prepare and maintain the chainsaw assessment

prepare and maintain the chainsaw assessment

Registered Charity No. 1096429

STONELEIGH PARK, WARWICKSHIRE CV8 2LG

Tel: 024 7685 7300 Fax: 024 7669 6128

Email: [email protected]

LEVEL 2 AWARD

IN

CHAINSAW AND RELATED OPERATIONS (QCF)

CS 30 – PREPARE AND MAINTAIN THE CHAINSAW

ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

© NPTC 2009

© NPTC 2009

Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is forbidden without prior consent of NPTC

1

CHAINSAW AND RELATED OPERATIONS (QCF)

CS30 – Prepare & Maintain The Chainsaw

Introduction

The scheme is administered by NPTC.

NPTC will:

Publish - scheme regulations

- assessment schedule

- assessment material

Approve centres to co-ordinate and administer the scheme

Set standards for the training of Verifiers and Assessors

Recruit, train and deploy Verifiers

Issue certificates to successful Candidates

The Certificate of Competence/ ID Card

Certificates of Competence/ ID Cards will be awarded to Candidates who achieve the required level of competence in the Units to which their Certificate relates.

Instruction

Attendance at a course of instruction is not a pre-requisite to an application for an assessment but potential Candidates are strongly advised to ensure that they are up to the standard that will be expected of them when they are assessed.

NPTC does not hold a register of instructors; however instruction will normally be available from recognised training providers and/or centres of further or higher education active in the areas covered by this certificate. Further information on training may be obtained from the local Assessment Centre.

Access to Assessment

Assessment Centres will be responsible for arranging assessment on behalf of a Candidate. Assessment may only be carried out by an Assessor approved by NPTC for that scheme. Under no circumstances can either instructors involved in the preparation of candidates, or the candidates work place supervisors, or anyone else who might have a vested interest in the outcome, carry out the assessment.

The minimum age limit for Candidates taking certificates of competence is 16 years. There is no upper age limit.

Assessment

Assessment is a process by which it is confirmed that the Candidate is competent in the Units within the award to which the assessment relates. It is a process of collecting evidence about his/her capabilities and judging whether that evidence is sufficient to attribute competence.

The candidate must be registered through an NPTC approved Assessment Centre for this qualification prior to assessment.

The schedule of assessment contains the criteria relating to:

Observation of practical performance

Assessment of knowledge and understanding

When all the criteria within the Units for which assessment has been sought have been completed the result(s) will be recorded on the Candidate Assessment Report Form(s).

Performance Evaluation

The result of each assessment activity is evaluated against the following criteria:

4 = Meets or exceeds the assessment criteria by displaying a level of practical performance and/or underpinning knowledge, with no ‘minor’ or ‘critical’ faults. (Competent).

3 = Meets the requirements of the assessment criteria for both the practical performance and the underpinning knowledge, with some ‘minor’ faults but no ‘critical’ faults. (Competent).

2 = Does not fully satisfy the requirements of the assessment criteria, being unable to perform the practical task satisfactorily or being deficient in underpinning knowledge leading to the recording of minor faults. (Not yet competent).

1 = Does not satisfy the requirements of the assessment criteria, being unable to perform the practical task satisfactorily or safely or being deficient in underpinning knowledge leading to the recording of a critical fault. (Not yet competent).

A list of registered Assessment Centres is available from NPTC. (www.nptc.org.uk)

Verification

Verification is a process of monitoring assessment; it is an essential check to confirm that the assessment procedures are being carried out in the way that NPTC has laid down. The overall aim of verification is to establish a system of quality assurance that is acceptable in terms of both credibility and cost effectiveness.

Approved Assessors will be subject to a visit by the Verifier at a time when assessments are being undertaken.

A selection of assessment reports completed by the assessor will be evaluated by NPTC.

Compliance with the verification requirements is a pre-requisite for Assessors remaining on NPTC’s list of approved assessors.

© NPTC 2009

Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is forbidden without prior consent of NPTC

2

Safe Practice

At all times during the assessment, the chainsaw and other equipment must be operated in a safe manner in accordance with industry good practice, whatever the task being carried out.

1.

2.

Assessors must hold a current ‘First Aid at Work’ Certificate.

It is strongly recommended that Candidates hold at least a recent, recognised ‘Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW)’

Certificate.

3.

4.

All chainsaws used in the assessments must comply with Arboriculture and Forestry Advisory Group (AFAG) Safety

Guide 301, HSE Chainsaws at Work INDG317(rev1), in terms of safety features, and be a model and size suited to the task(s) required.

Recommended guide bar lengths should be observed, although variations may be accepted at the discretion of the

Assessor where this is appropriate to the task.

Candidates should be familiar with the saw, associated machinery and appropriate tools that they are going to use. 5.

6.

7.

A spare working chainsaw must be available.

Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be worn at all times by both the candidate and the assessor.

All PPE used must comply with AFAG Safety Guide 301, HSE Chainsaws at Work INDG317 (rev1), Health and

Safety Executive publications and current legal requirements in terms of specification and use.

8. A First Aid kit meeting current regulations, of the appropriate size for the number of persons on site, must be available (AFAG 802), along with appropriate fire fighting and suitable welfare facilities e.g. Hand cleansing wipes.

10.

11.

12.

13.

The Assessor must ensure a Risk Assessment has been carried out, and sufficient control measures implemented. In particular, the location of the site and weather conditions should be assessed, details of access, etc, which may be required by emergency services must be noted, as well as the nearest Accident and Emergency Hospital Unit. The means of contacting the emergency services must be established. All recorded risk assessment information should be clearly legible and accessible to all operators and completed for all locations where assessment activities are scheduled to take place.

Manual handling techniques must comply with current legislation.

Any necessary permission must have been granted, and notifications made as appropriate: (e.g. Local Planning

Authority, Forestry Commission, Forest Enterprise, Highways Authority, Private owners, statutory undertakers,

Police, etc).

All equipment being used for this assessment must comply with relevant requirements of the Provision and Use of

Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

Information may be sought from the relevant operator manuals or any other appropriate training or safety publication.

This would not include the NPTC schedule of assessment for the duration of the assessment activity.

