against chemicals - Determination of the resistance of
protective clothing materials to penetration by liquids under pressure
Protective clothing - Protection against liquid chemicals - Measurement of
repellency, retention, and penetration of liquid pesticide formulations through
protective clothing materials
Clothing for protection against heat and flame - General recommendations for
selection, care and use of protective clothing
Occupational protective clothing Set
- Guidelines on the selection, use, care and maintenance of protective clothing
- Occupational protective clothing—General requirements
AS/NZS 4824:2006
Protective clothing for firefighters - Requirements and test methods for
protective clothing used for wildland firefighting (ISO 15384:2003, MOD)
ANSI Z49.1-2005
Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes
ANSI/ISEA 107-2015
American National Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Accessories
NFPA 1971
standard on protectuve ensembles for structural fire fighting and proximity fire
fighting
NFPA 1977
standard on protective clothing and equipment for wildland fire fighting
NFPA 2112
Standard on flame resistant garments for protection of industrial personnel
against flash fire
Standard for Electrical safety in the workplace to protect personnel by reducing
exposure to electrical hazards.
Standard Performance Specification for Flame Resistant and Arc Rated Textile
Materials for Wearing Apparel for Use by Electrical Workers Exposed to
Momentary Electric Arc and Related Thermal Hazards
NFPA 70E
ASTM F1506 - 15
ASTM F1891 - 12
Standard specification for arc and flame resistant rainwear
ASTM F2302-08
Standard Performance Specification for Labeling Protective Clothing as Heat
and Flame Resistant
ASTM F2733-2009
Standard Specification for Flame Resistant Rainwear for Protection Against
Flame Hazards
ANSI/ISEA 101-2014
Limited use and disposable coveralls.
ANSI/ISEA 207-2011
American National Standard for High-Visibility Public Safety Vests
ASTM F2061-12
Standard Practice for Chemical Protective Clothing: Wearing, Care, and
Maintenance Instructions
PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICE
BS EN ISO 124028:2006+A1:2011
Personal flotation devices - Part 8. Accessories. Safety requirements and test
methods.
BS EN ISO 124024:2006+A1:2010
Personal flotation devices - Part 4. Lifejackets, performance level 100. Safety
requirements.
BS EN ISO 124023:2006+A1:2010
BS EN ISO 124022:2006+A1:2010
Personal flotation devices - Part 3. Lifejackets, performance level 150. Safety
requirements.
Personal flotation devices - Part 2. Lifejackets, performance level 275. Safety
requirements
BS EN 14144:2003
Lifebuoys. Requirements, tests
AS 4758.1:2015
NZS 5823: 2005
Lifejackets - General requirements
Specification for buoyancy aids and marine safety harnesses and lines
ANSI/UL 1123
Standard for Marine Buoyant Devices
ANSI/UL 1191
Standard for Components for Personal Flotation Devices
ANSI/UL 1517
Standard for Hybrid Personal Flotation Devices
ANSI/UL 1177
Standard for Buoyant Vests
FOOT PROTECTION
BS EN ISO 20345:2011
Personal protective equipment. Safety footwear. Toecap protection of 200J.
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BS EN ISO 20346:2014
Personal protective equipment. Protective footwear. Toecap protection of 100J.
BS EN ISO 20347:2012
Personal protective equipment. Occupational footwear. No Toecap protection.
BS EN 15090:2012
Footwear for firefighters.
BS EN 13832-2:2006
Footwear protecting against chemicals. Requirements for footwear resistant to
chemicals under laboratory conditions.
BS EN 13832-3:2006
Footwear protecting against chemicals. Requirements for footwear highly
resistant to chemicals under laboratory conditions.
