saving energy

saving energy
ENERGYSAVING
TIPS
Helping You $ ave
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Heating and cooling 4
Water heater
4
Insulation5
Windows and doors
5
Kitchen6
Lighting7
Electronics7
Bathrooms8
Bedrooms8
Fireplaces8
Laundry room
9
Garage9
Exterior10
Pools, ponds and spas
10
Kilo-what?10
Counting Kilowatts
11
Kilowatt-hours Used
in an Average Home
12
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ENERGYSAVING
TIPS
Save Energy in Your Home and Reduce Its Carbon Footprint
American homes and apartments use 22 percent of the energy
consumed in the U.S. according to the U.S. Energy Information
Administration. Residential energy consumption increased almost four
times between 1950 and 2014. One-third of American homes are at least
45 years old and many need to be remodeled with new energy-saving
appliances and building materials to conserve energy and reduce the
nation’s carbon emissions.
A home’s “carbon footprint” is the approximate amount of greenhouse
gases created directly and indirectly from energy used. The details in the
following pages, plus the energy-use chart on the inside back cover, will
help you reduce your home’s energy consumption and carbon footprint.
3
Heating and Cooling
Almost half of household energy goes to
heating and cooling.
• In old and new units, replace or clean the air
filter monthly.
• Have systems checked by a licensed service
technician yearly.
• Make sure outdoor units have at least a twofoot clearance on all sides for proper air flow.
• Set an energy-saving programmable
thermostat to 78 degrees in summer and 68 degrees in winter.
• When it’s time to replace an old unit, purchase a high-efficiency
model with an annual fuel utilization efficiency rating of at least 90.
Water Heater
Water heating accounts for approximately
18 percent of a residential electric bill.
• Lower the thermostat to 120 degrees.
Keep it at 140 degrees if your dishwasher
does not have a temperature booster
feature.
• Insulate hot water pipes in an unheated
area, such as a crawl space, garage, or
outdoor utility room.
• Purchase an energy-efficient water
heater from NOVEC Solutions.
We now carry the Marathon and a GE heat-pump water heater.
4
Insulation
The most cost-effective way to
reduce energy bills, eliminate
cold drafts, and avoid moisture
problems is to plug air leaks and
then insulate.
• Install thin foam seals under
switch and outlet covers.
• Weather-strip or insulate the attic
door or hatch.
• Install R-60 insulation between attic floor joists. If joists are visible with
the existing insulation, add more. Do not block soffit vents.
• Install R-19 insulation between house walls and under the floor above
a crawl space. Hire a professional to do this job.
Windows and Doors
Heat travels through glass. Prevent
losing 15 to 30 percent of heated
or cooled air.
• Weather-strip and caulk around
window and door frames.
• Add storm windows to singlepane windows or install
double-gazed, low-emissivity
coated windows. New energy-efficient windows with Low-E coatings
can reduce energy loss as much as 50 percent, according to the U.S.
Department of Energy.
• Apply Low-E coatings to existing windows and glass doors.
• Install storm doors to all exterior entrances.
5
Kitchen
Appliances account for about 20 percent of
household energy consumption. Purchase
models with the ENERGY STAR label to cut
operating costs.
• Refrigerator and Freezer – Open and close
refrigerator and freezer doors quickly and
infrequently. Locate the refrigerator away
from the oven and stove. Keep condenser
coils clean. Door gaskets should be tight
enough to hold a dollar bill firmly in place.
If not, replace the gaskets.
Refrigerators manufactured before 1993 use more than three times
the electricity modern models use. Replacing a 1992 side-by-side,
20-cubic foot model with a new ENERGY STAR model will save about
$116 a year in electricity and eliminate hundreds of pounds of CO2
from being emitted into the atmosphere. To calculate individual
savings visit www.energystar.gov.
• Oven – Preheat oven for only 10 minutes for bakery-type foods. Many
other dishes can be heated or baked without preheating the oven.
Avoid opening the door to peek at food cooking. Use a microwave,
convection or toaster oven when practical; a microwave draws less
than half the power of a conventional oven and cooks in a fraction of
the time.
• Stove – Match bottoms of pots and pans to burner sizes. Cover pans
when bringing water to a boil and cooking most foods.