The current Regulations for transport, handling and storage of fuel and oils must be complied with.

Provision must be made to avoid the risk of environmental pollution.

It is the responsibility of the Assessor and the Candidate to ensure that any additional requirements and provisions are met as relevant to this qualification.

At all times during the felling operation, candidates must act in a way so as not to endanger themselves, the assessor or any other person or equipment. Work must be carried out to achieve the requirements of the assessment criteria in accordance with all relevant and current legislation and good practice guidance (e.g. INDG317, Chainsaws at Work,

AFAG Guides 302, 303, 304 and 307).

If required, relevant records must be accurately kept.

Appropriate steps should be taken to maintain effective teamwork in respect of other persons on site during the

19.

20.

21. assessment. This may include taking steps to ensure effective communication and safety precautions.

Assessors must ensure that they are within their verification time periods for the assessments they wish to undertake as per NPTC Assessor Code of Practice.

If these conditions are not observed this may result in the Candidate not meeting the required standard.

Complaints and Appeals

NPTC and its Assessment Centres have a formal Complaints and Appeals procedure. In the event of any dissatisfaction with the arrangements and conditions of assessment, the candidate should first contact the Assessment Centre through whom the assessment was arranged and submit the complaint in writing.

For further information on NPTC’s Equal Opportunities Policy and Complaints and Appeals Procedures, please refer to www.nptc.org.uk

Learning Outcomes

5.

6.

The candidate will be able to:

1.

2.

Understand operator safety during chainsaw maintenance

Be able to carry out routine and periodic maintenance to a chainsaw

3.

4.

Be able to start and check a chainsaw

Understand operator safety during chainsaw use

Be able to safely crosscut timber that is less than guidebar length in diameter

Stack crosscut timber

The assessment is made up of two units:

Unit 30.1 Maintenance of the Chainsaw

Unit 30..2 Crosscut and stack small diameter timber using a chainsaw

All activities within the assessment are mandatory unless otherwise indicated in the text.

Candidates must successfully achieve all Assessment Activities unless otherwise specified.

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Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is forbidden without prior consent of NPTC

3

Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) – Unit value

The Award to Prepare and Maintain a Chainsaw has a credit value of 2 credits on the QCF:

Assessment and site requirements:

The assessment for unit 30.1 should ideally be undertaken under workshop conditions. Maintenance of the saw can be completed at the work site, if the saw can be held securely for sharpening and the assessment can be conducted effectively without compromising other site work activities.

The candidate should be equipped with a chainsaw appropriate to their normal working environment in good condition with a maximum recommended guide bar length of 380mm (15”) for Unit 30.1/30.2

The candidate should be equipped with the correct tools, equipment, product and maintenance manuals appropriate to the model of the saw to enable the chainsaw to be maintained and used in accordance with the manufacturers guidance.

The candidate should be equipped with sufficient fuel and oil, appropriate to the make and model of the chainsaws, for the assessment for unit 30.1/30.2

Warning signs must be erected as appropriate to risk assessment.

Sufficient timber of suitable dimensions (200mm-380mm/8-15” diameter) and finish appropriate to the candidates’ normal working environment should be available to allow cuts to be completed safely and the cut produce stacked accordingly.

The length and weight of the timber must be sufficient to exert tension and compression forces, which has the potential to trap the saw requiring the use of hand tools to release the trapped saw.

Demonstrate knowledge sections of the assessment activities can include practical operations to part satisfy the criteria.

Maintain sections of the assessment activities can include maintenance on parts from other saws if required, E.g. Re-coil starter systems, spark plug removal. Where alternative machinery or parts are utilised it should be of a similar make,

• model and size to that of the candidates own.

Sufficient working space must be provided to each candidate to allow the assessment to be conducted effectively without comprising other work site or assessment activities. E.g. multiple assessments being completed at one time.

Assessors should complete a pre-use inspection of all work equipment intended to be used during the course of the assessment. Ensuring equipment meets the requirements of suitability in terms of size, condition, safety features etc.

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Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is forbidden without prior consent of NPTC

4

Unit 30.1: Maintenance of the chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

1. Observe safety precautions and wear appropriate PPE

2. Identify, check and explain the function of the safety features of the chainsaw

3. Identify components parts of the chain, stating their function and potential problems from wear or damage.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Unless otherwise stated in manufacturers handbook, operator manual or risk assessment, PPE should include:

-

Safety boots

Footwear with toe protection is sufficient.

Risk assessment should determine whether gloves are necessary when sharpening taking into account the method and approach to the job, and the experience of the operator

- Mandatory eye protection if an airline is used

If airlines are to be used they must be low pressure systems

Check that at least the following are undamaged and functional

-

Positive clearly marked on/off switch

- Front hand guard/chain brake lever

- Mandatory symbol: Head/eye/ear defender

- Throttle lock: the throttle opens only when the interlock is depressed

-

Chain catcher in place and secure

-

Rear hand guard undamaged

- Anti-vibration mounts are in good order

- Exhaust system/silencer are in good order

-

Chain with low-kickback characteristics

Components parts of the chain may include:

-

Left and Right hand cutters inc. Depth Gauge

-

Tie Strap and preset Tie-Strap inc. Rivets

-

Drive Link

- Guard Links

Drive link

-

Straight back of link driven by sprocket

- Shape and profile clears bar groove of debris and carry oil along the bar

- The gauge of the drive link must match the thickness of the bar groove

Inspection points

- Straight back of tang to allow smooth drive from sprocket

- Battered and broken tang bottoms from incorrect chain tension

-

Wear to front and back of tang from worn sprocket

Tie Strap and Rivets

- Hold chain components together

Inspection point

-

Rivets not showing signs of excessive wear.

Cutters and Depth Gauge

-

Can be obtained in a variety of shapes for different applications

-

Depth gauge regulates the amount of wood the cutter contacts

Guard links

-

Allow smooth out cutting action of the chain by being ramped allowing timber to flow into the cutter

- Reduce potential for kick back

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5

Unit 30.1: Maintenance of the chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

4. Demonstrate knowledge of information required to select a replacement chain for a given saw

5. Sharpen chain in accordance with manufacturers information

6. Demonstrate knowledge of the reasons for sharpening taking into account:

Correct filing angles

Consistent cutter length

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Information required to select a replacement chain may include:

- Chain pitch

- Gauge/thickness of drive links

-

Number of drive links/chain/bar length

- Identify correct sharpening angles and file size through use of chain charts, manufactures information, chain box etc.

