Secure MICR Printer User`s Guide

Secure MICR Printer
User’s Guide
ST9715 Secure MICR
Printer
User’s Guide
Source Technologies, LLC
4505B Westinghouse Commons Dr.
Charlotte, NC 28273
Phone: 1.800.922.8501
Fax: 704.969.7595
www.sourcetech.com
Source Technologies
ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Copyright
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Source Technologies. All rights reserved.
No part of this document may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information
storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Source Technologies.
Published in the United States of America by:
Source Technologies
4505B Westinghouse Commons Drive
Charlotte, NC 28273
Author: Source Technologies
Notice
This manual serves as a reference for a Source Technologies’ secure MICR printer.
This manual should be used as a reference for learning more about MICR technology
and developing MICR printing applications. This guide was produced to assist IS
technicians and engineers in the integration of Source Technologies’ programmed
printers with their custom MICR applications. The guide also contains information on
MICR related error messages that post to the operator panel.
To the best of our knowledge, the information in this publication is accurate: however,
neither Source Technologies nor its dealers or affiliates assume any responsibility or
liability for the accuracy or completeness of, or consequences arising from, such
information. Changes, typos, and technical inaccuracies will be corrected in subsequent
publications. This publication is subject to change without notice. The information and
descriptions contained in this manual cannot be copied, disseminated, or distributed
without the express written consent of Source Technologies. This document is intended
for informational purposes only. Mention of trade names or commercial products does
not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use by Source Technologies. Final
determination of the suitability of any information or product for use contemplated by any
user, and the manner of that use is the sole responsibility of the user. We recommend
that anyone intending to rely on any recommendation of materials or procedures
mentioned in this publication should satisfy himself as to such suitability, and that he can
meet all applicable safety and health standards.
All trade names or products used in this manual are for identification purposes only and
may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Document Number: 106989
Revision: A
Source Technologies
ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
1.
MICR Overview ....................................................................................................... 5
The Check Clearing System..................................................................................... 5
MICR Printing Standards in the United States Today ............................................... 5
2. MICR Check Design ............................................................................................... 7
General Features of Check Design .......................................................................... 7
Position and Dimension Gauge ................................................................................ 7
Design Elements in Detail ........................................................................................ 7
Data Elements ......................................................................................................... 8
3. Quality Issues ....................................................................................................... 12
Printer Features ..................................................................................................... 13
MICR Toner ........................................................................................................... 13
MICR Check Stock ................................................................................................. 13
4. Security Issues ..................................................................................................... 15
5. MICR Features ...................................................................................................... 17
Secure MICR ......................................................................................................... 17
MICR Fonts ............................................................................................................ 17
Secure Fonts ......................................................................................................... 17
MicroPrint............................................................................................................... 17
Resource Storage .................................................................................................. 18
MICR Toner Cartridge ............................................................................................ 18
6. MICR Commands ................................................................................................. 19
PJL MICRJOB........................................................................................................ 19
Fonts and Secured Resources ............................................................................... 19
PJL Unlock Sequence ............................................................................................ 20
PJL Re-Lock Sequence ......................................................................................... 20
PJL Re-Lock Sequence With A New Password Value............................................ 20
PCL Font Call Commands ..................................................................................... 20
Toner Cartridge and Imaging Units ........................................................................ 22
Error Messages……………………………………………………………………………23
7. MICR Command Example ................................................................................... 24
PJL Unlock Sequence ............................................................................................ 24
PCL Initial Set-Up .................................................................................................. 24
PCL MACRO Call .................................................................................................. 24
PCL Font Calls, Positioning Commands and Variable Print Data ........................... 24
PJL Re-Lock Sequence ......................................................................................... 24
Appendix A: E13B MICR Font Mapping .................................................................... 27
Appendix B: Secure Numeric Font Mapping…………………………………...……….28
Appendix C: ICR Secure Numeric Font Mapping ..................................................... 30
Appendix D: CMC7 MICR Font Mapping ................................................................... 31
Appendix E: Contact ................................................................................................... 32
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Overview | 1
1. MICR Overview
MICR stands for Magnetic Ink Character Recognition. All MICR documents have a MICR
line with numbers and symbols printed in a unique MICR font with magnetically
chargeable ink or toner. Each character of the MICR font has a unique waveform when
sensed magnetically. Financial institutions and the Federal Reserve use the MICR line to
identify and sort checks. The high-speed automated processing of checks and other
financial documents depends on the accuracy and the integrity of the data printed in the
MICR line. Your new Source Technologies Secure MICR Printer is specifically designed
to produce high quality MICR documents.
The Check Clearing System
The Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (Check 21) was signed into law October 28,
2003. Prior to Check 21, checks traveled through the bank’s high speed reader/sorter
equipment an average of near seven times in the Check Clearing process. Some checks
could be read up to 30 times or more by these machines.
In today’s environment high and low speed check readers can capture a picture or
image of the check allowing for images to be exchanged between financial institutions,
the Federal Reserve, and other clearing houses. This new law, Check 21, defines what
is called a “Substitute Check”, and removed barriers that existed in converting physical
checks to check images for clearing. The original physical check can now be truncated
by the first institution that converts the check to image. The original check can now be
destroyed.
United States and International MICR Standards still require the printed MICR line
information to be of the highest quality and durability, and be printed with magnetic ink or
toner. Additionally, issues related to check fraud continue to place high importance on
print quality. For these reasons, the quality and durability of information printed with
Source Technologies’ Secure MICR Printers remains a key new product development
criterion.
MICR Printing Standards in the United States Today
Congress established the Federal Reserve System (FRS) in 1913. Today most
commercial banks in the United States belong to the FRS. Many other depository
institutions provide banking and checking account services to the public. These other
institutions, such as some credit unions, savings and loan associations and non-member
banks, are not formally part of the FRS. However, they have access to the payment
services it provides and are subject to many of the FRS regulations.