• Dishwasher – Run the dishwasher only when full to save hot water.
Letting dishes air dry saves more energy. Don’t let hot water run
continuously when washing dishes by hand.
6
Lighting
Traditional lighting consumes approximately
6 percent of home electricity. Using new
energy-saving lighting can reduce this
consumption significantly. Look for the
ENERGY STAR label when buying light bulbs.
• Turn lights off when leaving a room, or
install motion sensors in light fixtures.
• Replace incandescent indoor and outdoor
bulbs with light-emitting diode (LED) or
compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) bulbs.
LED bulbs use 90 percent less electricity than traditional incandescent
bulbs and last even longer than CFLs. CFLs use 75 percent less
electricity and last 10 times longer.
• Use LED holiday lights. They use 90 percent less energy than
incandescent holiday lights, last much longer, and are safer because
they do not produce heat.
• If you have torchiere fixtures with halogen light bulbs, consider
replacing them with CFL torchiere light bulbs. CFL torchieres use 60
to 80 percent less energy, can produce more light and are safer than
halogen bulbs, which reach dangerously high temperatures.
• Install task lighting under kitchen cabinets and over tool benches and
desks to avoid illuminating entire spaces.
• Use light-colored paint on walls and ceilings to reflect light.
Electronics
Modern electronic devices consume
electricity even when they are turned off.
ENERGY STAR models consume less than
non-rated devices.
• Unplug battery chargers or power
adapters when devices are fully charged.
7
• Turn off televisions, DVD players, game consoles, computers, cable
boxes, DVRs and other electronics when not in use. Better yet, plug
them into a power strip and turn off the power.
• Generally, big-screen high-definition plasma TVs use the most
electricity. TVs with LED screens use much less. Consider annual
operating costs when selecting a new TV.
Bathrooms
• Use exhaust fans to remove humidity during the
summer. Remember to turn a fan off to avoid
venting conditioned air.
• Install low-flow showerheads and shower for less
than 10 minutes.
• Fix leaky faucets.
• Caulk or use spray foam around plumbing penetrations in exterior walls.
Bedrooms
• Do not block heating and cooling vents with
furniture.
• Install ceiling fans, if there is enough headroom, to
distribute air. Run the blades clockwise in winter
to force warm air down, and counterclockwise in
summer to help make the room feel cooler.
Fireplaces
Snuggling up on the sofa before a crackling fire may sooth the soul, but
not the pocketbook. The draft the fire creates sucks heated room air up
the chimney. The fireplace draws cold air down into the house when the
damper and glass doors are open after the fire dies.
• Close damper and tempered glass doors when a woodburning
8
fireplace is not in use. Make sure the flue
damper closes completely.
• Caulk around the fireplace hearth.
• Install a metal-lined heat exchanger to
increase the amount of heat released in
the room.
• Safety Reminders:
Have a chimney sweep clean the flue annually to prevent fires.
Keep a fire extinguisher nearby.
Laundry Room
• Wash full loads.
• Wash dark laundry in cold water,
light-colored laundry in warm
water, and soiled items and bed
sheets in hot water. Rinse all
laundry in cold water.
• Remove lint from the dryer vent
after every use to save energy and
prevent fires.
• Purchase a washer with the ENERGY STAR label. High-efficiency
washers use 30 percent less water and 50 percent less energy than
conventional machines.
Garage
• Keep doors closed as much as possible to prevent cold or hot air from
infiltrating the house.
• Turn off the lights when you leave, or install motion sensors in the
fixtures.
• Install insulated doors.
9
Exterior
• Install light sensors or timers on
outdoor lights to operate them
automatically. Use energy-saving bulbs
that are compatible with sensors.
• If not using sensors, use LED or CFL bulbs.
• Use solar-powered or low-voltage lights
along garden and walkway paths.
• Plant deciduous shade trees on the southern and western sides of the
house to block the sun’s rays in summer and allow rays to heat the
house in the winter. Plant an evergreen wind-break on the northern
and northwestern sides to block cold winter winds.
Pools, Ponds and Spas
• Cover heated pools and spas, if
applicable, when not in use to keep
heat in and children and animals out.
• Use energy-efficient pumps and lowvoltage or LED lights.