-

Check cutters for damage and select 1 st

cutter to sharpen

-

Chain secured in chain vice or on bar in bench vice(ensuring correct chain tension) or timber vice

- Cutters sharpened using file of correct size with handle fitted

- Top and side plate angles maintained

-

Consistent length of cutters maintained

-

Burrs removed if applicable

- Height and profile of depth gauges maintained

- Chain is sharp on completion

- Enhances cutting performance

- Working corner must be properly sharpened

- Top and/or side plate angles too high causes vibration, poor cutting and wear.

- Cutter length directly affects cutter height

Variations in cutter length can lead to:

Correct depth gauge setting

7. Demonstrate knowledge of symptoms associated with poor

8. Maintain guide bar

9. Demonstrate knowledge of reasons for maintaining guide bar

-

Saw not cutting in straight line

- Increased risk of kick back

- Uneven wear of bar rails

-

Reduces risk of kick back

-

Reduces risk of chain breakage

- Reduces chain vibration and thus the risk of ‘White Finger’

- Reduces excessive wear on chain components

- Achieves optimum cutting speed

-

Wood dust being produced by blunt saw

-

Fine chips produced if depth gauges not lowered

- Saw may cut in a curve if teeth are different lengths or blunt on one side

-

Vibration (or kick back) during cutting because of poor sharpening angles and/or too low depth gauge setting

- Identify uneven and damage rails and correct as appropriate

(e.g. dress bar)

- Straightness of bar checked and commented on

-

Bar groove depth checked

-

Blueing and cracking identified and commented on

- Burrs removed correctly

- Groove and oil holes cleared correctly

- Nose sprocket greased if applicable

-

Bar turned to reduce wear

-

Reduce vibration and allow straight cutting

- To prevent damage resulting from burr formation

- Allow lubrication of chain

-

Reduce chain and sprocket wear

-

Bar turned to maintain even wear

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6

Unit 30.1: Maintenance of the chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

10. Clean air filter and compartment

11. Chain brake mechanism cleaned, inspected and commented on

Demonstrate knowledge of action to take if chain brake components are worn

12. Demonstrate knowledge of sprocket replacement procedure for relevant saw type

13. Reassemble chain, bar and side plate and comment on chain tension

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Air filter is a key area for routine cleaning as the filter prevents debris entering carburettor and needs to be clean to maintain air/fuel ratio and therefore performance

Filter cleaned:

-

Excess debris removed from around filter prior to removal

- Filter removed, protecting carburettor

- Filter inspected maintained and cleaned appropriate to condition

-

Filter refitted correctly

Chain Brake Maintenance

-

Clear debris from chain brake mechanism /clutch housing.

-

Chain brake band checked for wear and commented on

- Replace the whole unit or band in accordance with manufacturers instruction

-

If damaged and repair not possible label saw ‘not to be used defective chain brake’

In board clutch:

- Remove retaining clip

-

Dismantle sprocket assembly

-

Sprocket checked for wear and comment made on condition

- Clean crankshaft stub and grease needle cage where appropriate

- Re-assemble

Outboard clutch:

- Remove spark plug

- If appropriate piston locked as per manufactures guidance

- Unscrew clutch weights according to manufacturers guidance

-

Sprocket checked for wear and comment made on condition

-

Clean crankshaft stub and grease needle cage where appropriate

- Re-assemble

-

Sprocket wear limits as per manufacturers handbook

- Ideal chain to sprocket ratio: 1 sprocket to 2/3 chains

-

Chain and bar refitted to power unit

-

Ensure tensioning mechanism is correctly located

- Side plate fitted and nuts hand tightened

- ‘Cold’ tension confirmed

- Side nuts tightened

Chain too tight:

- Wear on bottom of tie straps and cutter body

- Slow pick-up on acceleration

- Power loss on small engine saws

-

Damage to sprocket and bearings

-

Over heating bar and chain

- Excessive wear on bar and rails

Chain too slack:

-

Wrong cutting angle

- Increased risk of chain derailing

- Wear on rivets and heel

- Excessive wear between bar rails

-

Increased wear at topside of bar on entry and underside of bar at nose sprocket

- Chain creep at tickover

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7

Unit 30.1: Maintenance of the chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

14. Check and/or change spark plug as appropriate and comment on condition

15.Service recoil starter mechanism and comment on cord condition and replacement

16. Clean power unit and covers and inspect for damage

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Engine cover and spark plug removed

- Plug cleaned or replaced as necessary

- Wear/damage visually assessed

- Gap size checked and set if necessary

Colour of deposits on spark plug may indicate:

- Fuel rich, dark brown to black

- Fuel starved, light brown to white

-

Starter cover removed and air ways cleared

- Cord and coil spring released

- Cord inspected for wear

-

Cord and coil spring re-tensioned

-

Re-coil checked to ensure spring tension is correctly applied

- Pull toggle checked for security

- Over tensioned: cord fully extended, still allowing for a half turn of the coil spring

-

Housing/spring binds before cord fully extended

- Under tensioned: Recoil pull toggle does not move back into housing when pushed over

-

Cord does not fully retract

Cord wears at:

- Base of toggle

- At attachment to pulley wheel

- Debris removed from fins/air intake

- External screws, nuts and bolts present and secure

- Removal of side casings to clean and check components

-

All damaged, missing or worn components replaced as necessary or defects reported as appropriate

17. Demonstrate knowledge of fuel filter maintenance

18. Demonstrate knowledge of the correct fuel mix required for the operators chainsaw

19 . Demonstrate knowledge of the safety clothing to wear when using the chainsaw

- Fuel cap removed

-

Filter located and removed from tank using appropriate tool

-

Condition of filter determined

- Cleaning procedures using non flammable detergents followed by rinsing and drying or replacement as appropriate

-

-

Information relating to ratio of fuel to two stroke oil obtained

Understand meaning of ratios used

PPE in accordance with health and safety requirements and Risk

Assessment e.g.

