2008 Football West Match Officials Guide

2008 Football West Match Officials Guide
Match Officials’
Guide
~ 2017 ~
Contents Page
1.
Football West
4
2.
Organisation of Football in W.A.
5
3.
Contacts
6
4.
Administration
4.1
Match Officials’ Guide
4.2
Registration
4.3
Registration Fees
4.3.1 Registration Refund Policy
4.4
Insurance
4.5
Upgrading Qualifications
4.6
Referee Panels
4.7
Fitness Tests
4.8
Training & Coaching Nights
4.9
Appointments
4.10
Uniforms & Equipment
4.11
Match Fees
4.11.1 Match Fee Claims
4.11.2 Forfeited, Postponed or Abandoned Fixtures
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
10
10
10
Match Official’s Duties
5.1
Officials
5.2
Match Preparation
5.3
Instructions to Assistant Referees
5.3.1 Club Assistant Referees
5.3.2 Official Assistant Referees
5.4
Rules of Competition
5.4.1 Match Durations
5.4.2 Substitutes
5.4.3 Cup & Finals Matches – Determining the winner of the match
5.4.4 Late Kick Offs & Forfeits
5.4.5 Submittal of Match Documentation
5.4.6 Incident Reports & Tribunal Hearings
5.4.7 Best & Fairest Voting
5.4.8 Postponed or Abandoned Fixtures
5.5
Offences against Match Officials
5.6
Referee Assessors
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
Disciplinary Action
18
5.
6.
Appendices
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Football West Match Officials Code of Conduct
Officials Code of Ethics
Conflict of Interest Policy
Referees’ Technical Committee Terms of Reference
Schedule of Match Fees
Standardised Instructions for Assistant Referees
Report Writing
Sample Match Sheets / Cards
19
20
21
22
27
29
35
39
Honours, Awards & Finals Appointments
41
Afterthoughts
45
2017 Football West Match Officials’ Guide
1. Football West
Football West is the sole governing body for soccer in Western Australia
and represents all levels of competition, development and coaching in
metropolitan and regional areas.
The world game has been a powerful and unifying force in the WA
community for more than 120 years, bringing together football fans and
participants regardless of age, gender or ethnicity.
With over 200,000 players in the sport, Football West, which is affiliated to
Football Federation Australia, has created an environment that brings
the game to life on parks, pitches and indoor centres around the state.
Football West nurtures and encourages the next generation of players through pathways that
have also been developed for coaches and match officials to pursue their dreams and
aspirations.
A commitment to both community and high performance is reaping rewards with players such
as Matildas striker Samantha Kerr and Socceroos defender Trent Sainsbury making their mark on
the global stage.
Football West is now poised to capitalise on the sport’s great potential by fusing local player
development with a feverish community spirit through the establishment of a second A-League
franchise in WA.
The development of a business case for a State Football Centre, supported by the WA
Government, has provided additional impetus and the possibility of critical infrastructure to
further harness the sport’s growth.
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2. Organisation of Football in W.A.
The structure of football leagues organised by Football West are as follows:
Senior Leagues
Competition
Divisions
Grades
First Team
National Premier
Leagues – WA
Seniors (14 teams)
Under 20
Under 18
Juniors (21 teams)
Under 12 to Under 16
First Team
Division One
(11 teams)
Reserves
Under 18
State League
First Team
Division Two
(11 teams)
Reserves
Under 18
Amateur League
Women’s League
Metropolitan Leagues
& Masters Leagues
Premier Division to
Division Five
First Team
State League
(Premier & Division 1)
First Team
Metropolitan League
Single team leagues
Reserves
Reserves
Single team leagues
Junior Leagues
Small Sided Football
6’s to 11’s
Small sided, non-competitive mixed fixtures
(these matches are not appointed official referees)
Junior & Girls Only
12’s to 18’s
Competitive fixtures on full size pitches
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3. Contacts
Football West
Address:
Postal:
Phone:
Email:
Website:
Unit 94, 262 Lord Street, Perth WA 6000
PO Box 214, Maylands WA 6931
(08) 6181 0700
[email protected]
http://www.footballwest.com.au
Football West Coach and Education Centre
Gibbney Reserve, Ferguson Street, Maylands WA 6051
Football West Referees
Email:
[email protected]
Edward M. Lennie OAM JP
General Manager, Football
Coach, Referee, Education & Development
Office:
Mobile:
Email:
(08) 6110 5924
0424 133 749
[email protected]
Mathew Cheeseman
Manager, Referees
Office:
Mobile:
Email:
(08) 6110 5920
0410 496 058
[email protected]
Dave Collier
Referees Support Officer
Office:
Mobile:
Email:
(08) 6110 5921
0407 511 071
[email protected]
2017 Technical Committee
2015-16 Standing Committee
Edward M. Lennie
Mathew Cheeseman
Greg Birch
David Currie
Stephen Muldoon
Sam Musca
David Shanks
Sam Musca
David Shanks
Giuliano Cantoni
(Chair)
(Manager, Referees)
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4. Administration
4.1
Match Officials’ Guide
This Match Officials’ Guide is produced by Football West for the aid of all match officials. It is
available on the Football West website, and updated as often as necessary. If anyone believes
that there is information in this guide that is incorrect, or has some information that they believe
would be useful to include (especially historical information or further honours), please contact
Football West. A special thanks to Bob Watson for providing much of the historical information.
4.2
Registration
Registration as a match official with Football West is open to all persons suitably qualified. Match
officials and their qualifications are defined as either active (referee) or non-active (assessor
and/or instructor). If an individual attains both a current active and a non-active qualification,
then they shall be regarded as an active member (subject to the payment of the appropriate
fee).
In order for registered Football West referees to officiate, they are required to pass the minimum
requirements of the Laws of the Game Certificate and Level 4 courses as stipulated by Football
Federation Australia (FFA). Referees who move to Western Australia with a current refereeing
qualification from interstate or overseas may be able to have that qualification (or similar)
recognised as outlined in the Australian Officiating Development Schedule (AODS) as published
by FFA. Similarly, referee assessors and instructors are required to hold the minimum Level 3
requirements to register as a match official in that capacity.
Football West is not obliged to accept any individual’s registration as a match official. If a
registration is rejected, the individual may request for the decision to be reviewed by the
Referees’ Technical Committee. This request must be made in writing and within 14 days of being
notified of their rejection. The decision of the Committee will be considered final and no further
correspondence will be entered into.
4.3
Registration Fees
Registration as a Football West match official is also dependent on payment of the annual
registration fee. Referees will be advised in writing if they become unfinancial for any reason
other than non-payment of annual subscriptions. New or renewing registrations will not be
processed until such payment has been received. Match officials who hold both a current active
and non-active qualification must pay the referee registration fee at the appropriate level if they
wish to remain as an active member.
Metropolitan registration fees for the 2017 season are as follows (incl. GST):
 All competitions (including NPL/State League)
$ 385.00
 All competitions (except NPL/State League)
$ 235.00
 Junior & School competitions only
$ 145.00
 Youth referees (born in 1999 or later)
$ 85.00
 Assessors (non-active only)
$ 85.00
In addition to the above registration fee, each individual will be compulsorily charged $11.00
(incl. GST) for the 2017 FFA Laws of the Game book, as well as $4.00 (incl. GST) for the FFA Referee
Registration Levy.
Registration fees must be paid in full prior to the referee being registered to officiate in any
Football West competition for that season. Payments made online through MyFootballClub also
incur a 1.83% merchant fee.
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4.3.1 Registration Refund Policy
A referee who wishes to cancel their registration may be eligible for a refund as per the following:
(a) A referee who has not officiated in any matches during a registered season (including
friendly or pre-season matches), and wishes to cancel their registration shall be entitled to a
full refund (100%) of their paid registration component as outlined in Section 4.3 (i.e. not
including the FFA Referee Registration Levy, Laws of the Game book or any bank/merchant
fees), providing notice is given to Football West prior to 30 June that year. After 30 June, no
refunds will be issued.
(b) A referee who has officiated in any matches during a registered season, but wishes to
cancel their registration shall be entitled to a refund of their paid registration component as
outlined in Section 4.3 (i.e. not including the FFA accreditation fee, laws of the game book or
any bank/merchant fees), as per the amounts listed in the following table:
Prior to 1 April
Between 1 April & 30 June
After 30 June
4.4
75% refund
50% refund
No refund
Insurance
Match officials are protected under the FFA National Insurance Programme (provided by Gow
Gates) for any injury sustained during a sanctioned fixture or organised training by Football West
or other sanctioned events as prescribed from time to time. Further information on the policy,
including
information
on
how
to
make
a
claim,
can
be
found
at
http://www.gowgatessport.com.au/football.
4.5
Upgrading Qualifications
If a referee wishes to upgrade their current qualifications (either active or non-active), then they
must follow the procedure as stipulated by FFA. This procedure is outlined in the Australian
Officiating Development Schedule, which is available to view on both the Football West and
Football Federation Australia websites. Information on courses will be made available to all
officials by email, and also published on the Football West and MyFootballClub websites.
4.6
Referee Panels
All active match officials will be eligible to be placed in a panel of referees relevant to specific
duties in a competition, based on their registration status. This selection of panels is undertaken
by the Football West Referees’ Technical Committee and is based upon – amongst other things –
current qualifications, experience and previous performance. Panels may be reviewed during
the season, and any changes to these panels will be updated on the Football West website.
Further information about regulations concerning panels can be found in the Referees’ Technical
Committee Terms of Reference, which is included as Appendix D.
4.7
Fitness Tests
Pre-season and mid-season physical fitness tests may be held for referees to assist with allocation
into appropriate panels. It may not be considered necessary for every referee to complete a
fitness test, however it may be made compulsory for referees in certain panels. Failure to
complete a compulsory fitness test on the designated dates for inclusion in specific panels may
deem that official ineligible to take a position in that panel. These tests will be conducted by the
appointed Football West trainer under the supervision of the Technical Committee. Further tests
during the season may be held at any time.
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Although fitness testing may only occur once or twice a year, remember that every assessment
or coaching sheet is also a fitness test. If the assessor thinks a referee is not fit enough, they will
give an assessment mark reflecting that, and as a result the referee may be moved to lower level
games. Active members may also be required to take a fitness test, as and when the Technical
Committee deem necessary. This may include match officials who are returning from injury after
a lengthy period without allocations. Further information about regulations concerning fitness
testing can be found in the Referees’ Technical Committee Terms of Reference, which is
included in Appendix D.
4.8
Training & Coaching Nights
Organised fitness training takes place every Monday and Wednesday (excluding Public
Holidays) commencing at 6:30pm lasting 75-90 minutes. These sessions take place at the grass
track and field at Noranda Sports Complex (located behind Noranda Palms Shopping Centre on
the corner of Benara Road and McGilvray Avenue). All referees are welcome to attend fitness
training, and sessions are run 12 months of the year.