AS/NZS 2210.1:2010
Occupational protective footwear. Guide to selection, care and use
AS/NZS 2210.2:2009
Occupational protective footwear - Test methods (ISO 20344:2004, MOD)
AS/NZS 2210.3:2009
Occupational protective footwear - Specification for safety footwear (ISO
20345:2004, MOD)
Occupational protective footwear - Specification for protective footwear (ISO
20346:2004, MOD)
Occupational protective footwear - Specification for occupational footwear (ISO
20347:2004, MOD)
Protective footwear for firefighters – Requirements and test methods
AS/NZS 2210.4:2009
AS/NZS 2210.5:2009
AS/NZS 4821:2014
ASTM F2413-2011
Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective (Safety) Toe
Cap Footwear
ASTM F2412 - 11
Standard Test Methods for Foot Protection
ASTM F2892-2011
Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for Soft Toe Protective
Footwear (Non-Safety / Non-Protective Toe)
Standard Test Method for Measuring the Coefficient of Friction for Evaluation of
Slip Performance of Footwear and Test Surfaces/Flooring Using a Whole Shoe
Tester
ASTM F2913 - 11
FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT
BS EN 354:2010
Personal fall protection equipment. Lanyards
BS EN 355:2002
Personal protective equipment against falls from a height. Energy absorbers.
BS EN 361:2002
BS EN 362:2004
BS EN 363:2008
Personal protective equipment against falls from a height. Full body harnesses.
Personal protective equipment against falls from a height. Connectors.
Personal fall protection equipment. Personal fall protection systems.
BS EN 365:2004
Personal protective equipment against falls from a height. General requirements
for instructions for use, maintenance, periodic examination, repair, marking and
packaging.
BS EN 795:2012
Personal fall protection equipment. Anchor devices.
EN 813:2008
EN 358:2000
PPE for prevention of falls from a height - Sit harnesses
Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a
height. Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards.
BS EN 360:2002
Personal protective equipment against falls from a height. Retractable type fall
arresters.
Code of practice for selection, use and maintenance of personal fall protection
systems and equipment for use in the workplace
Code of practice for the design, selection, installation, use and maintenance of
anchor devices conforming to EN 795
Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor devices.
Class A1 Single point anchors, e.g. SafeRing and PushLock
Class B Temporary anchors, e.g. tripods and cross beams
Class C Horizontal flexible cable systems, e.g. ManSafe
Class D Horizontal rails, e.g. abseil track
Class E Dead weight anchorages, e.g. Free-standing Constant Force Post
PPE - Descender devices. Escape or rescue device, for controlled descent at a
limited velocity
PPE - Guided type fall arresters (on a rail). Vertical travelling device locking onto
a rail as result of a fall
PPE - Guided type fall arresters (on a rope/cable). Vertical travelling device
working on a wire cable or a rope, locking in a fall e.g. ClimbLatch
BS 8437:2005
BS 7883: 2005
BS EN 795
BS EN 341:1993
BS EN 353-1:2002
BS EN 353-2:2002
Page 70 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
BS EN 358:2000
BS EN 360:2002
BS EN 364:1993
UNRESTRICTED
PPE - Work positioning systems. A combination of components to make up a
system e.g. pole strap, NOT to be used for fall arrest
PPE - Retractable type. Inertia reel blocks (NOT retractable 2.4m car seat belt
style lanyards), previously called “fall arrest blocks”
PPE - Test methods. Detail of test methods to be carried out in the laboratories of
an accredited test house, to confirm the products compliance with the
requirements of the standard
AS/NZS 1891.4:2009
Industrial fall-arrest systems and devices. Selection, use and maintenance
AS/NZS 1891.1:2007
Industrial fall-arrest systems and devices - Harnesses and ancillary equipment
AS/NZS 1891.2:2001
Industrial fall-arrest systems and devices - Horizontal lifeline and rail systems
AS/NZS 1891.3:1997
AS/NZS 4488.1:1997
Industrial fall-arrest systems and devices - Fall-arrest devices
Industrial rope access systems - Specifications
AS/NZS 4488.2:1997
AS/NZS 5532:2013
Industrial rope access systems - Selection, use and maintenance
Manufacturing requirements for single-point anchor device used for harnessbased work at height
ANSI/ASSE Z359
ANSI/ASSE Z359.0-2012
ANSI/ASSE Z359.1-2007
ANSI/ASSE Z359 Fall Protection Code Package Version 3. This consists of the
below:
Definitions and Nomenclature Used for Fall Protection and Fall Arrest
Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems, Subsystems and
Components
ANSI/ASSE Z359.2-2007
Minimum Requirements for a Comprehensive Managed Fall Protection Program
ANSI/ASSE Z359.3-2007
ANSI/ASSE Z359.4-2013
Safety Requirements for Positioning and Travel Restraint Systems
Safety Requirements for Assisted-Rescue and Self-Rescue Systems,
Subsystems and Components
ANSI/ASSE Z359.6-2009
Specifications and Design Requirements for Active Fall Protection Systems
ANSI/ASSE Z359.7-2011
ANSI/ASSE Z359.11-2014
ANSI/ASSE Z359.12-2009
Qualification and Verification Testing of Fall Protection Products
Safety Requirements for Full Body Harnesses
Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest System
ANSI/ASSE Z359.13-2013
Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards
ANSI/ASSE Z359.14-2014
Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices For Personal Fall Arrest and
Rescue Systems
Page 71 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 1 - Assigned Protection Factors for RPE
The table below gives guidance for Respiratory Protection Equipment (RPE) and their Assigned
Protection Factors (APFs). These factors are sometimes referred to on Safety Data Sheet (SDS).