-

Safety helmet

- Eye and ear protection

- Gloves appropriate for the task

-

Non-snag outer clothing

-

Personal First Aid Kit

All PPE should conform to applicable CE/EN standards where appropriate

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8

Unit 30.1: Maintenance of the chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

20. Start chainsaw from cold

21. Check chainsaw for condition and operational safety

22. Demonstrate knowledge of actions to take if safety checks indicate incorrect saw preparation/maintenance

23. Demonstrate knowledge of reasons for maintaining a correct stance during chainsaw starting procedures

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Appropriate fuelling site is selected taking into account

- A safe distance from buildings

- In a shaded area away from work and equipment

- A safe distance from any source of ignition

-

Away from a main fuel store

-

A position selected to minimise damage to the environment

Appropriate starting site selected taking into account

-

Chainsaw to be clear of people by 5 metres

-

Selection of level area free of objects which could catch the chain

- Chainsaw being a safe distance from fuelling point

Starting procedure

-

Remove chain/bar cover

- Place saw on ground

- Ensure no debris can catch chain

- Secure rear handle

-

Engage half throttle

- Apply decompressor (if appropriate to saw)

- Switch saw on

- Ensure chain brake set according to manufacturers instructions

-

Adopt safe stance ensuring:

Legs and feet are clear of the chain

Chainsaw is stable/secure during the starting procedure

Minimal risk of muscular/skeletal injury

- Pull starter cord sharply and firmly

-

Choke released when engine fires.

-

Half throttle released when engine runs

Operational safety checks of the chainsaw

- Ensure chain lubrication functioning

-

Ensure chain brake functions by completing chain brake test in accordance with manufacturers instruction

- Chain stationary at tick over (chain creep)

- On/off switch functions

Chain creep

-

Adjust tick over

Inadequate lubrication

-

Check the tank has oil

-

Remove the bar and check the oil holes and guide bar groove are clear of debris

- Adjust the oil flow if appropriate

Inoperable on/off switch

-

Apply the chain brake

- Close the choke

Worn or damaged clutch components

-

May cause permanent chain drive

-

May contribute to no chain drive

- Increased wear on clutch drum

- Increased wear on clutch component parts

-

Reduce the risk of overbalancing

- Ensure legs and feet are clear of the chain

- Ensure the chainsaw is stable/secure during the starting procedure

-

Reduces the risk of muscular/skeletal injury

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9

Candidates Name: Date: Start Time: Duration: hrs

Unit 30.2: Crosscut and stack small diameter timber using a chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

1. Explain how to identify hazards and comply with the control procedures within a risk assessment

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Hazards may be identified noting:

- Sites: Information from walking the site and a site specific risk assessment

-

Tasks: Information from a work specification, method statement or industry good practice information

- Machines: Information from manufacturers guidance

- Operators: Level of experience, training received

The Five Steps to Risk Assessment may include:

-

Identify the significant hazards

- Evaluate the risks and to whom

- Indicate control measures required

- Communicated to all other operators

-

Review the assessment and update if necessary

2. Summarise emergency planning and procedures for a site Emergency planning and procedures for a site could include:

- Designated meeting place

- Site location name

-

Nearest access point

3. Explain why it is important to maintain effective communication with others

- Suitable helicopter landing area

- Phone number of nearest doctor

-

Location and phone number of nearest Accident and Emergency hospital

- Works manager contact details

- Your own contact number

-

Relevant authorities informed about work in progress

- Individuals understand roles within the workplace

- Develop teamwork

- Creation of a safe work environment

4. Describe the causes of and how to prevent pollution and environmental damage

Causes may include:

- Incorrect storage of fuel and oil

-

Defective machinery

5. Check and prepare chainsaw for chainsaw operations

Prevention may include:

- Following principles of industry good practice

-

Appropriately trained operators

- Chain tension and condition checked for safe and effective use

-

Safety features checked for condition and function

-

External nuts and bolts checked for security

- Chainsaw contains sufficient fuel and oil for operations

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10

Unit 30.2: Crosscut and stack small diameter timber using a chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

6. Demonstrate knowledge of the safety

Considerations required during crosscutting.

7. Identify and explain tension and compression in relation to timber under moderate strain on the work site

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

- The minimum safe working distance from other people is 5 metres or twice the length of the longest produce, whichever is the greater.

-

Appropriate PPE is worn by operators

- A safe stance is adopted when using the chainsaw

- The chain brake is used appropriately during cross cutting operations

-

The chainsaw is switched off and/or chainbrake applied prior to removing a trapped saw

- Avoid chainsaw bar coming into contact with ground or obstruction causing kick back injury or saw damage

- Plan sequence of work so that an escape route is available at all times

-

Only one person to work on the timber

- Never work below timber on a slope

- Ensure timber is in a stable condition before any cutting commences

- Tension - found on the outside edge of strained timber and when cut, the kerf opens

-

Compression - found on the inside edge of strained timber and when cut, the kerf closes

- Important in crosscutting because the sequence of cuts should always result in the final cut being made from the tension side so that the saw does not become trapped in the kerf

8. Crosscut timber under guide bar length to a given specification

9. Demonstrate knowledge of the risks associated with using long chainsaw bars to cut small diameter timber

- Correct use of PPE during chainsaw operations

- Safe starting procedure adopted

- Safe stance including:

Legs and feet are clear of the chain

Chainsaw is stable/secure/supported during crosscutting

Minimal risk of muscular/skeletal injury

-

Bar aligned to maintain accuracy

- Head out of line of chain

- Use of throttle to cut safely and efficiently

-

-

- Cutting techniques employed to complete severance of timber

-

Appropriate boring technique

-

Sequence of cuts to prevent saw becoming trapped

- Appropriate aids used for lifting, rolling or levering

- Tension and compression cuts should meet

-

Chain brake used appropriately

Saw switched off and left in safe position, bar cover replaced

-

-

-

-

-

Greater risk of the guide bar hitting the ground

Increased risk of kickback

Increased risk of muscular/skeletal injuries

Increased risk of loss of balance

Use of multiple tension cuts 10. Demonstrate knowledge of how to crosscut small diameter timber under severe tension