Coaching nights are held both north and south of the river from March to September inclusive,
catering for all levels of competitions. As a general rule, meetings south of the river are held at
Willetton Senior High School on the second Wednesday of month, with north of the river meetings
held at Noranda Sports Complex on the third Wednesday of the month. Dates are subject to
change due to other events on the football calendar, and notice of changes will be provided to
all registered referees by email.
4.9
Appointments
Refereeing appointments are performed on a weekly basis. All referees are expected to keep
their availability information up to date using Schedula, the online appointments website
(www.schedula.com.au). Accounts for all referees are created once they have registered
through MyFootballClub.
All senior appointments and NPL junior appointments are uploaded into Schedula, with
appointments generally released on a Tuesday afternoon for the upcoming weekend. Officials
are expected to confirm their appointments in Schedula within 24 hours of being released. A full
appointments list is then made available to all registered officials on Friday once confirmed. The
appointments process for junior competitions will be advised to all officials at the
commencement of the season, or upon registration. Priority is given to those referees who are
unrestricted in their duties.
It is the responsibility of the individual match official to make sure that they are aware of all
fixtures to which they are appointed. Match officials may be fined for not officiating at their
appointed fixture/s (see Section 6). If a referee wishes to change an appointment, this must be
arranged with Football West first otherwise the appointment stands. If a match official is unable
to officiate a game they have been appointed to, it is solely their responsibility to provide
adequate notice to Football West. This notice should be provided verbally in the first instance
and then confirmed in writing as soon as possible.
4.10 Uniform & Equipment
The recommended list of uniforms and equipment for a referee to obtain is:
1.
Approved current refereeing shirt
2.
Alternative colour(s), as advised from time to time
3.
Approved current refereeing shorts
4.
Approved current refereeing socks
5.
Whistle (Fox40 preferred)
6.
Assistant Referee flags
7.
Yellow & Red Cards
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8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Notebook – this may be combined in a special folder for the cards
Predominately black footwear (with black laces)
Watch
Pens / Pencils
Coin
Ball pump & pressure gauge
Pre-paid self-addressed envelopes for match sheets – adult fixtures only
Voting cards – NPL senior and Men’s State League fixtures only
Initially because of cost, you may only be able to purchase one of each of the first five items
listed, but it is preferable to carry with you to each game at least two of these items. If you have
more than one game on the same day when it is raining, you may get saturated doing the first
game and find it necessary to have a dry strip for your second game.
For the 2017 season the prescribed uniform for registered Football West referees officiating in all
sanctioned Football West metropolitan competitions (items 1-4) is produced by Kelme, with both
the FFA Referee and Football West logos embroidered on the shirts. These uniforms are available
for purchase from Onside Sports (22 Enterprise Crescent, Malaga). Referees who wear a nonapproved uniform may be liable for Disciplinary Sanctions as provided in Section 6 of this guide.
Items 5-8 are available to purchase from our preferred supplier AusRef, with more information on
their website: www.ausref.com
Pre-paid self-addressed envelopes and voting slips are available for collection at coaching
nights and meetings, or from the Football West office on request.
4.11 Match Fees
For NPL senior, men’s State League and Amateur Premier Division fixtures, Football West invoices
the clubs for payment of referee match fees. Payments are then made to referees by electronic
funds transfer (EFT) every two months. For example, fees from April & May will be paid in June.
In all other leagues, match fees are to be paid to the referee before the start of each match.
Each team shall be responsible for 50% of the match fee. If the match fee is not paid, the match
can proceed but a claim form is to be submitted by the referee to Football West for processing.
See Section 4.11.2 (Match Fee Claims) below for further details on match fee claims.
The complete list of match fees is located in Appendix E of this guide.
4.11.1 Match Fee Claims
If a match official needs to submit a match fee claim for a fixture where cash is the payment, but
they do not receive the fee on the day (e.g. one or both teams are absent, kick off has been
changed or any other reason), the details should be submitted using the online form on the
Football West website, or by using the following link:
http://www.footballwest.com.au/referee/claim
4.11.2 Forfeited, Postponed or Abandoned Fixtures
Football West Rules of Competition provide for the following scenarios:
 If the appointed referee postpones or delays any fixture, he must submit a report in writing
to Football West within 72 hours of the scheduled conclusion of the fixture outlining the
reasons for his actions. The appointed referee is entitled to 50% of the prescribed match
fee for a postponed fixture and 100% of the match fee for a delayed fixture which is
subsequently completed or abandoned.
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
When a fixture is forfeited by a club, the referee is entitled to receive 100% of the
prescribed match fee to be paid by the club which forfeited the fixture, unless the
forfeiting club informed Football West in writing at least 72 hours prior to the scheduled
kick-off.

When a match is abandoned, the match officials are entitled to receive 100% of the
match fee.
Please note that it is vitally important that when reporting an abandoned match that the reason
for the abandonment is clearly established. If in your opinion one of the teams caused the
abandonment, then the outcome of the result of the match will be affected (see Section 5.4.8
for more information).
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5. Match Official’s Duties
5.1
Officials
The average football spectator or even the average player does not generally appreciate the
responsibility and power accorded to the referee in accordance with the Laws of the Game.
It would be fair to say that the level of the referee’s responsibility increases with the importance
of the match in as much as there are increasing tensions and pressures on the players and
spectators. Every decision made in an important match is subject to closer scrutiny and criticism,
in comparison to a more junior encounter.
The referee needs to show qualities of man-management, authority and understanding of the
players and their problems in order to maintain control. These qualities are important in all
games. In senior matches where official assistant referees are appointed, it is important that the
co-operation amongst the three officials and the assessor (if appointed) is of the highest order.
5.2
Match Preparation
 Check your match appointment as soon as you receive it, especially the ground, as a team
may have changed their ground from those previously used. If you are not sure of how to get
to a particular ground – ASK!
 Prior to leaving for the match ensure you have of all the equipment you will need
 Ensure all of your refereeing equipment is neat, clean and tidy
 Arrive at the ground at least sixty (60) minutes prior to the scheduled kick off
 Check the ground, markings, goalposts, nets and corner posts to see that they conform to
requirements. If there are any faults, give the home side adequate time to rectify them
(hence the importance of arriving early) – for senior fixtures it is recommended that the
inspection of the field of play by both the reserve referee and first team referee is carried out
during half time of the preceding fixture, so as not to interfere with the match in progress
 Make yourself known to the team/ground officials
 Obtain the three M’s before the start of the game: match ball (plus any spares if necessary),
match card (or match sheets) and match fee (if paid in cash)
 Obtain club assistant referees if necessary
 Check the players’ equipment
 Make sure you are adequately warmed up before the game
 Give instructions to your assistant referees
 ENJOY YOURSELF! 
5.3
5.3.1
Instructions to Assistant Referees
Club Assistant Referees
When giving instructions to club assistant referees, make sure that both are present. One reason is
to save you repeating yourself, but also to ensure they receive the SAME instructions. Club
assistant referees should only be given basic instructions to assist with the management of the
game, rather than the full responsibility of an assistant referees as listed in the Laws of the Game.
Examples of instructions to club assistant referees include:
 Signal when the ball is out of play (throw-in, goal kick, corner kick)
 Offer an opinion when a player is in an offside position and should be penalised
 Advise them that you will make the final decision on any opinion that they offer, and for them
not to get offended if you happen to overrule them. It is also a good idea to advise the
captains to remind their players to “play the whistle” and not to stop when the club assistant
referee raises the flag, as you may decide to allow play to continue.
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5.3.2
Official Assistant Referees
With official assistant referees appointed by Football West, there is greater scope for cooperation
with the referee. To ensure consistency in the way matches are handled, Football West has
prepared standardised instructions in accordance with the Laws of the Game, which can be
found in Appendix F. These instructions shall be adhered to for all matches where official assistant
referees are appointed. However this does not preclude the referee from providing additional
information regarding tactical matters and match management, which is an important process
at higher levels of the game.
5.4
Rules of Competition
Referees should be aware of the Rules of Competition that apply to the various matches that
they officiate. Below are a list of the basic information that you MUST know, however please note
that the full Rules of Competition can be found on the Football west website.
5.4.1






All senior leagues (including NPL/SL 18’s)
Junior & Girls Under 17’s & 18’s
Junior & Girls Under 16’s
Junior & Girls Under 15’s
Junior & Girls Under 13 & 14’s
Junior & Girls Under 12’s
5.4.2






Match Durations
Substitutes
NPL Senior Grades
Men’s State & Amateur Leagues
Social, Masters & Women’s Leagues
NPL Junior Grades – all ages
Junior & Girls Leagues – 16’s to 18’s
Junior & Girls Leagues – 12’s to 15’s
5.4.3
45 minute halves
45 minute halves
40 minute halves
35 minute halves
30 minute halves
25 minute halves
3 subs from 5 named
3 subs from 5 named
Interchange – total of 16 players
Interchange – total of 16 players
Interchange – total of 16 players
Interchange – total of 14 players
Cup & Finals Matches – Determining the winner of the match
Where a winner is required to be determined in a drawn cup or finals fixtures, all matches, with
the exception of those listed below, proceed straight to kicks from the penalty mark as outlined
in the Laws of the Game. In the following listed matches where scores are level at the end of
normal time, two periods of 15 minutes extra time are played, before proceeding to kicks from
the penalty mark if scores are still level:
 State League Cup – First Team ONLY
 Sunday League Cup – First Team ONLY
 NPL Top 4 Cup – First Team ONLY
5.4.4
Late Kick Offs & Forfeits
In all games, the kick off time will be shown on the appointments list. The referee should at all
times try to ensure that a game kicks off at the published time. You should refrain from kicking off
earlier than the scheduled time, but must be aware of the time gap between the two fixtures if
the game happens to start late.
If you are late kicking off you must reduce your time to allow the following game to start on time.
This only applies if there is insufficient time left before the scheduled starting time for the next
game, to allow the game to be played within the normal time. If you are unsure as to whether
another game follows yours, reduce the halves. The reasons for late kick off must be reported to
Football West. In deciding the length of each half, divide the amount of time lost due to the late
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start by two, and deduct that from the normal time for each half. Note that in junior, girls only
and youth fixtures, no additional time is to be played at the end of each half.
With the exception of abandoned fixtures, each period must last for the following minimums in
order for a result to be recorded:
 NPL senior, Men’s State & Amateur Leagues
35 minutes
 Women’s, Metropolitan & Masters Leagues
30 minutes
 Junior Leagues – 18’s
30 minutes
 Junior Leagues – 15’s & 16’s
25 minutes
 Junior Leagues – 13’s & 14’s
20 minutes
 Junior Leagues – 12’s
15 minutes
If a team is not ready to start the game 15 minutes after the scheduled starting time, the match
MUST NOT commence – this is then reported to Football West for their decision. You should not
advise teams on the day as to what the result may be recorded as (for example, declaring a
forfeit), as the respective competition administrator will make the determination. Please note that
this is different to when both teams are ready to play but the field is unavailable (e.g. a previous
game finishing late), in which case the game may still proceed, but with reduced halves if
required.