Assigned Protection Factor (APF), which best reflects the workplace conditions, is a number rating that
indicates how much protection that RPE is capable of providing. For example, RPE with an APF 10
indicates that a respirator reduces contaminant concentration by one-tenth.
All respiratory protective equipment has an APF that allows a specialist to select the correct type of
RPE and Filter/Cartridge to protect the user from the hazards associated with the job based on the
Workplace Exposure Limit (WEL) of the hazardous substance the user is working with.
For instance if a worker was working with softwood (particulates) where the concentration in the
workplace from the task is 55 mg/m3, and this product has a WEL of 5 mg/m3 over an 8hr TimeWeighted Average (TWA).
The calculation to work out the required APF Level of respiratory protection is completed as follows:
55 mg/m3
5 mg/m3
= 11 x WEL (5 mg/m3)
This means you would need a facemask with an APF of at least 11, which would mean using a
particulate filter FFP3 facemask as it has an APF of 20 rather than a FFP2, which has an APF of 10.
Type of Respirator
Filtering Half Mask (EN 149)
Half Mask (EN 140)
Full Face Mask (EN 136)
Class
APF (UK)
FFP1
4
FFP2
10
FFP3
20
P1
4
P2
10
P3
20
GasX
10
P1
4
P2
10
P3
40
GasX
20
TH1
10
TH2
20
TH3
40
TM1
10
TM2
20
TM3
40
Compressed air with full mask (EN 14593-1)
Demand
40
Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus positive pressure (EN
137)
Demand
2000
Powered Air Purifying Respirator with hood or helmet (EN
12941)
Powered Air Purifying Respirator with tight fitting mask
(EN 12942)
Page 72 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
Assigned Protection Factors5
No.
Type of
Respirator1, 2
UNRESTRICTED
(OSHA)
Half
face
mask
Full face
mask
Helmet/
Hood
1
Air-Purifying Respirator
103
50
2
Powered Air-Purifying Respirator (PAPR)
50
1,000
3
Supplied-Air Respirator (SAR) or Airline Respirator
 Demand mode
10
50
 Continuous flow mode
50
1,000
 Pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode
50
1,000
 Demand mode
10
50
50
 Pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode
(e.g., open/closed circuit)
--
10,000
10,000
4
25 / 1,0004
25 / 1,0004
Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)
Notes:
Employers may select respirators assigned for use in higher workplace concentrations of a hazardous
substance for use at lower concentrations of that substance, or when required respirator use is
independent of concentration.
1
The assigned protection factors in above table are only effective when the employer implements a
continuing, effective respirator program as required by 29 CFR 1910.134 (OSHA Respiratory
Protection Standard), including training, fit testing, maintenance, and use requirements.
2
3
This APF category includes filtering facepieces, and half masks with elastomeric facepieces.
The employermust have evidence provided by the respiratormanufacturer that testing of these
respirators demonstrates performance at a level of protection of 1,000 or greater to receive an APF of
1,000. Absent such testing, all other PAPRs and SARs with helmets/hoods are to be treated as loosefitting facepiece respirators, and receive an APF of 25.
4
These APFs do not apply to respirators used solely for escape. For escape respirators used in
association with specific substances covered by 29 CFR 1910 subpart Z, employers must refer to the
appropriate substance-specific standards in that subpart. Escape respirators for other IDLH
atmospheres are specified by 29 CFR 1910.134(d)(2)(ii).