11. Demonstrate knowledge of methods used for crosscutting timber of greater diameter than the chainsaw bar length

-

Use of reduction cuts

- Change to a larger chainsaw/guide bar

- Roll timber over

- Cut from both sides

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11

Unit 30.2: Crosscut and stack small diameter timber using a chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITES

12. Demonstrate knowledge of the procedure for removing trapped saw

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

First switch off engine and/or apply chain brake

-

Lever the timber to open the cut

- Drive a wedge into the closed kerf

- Withdraw the saw

- Use another saw to free the trapped saw cutting the timber at least

300mm (12”) from the trapped saw

13. Demonstrate knowledge of safe lifting and handling practices

14. Stack produce for subsequent handling

15. Demonstrate knowledge of reasons for tidy stacking

- Use aid tools correctly and when appropriate e.g. timber tongs

- Use safe lifting techniques

- Pivot loads rather than carry them

-

Move the lightest pieces to the heavy pieces

-

Drag, roll, move end over end

-

Use of efficient and ergonomic work methods

- Use of appropriate aids to handle / move products

- Correct stance during lifting

-

Avoiding excessive lifting by levering, sliding, rolling

-

Quality of stacking must be to an agreed job specification

- Position of stack appropriate to method of extraction

- Manually constructed stacks are limited to 1 metre high

- Stacks should be left in a safe, stable condition

-

Roads, footpaths, etc. clear of debris and waste materials

- Facilitates subsequent handling

- Cut lengths easily checked for size

-

Stacks can be estimated for volume

-

Stacks are safer as no lengths sticking out

- Stacks are safer as timber more stable

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12

N P T

C

Registered Charity No. 1096429

STONELEIGH PARK, WARWICKSHIRE CV8 2LG

Tel: 024 7685 7300 Fax: 024 7669 6128

Email: [email protected]

LEVEL 2 AWARD

IN

CHAINSAW AND RELATED OPERATIONS (QCF)

CS31 - FELL AND PROCESS SMALL TREES

(pre-requisite CS30)

Maximum recommended guide bar length: 380mm (15”)

This unit covers trees whose effective diameter at felling height is between

200mm and 380mm (8” and 15”) (i.e. less than guide bar length)

ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

© NPTC 2009

© NPTC 2009

Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is forbidden without prior consent of NPTC

1

CHAINSAW AND RELATED OPERATIONS (QCF)

CS31 - FELL & PROCESS SMALL TREES

Introduction

The scheme is administered by NPTC.

NPTC will:

Publish - scheme regulations

- assessment schedule

- assessment material

Approve centres to co-ordinate and administer the scheme

Set standards for the training of Verifiers and Assessors

Recruit, train and deploy Verifiers

Issue certificates to successful Candidates

The Certificate of Competence/ ID Card

Certificates of Competence/ ID Cards will be awarded to Candidates who achieve the required level of competence in the Units to which their Certificate relates.

Instruction

Attendance at a course of instruction is not a pre-requisite to an application for an assessment but potential Candidates are strongly advised to ensure that they are up to the standard that will be expected of them when they are assessed.

NPTC does not hold a register of instructors; however instruction will normally be available from recognised training providers and/or centres of further or higher education active in the areas covered by this certificate. Further information on training may be obtained from the local Assessment Centre.

Access to Assessment

Assessment Centres will be responsible for arranging assessment on behalf of a Candidate. Assessment may only be carried out by an Assessor approved by NPTC for that scheme. Under no circumstances can either instructors involved in the preparation of candidates, or the candidates work place supervisors, or anyone else who might have a vested interest in the outcome, carry out the assessment.

The minimum age limit for Candidates taking certificates of competence is 16 years. There is no upper age limit.

Assessment

Assessment is a process by which it is confirmed that the Candidate is competent in the Units within the award to which the assessment relates. It is a process of collecting evidence about his/her capabilities and judging whether that evidence is sufficient to attribute competence.

The candidate must be registered through an NPTC approved Assessment Centre for this qualification prior to assessment.

The schedule of assessment contains the criteria relating to:

Observation of practical performance

Assessment of knowledge and understanding

When all the criteria within the Units for which assessment has been sought have been completed the result(s) will be recorded on the Candidate Assessment Report Form(s).

Performance Evaluation

The result of each assessment activity is evaluated against the following criteria:

4 = Meets or exceeds the assessment criteria by displaying a level of practical performance and/or underpinning knowledge, with no ‘minor’ or ‘critical’ faults. (Competent).

3 = Meets the requirements of the assessment criteria for both the practical performance and the underpinning knowledge, with some ‘minor’ faults but no ‘critical’ faults. (Competent).

2 = Does not fully satisfy the requirements of the assessment criteria, being unable to perform the practical task satisfactorily or being deficient in underpinning knowledge leading to the recording of minor faults. (Not yet competent).

1 = Does not satisfy the requirements of the assessment criteria, being unable to perform the practical task satisfactorily or safely or being deficient in underpinning knowledge leading to the recording of a critical fault. (Not yet competent).

A list of registered Assessment Centres is available from NPTC. (www.nptc.org.uk)

Verification

Verification is a process of monitoring assessment; it is an essential check to confirm that the assessment procedures are being carried out in the way that NPTC has laid down. The overall aim of verification is to establish a system of quality assurance that is acceptable in terms of both credibility and cost effectiveness.

Approved Assessors will be subject to a visit by the Verifier at a time when assessments are being undertaken.

A selection of assessment reports completed by the assessor will be evaluated by NPTC.

Compliance with the verification requirements is a pre-requisite for Assessors remaining on NPTC’s list of approved assessors.

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2

Safe Practice

At all times during the assessment, the chainsaw and other equipment must be operated in a safe manner in accordance with industry good practice, whatever the task being carried out.

If these conditions are not observed this may result in the Candidate not meeting the required standard.

1.

2.

Assessors must hold a current ‘First Aid at Work’ Certificate.

It is strongly recommended that Candidates hold at least a recent, recognised ‘Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW)’

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Certificate.

