Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00

Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 1
WARS ACROSS THE WORLD (WAW) Summary
Quick Rules Summary
Units:
- There are 3 types of units in WAW: combat, support (don’t show combat factors) and leaders.
- Combat units and leaders have a movement factor, a combat factor and a morale factor.
Movement:
- A stack in a region can be made of an unlimited number of units, except in those regions with difficult terrains which
can contain a maximum of 6 combat units.
- Stacks move from region to region, using their movement point’s allowance, spending it according to terrain and
connection costs.
- A land stack may only enter a region occupied by enemy combat units if it has at least one leader.
- When a stack enters a region with enemy units, no other friendly stack may enter the same region (except air units
already there or coming there).
Combat:
- Combats oppose two adverse stacks in the same region.
- Air battles (interceptions) are handled automatically by the game engine without player’s intervention.
- Land battles last two rounds and are simultaneous.
- Naval battles last only one round and the winner of the previous maneuver test shoots first.
- The Battle Morale of each side is computed as follows: mean of the combat units’ morale + leader’s morale value.
- Many modifiers (terrains, cards, various superiorities) may be applied to combat factors (or moral factors) of the units.
- In a battle round, one D10 die is rolled for each unit:
* If the result is inferior to the modified combat factor, the unit inflicts one hit to the opposing side.
* If the result is equal to the modified combat factor, the unit inflicts one panic to the opposing side.
- Panics are handled first. Each panicked unit leaves the battlefield and no longer fights. Each panic lowers the side’s
battle morale by 1.
- Hits are inflicted next. A unit suffering a hit is destroyed (unless those with 2-steps, which are then reduced). Each
destroyed unit (not reduced) lowers the side’s battle morale by 1.
- When the battle morale gets below 0, the side is demoralized and may rout.
Aviation:
- Air units move twice per turn and are not stopped by enemy units. They return to base automatically.
- During their air offensive phase, they can attack enemy stacks.
- During their air defensive phase, they can only be move on to friendly stacks (on land or at sea) to help defend them.
Sieges:
- A fortress displays a defense factor and may contain friendly units inside.
- If at least 2 enemy units besiege a fortress, a D10 is rolled. On a modified result equal or lower to the fortress
defense factor, the latter surrenders (and units sheltered inside are eliminated).
Economy:
- Income of controlled regions is added to the treasury usually every two turns.
- Maintenance costs are paid, on a flat basis for navy and air force, and for stacks of 5+ land combat units.
- The player may then purchase units, extra cards or repair is reduced combat units with the balance.
Victory:
- Victory Conditions are detailed for each scenario. As a rule, the first side to reach 20 Victory Points wins the scenario,
but other conditions may also prevail. Check the scenario information sheet.
Warning
Please Read Before Using This Game Or Allowing Your Children To Use It.
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Some people are susceptible to epileptic seizures or loss of consciousness when exposed to certain flashing lights or
light patterns in everyday life.
Such people may have a seizure while watching television images or playing certain video games. This may happen
even if the person has no medical history of epilepsy or has never had any epileptic seizures.
If you or anyone in your family has ever had symptoms related to epilepsy (seizures or loss of consciousness) when
exposed to flashing lights, consult your doctor prior to playing. We advise that parents should monitor the use of video
games by their children. If you or your child experience any of the following symptoms: dizziness, blurred vision, eye or
muscle twitches, loss of consciousness, disorientation, any involuntary movement or convulsion, while playing a video
game, IMMEDIATELY discontinue use and consult your doctor.
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Do not stand too close to the screen. Sit a good distance away from the screen, as far away as the length of the
cable allows.
Preferably play the game on a small screen.
Avoid playing if you are tired or have not had much sleep.
Make sure that the room in which you are playing is well lit.
Rest for at least 10 to 15 minutes per hour while playing a video game.
Notice
WARS ACROSS THE WORLD is a trademark of SAS STRATEGIAE, based in la Terrasse sur Dorlay, France.
SAS STRATEGIAE reserves the right to make improvements to this product described in this manual at any time and
without notice.
This manual, and the software described in this manual, is under copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this manual
or the described software may be copied, reproduced, translated or reproduced to any electronic medium (unless for
personal use) or machine-readable form without the prior written consent of SAS STRATEGIAE.
SAS STRATEGIAE makes no warranties, conditions or representations express or implied, with respect to this manual,
its quality, merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose. This manual is provided ‘as is’. SAS STRATEGIAE
makes certain limited warranties with respect to the software and the media for the software. In no event shall SAS
STRATEGIAE be liable for any special, indirect or consequential damages.