• Pumps and lights do not need to
run continuously; turn them off with
automatic timers.
Kilo-what?
A customer’s electric bill is generally based on the number of kilowatthours used that month. A kilowatt-hour is a unit of measurement like a
calorie or gallon, except that it applies to electrical energy.
To calculate a kilowatt-hour, multiply, the number of watts listed on a
light bulb or on the back of an appliance by the number of hours used.
Then divide by 1,000.
10
Watts x hours used = kilowatt-hours
1,000
For instance: a 100-watt light bulb in use for 10 hours divided by 1,000
equals 1 kilowatt-hour.
Counting Kilowatts
The electricity used in a home is recorded by a meter. Reading meters
helps customers track their use patterns daily and seasonally so that
they can discover times when conserving electricity will lower their
electric bills.
Spring and autumn are good times to start tracking kilowatt-hours,
because most customers use very little heating or air conditioning. When
the temperature drops or escalates, customers can estimate the heating
or air-conditioning portion of their bills by subtracting their daily totals
from the averages recorded during milder months.
Some of NOVEC’s residential meters have five dials. To track the number
of kilowatt-hours used, record the numbers on the clock-like faces,
reading them from right to left. Every other dial moves counterclockwise
and the dial to the right must go all the way around before the dial on the
left advances one place. When the pointer
is between two numbers, record the lower
Example:
of the two numbers.
Customers who have newer digital
meters can record a reading
at the first and last of a month and
subtract the numbers to see how many
kWh’s they used.
VISIT NOVEC.COM
FOR AN ONLINE ENERGY
AUDIT OF YOUR HOME.
Or, hire a professional energy auditor.
Names of certified energy audit
professionals can be found at
resnet.us or bpihomeowner.org.
11
Kilowatt-hours Used in an Average Home
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32^
33
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12
Appliance
Wattage
kWh per Month
Air Conditioner - Central
Air Conditioner - Window
Attic Fan
Blender
Cable Box
Ceiling Fan
Clothes Dryer
Coffee Maker
Curling Iron
Dehumidifier
Desktop Computer
Dishwasher
DVR
Electric Blanket
Fax Machine
Freezer
Frying Pan
Garbage Disposal
Hair Dryer
Heat Lamp
Hot Plate
Humidifier
Iron
Laptop Computer
Light Bulb - CFL
Light Bulb - Incandescent
Microwave
Mixer
Oven
Printer
Radio
Refrigerator
Space Heater
Stereo
Television - LCD
Television - Plasma
Toaster
Vacuum Cleaner
Water Heater
Washing Machine
Well Pump
Window Fan
6,000
1,100
370
380
35
100
4,500
1,200
350
625
500
1,200
35
200
10
800
1,200
450
1,500
250
1,200
200
1,000
46
18
60
1,500
125
12,000
400
70
300
1,000
100
200
350
1,100
600
4,500
Varies
1,200
200
540
99
90
1
25
30
100
9
10
225
15
30
25
12
7
576
15
2.5
1.5
2.5
8
40
12
4.6
4
14
16
1
98
1
7
216
150
9
36
63
3
4
500
.26 per load
60
14
5
3
9
12
16
23
26
2
27
11
8
25
17
21
28
14
30
1
7
24
22
29
18
4
20
15
10
19
31
13
32
6
33
*Depends on cubic feet.
- Not in illustration.
^ Varies depending on whether using a conventional vs. high-efficiency
machine and number of wash loads per month.
13
For more energy-saving tips, visit the following:
novec.com/save
energystar.gov
energy.gov/energysaver
List of renewable energy certificate suppliers:
novec.com/renewableenergycertificates
Information about renewable energy for children:
novec.com/kids
Department of Energy website about renewable energy:
eere.energy.gov
A Department of Energy website about government
renewable energy projects:
nrel.gov
Information about appliances and energy efficiency:
dmme.virginia.gov
Information about fuel economy for automobiles,
including a listing of the EPA mpg ratings for all cars,
tips on maximizing fuel economy, etc.:
fueleconomy.gov
Helping You $ ave
Lomond Business Center
10323 Lomond Drive
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2710
Manassas, VA 20108-0875
703-335-0500 or 1-888-335-0500
www.novec.com
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