All chainsaws used in the assessments must comply with Arboriculture and Forestry Advisory Group (AFAG) Safety

Guide 301, HSE Chainsaws at Work INDG317(rev1), in terms of safety features, and be a model and size suited to the task(s) required.

Recommended guide bar lengths should be observed, although variations may be accepted at the discretion of the

Assessor where this is appropriate to the task.

Candidates should be familiar with the saw, associated machinery and appropriate tools that they are going to use.

A spare working chainsaw must be available.

Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be worn at all times by both the candidate and the assessor.

All PPE used must comply with AFAG Safety Guide 301, HSE Chainsaws at Work INDG317 (rev1), Health and

Safety Executive publications and current legal requirements in terms of specification and use.

A First Aid kit meeting current regulations, of the appropriate size for the number of persons on site, must be available (AFAG 802), along with appropriate fire fighting and suitable welfare facilities e.g. Hand cleansing wipes.

10.

11.

12.

The Assessor must ensure a Risk Assessment has been carried out, and sufficient control measures implemented. In particular, the location of the site and weather conditions should be assessed, details of access, etc, which may be required by emergency services must be noted, as well as the nearest Accident and Emergency Hospital Unit. The means of contacting the emergency services must be established. All recorded risk assessment information should be clearly legible and accessible to all operators and completed for all locations where assessment activities are scheduled to take place.

Manual handling techniques must comply with current legislation.

Any necessary permission must have been granted, and notifications made as appropriate: (e.g. Local Planning

Authority, Forestry Commission, Forest Enterprise, Highways Authority, Private owners, statutory undertakers,

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

Police, etc).

All equipment being used for this assessment must comply with relevant requirements of the Provision and Use of

Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998.

Information may be sought from the relevant operator manuals or any other appropriate training or safety publication.

This would not include the NPTC schedule of assessment for the duration of the assessment activity.

The current Regulations for transport, handling and storage of fuel and oils must be complied with.

Provision must be made to avoid the risk of environmental pollution.

It is the responsibility of the Assessor and the Candidate to ensure that any additional requirements and provisions are met as relevant to this qualification.

At all times during the felling operation, candidates must act in a way so as not to endanger themselves, the assessor

19.

20. or any other person or equipment. Work must be carried out to achieve the requirements of the assessment criteria in accordance with all relevant and current legislation and good practice guidance (e.g. INDG317, Chainsaws at Work,

AFAG Guides 302, 303, 304 and 307).

If required, relevant records must be accurately kept.

Appropriate steps should be taken to maintain effective teamwork in respect of other persons on site during the

21. assessment. This may include taking steps to ensure effective communication and safety precautions.

Assessors must ensure that they are within their verification time periods for the assessments they wish to undertake as per NPTC Assessor Code of Practice.

If these conditions are not observed this may result in the Candidate not meeting the required standard.

Complaints and Appeals

NPTC and its Assessment Centres have a formal Complaints and Appeals procedure. In the event of any dissatisfaction with the arrangements and conditions of assessment, the candidate should first contact the Assessment Centre through whom the assessment was arranged and submit the complaint in writing.

For further information on NPTC’s Equal Opportunities Policy and Complaints and Appeals Procedures, please refer to www.nptc.org.uk

Learning Outcomes

The candidate will be able to:

1.

2.

3.

Identify the Risk Assessment and Emergency procedures on a work site

Select and prepare equipment required for safe and effective felling

Fell small trees safely and accurately using an appropriate method

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Fell leaning trees using a safe technique

Remove branches safely in a manner appropriate to the branching habit

Crosscut stems accurately and safely to a given length and diameter specification

Stack timber using appropriate manual handling techniques

Take down small hung-up trees safely using appropriate hand tools

All activities within the assessment are mandatory unless otherwise indicated in the text.

Prior to assessment in this unit, candidates must successfully achieve CS 30.1 and 30.2 - Maintain and Operate the

chainsaw

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A minimum of two trees must be felled to the required standard one of which may be hung up for assessment in Part 4. The candidate must achieve Part 1 assessment activity 6 and either assessment activity 7 or 8 (at the assessor’s choice).

Candidates must successfully achieve all Assessment Activities unless otherwise specified.

Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) – Unit value

The Award to Fell and Process Small Trees has a credit value of 3 credits on the QCF:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Assessment and site requirements:

- Range of trees with an effective diameter at felling height of between 200mm and 380mm (8" and 15"), either conifer or broad-leaved, or both, of which some can be made to hang up in neighboring trees

Rear handled chain saw in good condition [maximum recommended guide bar length: 380mm (15")]

Sufficient fuel and oil for the assessment, appropriate to saw model

Appropriate felling aids (e.g. felling lever, wedges, etc)

A winch appropriate to the tree size must be available on site in case manual methods of take-down are unsuccessful

Stump treatment if applicable

Demonstrate Knowledge sections of the assessment activities can include practical operations to part satisfy the criteria.

Sufficient working space must be provided to each candidate to allow the assessment to be conducted effectively without comprising other work site or assessment activities.

- Assessors should complete a pre-use inspection of all work equipment intended to be used during the course of the assessment. Ensuring equipment meets the requirements of suitability in terms of size, condition, safety features etc.

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4

Part 1: Fell Small Trees using a chainsaw

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Select and wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE, Safety clothing)

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

PPE in accordance with health and safety requirements and Risk

Assessment e.g.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of planning the felling operation

Demonstrate knowledge of the legal constraints in relation to proposed tree felling

Demonstrate knowledge of the environmental considerations which may affect to tree felling

3. Check and prepare chainsaw for felling work

4. Prepare the site for felling

- Safety helmet

- Eye and ear protection

-

Gloves appropriate for the task

-

Non-snag outer clothing

-

Personal First Aid Kit

- Whistle

-

The conditions of the site, including terrain, soil and weather must be considered

- Identify the correct trees to be felled by agreed method

- A safe working distance of at least two tree lengths between workers must be maintained

-

No unauthorised person within two tree lengths, or directly below on steep slopes

- Working in a ‘pairing system’ so that regular contact with partner is maintained

-

No felling if wind conditions are such that control over the felling direction will be lost

- Operators on site should all have a failsafe method of communication (e.g. whistle) to raise the alarm in the event of an accident

-

Ensure that all underground and overhead way-leaves have been accurately identified before felling commences

- Ensure clearances as laid down within AFAG 804 are maintained when felling in proximity to overhead power lines

- Use of brash mat or other system for ground protection as appropriate

-

Use of natural felling bench where available to aid ergonomic working

- Signs must be erected warning others of the work carried out

- Additional measures taken if public likely to enter the two tree length exclusion zone, e.g. look-out near paths etc.