In 1958, because of the explosive growth of check usage, the American Bankers
Association selected the E-13B MICR font and the MICR system as the technology for
high-speed check processing. MICR was the result of a joint development project
headed by the Stanford Research Institute and the General Electric Computing
Laboratory with participation from a few of the major banks and other computing
technology companies, IBM, Control Data, Deluxe, Bank of America, and others. Today,
check standards are determined by the Accredited Standards Committee X9AB
Payments Subcommittee of which Source Technologies is a voting member. The latest
versions of the standards and technical guidelines are available from:
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Overview | 1
Hardcopy:
Global Engineering Documents
Phone 800-854-7179 or 303-397-7956
Fax 303-397-2740
global@ihs.com
http://global.ihs.com
Softcopy:
X9 Electronic Bookstore
www.X9.org - click ESS
www.ansi.org - click ESS
or
http://webstore.ansi.org
The key standards that address check documents are as follows:
ANSI X9.100-160 Specifications for Placement and Location of MICR Printing
ANSI X9.100-10 Paper Specifications for Checks
ANSI X9.100-20 Print and Test Specifications for Magnetic Ink Character Recognition
ANSI X9.100-30 Optical Background Measurements for MICR Documents
ANSI X9.100-110 Document Imaging Capability
For those with an interest or need there are also US standards that address Deposit
Tickets, Check Endorsements (the back of the check), image interchange file formats,
and other MICR areas.
Users of our Secure MICR Printers are not required to have access to the above
standards. Our Technical Support staff maintains current knowledge of the standards
and changes that affect the check industry in the US and other countries with unique
requirements.
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MICR Check Design | 2
2. MICR Check Design
General Features of Check Design
To be a legal and negotiable document, the necessary data elements required on a
check are the date, amount, payee name, payer’s bank name, and payer’s signature.
Other elements included in a good check design are: the amount in words, account title,
check serial number, fractional routing number and MICR line.
A good check design contains security features and is formatted to be easily read by
both machines and the human eye. If the format is complicated, the depositor, bank
employee or reader/sorter machine may make an error in reading the data.
Position and Dimension Gauge
A MICR position and dimension gauge, like the one available from Source Technologies
(part number 205-1000MGE or 220-M1027-34, is an important tool for use in designing
checks. During check design, check your output against this gauge to determine if the
data elements (date, amount, payee name, payer’s bank name, and payer’s signature)
are correctly positioned on your document.
Design Elements in Detail
Paper
The ideal paper for check production is 24 to 29 lb. laser bond. Source
Technologies’ MICR lab has tested paper stock from most major manufacturers
and has compiled a list of products that produce superior results. Contact your
sales representative for this information. For a fee, Source Technologies will test
your paper for proper MICR adherence and check reader/sorter performance.
There are also many security features available to aid in the overall security of
your MICR documents. Please refer to Chapter 4, Security Issues, for more
information on check stock specifications and security features.
Size
The size of check documents must be:
6.00 inches to 8.75 inches in length
2.75 inches to 3.66 inches in height
We recommend standard 8.5" X 11" letter size stock or 8.5" X 14" legal size
stock for proper feeding through your ST Secure MICR Printer. The number of
checks per page is determined by your application. Custom size stock other than
letter or legal can be done with proper planning and application programming
within the paper size specifications for the base printer.
MICR Clear Band
The MICR clear band is an area at the bottom of the check where the MICR line
prints. No other magnetic printing should appear in this area on both the front
and back of the document. The clear band is an area 0.625 (5/8) inches high
from the bottom of the check running the entire length of the check. Exact MICR
line placement in this area is very important. Please refer to Figure 3.1 for more
information on MICR line placement.
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Data Elements
Date
The date is a required data element for a check. It represents the day upon which
or after which the transfer of the check amount may take place. The date is
usually placed in the upper right portion of the check so it does not interfere with
the convenience amount field. The common format is Month, Day and Year,
however, the military format of Day, Month and Year is also acceptable.
Amount
The amount of the check is a required data element for negotiation. The amount
usually appears at least twice on the check. The amount printed in numbers is
called the convenience amount. The amount printed in words is sometimes
referred to as the legal amount; this is the amount that applies if there is a
difference between the two amount fields. The amount may also be printed a
third time on the check in a secure font, intended to make alteration of the
amount field difficult. Please refer to Chapter 6 and Appendix B for information on
Source Technologies’ Secure Numeric Font.
Convenience Amount
The convenience amount location is specified in ANSI X9.100-110. Since this
amount can be machine scanned, its location and design should be kept within
the specifications. The amount beginning with the dollar sign should be left
justified within the scan area with numbers spaced normally to the right. The
dollars and cents should be separated by a decimal point with the cents printed
in the same size font as the rest of the field. Embedded commas should not be
used. The convenience amount background should have good reflectance so it
does not interfere with optical scanning.
The convenience amount should be printed in a simple, fixed pitch font. We
recommend our ICR Secure Numeric Font (see Appendix C). It was designed to
be easily read by image capture equipment and is also a fraud deterrent. A fixed
pitch courier font, or if available, OCR-B, are also acceptable fonts to print the
convenience amount.
Note: The Source Technologies’ Secure Numeric Font (see Appendix B)
should not be used in the convenience amount since it is not a machinereadable font.
Amount in Words
The amount in words (sometimes called the legal amount) is normally located
either above or below and to the left of the convenience amount. The area for
the amount in words should be entirely filled to make alterations difficult. The
amount should start at the far left of the line with the words placed immediately
adjacent to each other. The cents need not be written out. They may be
expressed as a fraction (60/100), and should be placed immediately to the right
of the dollar amount and followed by a line or other space filler to inhibit
alteration.