5.4.5
Submittal of match documentation
All match documentation must be submitted to Football West as soon as possible after the
completion of the match. It is absolutely vital that all information relating to a match is provided
to the appropriate competition administrators as soon as possible, to ensure that results can be
confirmed, data can be processed, and any ensuing suspensions are advised without delay.
Deadlines for submittal of match documentation are as follows:
Competitions with electronic referee reports
FFA Cup
Round 3 onwards
NPL WA
First team only
Men’s State League
First team only
Amateur Premier Division
First team only
Women’s State League
First team only
Deadline for submittal
10:00am next business day
10:00am next business day
10:00am next business day
10:00am second business day
10:00am second business day
All other competitions
10:00am third business day
Match documentation can be (and is encouraged to be) submitted electronically by email to
[email protected] If you wish to utilise this option, then please ensure that the scan is of
sufficient size and quality to allow the information to be read clearly, and that each
page/document should be scanned on a separate page. If you are taking photos of the
documents, then please only have one document per photo.
If electronic submittal of documentation is not possible, then referees must ensure that they post
the documents within one day of the match to Football West (PO Box 214, Maylands 6931) to
ensure they arrive on time, or hand deliver to the Football West office (94/262 Lord Street, Perth
6000).
Failure to submit match documentation within the required timeframe may result in disciplinary
action as listed in Section 6.
5.4.6
Incident Reports and Tribunal Hearings
Incident reports are to be submitted using the online form on the Football West website under the
Referees menu, and must be submitted by 12:00pm the next business day following the match.
This report can also be found by using the following link:
http://www.footballwest.com.au/referee/report.
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More information about report writing can be found in Appendix G.
If a tribunal hearing is required following the submittal of a referee report, the referee is required
to make themselves available, where possible, to either attend the hearing in person or be
available by phone to be contacted by the tribunal members during the hearing.
5.4.7
Best & Fairest Voting
The referee must complete votes for the Best and Fairest players in all grades and divisions of the
senior leagues, those being State, Amateur and Women’s State Leagues. There is no voting
required for cup matches in any league. Voting is done for the entire game (not for each team)
on the following basis:
 Top Player
3 points
 Second Player
2 points
 Third Player
1 point
Voting is also required for the best goalkeeper for first teams in the NPL and the Premier Division
of the Men’s Amateur & Women’s Premier League.
The results are to be recorded on a voting card for NPL senior & Men’s State League matches,
and on the team sheet for all other applicable leagues. Pre-paid self-addressed envelopes and
voting slips are available for collection at coaching nights and meetings, or from the Football
West office on request.
5.4.8
1.
A match may not be postponed or abandoned except:
a)
b)
c)
2.
Postponed or Abandoned Fixtures (extracted from Competition Rules, Article 3)
on the instructions of the referee; or
by order of the police or other authority exercising its statutory powers to that effect; or
on the instructions of or with the prior written consent of Football West.
If the appointed referee postpones, delays or abandons a match, he must, within 30 minutes
of making such a decision, inform:
a)
b)
c)
The home club;
The visiting club; and
The Referee Allocator.
8.
A club or participant found to have caused the abandonment of any match, will be
sanctioned in accordance with the Disciplinary & Grievance By-Law and will forfeit that
match.
9.
If a match is abandoned prior to half time, then the match will be replayed, unless, in the
opinion of the referee, one of the participating teams caused the abandonment of the
match or unless otherwise stipulated in these rules or accompanying annexes.
10. If a match is abandoned at half time or after the commencement of the second half, then
the score at the time of the abandonment of the match will be deemed to be the match
result, unless, in the opinion of the referee, one of the participating teams caused the
abandonment of the match.
12. If a match is abandoned, and that match is one in which the outcome must be that one of
the teams must be declared a winner on the day, for example a knock out cup match, and
at the time of the abandonment scores are level, then that match will be replayed in full,
unless in the opinion of the referee, one of the participating teams caused the abandonment
of the match.
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It is not the responsibility to advise the clubs the status of an abandoned match with regards to a
potential replay, and if asked referees are advised to respond that Football West will make the
determination as per the Competition Rules.
As the Competition Rules clearly indicate that an abandoned match caused by one of the
participating teams will result in a forfeit, it is absolutely imperative that referees clearly indicate in
their incident report the reasoning for abandoning the match. If blame can be solely attributed
to one of the teams, then that information must be included.
5.5
Offences against Match Officials
A player who makes deliberate contact with a match official can be charged with a number of
different offences under the Disciplinary & Grievance By-Law, depending on the nature of the
offence. These offences are split into four broad categories:
 Unsporting behaviour towards a Match Official
 Recklessly makes contact with a Match Official
 Spits at a Match Official
 Assault of a Match Official
Assaulting a match official is an extremely serious offence, and will not be tolerated by Football
West. In the case of an assault on a match official, it is important that the following procedure be
followed:
 Stop and abandon the game
 Obtain the name of the assailant if possible – the offending club should be requested to
provide it where possible
 Advise Football West as soon as possible
 Report to the police as soon as possible and obtain an incident report number
 Submit the necessary incident report to Football West, and advise the police incident
report number within your report.
Not all acts of deliberate contact with a match official are necessarily considered as “assaults”,
and the majority would not require abandoning of the match. But where such contact causes
physical harm to the match official, or intends to cause physical harm (e.g. an attempted punch
which misses), then the above procedure must be followed.
5.6
Referee Assessors
Referee assessors are considered to be an integral part of the allocated team of match officials
and are therefore expected to be aware of the requirements under the FFA Match Officials
Code of Ethics (listed in Appendix B of this document).
In order that the assessor is able to complete his responsibilities, it is reasonable for the appointed
assessor to be in attendance at the ground 60 minutes prior to the scheduled kick off for which
he has been appointed, during which time the assessor is able to observe the appointed
referee’s protocol adopted.
Attendance at this prescribed time will also enable the assessor to assist with any questions
and/or problems facing the match officials. The assessor should be able to liaise if necessary
between any official club representative and the appointed match officials for the day.
Problems solved prior to the commencement of the fixture will in all probability reduce any
adverse consequences later.
The assessor should be in possession of both this Match Officials’ Guide and any necessary
Football West publications (for example, current Football West Rules of Competition) when the
contents of such publications are directly relative to the official duties of the appointed match
officials.
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Attention is drawn to the directives relating to the correct protocol required for the completion
and submitting of coaching sheets or full assessment reports. Note that these reports must be
submitted to the individual match officials no later than four (4) working days after the date of
the match. Failure to do so may results in disciplinary action against the assessor as specified in
Section 6 below.
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6. Disciplinary Action
6.1 The following fines shall be in place for the 2017 season:
6.1.1
6.1.2
6.1.3
6.1.4
6.1.5
6.1.6
Match documentation not received by the Football West office within two (2)
working days after the conclusion of the match – 50% of match fee
Failure to supply required information to the results service (where applicable) – 25%
of match fee
Failure to attend a match appointment without due cause – 100% of match fee
Failure to submit an assessment report or coaching sheet to the respective referee
within four (4) working days after the conclusion of the match – 50% of the assessor’s
match fee
Wearing a non-approved uniform during a Football West sanctioned fixture – 50% of
match fee
Failure to show a required sponsor logo on a uniform as directed by Football West –
50% of match fee
6.2 Match Officials who are alleged to have breached Football West, FFA or FIFA regulations,
including but not limited to disciplinary, code of conduct or statutes, will have the matter
heard by the Referees’ Technical Committee in the first instance. The Referees’ Technical
Committee reserves the right to refer a charge against a Match Official to the Tribunal.
6.3 Subsequent to Section 6.1.1 above, payment for match officials will not be processed until all
match documentation (including match sheets, voting cards and incident reports) are
received at the Football West office.
6.4 Any match official who receives a fine as listed in Section 6.1 above may apply to the
Football West General Manager, Football for review. This request must be made in writing
(either by post, email or fax) no later than seven (7) days after receiving notification of the
fine.
6.5 A match official who is sanctioned three times within one season will be immediately
referred to the Referees’ Technical Committee for potential further disciplinary action.
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Appendix A
Football West Match Officials Code of Conduct
Under the Laws of the Game the decisions of a referee on points of fact connected with the play
are final as far as the result of the game is concerned. A referee also has wide-ranging powers
defined in Law 5.
In addition to the quality of refereeing, the behaviour of the referee has an impact, either
directly or indirectly, on the conduct of all others involved in the game.
Respect for referees and their decisions is a fundamental part of the game.
The referee should:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Make every effort to prepare fully for a match, both physically and mentally.
Apply fairly and impartially the Laws of the Game.
Not be afraid to take decisions.
A referee should be fair and firm and must resist any possible influence from protests on the
part of players, team officials or spectators.
Show Respect towards players and team officials.
Be honest and completely impartial at all times, irrespective of the teams, players or team
officials involved in the match.
Decline to be appointed to a match if not completely physically or mentally fit to referee
that match (because of illness, injury, or for family or other reasons).
Inform Football West directly if unable to referee a team or teams for any reason.
Always have regard to the best interests of the game, including where publicly expressing
an opinion on the game or any particular aspect of it, including others involved in the
game.
Not tolerate inappropriate language from players and/or officials.
The powers of a referee must be used with wise judgement and care. Authority and a firm
approach must be combined with respect.
1
2
3
A referee should have regard to protecting the players.
A referee should show due Respect when speaking with the players, even in the event of
infringements.
In reports, a referee should set out the true facts and not attempt to justify any decisions.
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Appendix B
Officials Code of Ethics
Ethics and Football Match Officials
Rationale
The Australian Sports Commission’s National Officiating Accreditation Scheme [NOAS] policy is
that:
 The responsibility for the ethical conduct of sport in Australia rests EQUALLY with officials,
players, administrators, coaches, spectators, media, educators, parents, governments,
sponsors, and team owners.
 The duty of the sports official is to act as an impartial judge of sporting competition.
 This duty carries with it an obligation for the official to perform with accuracy, consistency,
objectivity and the highest sense of integrity.
 NOAS recognises that to preserve and encourage confidence in the professionalism and
integrity of officiating, ethical behaviour must first be fostered by officials.
 NOAS will promote this policy in the wider community.
Rights and Responsibilities of Football Match Officials
Football Match Officials have rights and responsibilities. They have the right to expect that:
 their health and safety are paramount;
 they are treated with respect and openness;
 they are appointed to a level of competition appropriate to their level of competence;
 they have access to self improvement opportunities.
Their responsibilities are enshrined in the following Code of Ethics.
FFA Match Officials’ Code of Ethics

















Abide by the FFA Football Code of Conduct.
Ensure conduct is honourable and maintains the dignity of the position held.
Portray a positive role model in behaviour and personal appearance.
Consider the safety and welfare of all participants to be paramount.
Know the Laws of the Game and the interpretations thoroughly.
Act with complete integrity, accepting responsibility for all actions take.
Officiate impartially, firmly and effectively with courtesy and consideration.
Avoid circumstances which may lead to a conflict of interest.
Be courteous, respectful and open to discussion and interaction.
Value and respect all participants ensuring their rights are protected at all time.