-

Once any felling cut has been started on a tree, the tree must not be left standing

- A Felling Licence may be required

-

T.P.O’s (Tree Preservation Order)

-

Conservation areas

- Wildlife and Countryside Act

- Water Guidelines recommended for sites

-

Protection of wildlife

-

SSSI’s, Nature reserves etc

- Archaeological and historic features

- Amenity or Landscape considerations

- Chain tension and condition checked for safe and effective use

- Safety features checked for condition and function

-

External nuts and bolts checked for security

-

Chainsaw contains sufficient fuel and chain oil for operations

-

Control measures identified in Site Specific Risk Assessment are applied

- Determine the felling direction in relation to method of extraction or conversion

- Set up a felling bench if required

-

Remove debris from around the base of the trees to be felled and compact vegetation to facilitate felling at appropriate height

- Remove dead or suppressed trees and any other vegetation adjacent to the tree or in the felling direction that may be a danger

- Inspect the felling area and adjacent trees for dead wood and insecure branches

-

Ensure no unauthorised person is within 2 tree lengths distance

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5

Part 1: Fell Small Trees using a chainsaw (continued)

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

5. Prepare the tree for felling by safe brashing

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Remove low branches taking into account:

-

Position of the saw in relation to the operator, bar on opposite side of stem

- Height to which branches are removed

- Saw body not above shoulder height

Demonstrate knowledge of the dangers of using a pushing chain

Part 1: Fell Small Trees using a chainsaw (continued)

-

Brashing close to the stem

-

-

The saw can run back on the chain towards the operator pushing him/her off balance, contacting body with bar/chain or causing kickback injury

The saw must be pushed in close to the tree and out of line of the body to prevent this happening, avoiding using pushing chain on heavier branches

A minimum of two trees must be felled to the required standard one of which may be hung up for assessment

in Part 4. The candidate must achieve assessment activity 6 and either assessment activity 7 or 8 (at the assessor’s choice)

6.

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

Fell a tree in the required direction accurately.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Choice of felling direction made

-

Escape route(s) prepared and selected

-

Tree Inspected for signs of rot or decay e.g. Fungal growth

Cavities

- Remove buttresses or cut into root spurs to prevent tearing where appropriate

A sink is cut to determine felling direction, using:

- Safe stance

- Top sink cut at an appropriate angle and height

-

Bottom sink cut as near to ground level as practicable

-

Cuts of appropriate depth

- Sink cuts meet accurately

- Sink facing in the chosen direction of fall

-

Chain brake used appropriately

The main felling cut/s made using:

Demonstrate knowledge of the dangers of using a pushing chain

Demonstrate knowledge of the techniques to be used to fell a tree that has “sat back” against the intended felling direction.

Demonstrate knowledge of situations where the angle of sink cut can be varied

Demonstrate knowledge of alternative felling methods for smaller trees

- Level cut(s) at appropriate height at or above level of sink

- “Pushing chain” or “pulling” chain

-

Safe withdrawal of the saw

- Chain brake as appropriate

- A hinge is retained of adequate dimensions

-

Appropriate aid tools are used safely if required to fell tree

-

A prepared escape route is used as soon as the tree begins to fall

-

Site checked for safety once tree has fallen

- The saw can run back on the chain towards the operator causing lacerations, kickback or loss of balance

-

The saw must be locked in by the operator (e.g. leg behind the saw) to prevent this happening

-

Make a small boring cut into back of tree at position of felling cut and insert felling lever to lift tree over

- Make new felling cuts to fell tree (in the direction of lean if site conditions allow)

-

Drive a wedge into the main felling cut to lift tree over

- Tree may be required to break off stump sooner than normal (e.g. felling over a bank or obstacle) so a sink shallower than normal is made

- Tree required to stay attached to the stump (e.g. on a steep slope or adjacent to a watercourse etc.) so a sink more open than normal is made

- e.g. ‘v’ cut or step cuts

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6

Part 1: Fell Small Trees using a chainsaw (continued)

EITHER :

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

7. Fell a tree is that is weighted in the felling direction

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Determine felling method and safe working zones

-

Select and prepare escape route(s)

- Prepare a sink of the correct dimensions

- Keep head and body away from rear of tree

- Bore in from the side of the tree behind the sink to leave an adequate hinge

- Cut away from the hinge to leave a ‘hold’ at the rear

Demonstrate knowledge of the consequence of not using the correct technique to a tree is that is weighted in the felling direction

- A hinge is retained of adequate dimensions

-

Appropriate aid tools are used safely if required to fell tree

-

A prepared escape route is used as soon as the tree begins to fall

-

Site checked for safety once tree has fallen

- The tree can split and hit the operator

-

The tree can split and throw the chainsaw

-

A spur or root can fly up and hit the operator

OR

8.

Demonstrate knowledge of felling a tree which is slightly weighted against the intended felling direction

Fell a tree which is slightly weighted against the intended felling direction

Demonstrate knowledge of the consequences of not using the correct technique when felling a tree which is slightly weighted against the intended felling direction

-

Determine felling method and safe working zones

-

Select and prepare escape route(s)

- Prepare a sink of the correct dimensions

- Felling cuts made and felling aid employed using a safe and effective felling method

-

A hinge is retained of adequate dimensions

-

Appropriate aid tools are used safely if required to fell tree

- A prepared escape route is used as soon as the tree begins to fall

- Site checked for safety once tree has fallen

- Determine felling method and safe working zones

-

Select and prepare escape route(s)

-

Prepare a sink of the correct dimensions

-

Felling cuts made and felling aid employed using a safe and effective felling method