Example: One hundred forty-four and 62/100---------------DOLLARS
Given the available area on the document, you may need to use a smaller font
when printing larger value amounts.
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MICR Check Design | 2
Payee Area
The payee is a necessary data element for a negotiable document. The payee
area is generally to the left side of the document either above or below the
amount in words. It is often preceded by the words “Pay to the Order Of.” The
payee data should not enter the MICR clear band, which extends 5/8 of an inch
above the bottom of the check. Some financial institutions have established
specific print requirements for the Payee Name and optional address. Consult
your bank for details on their print requirements.
Signature Area
A signature is a required data element for a negotiable document. The signature
or signatures authorize the bank to honor the check; therefore, it must match the
bank’s records. The signature area should be beneath the convenience amount
area but the signatures should not enter the convenience amount area or the
MICR clear band. This is especially true if you print the signature with MICR
toner.
Drawee Institution Name
The name of the institution where the maker’s account is located is referred to as
the drawee institution. The bank’s name, city, and state are required.
Account Title
The account title is normally printed in the upper left corner of the check. It
includes the name of the account holder and other information such as
addresses, telephone numbers, and logos. The data in the title should be legible
and sufficiently complete so that if the MICR data account number is destroyed,
the drawee institution can refer to the account title in order to trace the account
number.
Memo Line
This line is located in the lower left quadrant of the check, and is not required.
Data printed here does not contain any legal significance. Printing in this area
with magnetic toner should not extend downward into the MICR clear band which
is 5/8 of an inch above the bottom of the check.
Check Serial Number
The check serial number is generally printed in the upper right quadrant of the
check. Although the check number is not required for the check to be negotiable,
the account holder and financial institution use these numbers to reconcile
statements and execute stop payments. The check serial number should also
appear a second time in the MICR line, and these numbers should match. The
number of digits in the check serial number is controlled by the financial
institution and the MICR line format. Consult your banking institution for their
requirements.
Fractional Routing Number
The fractional routing number should be printed in a fractional format in the upper
right quadrant of the check. This number is assigned to identify the Federal
Reserve District and drawee institution. Consult with your bank for the proper
routing number and format for each of your accounts.
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MICR Check Design | 2
MICR Line
Accurate high-speed processing of your checks by financial institutions is
enabled by the accuracy and integrity of the data in the MICR line. Refer to
figure 3.1 for the location of the following MICR line fields. The MICR line is read
from right-to-left with position one being the right most position proceeding to
position sixty-five on the left. The MICR line must be printed at exactly eight
characters per inch.
Auxiliary On-Us Field—Positions 65 to 45
This field usually contains the check serial number for commercial size checks
and possibly account control information. It is bounded by On-Us symbols
. It is not included on personal, small size checks.
External Processing Code (EPC) Field—Position 44
This one digit field is position 44 of the MICR line. This field is usually left
blank. The use of this field is reserved and is controlled by the ASC X9AB
Standards Committee.
Routing Field—Positions 43 to 33
The routing field is bounded by Transit symbols
in positions 43 and 33. It
contains fixed format information about the drawee institution. Consult with
your bank for the specific data field to be placed here for each of your
accounts.
On-Us Field—Positions 32 to 14
The On-Us field contains the makers’ account number. The structure and
content of this field is left to the drawee bank. On personal checks this field
also contains the check serial numbers. The On-Us field may not consist of
more than 19 characters. An On-Us symbol
must appear immediately to
the right of the account number.
Blank Field—Position 13
Position 13 is always left blank.
Amount Field—Positions 1 to 12
The amount field is the right most field in the MICR line. It remains blank until
it is printed by the bank of first deposit. When the check enters the banking
system, the bank of first deposit encodes this field from data in the
convenience amount field. It will be bounded by Amount symbols
.
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MICR Check Design | 2
Figure 2.1: Sample Check
A. Serial Number: Must be in the upper right corner and match the serial number in the
MICR line (see D for further explanation).
B. Fractional Routing Transit Number: Should be in the upper right corner and must
match the routing transit number in the MICR line with the exception of the state
prefix number (ex. 66 = NC, 67 = SC, 64 = GA, etc.) and the preceding zeros.
C. Bank Name, State, City: The bank logo is optional. Name of bank, city and state
where the account will be assigned/opened are required fields.
D. Aux On-Us (46-55): This is a required field if the customer desires services offered
by the bank, which require a serial number. The serial number format is controlled by
the payer’s bank. A & D should match.
E. Routing Number (34-42): Designates the Federal Reserve district and financial
institution. Each city, state or region that the bank serves has a unique institution
identifier. IMPORTANT: positions 35-42 are the Routing Numbers; position 34 is the
check digit.
F. Account Number: This is a unique number assigned to the customer’s account.
G. Optional Serial Number: Used for personal accounts (checks only). This should be
a 4-digit, zero-filled field that matches the serial number in the upper right corner.
H. Convenience Amount Area: should be in the general location shown above in the
diagram. The illustrated box in the diagram is optional and if used, should conform
to ANSI X9.100-110. A single vertical stroke dollar sign is required.
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Quality Issues | 3
3. Quality Issues
A high quality MICR document can be read by bank reader/sorter equipment many times
with no readability issues and does not result in damage to bank equipment. This quality
is the result of a well-designed printer, an originally manufactured MICR toner and highquality check stock.
MICR Printing Supplies
The ST9715 Secure MICR Printer has two user replaceable MICR components relative
to printing MICR documents. Both components must be MICR capable units and be
installed in the printer as a paired set.
MICR Cartridge
There are two size versions of the ST MICR cartridge. A new printer ships with a
1.5K or 1,500 page yield cartridge. The 5K version can be ordered for
replacement. The cartridge yield is based on printing pages at an average print
coverage of 5% in continuous printing mode. The yield claim has been certified
by the procedures governed by the international standard ISO 19752.