Undertake continual self improvement and upgrading of personal competencies.
Maintain good levels of physical fitness.
Encourage inclusivity and access to all areas of officiating.
Nurture teamwork with fellow referees, assist them, be loyal to them and avoid all criticism of
them.
Refrain from public statements about any game except to clarify an interpretation of the Laws.
Maintain the upmost respect for Football, rejecting corruption, drugs, racism, violence and
other threats to the game.
Accept that it is a privilege to be part of Football and strive to make all actions reflect credit
upon Football’s participants, organisations and affiliates.
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Appendix C
Conflict of Interest Policy
There are three categories of conflict of interest:
1. Immediate family
2. Club committee member
3. Player / Coach
It is incumbent on all match officials to provide Football West with a list of any potential conflicts
of interest when completing their registration. If a match official is appointed to a match where
such a conflict exists as described below, then they must inform the relevant appointments
officer immediately and decline the appointment.
Immediate Family
A match official must not be appointed to officiate a match where a member of their
immediate family is participating (i.e. player or coach), or normally participates for one of the
competing teams – this rule applies to ALL Football West competitions.
For example: if a referee has a sibling who normally plays NPL first team, the referee must not be
appointed to officiate that team, even if the sibling is not participating due to injury. This however
would not prevent the referee from officiating that club’s Under 18 or Under 20 teams.
For the purpose of this conflict, “immediate family” shall be defined as one’s parents, siblings,
spouse/partner, children, grandparents or grandchildren.
Club Committee
A match official who is a club committee member must not be appointed to officiate a match in
the same division that their club participates in, if in the following competitions:
 NPL & State League (all divisions and grades)
 Amateur League (all divisions and grades)
 Women’s State League (Premier & First Divisions)
Player / Coach
A match official who is a player or coach must not be appointed to officiate a match in the
same division that their specific team participates in – this rule applies to ALL Football West
competitions.
Furthermore, a match official who is a player or coach must not be appointed to officiate a
match in the same division that their club participates in for the following competitions:
 NPL & State League (all divisions and grades)
 Amateur League (all divisions and grades)
 Women’s State League (Premier & First Divisions)
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Appendix D
Football West Referees’ Technical Committee
Terms of Reference
Preamble
In accordance with the Australian Officiating Development Schedule as issued by Football
Federation Australia (section 2.2), the National Referees Technical Committee has
recommended to Member Federations that they have a State Referees Technical Committee.
Football West as the recognised Member Federation in Western Australia, has assumed the
responsibility for the creation and management of a State Referees Technical Committee for
referees based in the Perth metropolitan area under the Terms of Reference below.
1. Definitions
a. AODS means the Australian Officiating Development Schedule as issued by Football
Federation Australia.
b. Appointments Officer means an individual appointed by Football West responsible for
appointing match officials.
c. Committee means the Football West Referees’ Technical Committee.
d. Disciplinary & Grievance By-Law means the Football West Disciplinary & Grievance ByLaw (Football West By-Law 11) that applies to ensure appropriate conduct both on and
off the field, as promulgated by Football West from time to time (a current version of
which can be obtained from www.footballwest.com.au).
e. FFA means Football Federation Australia.
f. Match Officials means individuals who are recognised under article 13.1 of the FFA
National Registration Regulations and currently registered with Football West (including
referees, referee assessors and referee instructors).
g. NRTC means the National Referees Technical Committee as defined by the AODS.
2. Structure
a. Chair to be appointed by the Football West Chief Executive Officer.
b. Football West Referees Manager is automatically a Committee member.
c. The Committee shall consist of between five and seven members (including the Chair &
Referees Manager), with representation from across the refereeing and non-refereeing
community.
d. Chair to appoint Committee members with final membership to be endorsed by the CEO.
e. Nominations for Committee members may be requested at the Chair’s discretion.
f. Appointments for all Committee positions (except Referee Manager) to be made on a 12
monthly basis.
g. At the first meeting of the year, the Committee shall appoint a Secretary, whose duties
are defined in Section 8.
3. Roles and responsibilities
a. Chair is responsible for the performance of the Committee.
b. Chair (or appointed delegate) to attend and report to the NRTC each November.
c. Be responsible for the performance of Football West match officials and for the
implementation of the national curriculum as directed by FFA.
d. Supervise the career development of all registered match officials by ensuring that FFA’s
requirements and processes are implemented.
e. Demonstrably comply with all FFA directions regarding the development, training,
education, coaching and qualification of match officials.
f. Be responsible for the identification of registered match officials ready to undertake
further programs and recognition at national level.
g. Monitor, supervise and assess registered match officials undertaking Community level
programs and qualification processes.
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4. Quorum
A quorum shall consist of the Chair or Secretary plus three other Members as defined in Section 2.
5. Meeting Agenda
a. Attendance & Apologies
b. Confirmation of previous minutes
c. Business arising
d. Correspondence
e. General Business
f. Next Meeting
g. Close
6. Voting
a. All members appointed to the Committee shall have full voting rights.
b. The Chair shall only have a casting vote to be exercised when required.
c. Any member of the Committee who is deemed to have either a vested, close, or
personal interest, in any subject matter before the Committee, shall be proclaimed as
having a “conflict of interest”. Any member of the Committee may raise the concern of
another member having a conflict of interest. When a member of the Committee has a
conflict of interest raised against them, this is to be confirmed by a majority vote of the
remaining members. Under such circumstances and while that specific subject matter is
under discussion/debate/review the member shall not be allowed to enter into any
debate/discussion/voting process on that specific matter. Such identified subject matters
and proclamations shall be clearly recorded within the minutes of the Committee.
d. The result of any vote shall be by a simple majority.
e. An Appointments Officer requested to attend a Committee meeting shall be non-voting,
unless that individual is a member of the Committee as listed above.
7. Duties of the Committee Members
a. Chair – To ensure that Committee meetings are conducted in accordance with the
generally accepted rules of debate and that the Committee operates within these Terms
of Reference.
b. Secretary – Shall:
i. Take comprehensive minutes of each and every Committee meeting;
ii. Send copies of the minutes to all other Committee members and Football West;
iii. Receive all correspondence from Football West for and on behalf of the Committee;
iv. Send out all correspondence as instructed by the Committee, with a copy of the
correspondence to Football West; and
v. Carry out any other administrative duties required by the Committee that will
contribute to the efficient and harmonious running of the Committee
c. Committee Members – Without portfolio shall carry out any duties required by the
Committee that will contribute to the efficient and harmonious running of the Committee.
Specific portfolios may be determined from time to time at the request of the Chair,
however this does not prevent the involvement in discussion of other Committee
members when those portfolios are being discussed.
8. Duties of Football West
a. In accordance with these Terms of Reference, Football West shall be responsible for:
i. The appointment of referees and referee assessors to all competitions governed by
Football West in the metropolitan area, in accordance with any panels determined
by the Committee under section 11 below, and all related regulations. It is noted that
discretion is allowed where there is an insufficient number of referees required to fill
duties in a specific panel;
ii. Notifying the respective referees and referee assessors of their appointments;
iii. Keeping a record of all marks and coaching sheets submitted;
iv. Providing an updated marks listing to the Committee at each scheduled meeting;
v. Providing the Committee with the list of award winners based on final marks at the
conclusion of the season.
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9. Fitness Testing
a. The Committee at the conclusion of each season shall confirm the fitness test
requirements for the following season.
b. These requirements shall specify which panels or groups of referees are required to
complete a pre-season fitness test, whether a mid-season fitness will also be required for
those panels, the fitness test to be used, and the required level to be reached to be
considered for each panel.
c. Dates for fitness testing shall be set by Football West to fit within the demands of the
football calendar, and provide the Technical Committee with sufficient time to formulate
panels as per section 11.
d. Only those referees who complete a fitness test to the required standard for a specific
panel will be considered by the Committee for appointment to such a panel – or reappointment to a panel in the case of mid-season fitness testing – except under the
following circumstances:
i. A referee who is injured during the entire fitness test period and unable to attempt
any test on the nominated dates – a medical certificate must be presented to the
Committee as soon as practicable after the injury occurring.
ii. A referee who is injured during a fitness test attempt and is unable to attempt any
further tests on the nominated dates – a medical certificate must be presented to the
Committee as soon as practicable after the injury occurring.
iii. A referee who is absent or unavailable during the entire fitness test period must apply
in writing to the Committee for a deferral. This advice must be provided prior to the
fitness testing period commencing, and the Committee’s decision with regards to the
requested deferral is considered final and no further correspondence shall be
entered into.
e. A referee who fulfils the criteria listed in section (d)(i) and (d)(ii) above, or receives a
deferral from the Committee under section (d)(iii) above, shall be entitled to attempt a
supplementary fitness test once able. This advice shall be provided by the referee to
Football West who will make the necessary arrangements. For the avoidance of doubt,
the referee will only be provided one opportunity to pass the fitness test before their panel
placement is confirmed. For ease of logistics, such supplementary fitness tests will be
arranged at a time when the majority of participants are able.
f. Referees who are required to complete a fitness test for accreditation courses (i.e. Level 2
Referee & Level 1 Referee), shall complete their attempt during the nominated preseason or mid-season fitness testing periods.
10. Referee Panels
a. The Committee shall formulate panels comprising of sufficient referees to satisfy the
demands of each competition league where appropriate. For guidance, panels MUST be
created for NPL & State League and Amateur League competitions, and are optional at
the Committee’s discretion for all other competitions.
b. The Committee may also create panels consisting of referees who require Assistant
Referee duties only.
c. Each panel shall be clearly identified with the duties for the referees comprising that
panel.
d. Such panels shall be initially published prior to the commencement of the league season,
excluding any pre-season competitions (e.g. Night Series).
e. Match officials shall be panelled commensurate with their abilities, skills, qualifications,
fitness and attitude.
f. Football West shall have discretion during the appointments process to appoint referees
to matches outside their nominated panel when required (e.g. insufficient numbers),
provided such individuals have met the requirements to officiate matches from that
panel. This includes practical assessments for accreditation courses (i.e. Level 2 Referee &
Level 1 Referee), whereby the necessary requirements from the course must have been
met, including fitness tests.
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g. Each panel shall be subject to review regularly during the season. Assessment marks,
coaching sheet marks and coaching comments together with any other specific
consideration shall determine any movements between or within panels.
h. At the end of each season the referee at the bottom of their respective panel may be
considered for movement to the next panel downwards for the following season.
i. At the end of each season the referee at the top of their respective panel may be
considered for movement to the next panel upwards for the following season, subject to
the referee meeting the requirements of the higher panel.
j. Clauses (h) and (i) above do not prevent the Committee from moving or not moving any
panel member up or down at their discretion.
11. Finals Appointments
a. The Committee will make appointments for match officials to quarter finals, semi finals
and the final match for State, Amateur, Social, Masters and Women’s Cup competitions.
This shall include any playoff or finals series at the conclusion of a regular league season.
b. Football West will make appointments for match officials to quarter finals, semi finals and
the final match for Junior, Youth or Girls Only Cup competitions. This shall include any
playoff or finals series at the conclusion of a regular league season. These appointments
will be confirmed by the Committee before being published.