These terms and conditions do not affect or prejudice the statutory rights of a purchaser in any case where a purchaser
is a consumer acquiring goods otherwise than in the course of a business.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 3
WARS ACROSS THE WORLD (WAW) MANUAL
I – Presentation
Wars across the World is a strategy game system for 1 to 4 players allowing to replay all conflicts from the ancient era to
modern days, or even non-historical, fantasy or science-fiction ones. The game is turn-based. Each scenario has a given
number of players and turns.
In WAW, players receive Victory Points (VP) for the sides they control (usually one-to-one fights), score being accounted
for victories and defeats on the field, structures (cities, castles, etc...) captured, as well as specific regions under their
control by the end of the scenario. In addition, the game's cards also provide, or cost, VPs. The player with the higher
score at the end of the scenario usually wins the game, unless the scenario has particular victory conditions that may
prevail (such as capturing a given location or reaching a certain index).
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II – Main Menu
A / Menu
After the WAW logo presentation and loading, the main menu page appears (see Illustration 2.1) giving access to the
main game functions (new game, load game, save game), options and store (not in version 1.00).
Illustration 2.1
When you leave an ongoing game (see section III) you are taken back to a intermediate menu offering more options
(related to the ongoing game) or permitting to come back to the main menu (validate your choice - see Illustration
2.1bis below)
Illustration 2.1bis
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B / Options
The options menu as presented in Illustration 2.2 below can be accessed from the main menu. Parameters such as the
game language, the music and sounds levels, or the AI difficulty level can be adjusted from there.
The game rules (this present manual) can be accessed directly in game, as well as information on Steam successes.
Illustration 2.2
The autosave function is activated by default, and you need to uncheck it in order to prevent it from action (if not the
game is saved automatically at the end of each turn).
The function showing battles between AI sides (those controlled by the computer) allows seeing every battle, but it slows
down the game consequently (although it is sometimes enjoyable to see opposing units in battle, especially when they
suffer losses from other hands than yours)
C / Store
The function that allows buying DLCs directly from our store is not yet activated in version 1.0
D / Save and Load
The function that allows saving an ongoing game, or allows loading a previously saved game. See Illustrations 2.3 and
2.4 below Remember the game has the autosave activated by default. (Saved games by end of each turn and each
phase automatically).
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Illustration 2.3
You can rename the saves by double-clicking on their name inside their lines on the save window.
Illustration 2.4
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III – Scenario Menu
A / The Scenarios
This menu allows selecting which scenario you can play. Scenarios are displayed by chronological order, starting with
the most ancient in history. If a scenario name is displayed as grayed-out, it means it is available for purchase from the
store but not yet acquired by you.
Illustration 3.1
For each scenario you can see a general description and presentation, and a short piece of information on the available
sides, their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their goals (see illustration 3.2). An estimated playing time is also
given. To start, you must first select the shield (or the human/computer button) of the side you want to play before
pressing 'Start Game'. When playing hot seat, just click on the ‘Human’ button below each of the sides’ shields.
Illustration 3.2
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When the scenario starts, a load window is displayed (illustration 3.3), showing the load percentage in progress. Once
load is complete, you are on the mapboard of the scenario and a small windows tells who is going to move first (as this
may be the other side - see illustration 3.4). You can click on the I button in it to get a presentation sheet of the
scenario.
Illustration 3.3
Illustration 3.4
B / Information on the Scenario
When clicking on the I button in the scenario start window (see illustration 3.4 above), you can access the scenario
information sheet. The game built-in PDF viewer will show you a presentation about your future game. It usually displays
3 pages (see illustrations 3.5 below).
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Illustration 3.5
In this window you can read most important information about what is different in the current game from the basic rules,
and also the specific victory conditions or game special rules that are in effect. You can zoom in or out, move the
window, reduce it, or perform searches in it.
Translator Note: those sheets are only in French and English in the current version of the game, and if you play in another language
(such as Russian, German or Spanish), the I button won’t show. But you can always access those Information sheet in PDF format at
the root of the scenario directory.
C / Intermediate Menu
When leaving an ongoing game, you are returned to an intermediate menu that allows you to perform various functions
on your current game (such as save, resume, quit) or also return to the main menu or the game’s options). See
Illustration 3.6 below.
Illustration 3.6
Usually, when in the intermediate menu, you can notice that the main screen background is the same as your current
game loading screen, and not the main menu background screen (the rotating world map).
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IV – Mapboard and Main User Interface
A/ User Interface – Buttons and Functions
Please refer to illustration 4.1 (and following) below to check the descriptions and explanations.