Print applications that are more transactional and averaging near 5% coverage
but nearer to a 1 to 3 page average print job, will see yield nearer to 85 to 95% of
the stated yield. When the printer alerts the user that 0 pages remain and a new
cartridge is needed, the cartridge is empty. It must be replaced to continue.
MICR Imaging Unit or IU
The imaging unit contains a majority of the components needed to transfer an
image to paper. The unit also contains a Refuse Bin for storing any waste toner
cleaned from the photoconductor or OPC. In terms of component wear and
waste capacity, the IU useful life should be near 40K or 40,000 pages or sides
assuming some duplex printing. The 40K is based on an average print coverage
of 5% and an average print job size of three pages or page sides. Lower actual
average print coverage and/or a larger average page count per job will increase
the useful life of the IU. Higher actual average print coverage above 5% and/or a
smaller average page count below three will shorten the useful life. Internally, the
printer automatically adjusts unit alarms or replacement alerts based on the
actual printing factors. If the actual print averages extend the useful life beyond
the 40K page forecast, the printer will not exceed 60K pages or sides due to
wear OPC factors. The printer will stop printing and request a new unit.
Interchanging MICR and non-MICR Components
For non-MICR print jobs the MICR cartridge and IU can be replaced with
standard Lexmark components. Both units must be swapped as a pair. A
“mismatched cartridge and imaging unit” error will occur if only one component is
swapped. Extra care should be taken with protecting components from damage
when not installed in the printer. All usage tracking information is kept separate
for all components and matched to the appropriate component serial numbers.
Components can be interchanged between printers.
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Printer Features
Your secure MICR printer is equipped with some features to ensure high-quality MICR
documents.
Paper Type
When the printer senses the presence of a Source Technologies’ MICR toner
cartridge, internal operating points that affect the print engine and fuse grade are
optimized for MICR documents and the MICR toner. For the optimum MICR
quality we recommend that the printer paper trays with check paper have the
Paper / Texture / Weight settings set to Bond / Rough / Heavy. See the base
printer’s User’s Guide regarding paper tray settings.
Print Density
For optimum MICR quality and maintaining compliance to the check printing
standards, the Print Density should be set to density 8, the default value, when
printing MICR documents.
MICR Toner and Imaging Unit (IU) nearing end-of-life
Internal alarms are set to alert the end user that the print cartridge or IU is
approaching the end of useful life and will require replacement soon. The initial
alarms are set to 10% life remaining for the cartridge and 5% remaining for the
IU. See the base printer’s User’s Guide for custom alarm alternatives. See
Section 8 of this manual for information on the relative messages displayed.
MICR Toner and Imaging Unit (IU) end-of-life
When the toner cartridge or the IU is determined to be at end-of-life, (0 Pages
Remaining) the printer will stop printing. To continue printing, a new cartridge or
IU will need to be installed. See Section 8 for information on the relative
messages displayed.
MICR Toner
Use only Source Technologies’ MICR toner when printing MICR documents. It is
specifically engineered to print quality MICR documents with your printer. The printer’s
MICR toner sensor is designed to work with the Source Technologies’ MICR toner
cartridge to prevent printing checks with regular toner components installed.
Source Technologies does not recommend the use of refilled or remanufactured MICR
toner cartridges. Refilled cartridges may result in expensive printer repairs and bank
check reject fees due to an inferior MICR toner formulation.
MICR Check Stock
Check stock has a significant impact on the resulting quality and security of your MICR
document. Here are a few features that should be considered when selecting a check
stock. Please see Chapter 4: Security Issues for more information on check stock
security features.
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Quality Issues | 3
Quality
Quality MICR check printing with your Source Technologies’ secure MICR printer
requires check stock that matches the printer’s requirements. Source
Technologies can supply paper specifically made for our printers. If you wish to
order check stock from other suppliers, please show the following requirements
to your sales representative. We will test other suppliers’ paper for a nominal fee.
Layout
Layout your check design before any paper is purchased or layout your design to
existing check stock. Keep perforations, orientation, special logos and any color
elements in mind. The printer can print just about anything as long as it is black.
Weight
We recommend 24 lb. - 29 lb. paper.
Stiffness
We recommend Taber M.D. 2.5 and C.D. 1.1 minimum.
Smoothness
For best toner fusing, we recommend rougher surfaces within the base printers’
specifications, and the Paper Specifications for Checks, X9.100.10. We
recommend a smoothness range of 150 to 200, Sheffield.
Paper Grain Direction
When using 24 lb. - 29 lb. bond paper we generally support either long or short
paper grain. Overall performance in the bank’s reader/sorters is best when the
resultant grain direction is left to right when viewing the check.
Perforations
All perforations in the stock should be Laser-Cut or Micro-Perfs (20 or more cuts
per inch). Larger perforations can produce excessive paper chaff and result in
damage to the toner cartridge. Perforations should be ironed by the paper
supplier to reduce nesting and potential double feeding of paper sheets.
Moisture
The paper moisture content should be between 4.7 and 5.5%. Storage conditions
have much to do with the final moisture content of most papers. Store your check
stock in a cool, dry, environmentally stable and secure area. Protective
wrappings should be removed just prior to use.
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Security Issues | 4
4. Security Issues
Printing negotiable documents from blank paper on desktop MICR laser printers makes
security a top priority for any company embarking on a desktop check-printing project.
Combating fraud is a moving target. As soon as a new weapon is developed, malicious
forces are at work to devise workarounds to it. Good security programs integrate
hardware, software, your employees, processes, and your financial institution into a
secure check production system. The ultimate liability for fraudulent documents rests
with the banks and their customers, and there can be many vulnerable points throughout
the overall system. Customers must have systems designed and documented to show
“Ordinary Care and Good Faith Effort” is in place to avoid liability. In the past, financial
institutions generally credited corporations when fraud was discovered. Today,
regulations attempt to define who may have been negligent in the transaction and put
the liability on that party or parties. If a fraudulent occurrence can be traced to a
corporation’s lack of security procedures or the design of their negotiable documents,
the regulations will protect the banks, or at best case the loss will be shared.