12. Suspensions/Removal From Appointments
a. The Committee has the power to suspend or remove a match official from appointments
if they have been deemed to perform in such a manner that their performance fails to
satisfy the expected duties, obligations or attitudinal considerations, or has deemed to
bring Football West into disrepute.
b. This decision can be reached either during a scheduled meeting of the Committee, or via
confirmation from the Committee members by either phone or email to the Chair.
c. The Committee may elect to make an initial decision on a suspension or removal from
appointments with just the evidence provided to them, or decide to defer a decision on
a suspension or removal from appointments until such time as the Match Official
concerned is able to provide evidence or refute any allegations made against them.
d. A suspension is a ban on taking part in a Match in any official capacity, which includes,
but is not limited to, participating as a Match Official, Club Associate or representing a
Club in any other manner (including playing).
e. A removal from appointments does not prohibit an individual from undertaking any other
football related activities.
f. Any match official who is suspended or removed from appointments under such
provisions is entitled to request a review of the Committee’s decision. Such request shall
be put in writing to Football West within seven (7) days of receiving notification.
g. Once a request has been lodged within the specified time frame, a review panel shall be
set up by Football West to hear the case. The case shall be scheduled to be heard at the
earliest possible opportunity.
h. The match official in question shall be notified of the result immediately after the review
panel has made their decision.
i. If the match official is still aggrieved at the outcome of the review, they may request a
grievance hearing as per the Disciplinary & Grievance By-Law, where a fee will apply.
13. Assessment Review Procedure
a. Any referee being aggrieved by an assessment report is required within a period of seven
(7) days from the date the assessment is received to firstly discuss such grievances with
the officially allocated assessor.
b. In the event that no satisfactory agreement results, then the referee may apply to
Football West Referee Development Manager (or equivalent) for a review of the
assessment.
c. In the event that no satisfactory agreement results, then the referee may apply to
Football West for an assessment review by the Committee.
d. The referee must lodge the review request within 14 days of receiving the assessment
report, clearly stating the reason for a review of their assessment.
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e. Football West shall set up a Review Panel made up of suitably qualified individuals to hear
the case.
f. The Review Panel shall be authorised to amend the assessor’s report based upon the
data supplied in the accompanying running sheet.
g. The referee and match assessor concerned shall be advised of the outcome by Football
West within seven (7) days of a decision being reached, and this decision shall be
deemed final, with no further correspondence being entered into.
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Appendix E
2016 Schedule of Match Fees
NPL Senior & Men’s State League Match Fees
(All fees will be held in account by Football West and paid periodically)
National Premier
Leagues – WA
First Team
Under 20s
Under 18s
Referee
$ 195.00
$ 100.00
$ 90.00
State League
Division One & Two
First Team
Reserves
Youth (18s)
$ 130.00
$ 90.00
$ 90.00
Assistant
$ 97.50
$ 50.00
$ 45.00
4th Official
$ 68.00
$ 35.00
$ 32.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
65.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
32.00
32.00
Travel Allowance
Metropolitan referees who are appointed to State League games in Bunbury will receive a travel
allowance of $60.00, with the allowance to be placed into the referee’s account along with their
match fees.
Cash Match Fees
(Fees are to be paid 50% by each team PRIOR to the start of the match)
Amateur League
Premier Div. (First Team)
First Division (First Team)
All other divisions
(including ALL Reserves)
Metropolitan & Masters Leagues
Referee
$ 100.00
$ 90.00
Assistant
$ 50.00
$ 45.00
4th Official
$ 35.00
$ 32.00
$ 84.00
$
42.00
$
30.00
$ 84.00
$
42.00
$
30.00
$
$
32.00
28.00
Women's League
Premier Div. (First Team)
All other divisions
$ 90.00
$ 80.00
$
$
45.00
40.00
Junior & Girls
17’s & 18's
16's
15's
13's & 14's
12's
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
34.00
29.00
26.00
23.00
19.00
27
68.00
58.00
52.00
46.00
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2017 Football West Match Officials’ Guide
Cup Finals Match Fees
(All fees will be paid by Football West into an account created for each official)
Assistant
$ 145.00
$ 75.00
$ 67.50
4th Official
$ 100.00
$ 50.00
$ 45.00
$
$
$
$
$
State Cup &
NPL Grand Final
First Team
Reserves
Youth
Referee
$ 290.00
$ 150.00
$ 135.00
Senior Cup Finals
Amateur League
Amateur Reserves
Metro & Masters
Women's State
Women’s Metro
$
$
$
$
$
150.00
125.00
125.00
135.00
120.00
$
$
$
$
$
75.00
62.50
62.50
67.50
60.00
Junior & Youth
(NPL Grand Finals &
Junior Cup Finals only)
17’s & 18's
16's
15's
13's & 14's
12’s
$ 100.00
$ 90.00
$ 80.00
$ 70.00
$ 60.00
$
$
$
$
$
50.00
45.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
50.00
40.00
40.00
45.00
40.00
Inspection & Coaching Sheet Fees
(All fees will be paid by Football West into an account created for each assessor)
Full Assessment
Coaching Sheet
Junior Observation
$ 100.00
$ 50.00
$ 25.00
Friendly Matches
(Fees are to be paid 50% by each team PRIOR to the start of the match, unless otherwise
notified)
Men’s adult games
Women’s adult games
Junior & Youth
$ 80.00
$ 70.00
As per normal league fee schedule
These fees do not include tournaments/carnivals, state team/representative matches or fixtures
against national or international touring teams. Details for these fixtures will be notified to referees
with their appointments.
Schools Competitions
PSA – Senior School (XI comps, Year 10)
PSA – Junior Schools (Year 7/8/9)
SSWA & IGSSA – Senior & Juniors
Referee
$ 65.00
$ 55.00
$ 50.00
Assistant
$ 32.50
$ 27.50
$ 25.00
PSA & IGSSA match fees will be invoiced directly to the relevant body, and then provided to the
referee by Football West. SSWA matches are paid cash on the day (half from each team), with
the exception of finals, whereby Football West will invoice SSWA and forward to the referee.
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Appendix F
Standardised Instructions for Assistant Referees
Referees will ask their assistant referees to carry out their duties in accordance with the following
instructions, based on the requirements of Law 6. The following instructions are to be adhered to
for all Football West competitions where official assistant referees have been appointed.
These instructions have been prepared with reference to the Practical Guidelines for Match
Officials as issued by the International Football Association Board (IFAB) and additional guidance
from Football Federation Australia, published in the 2016-17 FFA Laws of the Game (LOTG)
publication – the page numbers identify correspond to the appropriate section. Where there is a
variance from what is listed in the LOTG publication, it has been noted and listed in italics.
Preamble: Relationships between referees and their assistants (p.128)
Relationships should be based on trust and mutual respect. These conditions are essential if the
officiating team is to operate at an optimum level. Referees must accept that they are charged
with the responsibility of controlling matches. They should accept this key responsibility, make
decisions, and not force or allow their assistants to make the critical decisions. Assistants offer
opinions and assist the referee; they do not direct or command. If the referee has seen an
incident assistants should only intervene in extreme circumstances.
This principle extends to all decisions including offside. A referee should not automatically accept
an assistant’s signal, and must be prepared to decline that advice if considered appropriate to
do so.
Being an effective assistant is a multi-skilled and complex task. It demands total concentration
throughout the match. Whether the ball is in or out of play, close to the assistant or distant, the
assistant must concentrate fully. Assistants are not spectators at a match; they have important
roles to fulfil.
Pre-Match
 Referees must instruct the assistant referees to operate on the right wing.
 The referee will determine the time and routine for warming up, which the assistant referees
will be expected to take part in, unless they are officiating in the preceding fixture.
 Player’s equipment shall be checked by the assistant referees prior to entry to the field of play.
 Goal nets will be checked by the assistant referees in their half of the field of play after the
coin toss, and again immediately prior to the commencement of the second half.
 Electronic equipment (e.g. beep flags, communications systems), where used, will be tested
prior to entry to the field of play, re-tested immediately prior to kick-off and again immediately
prior to the start of the second half. Officials should not rely on electronic equipment, but use it
as a supplementary tool where listed below.
Positioning, Movement & Teamwork
Consultation (p.77)
When dealing with disciplinary issues, eye contact and a basic discreet hand signal from the AR
to the referee may be sufficient. When direct consultation is required, the AR may advance 2-3
metres onto the field of play if necessary. When talking, the referee and AR should both face the
field of play to avoid being heard by others and to observe the players and field of play.
Goal kick (p.80, variation)
The AR must first check the ball is inside the goal area. If the ball is not placed correctly, the AR
must not move from the position, make eye contact with the referee and raise the flag.
Once the ball is placed correctly inside the goal area, the AR should turn and run in a forward
direction and take a position in line with the second-last opponent.
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If the goal kick is likely to be played short, the assistant referee should be prepared to monitor the
ball leaving the penalty area before another player touches it, as well as attacking players
entering the penalty area before the ball is in play.
Goalkeeper releasing the ball (p.81)
The AR must take a position in line with the edge of the penalty area and check that the
goalkeeper does not handle the ball outside the penalty area. Once the goalkeeper has
released the ball, the AR must take a position to check the offside line.
Mass confrontation (p.84)
In situations of mass confrontation, the nearest AR may enter the field of play to assist the referee.
The other AR must observe and record details of the incident. The fourth official, where one is
appointed, should remain in the vicinity of the technical areas.
Required distance (p.84)
When a free kick is awarded very close to the AR, the AR may enter the field of play (usually at
the request of the referee) to help ensure that the players are positioned 9.15m (10 yds) from the
ball. In this case, the referee must wait until the AR is back in position before restarting play.
Substitution (p.84)
If there is no fourth official, the AR moves to the halfway line to assist with the substitution
procedure; the referee must wait until the AR is back in position before restarting play.
If there is a fourth official, the AR does not need to move to the halfway line as the fourth official
carries out the substitution procedure, unless there are several substitutions at the same time in
which case the AR moves to the halfway line to assist the fourth official.
Free kick to defending team in final third of field
At free kicks to the defending team in the final third of the field, the assistant referee must stay in
line with the position of the free kick and remain there to ensure that the ball is correctly placed.
Only when he is satisfied that the position of the ball is correct and will not be moved, should the
assistant referee move in line with the second last opponent.
After an offside
When possible an assistant referee, after a free kick for offside has been given, should be
positioned in line with the spot where the ball should be positioned to restart the game. The
assistant referee should then immediately take up a position to control the offside line (level with
the second last opponent), which is the assistant referee’s priority.
Penalty kick procedures
When a penalty kick is awarded during the normal course of play, the assistant should be on the
goal line where it meets the penalty area boundary line.
Goal scoring celebrations
The assistant referee should not form a physical barrier to try to stop players leaving the field of
play or entering the spectator areas during goal scoring celebrations. The assistant referee’s duty
is to make a smart movement towards the halfway line to signify that there are no problems with
the goal.