5
Page 73 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 2 - Guide to Selection of Filters for Filter Respirators
There are three main filter types:

Gas/vapour filters which remove specified gases and vapours

Particle filters which remove airborne solid and/or liquid particles

Combined filters which remove solid and/or liquid particles, and specified gases and vapours
All types of filter are classified with a code letter, a number and a colour code. The code letter and
colour code are constant for protection against different substances, the numbers are variable and are
used to indicate the level of protection given (class 3 gives the highest level of protection, class 1 the
lowest).
The table below shows the filter types, classes and colour codes, with typical applications at low levels
of concentration. Note that high levels of concentration will require the use of breathing apparatus.
For advice on specific gases, vapours and airborne particle protection at varying concentrations,
contact HML/4 as appropriate.
Note: colour codes shown meet BS EN standards. Other standards may be different.
Page 74 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 3 - Flame Retardant/Resistant (FR) fabrics that are NFPA 211
certified
Fabric Name
Fabric Man.
Fabric
Weight
(oz/yd2)
Inherent FR
(aka
Engineered)
or Treated
Cotton?
% Body
Fabric Fibre Content
Burn
(3 sec. test)
% Body
Burn
(4 sec.
test)
ATPV Certif.
(Arc
HRC
Wicking
Thermal
Certif. Air Perm.
(seconds to wick
Protection (1, 2, or
(cfm)
2 vertical inches)
Value)
NA)
(cal/cm2)
Tensile
Strength
WxF (lbs)
Tear
Strength
WxF (lbs)
Drifire
4.5
Inherent
63% Meta-aramid
15% FR Rayon
10% Para-aramid
9% Nylon
3% Conductive
Fibre
Springfield
LLC
4.5
Inherent
93% Nomex
5% Kevlar
2% Anti-static
33
57
5.2
1
>300
7ʺ in 15 sec
(Dupont
Method)
175 X
120
27 x 21
Springfield
LLC
6.0
Inherent
93% Nomex
5% Kevlar
2% Antistat
13
45
6.4
1
>150
>/=5.0"
(15 min)
230 x 170
26 x 20
Tecasafe
Plus 580
Red
Tencate
5.8
Inherent
48% Modacrylic
37% Lyocell
15% ParaAramid
22
N/A
6.5
1
94
61 sec
114 x 85
11 x 10
Nomex®
IIIA
TenCate
4.5
Inherent
93% meta-aramid/
5% para-aramid/
2% antistat
20
57
4.5
1
221 300
5ʺ (Warp) in 10
min (Refer to
AATCC 197)
RANGE:
170-172
x 100-126
RANGE:
10.4-25
x 8.0-16
Nomex®
IIIA
TenCate
6.0
Inherent
93% Nomex
5% para-aramid
2% antistat
11
35
5.6
1
80 -94
5ʺ (Warp) in 10
min (Refer to
AATCC 197)
RANGE:
225-240
x
150-173
12.0 x 8.8
FORTREX
Synergy
Airweave
4.5 oz
(Nomex
IIIA)
Synergy
Airweave
6.0 oz
(Nomex
IIIA)


19
N/A
5.5
1
49
9.1*
171 x 117
11.3 x 9.7
Coveralls shall have Flame Resistant (FR) reflective strips on shoulders, arms and legs.
Name embroidery and company logo must be manufactured from Flame Resistant (FR) material
and sown on with Flame Resistant (FR) thread.
Page 75 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 4 – CE Marking
The use of counterfeit, substandard and illegal PPE is potentially life threatening. Counterfeit and
illegal PPE is often made from substandard regrind materials without UV stabilisation or official
certification at a notified body. Although they may appear the same as premium products they are not
fit for purpose and are more likely to fail - with devastating consequences; exposing companies to the
risk of legal action.
All items of PPE that are sold in Europe and other countries must be approved for use under the
requirements of the PPE Directive and display the CE mark. This informs the user that the product
conforms to a number of minimum requirements and is safe to use as a piece of safety equipment. The
CE mark also identifies that the product is of sufficient quality to protect users from hazards.
Check the PPE item to ensure the presence of CE Marking.
Page 76 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 5 – PPE Task Matrix
This PPE Task Matrix shows the minimum PPE requirements for various task or job specific.