The following internal and external security measures will help minimize your risk of
check fraud.
1. Stay abreast of current check fraud methods and the latest in fraud detection.
Many financial institutions offer seminars to educate corporate clients.
2. Financial institutions should train tellers to look at the check, not the person
presenting the check. The check, not the person, is the item that must be
verified.
3. Incorporate security features into your base check stock and utilize printed
security features that address both alteration and counterfeiting of original
items. We have found the following check stock security features to be of
merit:
Artificial Watermarks - White on white printing generally on the back reveals
words or patterns when held at an angle. You should state on the front of the
check that this feature is present. True watermarks are valuable but more
costly.
Laid Lines - Background lines that make cut and paste alteration difficult.
These are normally on the back of the check.
Fuse Enhancing Additive - Coatings or additives to the paper that improve
the bonding of toner to the paper. This helps prevent altering of critical data
such as the amount, or payee name.
Chemical Additives - If an ink eradicator (bleach, acetone, etc.) is applied to
the document, the eradicator creates a permanent stain.
Numbered Check Stock - Sequential numbering printed in dye that
penetrates to the reverse side of the check can be used to verify authenticity.
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This also provides for inventory control of blank check stock. This number
should not be linked or be equal to the check serial number due to the
potential of occasional double feeding of paper in laser printers.
Note: These features serve as a general guide for check security. You
should not consider these features as an all-inclusive list. We
recommend consulting with your paper supplier or bank for any
additional comments or suggestions.
4. Firms accepting checks should be aware of damaged MICR lines.
Intentionally damaging the MICR line can increase the time necessary to
process an item, giving the forger enough time to leave town. Discoloration
could be an indication of alteration as well.
5. Safeguard check stock paper, and limit access only to necessary employees.
6. When generating final negotiable items:
 The document always includes the amount value in words
 The document should not include information that limits the value
range, i.e. “Not valid over $500.” This only guides the fraudulent
attempt. Use your application software to detect out of range items
 All levels of hardware and software password protection should be
utilized
7. Understand and approve the security procedures of your check stock
suppliers to safeguard stock in their custody.
8. Consider “Positive Pay” check services from your financial institution. You
should provide the check number, check date, dollar amounts, and
sometimes the payee name to your bank when checks are issued. The bank
will match these values and alert you to mismatches before clearing the
check to your account. Financial institutions should encourage full
participation of corporate clients.
9. Move methods of fraud detection to the item’s point of entry into the clearing
system. For example, low cost readers can detect low magnetic strength in
the MICR line, which is a possible indication of attempts to copy an original.
10. Review and document your internal negotiable document printing procedures.
Investigate employee backgrounds before assigning security authority. Split
the responsibilities. For example, an accounts payable production/security
officer should not also balance the account.
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MICR Features | 5
5. MICR Features
Source Technologies’ secure MICR printers are designed to allow both general office
document printing and secure MICR document printing. You may print a variety of
conventional jobs with regular Lexmark toner using all of the printer features available
such as network printer utilities. Source Technologies’ printers support multiple printer
languages (for example - HP’s PCL5 & PCL6, PostScript Level 2 emulations). The MICR
features require the PCL5e print data stream. Source Technologies has designed
features to enhance these printers with MICR mode specific operation that allows you to
securely print high-quality negotiable documents.
Secure MICR
Source Technologies’ secure MICR printers have resident fonts for printing MICR
documents, password secured in Flash memory. Specific PJL commands are required to
unlock and relock these font resources. While unlocked, they can be accessed with
standard PCL5e commands. Please refer to Chapter 6 for more information. In addition
to the secured font resources, the printer has been internally modified to ensure high
quality printing with MICR toner. Specific print densities, transfer voltages and fusing
temperatures are factory pre-set. Source Technologies’ Secure MICR printers only
support Source Technologies MICR toner cartridges.
MICR Fonts
The E-13B and CMC7 MICR fonts reside in the printer. Examples of these fonts are in
the Appendix of this manual.
Secure Fonts
Source Technologies has designed two fonts: Secure Numeric Font and ICR Secure
Numeric Font. These reside in the printer as well. Examples of these fonts are in the
Appendix of this manual.


The ICR Secure Numeric Font is designed for the Convenience Amount Scan
Area of your check. It can be read optically by the image capture equipment used
by the financial institutions.
The Secure Numeric Font should not be used in this area since the reverse
image aspect of this font prevents it from being read optically by this equipment.
We recommend using both of these fonts on your checks as they are designed to deter
check fraud.
MicroPrint
Your secure MICR printer also contains the MicroPrint font. MicroPrint is text less than
.010” tall. It can easily be read with a magnifying glass but appears to be a solid line to
an unaided eye. This font provides protection against reproduction by some scanners
and copiers.
Most check printers use a MicroPrint font in the signature area of their preprinted
checks. We recommend using this font to help deter check fraud. The text in this font
can either be fixed, such as the name of your organization, or it can be variable, such as
the check amount, payee name, etc. The use of variable text provides an additional
method of protection against check counterfeiters.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Features | 5
Use of the “MP” designate symbol, to identify the line as MicroPrint, is optional. The ST
MicroPrint font only contains alphanumeric characters. Punctuation marks, special
symbols and spaces are ignored by the font’s design and do not print.
Resource Storage
The Flash memory in the printer contains five Source Technologies’ secured fonts but
can be loaded with additional resources for check or non-check printing. The Flash can
be loaded with signature fonts, overlay Macros, or other custom resources limited only
by the available space. Flash memory in the ST9712 is read/write password protected.