When it is likely that players may leave the field of play in these circumstances it is recommended
that the assistant referee stops after 5-10m to be able to credibly assist the referee with
identification of any players to be cautioned for excessive goal scoring celebrations.
Obvious incorrect decision of the referee
If an assistant referee knows that a referee has made an obvious disciplinary error (e.g. two
yellow cards to the same player without sending them off, red or yellow card to the wrong
player, etc), they must intervene immediately (flag and beep or even enter the field of play if
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necessary). The other assistant referee (or fourth official if appointed) should if necessary also
assist in such cases.
Communication
Beep signal (p.86)
The beep signal system is an additional signal which is only used to gain the referee’s attention.
Situations when the signal beep may be useful include offside, offences outside the view of the
referee, or tight decisions for throw-ins, corner kicks, goal kicks or goals.
Electronic communication system (p.86)
Where an electronic communication system is used, the referee will advise the ARs before the
match as to when it may be appropriate to use the communication system with, or instead of, a
physical signal.
Flag technique (p.86)
The AR’s flag must always be unfurled and visible to the referee. This usually means the flag is
carried in the hand closest to the referee. When making a signal, the AR stops running, faces the
field of play, makes eye contact with the referee and raises the flag with a deliberate (not hasty
or exaggerated) motion. The flag should be like an extension of the arm. The ARs must raise the
flag using the hand that will be used for the next signal. If circumstances change and the other
hand must be used, the AR should move the flag to the opposite hand below the waist. If the AR
signals that the ball is out of play, the signal must be maintained until the referee acknowledges
it.
If the AR signals for a sending-off offence and the signal is not seen immediately:
 If play has been stopped, the restart may be changed in accordance with the Laws (free
kick, penalty kick etc.)
 If play has restarted, the referee may still take disciplinary action but not penalise the
offence with a free kick or penalty kick
Gestures (p.86)
As a general rule, the AR should not use obvious hand signals. However, in some instances, a
discreet hand signal may assist the referee. The hand signal should have a clear meaning which
should have been agreed in the pre-match discussion.
Corner kick / goal kick (p.86)
When the ball wholly passes over the goal line near to the AR, a signal should be made with the
right had (better line of vision) to indicate whether it is a goal kick or a corner kick.
When the ball wholly passes over the goal line the AR must raise the flag to inform the referee
that the ball is out of play and then if it is:
 Near to the AR – indicate whether it is a goal kick or a corner kick.
 Far from the AR – make eye contact and follow the referee’s decision. The AR may also
make a direct signal if the decision is an obvious one.
Fouls (p.87)
The AR must raise the flag when a foul or misconduct is committed in the immediate vicinity or
out of the referee’s vision. In all other situations, the AR must wait and offer an opinion if it is
required and then inform the referee what was seen and heard, and which players were
involved.
Before signalling for an offence, the AR must determine that:
 The offence was out of the referee’s view or the referee’s view was obstructed
 The referee would not have applied the advantage
When an offence/infringement occurs which requires a signal from the AR, the AR must:
 Raise the flag with the same hand that will also be used for the remainder of the signal –
this gives the referee a clear indication as to who will be awarded the free kick
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

Make eye contact with the referee
Give the flag a slight wave back and forth (avoiding any excessive or aggressive
movement)
The AR must use the “wait and see technique” to allow play to continue and not raise the flag
when the team against which an offence has been committed will benefit from the advantage;
it is therefore very important for the AR to make eye contact with the referee.
Fouls inside the penalty area (p.87)
When a foul is committed by a defender inside the penalty area out of the vision of the referee,
especially if near to the AR’s position, the AR must first make eye contact with the referee to see
where the referee is positioned and what action has been taken. If the referee has not taken any
action, the AR must signal with the flag, use the electronic beep signal and then visibly move
down the touchline towards the corner flag.
Fouls outside the penalty area (p.87)
When a foul is committed by a defender outside the penalty area (near the boundary of the
penalty area), the AR should make eye contact with the referee, to see the referee’s position
and what action has been taken, and signal with the flag if necessary. In counter-attack
situations, the AR should be able to give information such as whether or not a foul has been
committed and whether a foul was committed inside or outside the penalty area, and what
disciplinary action should be taken. The AR should make a clear movement along the touchline
towards the halfway line to indicate when the offence took place outside the penalty area.
Goal / no goal (p.79 & p.87)
When a goal has been scored and there is no doubt about the decision, the referee and
assistant referee must make eye contact and the assistant referee must then move quickly 25-30
metres along the touchline towards the halfway line without raising the flag.
When a goal has been scored but the ball appears still to be in play, the assistant referee must
first raise the flag to attract the referee’s attention then continue with the normal goal procedure
of running quickly 25-30 metres along the touchline towards the halfway line.
On occasions when the whole of the ball does not cross the goal line and play continues normal
because a goal has not been scored, the referee must make eye contact with the assistant
referee and if necessary give a discreet hand signal.
Offside (p.87)
To ensure correct judgement of offside offences, an assistant referee should not raise the flag
before considering the following criteria, using the so called “wait and see” technique:


Movement of the ball (direction, speed, distance, any deflection, etc)
Involvement of the player in active play by:
o Interfering with play;
o Interfering with an opponent; or
o Gaining an advantage by being in an offside position
Both referees and assistant referees must be fully aware of the most up to date interpretations
and guidance with regards to offside players being involved in active play.
The first action of the AR for an offside decision is to raise the flag (using the right hand, giving the
AR a better line of vision) and then if the referee stops play use the flag to indicate the area of
the field of play in which the offence occurred.
If the flag is not immediately seen by the referee, the AR must maintain the signal until it has been
acknowledged or the ball is clearly in the control of the defending team.
If available, the electronic beep signal or communications system may be used to alert the
referee to the flag signal.
Remember that is it better to be slightly late and correct, than to be too quick and wrong.
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Penalty kick (p.88)
If the goalkeeper blatantly moves off the goal line before the ball is kicked and a goal is not
scored, the AR must raise the flag.
Substitution (p.88)
Once the AR has been informed (by the fourth official or team official) that a substitution is
requested, the AR must signal this to the referee at the next stoppage.
Throw-in (p.88)
When the ball wholly passes over the touchline:
 Near to the AR – a direct signal should be made to indicate the direction of the throw-in
 Far from the AR and the throw-in decision is an obvious one – the AR must make a direct
signal to indicate the direction of the throw-in
 Far from the AR and the AR is in doubt about the direction of the throw-in – the AR must
raise the flag to inform the referee that the ball is out of play, make eye contact with the
referee and follow the referee’s signal
Using the eyes (p.129)
The key to effective co-operation between referees and assistants is eye contact. Only by
looking at the referee and being aware of the referee’s position can an assistant decide if
intervention is necessary.
Assistants should never interfere in the referee’s running of a match. They should only draw the
referee’s attention to incidents that the referee could not see clearly. If a foul occurs, but the
referee does not react (e.g. does not award a free kick, does not ‘chat’ a player, etc.), check
the referee’s position. Do not signal if the referee had a clear view of the incident. If the referee’s
view was blocked, flag to advise that an offence has occurred.
Attempt to make eye contact with the referee before raising your flag. This technique can clarify
whether or not the referee is seeking assistance. It also minimises the risk of conflicting signals
being given. The principle is simple: confer then decide.
Record keeping (p.131)
Keep a complete record of all key match events (goals, substitutions, cautions, send offs, etc.)
plus the time that each event occurred. This may prevent arguments over whether the same
player has been cautioned twice, the number of substitutions made, goal scorers, and so on.
Match officials should compare and check their records at half time and full time.
Incidents behind the referee’s back (p.132)
Assistants have to be alert to player misconduct that occurs behind the referee’s back. The key
to success is to keep an eye on any area where players from opposing teams are close together.
As a general rule if an offence occurs that requires action by the referee, wait until the referee is
facing you before raising your flag. When the referee has stopped play, beckon the referee to
you and report to the referee what you have seen and/or heard. It is not the assistant’s role to
insist what action the referee should take – just simply report what has happened. However, if the
referee requests a recommendation on an appropriate response you may offer an opinion.
In cases of serious breaches of the Laws one or both assistants may choose to flag even though
the referee’s back is turned. This is appropriate if it is believed that this may prevent further
problems. If only assistant has flagged it will alert the other assistant who may then flag if the
referee is looking in that direction. Both assistants must be aware of each other’s actions for this
system to be effective.
This cooperation also applies when the assistant nearest the technical area signals that a
substitution is required, but the referee is facing away from that assistant and cannot see the
signal. The other assistant should assist by also signalling for a substitution.
Attentive assistants are likely to enhance each other’s roles and the match as a whole.
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Zone of play (p.132)
As a general rule assistants should indicate offences that have occurred in their own zone of
play. However, should a major violation occur the assistant must draw the referee’s attention to it
even if the incident occurs on the far side of the field. This is required under Law 6. Before
signalling consider and rapidly answer these questions:
 Was the referee able to see what happened?
 If I signal for the offence will I be assisting or interfering?
At half time and full time (p.132)
When the referee whistles for half time and full time both assistants should sprint to the referee so
the three officials can leave as a team. Do not stroll across the field or wait for the referee to
reach you – move quickly to the side of the referee.
During stoppages (p.132)
When play is stopped by the referee for an injured player or for a substitution, the appropriate
assistant should stand opposite where the play should restart. This will help the referee
recommence the match from the correct position. It may even be necessary to move down the
line a little way past halfway into the other half.
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Appendix G
Report Writing
Report writing may be an onerous task for most referees, but the fact is, it is an obligation and
part and parcel of becoming a referee.
Referees are not the “judge and jury”. There are Competition Administrators and Tribunals to
consider the misconduct of players based on a Referee’s report, however they can only base its
decision on what a referee’s report reveals. It is up to the individual referee to present adequate,
accurate and relevant information.
Disciplinary Report Writing
Law 5 stipulates that the referee shall provide to the appropriate authorities a report, which
includes information on any disciplinary action taken against players, and/or team officials and
any other incidents which occurred before, during or after the match in question, so that the
appropriate action can be taken by the authorities concerned.
The preparation of an incident report can present problems for many referees, both experienced
and inexperienced. You must constantly bear in mind that your report will be the official basis of
any investigation that is made, and that the eventual action taken will depend greatly on the
clarity of your report.
In general, reports should be brief but at the same time they must contain enough evidence and
information for Competition Administrators and Tribunals to visualise unequivocally what
happened during the incident in question. Reports are to contain facts only, do not include your
“opinion”.
Referees must ensure that they differentiate between “the offence” and “the incident” when
making a report.
“The offence” is a classification, according to the Laws of the Game of the player’s misconduct.
“The incident” is a description of what the player actually did at the time “the offence” was
committed.