1 Visit to ONSHORE worksites
Visit to OFFSHORE worksites (by
2
boat or chopper)
l
During Boat transfers using Swing
Rope
l
IR
l
l
l
l
l
Fall
Foot
Protection Protection
l
Remarks
Safety Footwear
PFD
Fall Protection
Body
Protection
Personal
Flotation Device
Hand Gloves
Breathing
Apparatus
IR
3 During Helipcopter Travel
4
Respirator
l
Ear plugs/ Ear
muffs
l
Face shield
Safety Glasses/
Spectacles/
Goggles
No. Task or Job Specific
Safety Helmet
Head
Eye & Face Hearing Respiratory
Hand
Protection Protection Protection Protection Protection
Coveralls/ Body
Protective
clothing
Apron
High Visibility
vest
NOTE: Depending on the nature of activity, additional or different types of PPE may be required. An
activity risk / hazard assessment (including site hazards) to determine suitable PPE requirements
shall be carried out during work planning and PPE sourced. Safety data sheets shall also be referred
to ensure the appropriate PPE are used.
B
l
l
l
SU
l
R
B
Visit to NUIs
(Normally
Unattended
Installation) requires
life jacket.
B
Hand glove is NOT
a must during swing
rope transfer. If
glove is to be used,
it must be free from
dirt or oil.
B
Glove used must be
free from dirt or oil.
B
Hearing Protection
with two-way radio
communication
system may be
used.
Job Specific
5 Boat Landing Officer (BLO)
6
Helicopter Landing Officer (HLO) &
Helideck Assitant (HDA)
l
l
Construction activities
7 Blasting & spray painting
8 Brush Painting
9 Scaffolding
l
l
l
l
l
l
10 Radiography
l
l
11 Welding, flame cutting, gouging
12 Metal cutting, grinding, chipping
l
l
W
l
l
l
l
AF
l
WS
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
WG
l
IR
l
l
l
l
l
WG
IR
l
l
l
l
l
l
B
B
B
B
L
B
B
Lifting, Rigging and slinging (by
13
crane or forklift)
l
l
IR
l
B
14 Excavation
Pipe/spool/valve/flange handling &
15
Bolt tightening/loosening
16 Masonry
17 Carpentry
Drilling activities
18 Mud Room/ Shale Shaker
19 Mixing Chemicals at Mixing
20 Handling OBM at shaker area
21 Working on Derrick/Monkeyboard
22 High Pressure Testing
Marine activities
Working on vessel deck (e.g.
23
anchor handling, towing, mooring).
Working within 1.5m at the edge of
24 the jetty/wharf. (e.g. mooring,
handling of hoses).
Pilot transfer (personnel transfer
25
using pilot ladder)
26 Splicing Ropes
l
l
IR
l
B / RB
l
l
IR
l
B
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
B
B
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
CO
CO
IR
IR
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
IR
l
IF
B
l
l
IR
l
IF / R
B
l
l
IR
l
IF
B
l
l
GD
l
B
27 Wire socketing steel wire ropes
l
l
CR
l
B
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Require
Thermoluminescent
Dosimeter Badge
(TDB).
l
l
l
Use of push pull
sticks (hands free).
Banksman requires
High visibility vest.
Use of finger saver
tools (hands free).
B
B
RB
B
B
Cut resistant gloves
needed whilst
brooming wire.
Page 77 of 79
Aviation activities
28 Helicopter Maintenance
29 Pilots
30 Paramedics
SAR (Search & Rescue) Technical
31
Crew / Winchmen
32 Cabin Attendant
33 Helicopter Refuelling
34 Luggage Handlers
l
l
l
l
l
l
35 Traffic Officers
l
l
l
l
l
l
PFD
Fall
Foot
Protection Protection
Remarks
Safety Footwear
Body
Protection
Fall Protection
Hand Gloves
Breathing
Apparatus
Respirator
Ear plugs/ Ear
muffs
Face shield
No. Task or Job Specific
Safety Glasses/
Spectacles/
Goggles
Safety Helmet
Head
Eye & Face Hearing Respiratory
Hand
Protection Protection Protection Protection Protection
Personal
Flotation Device
UNRESTRICTED
Coveralls/ Body
Protective
clothing
Apron
High Visibility
vest
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Body Protection
refers to Uniform.