To load additional resources to Flash requires the proper PJL commands to unlock the
Flash memory device. This will be detailed in Chapter 6.
Storing resources (fonts, Macros, etc.) in RAM is also an option. Resources in RAM are
deleted when the printer is powered off and cannot be password protected in the printer.
MICR Toner Cartridge
When a MICR toner cartridge and MICR imaging unit are installed the following occurs:
Control of image density or print density and fusing temperatures are set to
optimum levels for MICR printing.
When the PJL “MICRJOB” command is sent, the following occurs:
1. The printer forces internal copies to 1. Downloaded copy commands are
ignored.
2. Automatic reprint of jammed documents is disabled, forcing the application to
reprint any jammed documents. This provides an audit trail to the application
of the jam event.
3. The printer checks for the presence of MICR toner cartridge and Imaging Unit
and will issue a message “Install MICR Cartridge” to the operator panel if not
presently installed.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Commands | 6
6. MICR Commands
The following are the key PJL and PCL commands required to access MICR resources
in the printer. For more information on PJL and PCL languages, contact Source
Technologies Technical Support for the most current version of ’s Printer Languages and
Interfaces Technical Reference documentation.
PJL MICRJOB
The MICRJOB command (@PJL MICRJOB) forces Copy count=1 and Jam
Recovery=OFF. In addition, if your MICR printer has been custom configured to support
both standard and MICR cartridges, the MICRJOB command will request a MICR
cartridge and Image Unit to be installed. The function of the MICRJOB PJL command
supports both SET and DEFAULT PJL options. An older version of the @PJL MICRJOB
without a SET or DEFAULT is still supported and functions similar to the SET command.
SET and DEFAULT formats for the MICRJOB command
There are two formats of the SET MICRJOB command
@PJL SET MICRJOB=ON
@PJL SET MICRJOB=OFF
The ON value must be included with the MICR printing application data stream.
The OFF value can allow a particular job to be processed as a non-MCR job if
the DEFAULT MICRJOB=ON was the current status of the printer.
There are two formats of the DEFAULT MICRJOB Command
@PJL DEFAULT MICRJOB=ON
@PJL DEFAULT MICRJOB=OFF (factory default)
The ON value forces all jobs to be treated as MICR jobs. This command format
allows users who cannot embed MICRJOB into their MICR printing application
data stream to send MICRJOB separately. For example, the user could send the
command in a flat file totally separate from the printing application. Once set, the
printer is now ready for MICR printing. The OFF format returns the printer to the
factory default value.
Because DEFAULT commands alter information stored in non-volatile memory,
the frequency of switching between DEFAULT ON & OFF should be limited to
around 5 times daily thereby protecting the memory from early failure.
Fonts and Secured Resources
Source Technologies’ secure MICR printers hold five password protected fonts in Flash
memory. The printer requires PJL commands with the correct password value to unlock
the font resources, followed by PCL commands to print the fonts. They are then relocked by PJL commands or by a printer power cycle.
The PJL commands to unlock the fonts must precede all PCL commands. The re-lock
PJL commands must follow the PCL commands and final form feed command. The PCL
commands can print an unlimited number of pages between the unlock and re-lock
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Commands | 6
sequences. The following examples will use <ESC> to indicate the Escape character,
ASCII 27 (1B). Values shown in parentheses () are hexadecimal.
PJL Unlock Sequence
<ESC>%-12345X@PJL LDECLARE LRESOURCE:”flash:” LRWLOCK=”PASSWORD”
(0D)(0A)@PJL ENTER LANGUAGE=PCL (0D)(0A)
The sequence contains a UEL (Universal Exit Language) command followed by the PJL
unlock and enter language commands. These commands are case sensitive.
PASSWORD is the initial default password value. The command delimiter is a Line Feed
(hex 0A) with Carriage Return (hex 0D) being optional. Spaces are required as shown.
The ENTER LANGUAGE command is optional but recommended. The command should
also end with a LF (hex 0A). At this time all secured resources including any resources
that are customer unique in Flash are unlocked and available to PCL commands.
The password value is limited to no more than 8 alphanumeric, case-sensitive
characters.
PJL Re-Lock Sequence
<ESC>%-12345X@PJL LDELETEPASSWORD LRESOURCE:”flash:”(0D)(0A)
<ESC>%-12345X
This sequence re-locks the resources with no change in the password value. The PJL
syntax of LDELETEPASSWORD is not the password. The command sequence
terminates with the UEL command (Universal Exit Language). This is optional but
recommended.
PJL Re-Lock Sequence With A New Password Value
<ESC>%-12345X@PJL DEFAULT LRESOURCE:”flash:” LRWLOCK=”xxxxxxxx”
(0D)(0A)<ESC>%-12345X
This command requires the resources to be previously unlocked. The new password is
represented by the value xxxxxxxx. The UEL is again optional but recommended.
After consulting Lexmark Technical Reference materials you may wish to expand the
PJL sequences to include more than the examples above. To chain multiple PJL
commands, follow the following format:
(UEL)(PJL COMMAND)(0A)(PJL COMMAND)(0A)(PJL COMMAND)(0A)(UEL or
ENTER LANGUAGE)
The normal printer action to any format problems or missing or extra symbols is to ignore
the PJL command. This may make it difficult to troubleshoot format errors.
PCL Font Call Commands
After PJL has unlocked the MICR Flash resources, the ST9715 uses standard PCL5e
commands to print. The five resident Source Technologies MICR font resources are all
bitmapped fonts and therefore cannot be scaled larger or smaller than the bitmapped
images. These fonts can be called by either a PCL Font Selection String or by their ID.