- A hinge is retained of adequate dimensions

-

Appropriate aid tools are used safely if required to fell tree

-

A prepared escape route is used as soon as the tree begins to fall

- Site checked for safety once tree has fallen

- The tree can sit back and trap the saw

-

The tree can sit back and fracture the hinge

Demonstrate knowledge of felling a tree is that is weighted in the felling direction

-

Determine felling method and safe working zones

- Select and prepare escape route(s)

- Prepare a sink of the correct dimensions

-

Keep head and body away from rear of tree

-

Bore in behind the sink to leave an adequate hinge

-

Cut away from the hinge to leave a ‘hold’ at the rear

- A hinge is retained of adequate dimensions

- Appropriate aid tools are used safely if required to fell tree

-

A prepared escape route is used as soon as the tree begins to fall

-

Site checked for safety once tree has fallen

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Part 2: Remove branches from small trees using a chainsaw by appropriate method

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the risks to consider when removing branches

2. Branches are removed from the tree using an appropriate method

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Tripping or falling over or into obstacles

-

Contacting obstructions with chainsaw causing kick back injury or saw damage

- Tree rolling onto operator if working on lower side of tree on a slope

-

Spring back from cut branches or saplings when severed

-

Falling debris from surrounding trees

Good Working Practice will include:

- Correct stance and support of the saw on tree or right leg

- Left thumb around the front handle

- Neither handle released while the chain is moving

-

Apply chain brake if reaching across bar

-

Apply chain brake when negotiating obstacles

- Not walking when the saw is on the same side of the tree as the operator without applying the chainbrake

- Avoid working on lower side of tree on side slopes

Do not:

- Reach too far round with saw on far side of tree

-

Cut towards legs or body

-

Use tip of guide bar

3. Remove the top of the tree

- Straddle the stem

Choice of work method:

- Systematic Sequence of cuts and position of the saw to remove branches as appropriate for the branching habit

- All branches removed flush with the stem

- Cut top at appropriate diameter

-

Remove top with a safe method of cutting

-

Dispose of top according to Job Specification

4. Remove remaining branches

5. Leave site in tidy condition

6. Demonstrate knowledge of the reasons for de-limbing flush with the stem

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- Turn stem using appropriate aid tools/ techniques

-

Use stem for protection when removing remaining branches

-

Use a safe and effective method to sever remaining branches

- Use under-sweep technique if applicable

- All branches removed flush with the stem

- Ensure no branches are left on fences, paths, roads, timber stacks, young trees etc or in ditches, ponds, waterways etc

- Brash stacked tidily, if appropriate, ready for subsequent handling (e.g

for a wood chipper)

Sprags / stubs or poorly cut branches can:

- Injure the person moving the timber

-

Increase friction when pulling along the ground

-

Damages other trees when extracting

- Prevent timber entering machines (e.g. chipper, peeler or saw bench)

- Hinder stacking or loading

- Pick up brash, soil, stones etc that damages the chainsaw or other equipment when pulling timber

8

Part 3: Crosscut felled trees

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Crosscut pole length timber under guide bar length to a given specification

Stack produce for subsequent handling

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

- Correct use of PPE during chainsaw operations

- Safe starting procedure adopted

- Safe stance including:

Legs and feet are clear of the chain

Chainsaw is stable/secure/supported during crosscutting

Minimal risk of muscular/skeletal injury

-

Bar aligned to maintain accuracy

- Head out of line of chain

- Use of throttle to cut safely and efficiently

-

-

- Cutting techniques employed to complete severance of timber

-

Appropriate boring technique

-

Sequence of cuts to prevent saw becoming trapped

-

Appropriate aids used for lifting, rolling or levering

- Tension and compression cuts should meet

-

-

Chain brake used appropriately

Accuracy of measurement within reasonable tolerance

Saw switched off and left in safe position, bar cover replaced

-

Use of appropriate aids to handle / move products

- Correct stance during lifting

- Avoiding excessive lifting by levering, sliding, rolling

- Quality of stacking must be to an agreed job specification

-

Position of stack appropriate to method of extraction

-

Manually constructed stacks are limited to 1 metre high

- Stacks should be left in a safe, stable condition

- Roads, footpaths, etc. clear of debris and waste materials

Part 4: Takedown of hung up trees using hand tools

1.

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

Prepare the site to facilitate take down:

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Assess position of tree and check condition of hinge

-

Remove debris and obstacles from take down route

- Decide on the final felling direction

- Prepare new escape routes as appropriate

- Select and position aid tools as required

-

No unauthorised person within two tree lengths or directly below on steep slopes

2. Demonstrate knowledge of unsafe practice during the take down of a hung-up tree

As per industry good practice supervisor informed

3. Partially sever the hinge with the chainsaw

- Safe position to side of tree

-

Position and angle of cuts

- Cutting technique for removal of appropriate part of the hinge

- Safe withdrawal of the saw

- Approximately 10% -20% of hinge left to support the tree on each/either side appropriate to take down method utilised

-

Safe placement of the saw on completion of cuts

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4.

Part 4: Takedown of hung up trees using hand tools

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES

Take down the tree using hand tools

Demonstrate knowledge of correct procedures to be adopted when a hung up tree is taken down by the use of a winch

Demonstrate knowledge of correct procedures to be adopted when a hung up tree cannot be taken down by the use of hand tools or a winch

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

-

Aid tool positioned and attached safely and effectively

Aid tool operated using:

-

Correct pushing technique

- Correct lifting technique

- Repositioning aid tool

-

Not working in danger areas

-

Releasing aid tool as tree falls

- Use escape route(s)

- If tree does not fall through roll out technique, remnant of hinge removed by safe method (if still attached) and tree is “walked” down with e.g. a wooden pole

- Tree in a stable condition before being processed

Safe working procedures to be adopted should include:

- The winch cable free from obstructions.

- No-one must enter the triangle formed by the cable when offset pulling.

-

Do not step over the winch cable

- Appropriate PPE is worn

- Clear pre-determined communications are essential when operating a winch

-

The chainsaw operator is in charge of the operation and gives the instructions to the winch operator.

- Work must stop immediately if anyone enters the exclusion zone

- Never leave tensioned winch systems unattended

-

Tree is taken down through use of machinery

-

Tree is marked off with warning tape and a supervisor informed

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