Your address - Western Cape Government

Your address - Western Cape Government
SAVING ENERGY IN YOUR KITCHEN
DISHWASHER

Dishwasher energy consumption can be reduced by turning off the dishwasher after the
final rinse and before the drying cycle. The clean dishes can then be wiped with a dry
cloth.

Fill the dishwasher completely before operating. Partial loads waste electricity and water.

Short wash cycles, rinse-only cycles, mid-cycle turn-off, and other features are designed for
energy conservation as well as convenience.

Connect your dishwasher to COLD water supply unless otherwise directed. Normally only
one wash and one final rinse cycle requires hot water which is heated by an element in the
dishwasher.

The dishwasher filters must be kept clear of debris. A blocked filter reduces efficiency and
wastes energy.

Proper loading is important for the dishwasher to work efficiently.
www.westerncape.gov.za
REFRIGERATOR

Choose a refrigerator of a size based on the needs of your family – a refrigerator operates
at peak efficiency when filled.

Do not overload your fridge, excessive products in your fridge will lower the quality of the
food and use more electricity – as much as 10-20% more for each extra product.

Do not set freezing temperatures lower than necessary, it wastes as much electricity as
excessive heat.

Thick frost on chilling panels reduces cooling ability. If you do not have a frost-free model,
defrost your refrigerator when frost is between 0,6 to 1,3cm thick.

Do not open your refrigerator door needlessly. By getting into the habit of removing and
replacing several articles at once, you will reduce the loss of cold air.

Let hot foods cool down before placing them in the refrigerator. (To prevent bacterial
growth allow about 20 minutes standing time).

Be sure the seal around your refrigerator door is intact. (Close the door on a piece of paper:
if you can pull the paper out easily, the seal should be replaced).

Remove all heavy wrapping from food before storing it in the refrigerator.

Cover all liquids stored in the refrigerator (especially frost-free models).

Foods should be placed slightly apart on refrigerator shelves to allow the cooling air to
circulate.

Exposed condenser coils/panels (usually at the back of the unit) MUST be kept clean and
dust free. When cleaning you must be careful not to damage the panels.

Do not place the refrigerator near the stove or against an uninsulated wall that faces the
sun.

Allow adequate space around the refrigerator for free air circulation. The air carries heat
away from the fridge – if air cannot circulate, the fridge cannot work properly.

Switch on the energy saving switch, if one is fitted to the refrigerator.

Switch off, empty or clean your fridge, when taking and extended holiday.
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FREEZER

Freezers and
refrigerators
operate
most
efficiently when
filled
to the
capacity
recommended by the manufacturers.

Never forget that only one-tenth of a freezer’s capacity should be used for freezing of fresh
food at any one time. The freezer must work harder to remove heat, and uses more power.
Example, 28 litres (one cubic foot) will store 12.5 to 15kg (25-30lbs.) of frozen food and will
freeze about 1.5kg (3lbs) of fresh food at a time.

Food to be frozen should be placed in contact with those parts of the freezer that contain
the refrigerant tubes, usually the sides of chest models.

Defrosting of chest type freezers should be done once or twice a year. For upright models,
defrosting should be done two or three times a year. NEVER allow frost build up to exceed
0.6 to 1.3cm.

By keeping a list of the location of foods in the freezers, the freezer can be kept open for
minimum of time, preventing the loss of cold air.

The freezer should be kept as full as possible to prevent heavy icing.

On all models keep condenser panels at the rear of the freezer clean and dust free for
maximum efficiency and conservation of energy.

A second freezer should only be operated when necessary.

In a single door unit, it is essential that the separate freezer compartment has its own door
intact. Otherwise the unit will tend to operate the whole of the refrigerator as a freezer – this
can be expensive.
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ELECTRIC STOVE

Use cooking utensils with flat bottoms and tight fittings covers.

Be sure pots and pans completely cover the stove plates.

Take advantage of the heat sensing control for stove plates. It allows the stove plate to cut
of the electricity supply occasionally while still cooking. It does not affect the food, only your
bill.

Use a pressure cooker to conserve energy when cooking foods that take a long time, such
as pot roasts, stews and steamed puddings.

Do not overcook foods, especially vegetables. Overcooking destroys essential nutrients.

For full efficiency from radiant stove plates the stove plate reflectors (underneath the stove
plates) should always be kept clean.

Bring foods to the boil quickly on the “high” setting, then turn the heat down to simmer to
finish cooking.

Do not use the grilling compartment to make toast - it is very expensive.

Do not use the oven to heat the kitchen – it is very expensive and far less efficient than a
heater.

Keep oven doors completely closed until food is cooked. Every time the door is opened,
the oven temperature drops, and the hear must be replaced.

Use the oven to prepare an entire meal – main course, vegetables and dessert. Remember
to plan meals that cook in the oven at the same temperature.

Allow free circulation of heat within the oven. Place pans and containers so that they do
not touch each other, or the sides of the oven.

To keep food warm place in a 66C (150F) or 82C (180F) oven. Do not leave it too long or
your meal will be very dry.

When buying a new stove, choose one with a convection oven. This type of oven uses less
energy than conventional ovens and cooking time is substantially reduced.
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MICROWAVE OVENS

Defrost your food in the refrigerator instead of the microwave oven: it is more economical.

Use your microwave oven to cook small to medium quantities of food. To cook larger
portions of meat, it is better to use a conventional oven.

Some microwaves do not heat up foods evenly. Wrap foods in plastic to hold in the steam,
this will help to give even heating. Be very careful not to cover the foods too well, steam
can burn you badly when you open the packet, so leave a flap open for the steam to
escape.

Cooking time is an important factor when determining energy efficiency levels. Compare
cooking times when you cook the same food in the microwave, in the standard oven, on
stove top elements or in a pressure cooker. You will easily see which method of cooking is
more efficient depending on quantity, volume and food types.

Follow the Manufacturer’s instructions to ensure that food is cooked correctly. Keep in mind
that microwave recipe books give the cooking times required by the appliance used by
the authors. Adjust cooking times to suit your micro- wave rating.

Never turn your microwave on when it is empty, you could damage it.

Keep the edges of your microwave door and its hinges clean. To wash the inside of your
oven, boil a cup of water in it and then wipe the sides with a damp cloth.
SMALL APPLIANCES

Using small kitchen appliances instead of the stove can save energy. Toasters, electric grills
and skillets, slow cookers, electric coffee pots and bottle warmers usually require less energy
than the stove when used correctly.

Use an electric kettle to boil water, not a sauce pan or a microwave.

When vacuuming, empty or replace the dust bag frequently.

A faulty appliance will not work efficiently and can waste energy. Repair or replace them
promptly.
Source: www.eskom.co.za
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