A player is cautioned (and shown the yellow card) if guilty of:
 delaying the restart of play
 dissent by word or action
 entering, re-entering or deliberately leaving the field of play without the referee’s
permission
 failing to respect the required distance when play is restarted with a corner kick, free kick
or throw in
 persistent infringement of the Laws of the Game
 unsporting behaviour
A substitute or substituted player is cautioned (and shown the yellow card) if guilty of:
 delaying the restart of play
 dissent by word or action
 entering or re-entering the field of play without the referee’s permission
 unsporting behaviour
A player, substitute or substituted player is sent off (and shown the red card) if guilty of:
 denying the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by
deliberately handling the ball (except a goalkeeper within their penalty area)
 denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity to an opponent moving towards the
opponents’ goal by an offence punishable by a free kick (exceptions apply)
 serious foul play
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



spitting at an opponent or any other person
violent conduct
using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures
receiving a second caution in the same match
With all of the above in mind, the following information should be given careful study, and until
the referee gains enough experience in the field of report writing, should be used as a reference
document when having to compile an incident report.
Important Note – Ensure that your reports cover all offences committed. If the player concerned
committed any further offence after being sent off, this can also be reported on the same
incident report, but please ensure that you make it clear that a separate offence has been
committed. Examples of such offences are refusing to leave the field, further violent conducts,
further acts of dissent, etc. If you are reporting two or more persons within the same incident,
then a separate report must be submitted for each person.
Planning a report
Give very careful thought to the wording of reports as it may make all the difference between a
help and a hindrance to those adjudicating the case. Tribunals are always anxious to support the
referee as far as justice will allow. In their early days, referees would do well to seek the help and
guidance of a senior colleague when writing reports. It is realised that some are more capable
with the written word than others, just as some are more ready with the whistle than others.
Charge headings:
Serious Foul Play / Violent Conduct
On many occasions, a well-written report has been ruined by the fact that the Tribunal finds the
accused person has been charged with the wrong offence. This is most commonly found to
apply to offences of serious foul play and violent conduct. For report purposes, the following
should distinguish the offences:
 Serious Foul Play: This arises when a player commits an offence punishable by a direct free
kick according to Law 12, against an opponent whilst challenging for the ball.
 Violent Conduct: This arises when a player commits an act of violence against any person
whilst not contesting for the ball. This includes match officials, spectators, or teammates.
Aspects of practical report writing
The following simple rules should assist both the experienced and inexperienced report writers:
1. Good reports are not only clear but also concise – they must contain the fullest possible
information of the incident in the fewest possible words. In must not contain your opinion
as to why it happened.
2. The language or the report must be suited to the people who are going to read it
3. The report must omit nothing of importance
4. The report must be competent. It must only contain information of what the referee has
directly perceived for himself (or from a neutral assistant referee).
5. If questions are asked, it is obvious that the report did not cover the subject fully enough
6. Do not be vague, your statements and information must be definite
7. Restrict yourself to the bare facts of the issue, do not over-elaborate. Those dealing with
the report only want to know what happened – too many words may confuse the issue
8. In the reporting of offensive, insulting or abusive language, the full words should be used
Questions to answer when writing a report
1. What happened? Describe the incident noting the numbers, names and teams of the
players involved.
2. Where did it happen? Identify where on the field of the player the incident occurred.
3. When did it happen? Note the minute of the game in which the incident occurred.
4. Previous attitude of the player? Had there been any bad feeling previously in the game
between the players involved?
5. Anybody injured? If so, who and what was the extent of the injury?
6. How far were you from the incident? Did you have a clear view?
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7. Were there any problems after the player was informed that he was being sent off? What
was the player’s reaction? Did he leave the field without any further comment or not?
Report layout
It is advisable that referees keep a copy of all report that they submit. When a referee has neutral
assistants, he should supply them with a copy of his report in order to cover the possibility that
they might be called upon by the Tribunal to give their observations at a later date. If this is not
practical they should at least discuss the report together.
An assistant who has to submit a report to support that of a referee (i.e. in situations brought to
the notice of the referee by the assistant concerned) should also supply a copy of the report to
the referee or at least discuss it with the referee. This is in order to ensure that the information
supplied to the Tribunal by both is not contradictory or vague in substance.
Officials should not however collude to make their reports identical, but they should confirm the
facts with each other as they saw them, immediately after the match.
Sample Send Off Reports
The following statements are examples of wording to use when writing send off reports:
#1 – Serious Foul Play
In the 43rd minute of the game, Green #5 (R. Smith) jumped at his opponent, Blue #8 (B. Jones)
making contact with both feet onto the shins of the Blue player and brought him to the ground. I
was approximately 10 meters away and had a clear view of the incident. As I deemed this
challenge to be using excessive force, play was stopped and I showed R. Smith a red card and
sent him from the field of play for Serious Foul Play.
#2 – Violent Conduct
In the 33rd minute of the game, Blue #10 (A. Parker) was standing next to the touchline, 10 metres
inside his own half of the field of play, alongside Green #5 (F. Davis). With his right first, he struck F.
Davis on the head. F. Davis also struck A. Parker (see separate report for F. Davis). I was 25 metres
away and had a completely unobstructed view of the incident. I showed A. Parker a red card
and sent him from the field of play for Violent Conduct.
#3 – Spitting at an Opponent
In the 65th minute of the game, I observed the Blue #5 (G. Mason) spit at the Blue goalkeeper (B.
Rave), after the goalkeeper had used offensive language towards G. Mason (see separate
report for B. Hills). The spittle landed on the goalkeeper’s face. I was in position next to the goal
post awaiting a corner kick with the two players in the middle of the goal area. I stopped the
corner kick from proceeding, and showed G. Mason a red card and sent him from the field of
play for Spitting at an Opponent.
#4 – Denies a goal or obvious goal scoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball
In the 4th minute of the game during the taking or a corner kick, the Green #3 (H. Johnson) was
standing on the goal line between the goal posts. From a header by the Blue #9 (T. Albert) the
ball was going goal wards. The Green #3 then reached to his left and punched the ball over the
crossbar, thus preventing a goal being scored. I stopped play to award a penalty kick, showed
him the red card and sent him off for denying a goal by deliberately handling the ball.
#5 – Denies an obvious goal scoring opportunity by an offence punishable by a free kick or a
penalty kick
In the 88th minute of the game the Green #11 (I. Hunter), gained control of the ball 15 metres
from the touchline and 20 metres into the attacking half, and headed goal wards. At that time
there were no other defenders between him and the goalkeeper. The nearest defender #5 (I.
Smith), was about three steps behind and chased the attacker for about 10 metres but was
unable to get into a position to make a fair tackle. Five metres outside the penalty area, I. Smith
then deliberately tripped I. Hunter from behind causing him to fall over. This denied an obvious
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goal scoring opportunity, so I therefore showed I. Smith a red card and sent him from the field of
play. I was approximately 10 metres from the incident with an unobstructed view.
#6 – Uses offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures
In the 65th minute of the game, I observed the Green goalkeeper (B. Hills) use offensive language
towards the Blue #5 (G. Mason). The words used were “You are a f***ing useless c***”. G. Mason
retaliated by spitting at the goalkeeper (see separate report). I was positioned next to the goal
post waiting for a corner kick to be taken. The players were in the middle of the goal area. I
stopped the corner kick from proceeding, and showed B. Hills a red card and sent him from the
field of play for using offensive, insulting and abusive language. SEE NOTE BELOW
#7 – Second cautionable offence
In the 15th minute of the game, Blue #9 (G. Butlin) was cautioned for dissent when he deliberately
kicked the ball away after an offside decision had been given against his team.
In the 68th minute of the game, Blue #9 (G. Butlin) scored a goal. Whilst celebrating he ran
behind the goal, taking off his shirt as he ran and proceeded to swing it around his head. He then
stood stationary, facing the spectators and waited until his team mates joined him. This took time
and necessitated my going to the players to get them back onto the field of play. G. Butlin was
cautioned for unsporting behaviour. He was shown the yellow card followed by the red card to
indicate that he was being sent off for having received two cautions in the same match.
#8 – Team Officials
In the 72nd minute of the game, I cautioned Rovers #9 for unsporting behaviour after she had
committed an act of simulation inside the penalty area. I observed that the Pink Ladies coach
(A. Taylor) was outside her technical area directing a stream of verbal abuse towards me. I
approached her and told her to return to her technical area and calm herself immediately. She
continued to abuse my position as the referee and did not return to the technical area as
requested. I then asked her to remove herself from the technical area and the vicinity of the field
of play, which occurred with this assistance of a club official.
NOTE:
Examples #3 and #6 illustrate when two players have been sent off at the same time,
and the importance that both reports are consistent with each other. Also note that
when reporting a language offence (such as in example #6), the full words must be
used! The above example has been edited for publication reasons. I’m sure everyone
knows what those words are!
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Appendix H
Sample Match Cards
The following pages contain examples of current Football West match sheets or match cards.
Please take notice of the correct method of filling in the required information.
Junior, Youth & Girls Only Match Cards
In the goals column, indicate the number of goals scored, and in the card columns, indicate the
offence only (Y1, R3, R7, etc). There is no need to indicate the times of goals or offences.
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Senior Match Cards (State League, Amateur, Social, Masters & Women’s)
Referees are to fill in all information in the goals, cards and sub columns, the scores (total, half
time and full time), the names of the match officials and the brand of match ball used.



Please ensure that the times of all goals, cautions, send offs and substitutions are
indicated, in the manner illustrated below. Cautions and send offs should be indicated
with the offence code and the time in brackets.
If a player is sent off for two cautionable offences, there is no need to indicate the two
offences on the match card, only the R7 code and time (the send off report will illustrate
the full details of the offences).
If a player is substituted in the 72nd minute, write “72” in the “OFF” column, and “72” in
the ON column for the replacement player.
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Honours & Awards
FIFA Listed Match Officials
Edward (Ted) Bude
Roy Stedman
Barry Harwood
Referee
Referee
Referee
1968 – 1970
1970 – 1972
1972 – 1991
Edward Lennie
Patrick McCaffrey
Angelo Nardi
Michael Nugus
Mathew Cheeseman
Referee
Assistant Referee
Referee
Assistant Referee
Assistant Referee
1996 – 2004
1999 – 2003
2006 – 2007
2007 – 2010
2013 – 2016
* FIFA have operated separate international lists for assistant referees since 1992
National League Referees & Assistant Referees
National Soccer League (1977-2004) & Hyundai A-League (2005 - current)
Referees
Barry Harwood (1979-1985)
David Mortimer (1990-1994)
Edward Lennie (1994-2004)
Andrew Gorton (1996/97)
Louis Prospero (1997-1999)
Angelo Nardi (2000-2007)
Adam Fielding (2014–)
Assistant Referees
Marilyn Learmont (1992-1994)
Edward Lennie (1992-1994)
Patrick McCaffrey (1996-2004)
Stephen Muldoon (1996-2006)
Keith Davies (1996/97)
Louis Prospero (1996-1998)
Frank Moretti (1996-2001)
Angelo Nardi (1997-2000)
Michael Nugus (1999-2012)
Michael Klaver (2001-2004)
Joe Fusari (2005-2012)
Mathew Cheeseman (2006-2016)
Josh Mannella (2009–)
Stuart Muldoon (2012/13)
Michal Jasinski (2012-2014)
Tim Mihevc (2012-2015)
Matthew Southern (2015–)
Western Australian Football Hall of Fame
The following referees have been inducted into the Hall of Recognition:
Barry Harwood (1996)
Roy Stedman (1996)
Robert Watson (2002)
Edwin Evans (2005)
Marilyn Learmont (2005)
Edward Lennie (2005)
David Mortimer (2005)
Eric Thomas (2008)
Giuliano Cantoni (2012)
Andrew Gorton (2012)
Football West Honorary Life Members
Frank Moretti (2012)
Stephen Muldoon (2016)
Angelo Nardi (2016)
* deceased
In 2011 Football West inducted the Life Members of Football Referees W.A. Perth (Inc.) and W.A.