Electrical and Control &
Automation activities
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
Working on low or high voltage
environment (eg. HV switching or
working on live electrical
equipments)
Electrical and Instrument (E & I)
work eg. cable termination,
glanding.
Electrical Cable Pulling
Overhaul/Repair/Test/Calibrate
general instruments - electronics
or conventional.
Others
General Housekeeping at worksite
Manual handling or manual lifting
High pressure water jetting
Working at Height
Working over/by water e.g.
scaffolding, abseiling, mooring.
Confined space entry
46 Asbestos Handling
l
l
IG
l
B
l
l
GD
l
B
l
l
IR
l
B
l
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
IR
IR
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
B
B
B
B
l
l
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
l
B
l
l
S/B
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
B
l
l
l
l
l
47 Laboratory work & sampling
Chemical Handling (eg.
batteries/acid filling,
48
refueling/defuelling of
engines/machines, mixing)
l
l
49 Spill Clean-up (onshore)
l
l
Food (meat & poultry) cutting in
kitchen/galley
51 Garden maintenance
52 Grass cutting
53 Tree cutting / Use of Chain saw
l
l
l
l
l
l
54 Abseiling
l
l
l
l
l
50
55
SM
Handling Hazardous waste
disposal
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
IF
I
S
I
B
B
B
l
Unvented safety
helmet to be used.
Unvented safety
helmet to be used.
Disposal coverall
may be used.
Apron may be
required to be used.
Disposable coverall
or glove may be
used.
Hair net/Head cover
required.
B
Working over water
requires Inflatable
life jacket.
B
Safety Rubber
boots may be used.
Note: Depending on the nature of activity, additional or different types of PPE may be required. An activity risk / hazard assessment (including site hazards)
to determine suitable PPE requirements shall be carried out during work planning and PPE sourced. Safety data sheets shall also be referred to ensure the
appropriate PPE are used.
Eye & Face Protection
Welding Goggles
Welding shield
W
WS
Respiratory Protection
Air fed hood and helmet
AF
Body Protection
Leather apron
Impervious
L
I
Legend
Hand Protection
Impact Resistant Gloves
Welding Gauntlets
Chemical / Oil Resistant Gloves
Grip & Dexterity Gloves
Insulating Gloves
Steel Mesh Gloves
Cut-Resistant
IR
W
CO
GD
IG
S
CR
Personal Flotation Device (PFD)
Rigid
R
Inflatable
IF
Special use device life jacket SU
Foot Protection
Safety Boots
Safety Shoes
Safety Rubber Boots
B
S
RB
Page 78 of 79
BSP-02-Standard-1628 - Personal Protective Equipment, Rev.7.4
UNRESTRICTED
Appendix 6 – Other References
General or others
1. Personal Protective Equipment Guide Part 1 – Overview, Shell HSSE & SP Control Framework Version 4, August 2016
2. BSP-HML4-Approved Medical Examiners.
3. Functional Health Specifications - Medical Evaluation of Fitness to Work Report HEMS.GL.2000.04
Eye protection
1. Protective eyewear, A reference guide for ABDO (Association of British Dispensing Opticians)
members – New 2014 revised edition
2. Eye and face protection, European Standards
Respiratory Protection Equipment
1. Personal Protective Equipment Guide Part 5 – Respiratory Protection, Shell HSSE & SP Control
Framework - Version 1, August 2016
2. HSG53 (Fourth edition) - Respiratory protective equipment at work – 2013
3. 3M Cartridge and Filter guide
4. Assigned Protection Factors for the revised respiratory protection standard, by OSHA (Occupational
Safety and Health Administration)
Personal Flotation Device (PFD)
1. Shell Shipping, Maritime Position Note - Guidance on Personal Flotation Devices, 31 March 2011
2. Facts about Life Jackets – by PFDMA (Personal Flotation Device Manufacturers Association)
Fall Protection Equipments
1. Technical Guidance Note 3 – Guidance on inspecting personal fall protection equipment, by WAHSA (The
Work At Height Safety Association)
2. DBI SALA - User instruction manual.
3. Inspecting fall arrest equipment made from webbing or rope, by Health and Safety Executive
4. Working at Height: Country Regulations, Standards & References
5. Code of practice for selection, use and maintenance of personal fall protection systems and equipment for use
in the workplace, by BSi (British Standards)
Page 79 of 79
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