The commands are:
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Commands | 6
E13B MICR FONT
<ESC>(10O<ESC>(s0p8h8v0s7b360T
The Selection String
SECURE NUMERIC
<ESC>(30802X
<ESC>(16C<ESC>(s0p5h36v0s112T
The ID Call
The Selection String
ICR SECURE
<ESC>(30043X
<ESC>(1O<ESC>(s1p12v0s0b110T
The ID Call
The Selection String
CMC7 MICR FONT
<ESC>(30066X
<ESC>14Y<ESC>(s0p8h8v0s0b361T
The ID Call
The Selection String
MicroPrint
<ESC>(30803X
<ESC>(2Q<ESC>(s1p1v0s0b112T
The ID Call
The Selection String
<ESC>(30055X
The ID Call
MICR FONT NOTE – The E-13B and CMC7 Fonts are 8 characters per inch. To position
correctly at an exact 8 characters per inch, the printer must be set to an internal Unit of
Measure of 600 DPI or greater or must have a horizontal motion index command at 8
CPI be issued after the font call. This is true even if the base printer is set at 600 DPI.
The default character positioning is at 300 DPI, and 300 divided by 8 equals 37.5 pixels.
The printer will either round down to 37 or up to 38 pixels causing characters to creep.
There are multiple ways to resolve this:
1. If you are using a printer driver set to 600 DPI, the printer data stream should
include a Unit of Measure PCL command set to 600. The command is
<ESC>&u600D
2. If the application controls the printer data stream, add the Unit of Measure
command early in the data stream. The command also affects X & Y positioning
commands. Add <ESC>&u600D
3. After calling the E-13B MICR font, issue an HMI (Horizontal Motion Index)
command set to 8 characters per inch.
<ESC>&k15H
The command must be included with every E-13B MICR font call using either the
Selection String or ID call. The command string is:
<ESC>(10O<ESC>(s0p8h8v0s7b360T<ESC>&k15H font data——The Selection
String
<ESC>(30802X<ESC>&k15H font data——The ID Call
Refer to the Font Mapping Appendix pages for specific character set data for each
font.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Toner Cartridge and Imaging Units
The ST9715 MICR Print Cartridge is comprised of two components: the toner cartridge
and the imaging unit.
Toner cartridges are available in two models depending on the yield: a 1.5K page and a
3K page. The 1.5K model ships with new printers. The 3K model is the normal
replacement model. The projected life in terms of page count is based on a typical 5%
print coverage and continuous print mode. These projected values of 1,500 and 3,000
were certified using the ISO 19752 Yield Testing Methodology. The standard requires
continuous print mode. The projected life is reduced somewhat dependent on the actual
average print-job page count.
The imaging unit contains a majority of the components needed to transfer an image to
paper. The unit also contains a Refuse Bin for storing any waste toner cleaned from the
photoconductor or OPC. In terms of component wear and waste capacity, the IU useful
life should be near 40K or 40,000 pages or sides assuming some duplex printing. The
40K is based on an average print coverage of 5% and an average print job size of three
pages or page sides. Lower actual average print coverage and/or a larger average page
count per job may increase the useful life of the IU. Higher actual average print coverage
above 5% and/or a smaller average page count below three will shorten the useful life.
Internally, the printer automatically adjusts unit alarms or replacement alerts based on
the actual printing factors. If the actual print averages extend the useful life beyond the
40K page forecast, the printer will not exceed 60K due to wear OPC factors. The printer
will stop printing and request a new unit.
The ST9715 MICR printer keeps record of the actual printing modes in terms of average
print job size and the actual average print coverage percentage. The printer internally
adjusts when either the toner cartridge or photoconductor unit needs to be replaced.
The following error messages pertain to the toner and imaging unit.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Error Messages
Your secure MICR printer has a set of front panel error messages unique to MICR
applications. These messages appear if there is a MICR related problem. The printer
may also print an error message on the page near where the error occurred. In many
cases you can receive more information about a displayed error by pressing Continue.
See the base printer’s User Guide for posted errors on the operator’s panel not listed
below.
Cartridge Related Errors
Error Message
on Display
41.xx Cartridge,
imaging unit
mismatch
Printed
Message
N/A
84.xx – Imaging
unit low
N/A
88.xx – Cartridge
is low
N/A
N/A
88.xx – 0 pages
remain, replace
the cartridge
Source Technologies
The printer may have
the wrong cartridge or
wrong IU installed.
These supplies must
both be either MICR or
standard (non-MICR)
The IU will soon need
to be replaced. 5% life
remains.
The amount of toner in
the cartridge is getting
low. 10% life remains.
Before printing a MICR
document, the printer
checks for MICR toner
supplies. If regular
cartridge and IU are
installed, the printer will
stop all printing and
display this message.
Action
Check labels and install
matched components
Press CONTINUE to
continue printing.
Press CONTINUE to
continue printing.
N/A
The imaging unit is at
End-Of-Life. It needs
to be replaced.
Replace the standard
toner cartridge and
standard IU with a MICR
toner cartridge and IU. If
MICR toner is not
available, you must
power-off your printer and
restart the print job at a
later time when MICR
toner is available.
Replace only the imaging
unit. The toner cartridge
need not be replaced.
N/A
The toner cartridge is
empty and needs to be
replaced
Replace only the toner
cartridge. The IU need not
be replaced.
Install MICR
Cartridge
84.xx - 0 pages
remain, replace
imaging unit
Description
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Command Example | 7
7. MICR Command Example
Figure 7.1, is an illustration of an Accounts Payable check and remittance information.
The page used a PCL macro for the static data and background design. This manual
does not address macro design and programming but the variable text information
including all the PJL and PCL commands used to print the example are located later in
this chapter. For illustrative purposes there are some extra spaces in the text preceding
the printable data. The following paragraphs describe the command functions. The
commands are a minimal set chosen to produce the example. Please consult Lexmark
Technical publications for the complete descriptions of PJL and PCL printer commands
PJL Unlock Sequence
The first two lines of the variable text example are PJL commands that unlock the MICR
font resources and enter PCL language processing. The password, PASSWORD, is the
default. These commands and all of the following commands are all case sensitive.