Football Referees Metrowest Branch (Inc.) as Honorary Life Members:
John Allen *
Syd Allen
W. Auld *
Percy Bailey
Rex Banwell *
Alan Beckwith *
Jack Blyth *
Terrance Booth *
F. Bowyer *
Herbert Bruynesteyn
Dave Collier
Alec Craigie *
Edwin Evans
David Ferguson *
Andy Gorton
Andy Hassell *
Laurie Harrod
Rhys Hill *
Ahmed Ismail
Robert McShane *
P. Muldownie *
Jeff Munn
R. Oswald *
Ben Owenell *
Ralph Preston
Eddie Retamal
Ken Rogers
41
Roy Stedman
Jud Sterner *
J. Stevenson *
Eric Thomas
E. Tonkinson *
Ernie Topelberg *
Robert Watson
Keith Wood *
P. Woods *
Updated 12 January 2017
2017 Football West Match Officials’ Guide
Football West Life Members
The following have been inducted as Life Members of Football West for services to officiating:
Stephen Muldoon (2016)
Golden Whistle – State League Referee of the Year
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
Barry Harwood
David Mortimer
Barry Harwood & Samuel Davidson
Barry Harwood
Samuel Davidson
Edward Lennie
Edward Lennie
Edward Lennie
Andrew Gorton
Edward Lennie
Patrick McCaffrey & Andrew Gorton
Patrick McCaffrey
Angelo Nardi
Angelo Nardi
Angelo Nardi
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Michael Klaver
Angelo Nardi
Stephen Muldoon
Angelo Nardi
Ton Klaver
David Currie
Steven Gregory
Mathew Cheeseman
Mathew Cheeseman
Mathew Cheeseman
Adam Fielding
Adam Fielding
Adam Fielding
David Bruce
State League Assistant Referee of the Year
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Malcolm Langton
Keith Davies
Patrick McCaffrey
Stephen Muldoon
Stephen Muldoon
Louis Prospero
Michael Klaver
Paul Middleton
Angelo Nardi
Joe Fusari
Mathew Cheeseman
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Steven Gregory
Josh Mihevc
Troy Miller
Mathew Cheeseman
Mathew Cheeseman & Ross Sardi
Mathew Cheeseman & Josh Mihevc
Michal Jasinski
Joe Fusari
Josh Mannella
Tom Dowle
Eamon McDonnell
2014
2015
2016
Arvin Shanmuganathan
Alex Best
Simon Hicks
Referee Encouragement Award
2011
2012
2013
Marcus Watts
Jennifer Wood
Nico Hoyle
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Premier League Grand Final Appointments
* No finals series was held prior to 1989, or from 1992-97, 2005-07 or 2015
Year
Referee
Assistant Referee 1
Assistant Referee 2
Fourth Official
2016
David Bruce
Daniel Cole
Eamon McDonnell
Tom Dowle
2014
Adam Fielding
Mat Cheeseman
Josh Mannella
David Bruce
2013
Mat Cheeseman
Michal Jasinski
Stuart Muldoon
Adam Fielding
2012
Josh Mannella
Michal Jasinski
Joe Fusari
Hugh Best
2011
Mat Cheeseman
Josh Mihevc
Ross Sardi
Joe Fusari
2010
Mat Cheeseman
Ross Sardi
Tim Mihevc
Josh Mihevc
2009
Mat Cheeseman
Joe Fusari
Mark Williams
David Costello
2008
Mat Cheeseman
Michael Nugus
Josh Mihevc
Steven Gregory
2004
Angelo Nardi
Sam Musca
Mat Cheeseman
Hugh Best
2003
Michael Nugus
Pedro Vasquez
Michael Frost
Robert More
2002
Angelo Nardi
Alex Ristovski
Pedro Vasquez
Patrick McCaffrey
2001
Stephen Muldoon
2000
Patrick McCaffrey
1999
Angelo Nardi
Andy Hassell
David Mortimer
Robert Dowden
Mark Wareham
Barry Harwood
Anthony Mullally
Roger Bugg
Jim Sharp
1998
1991
1990
1989
State Cup Finals Appointments
Year
Referee
Assistant Referee 1
Assistant Referee 2
Fourth Official
2016
David Bruce
Tom Dowle
Shane Skinner
Adam Fielding
2015
Adam Fielding
Josh Nixon
Hayden Frost
Steven Gregory
2014
Adam Fielding
Mat Cheeseman
Josh Mannella
Steven Gregory
2013
Adam Fielding
Joe Fusari
Matthew Southern
Michal Jasinski
2012
Mat Cheeseman
Joe Fusari
Stuart Muldoon
Hugh Best
2011
Joe Fusari
Josh Mihevc
Michal Jasinski
David Costello
2010
Mat Cheeseman
Tim Mihevc
Ross Sardi
Steven Gregory
2009
Steven Gregory
Mat Cheeseman
Joe Fusari
David Costello
2008
David Currie
Troy Miller
Paul Anderson
Mat Cheeseman
2007
Steven Gregory
Michael Nugus
Josh Mihevc
Ton Klaver
2006
Angelo Nardi
Mat Cheeseman
Taz Paraskevas
Jeremy Oliphant
2005
Stephen Muldoon
Troy Miller
Allan Dix
Michael Nugus
2004
Eddie Lennie
Ross Sardi
Joe Fusari
Jeremy Oliphant
2003
Patrick McCaffrey
Ron Tully
Ross Sardi
Joe Fusari
2002
Michael Klaver
Michael Nugus
Paul Middleton
Ton Klaver
2001
Angelo Nardi
2000
Angelo Nardi
Stephen Muldoon
Michael Nugus
Martin Osborn
1999
Louis Prospero
Frank Moretti
Felix Kelly
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State Cup Finals Appointments (cont.)
Year
Referee
Assistant Referee 1
Assistant Referee 2
Fourth Official
1998
Patrick McCaffrey
Stephen Muldoon
Neil Hornby
Michael Delany
1996
Andy Gorton
Frank Moretti
Keith Davies
Arthur Gregory
1995
Andy Gorton
Patrick McCaffrey
Adrian Hyde
John Burgess
1994
Eddie Lennie
John Burgess
Colin Dickson
Robert Dowden
1993
Eddie Lennie
Louis Prospero
David Smart
Felix Kelly
1992
Andy Gorton
John Burgess
Derek Minett
David Mortimer
1991*
Barry Harwood
David Mortimer
Mark Wareham
Robert Brown
1991+
Barry Harwood
Andy Gorton
Marilyn Learmont
David Smart
1990*
Sam Davidson
Keith Wood
David Mountford
Andy Gorton
1990+
Andy Hassell
Anthony Mullally
Enzo Castro
Greg Birch
1989
David Mortimer
Sam Davidson
Andy Gorton
Colin Dickson
1988
Andy Hassell
John Sappelli
Paul Planken
Louis Prospero
1987
Andy Hassell
Anthony Mullally
Louis Prospero
1986
Andy Hassell
Gordon Love
Sam Davidson
1985
Eddie Evans
Keith Wood
Tom Stokes
Syd Allen
1983
Frank Green
Paul Planken
Alex Learmont
Andre Bobojcov
1982
Ernie Lee
Peter Woods
Keith Wood
Gino Caruso
1981
Gordon Love
Barry Harwood
Daniel Tilson
Trevor Parry
1980
Eddie Evans
Andy Hassell
Geoffrey Walters
Joe Mort
1979
Frank Green
Keith Wood
Gordon Herbert
Gordon Love
1978
Ernie Lee
Gordon Love
Andy Hassell
1970
David Ferguson
Henri Witschge
Rudi Hankey
1969
Barry Harwood
Henri Witschge
James Doig
1968
Roy Stedman
Tom Hitchcock
James Doig
1967
Roy Stedman
David Ferguson
Dennis Legg
1997
1984
1977
1976
1975
1974
1973
1972
1971
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
1960
1990 & 1991
* SFWA Cup
+ PSL/Super Cup
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Afterthoughts
Who would be a referee?
For a pittance each week they subject themselves to abuse and protests at the hands of players,
managers, public and press. Their reward is the satisfaction derived from their task for which they
train in their spare time to maintain fitness. They are never right and very rarely have a “good
game”! With the escalation of rich rewards available to today’s footballing stars and clubs the
referee’s job has gone from difficult to well nigh impossible. On his decision may well rest the
result of a match, whether to give a penalty or not, off side or a goal. There must always be an
aggrieved part in such an adjudication who can call to his aid, his “prosecution”, slow-motion
replays and press photography. These after-match devices can be used to show the referee was
wrong in a decision given in a split second amidst the fast moving action. When the incident is
slowed down and re-run three times he may well be proved wrong. The point is surely obvious.
The referee has the difficult job in football. He is both human and part-time and mistakes must
occur. Indeed it is a credit to the referees that so few do. Just as there are good players and bad
players, so it is with the referees. The difficult arises from non-participatory criticism. The spectator
who makes his accusation from the comfort and perfect view of the stand, the television replay
which takes away the very factor which makes it inevitable – the speed of the action.
However, the position is rationalized, the referee will continue to be abused by the aggrieved, for
football is a sport of emotion allied to rich rewards and fame. All credit to referees and their
dedication and acceptance of an unenviable position. I certainly would not be one.
Don Revie
Former England Team Manager
The Age of Referees
By T. J. Jones, c. 1905
There was a chap who couldn’t run,
Whose playing days were long since done;
And consequently he was free,
To rule the game as Referee.
‘Twas F.A. Cup-ties and the “lines”
On which he had his chief designs;
Such matches are a pleasant task,
They always pay what you ask.
His vision, it must be confessed,
Was scarcely of the very best;
But yet he generally could see
Enough to take his weekly fee.
A Referee can’t be too old
While he has strength to take the gold;
Perhaps he cannot run or see,
But all the same he’ll Referee.
Sometimes the ball was near him,
Then he got mixed up amongst the men;
But always he preferred to stay
Where he was farthest from the play.
Taken from Soccer Record: 23 April 1966
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NOTES
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2017 Football West Match Officials’ Guide
NOTES
47
Updated 12 January 2017
Published by:
Football West
Unit 94, 262 Lord Street, Perth WA 6000
PO Box 214, Maylands WA 6931
Telephone: (08) 6181 0700
Facsimile: (08) 9271 7299
http://www.footballwest.com.au
ABN: 25 109 919 324
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