<ESC> is used to illustrate the ASCII Escape Character, ASCII 27, hex 1B. An actual
data stream requires the Escape Character, not <ESC>.
PCL Initial Set-Up
The next two commands set up some printer PCL variables. These commands are
normally early in the data stream. <ESC>&l2a1h6d1e64F sets the paper size to
LETTER, the input tray to TRAY 1, the lines per inch to 6, the top margin to 1, and the
lines per page to 64. The next command, <ESC>&u600D, is the Unit of Measure
command set to 600 dots per inch as mentioned in chapter 7. This affects proper MICR
line spacing and X and Y cursor positioning.
PCL MACRO Call
The next command calls macro 100 that was previously loaded in RAM memory. When
called, the graphic background, logos, and static data are written to the internal print
buffer.
PCL Font Calls, Positioning Commands and Variable Print Data
The next eleven lines of data in the example call printer resident fonts, position the
cursor, and print the variable information. This is using the minimal data required,
particularly the font selection strings, <ESC>(s4099t0b10H being a very short version to
call Courier, Normal Weight, 10 Pitch.
<ESC>*p300x600Y is a PCL positioning command. In this case its values are 600 pixels
down and 300 pixels to the right of the upper left corner of the page. The Unit of
Measure command determines the exact distance.
The next 4 lines call the secured MICR font resources using the ID for the font call. The
Form Feed prints the page.
PJL Re-Lock Sequence
The last two lines re-lock the secured fonts. The password is not changed in this
example.
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MICR Command Example | 7
FIGURE 7.1 SAMPLE ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CHECK
PJL and PCL commands used to print the sample check:
<ESC>%-12345X@PJL LDECLARE LRESOURCE:"flash:" LRWLOCK="PASSWORD"
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
MICR Command Example | 7
@PJL MICRJOB
@PJL ENTER LANGUAGE = PCL
<ESC>&l2a1h6d1e64F
<ESC>&u600D
<ESC>&f100y3X
<ESC>(s4099t0b10H
<ESC>*p300x600Y xxxxxxxxx xx/xx/xxxx
$x,xxx.xx
<ESC>*p300x2775Y xxxxxxxxx xx/xx/xxxx
$x,xxx.xx
3%
3%
$x,xxx.xx
$x,xxx.xx
<ESC>*p3250x75Y<ESC>(s4099t3b8H 123456
<ESC>*p3250x2200Y 123456
<ESC>*p4250x4450Y 123456
<ESC>*p3650x4775Y xx/xx/xxxx
<ESC>*p400x5225Y<ESC>(s4099t0b15H xxxxx Thousand xxxxx Hundred xxxxx
Dollars and xx/100 Cents
<ESC>*p600x5600Y<ESC>(s10H ABC TOOL & DIE
<ESC>*p600x5700Y 123 Main Street
<ESC>*p600x5800Y Yourcity, ST 12345-6789
<ESC>*p900x6325Y<ESC>(30802X<ESC>&k15H O123456O T123456780T
12345D67890O
<ESC>*p1500x5100Y<ESC>(30043X ($**1,234.56)
<ESC>*p3650x5400Y<ESC>(30066X $**1,234.56
<0C> Form Feed
<ESC>%-12345X@PJL LDELETEPASSWORD LRESOURCE:"flash:"
<ESC>%-12345X
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix A
Appendix A: E13B MICR Font Mapping
1Select only one alphanumeric character to call the font.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix B
Appendix B: Secure Numeric Font Mapping
Description
Character
Dollar Sign
Alpha/Numeric Hex Value
$
23
Left Bracket (
28
Right Bracket )
29
Asterisk
*
2A
Comma
,
2C
Dash
-
2D
Period
.
2E
Slash
/
2F
Zero
0
30
One
1
31
Two
2
32
Three
3
33
Four
4
34
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Secure Font
Character
28
ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix B
Appendix B continued: Secure Numeric Font Mapping
Description
Alpha/Numeric
Character
Hex Value
Five
5
35
Six
6
36
Seven
7
37
Eight
8
38
Nine
9
39
Arrow
>
3E
Secure Font Character
Example: Select font as send($>>123,456.00)
Note: The secure fonts in the example are magnified for
purposes of clarity.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix C
Appendix C: ICR Secure Numeric Font Mapping
Description
Alpha/Numeric
Character
Hex Value
Zero
0
30
One
1
31
Two
2
32
Three
3
33
Four
4
34
Five
5
35
Six
6
36
Seven
7
37
Eight
8
38
Nine
9
39
Asterisk
*
2A
Comma
,
2C
Period
.
2E
Dollar Sign
$
23
Character
Note: The secure fonts in the example are magnified for purposes of clarity.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix D
Appendix D: CMC7 MICR Font Mapping
Description
Alpha/Numeric
Characters
Hex Values
CMC7 Font
Values1
Zero
0
30
One
1
31
Two
2
32
Three
3
33
Four
4
34
Five
5
35
Six
6
36
Seven
7
37
Eight
8
38
Nine
9
39
Colon
:
3A
Semi-Colon
;
3B
Less Than
<
3C
Equal
=
3D
Greater Than
>
3E
Note: The CMC7 Font in the example above is
magnified for purposes of clarity.
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ST9715 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
Appendix E
Appendix E: Contact
For more information, contact:
Source Technologies.
4505B Westinghouse Commons Drive
Charlotte, NC 28273
www.sourcetech.com
techsupport@sourcetech.com
800.922.8501
Source Technologies, LLC
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ST9712 Secure MICR Printer User’s Guide
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