Illustration 4.1
 Back to Menu 1:this buttons takes you back to the intermediate Game menu (see Illustration 3.9 above) giving
access to various functions such as the save functions.
Warning: if you decide to return to the menu and access other scenarios, the part of the ongoing game not
previously saved will be lost. At best, after the first turn and if autosave function is still active, you can reload the
game at the end of the previous turn.
 Side(s) in play 2: the shields of the sides in play are presented one after the other, separated by the letters VS
(versus). The currently active side has its shield displayed much larger than the inactive ones. Clicking or Pressing
the shield will show the map with a color overlay indicating which side controls which region (Illustration 4.1a).
Illustration 4.1a
Furthermore, as shown in Illustration 4.1b below, if there are more than 2 sides (which is the most frequent case),
all extra sides shields are displayed on the same row, separated by VS. Also note that when clicking on the shield of
a side, you can see a drop down list that indicates, for that side, the level of its treasury, victory points and cards in
its hand (see 3a below).
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Illustration 4.1b
 Treasury 3 and Victory Points (VP) 4 in vigor for the active side. The money and VP icons will vary depending on
the scenarios (e.g. bank notes in modern scenarios, gold coins in ancient ones, to show the treasury).
 Tension Index 5: some scenarios have this parameter (see below in section XXX) that usually varies between 0
and 10 (but some range may be higher in certain scenarios) and that will trigger some game particularities when
reached or exceeded (enter in play of new units, cards, or even end of scenario in some cases). Particularities are
explained in the scenario information sheet.
 Information on Turn Number and Date 6: the panel displays visual information on the current game date and the
turn number (the figure after the / indicates how many turns in total there are in the scenario)
 Phase in Progress 7: the panel reminds you of the game phase currently in progress.
 Next Phase 8 button shown as an arrow. When grayed-out, it means you can't move to the next phase (usually
because some mandatory action is not dealt with). WARNING: once clicked, the game moves forward to the next
phase and it is no longer possible to cancel or return back.
 Access to Stack Content 10 is indicated by the square button (with the tank silhouette). When a stack is selected
on the mapboard, clicking on the button opens the detailed stack panel. This allows inspection of the stack content
but is only possible for the stacks belonging to the player (unless a game playing cards allows you to, such as
reconnaissance or spying). See Illustration 4.1b below.
Illustration 4.1b
 Selected Stack 10b is highlighted and green arrows in movement are displayed below it. The stack presents the
picture of the commanding leader (if any) or one of the most numerous units (if no leader). The figure in the small
circle located at the right side of the stack counter indicates how many combat units it contains (information not
given for opposing stacks, you just can see if it is a small, large or big stack by the look of the stack counter).
 Closing the Selected Stack 10a is possible by pressing this button, the panel will disappear and return to the usual
small 10 button state.
When a unit (or more than one, multiple select by simple clicking. Clicking again on selected unit allows to unselect
it) is selected, a white halo is displayed around its counter. See Illustration 4.1c below.
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Illustration 4.1c
When a right click is made on a given unit in the stack panel, the extended unit information window is displayed. It
gives more information on the unit (see D below and section IX on Units).
 Structures 11 are shown by icons on the map board showing their name, the owner (by its color on the name plate)
and some specific properties such as fortification and defense level, port or airport status, victory location, etc… See
Illustration 4.1d below.
Illustration 4.1d
Again, with a right click on the structure, an extended detail window is opened (see C hereafter and section XX on
Sieges).
B / The Mapboard(s)
According to the scenario, the mapboard is more or less vast. Most scenarios in the Classic collection have around a
hundred regions, which is roughly the size of two tablets screens. In the Expanded collection, the number of regions and
equivalent in screens is between 3 and 4 times bigger than in the classic one.
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Illustration 4.2 (NB: map look is an artist rendering and is designed to put players in the mood and spirit of the time)
Refer to illustration 4.2 above to follow the explanations that follow. Regarding the more detailed terrain effects, see
also section B and C hereafter. Other elements and explanation are also presented in the next sections of this manual.
 Sea Regions 1 usually have blue tones (depending on style) and can only be entered by naval units. The move cost
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of sea region is a standard 1 per region. Planes can fly over them (unless specific prohibition in some scenarios).
Supply may cross free sea regions between land regions with friendly ports as long as no enemy naval stack is
present. Note that lakes in some scenarios may function as seas (in smaller scenarios, lakes are rather considered
as rivers or even impassable regions)
Minor or Major River 2: they are in general a border between two land regions, shown as a more or less large blue
line between those regions. Most of the time rivers cost one (if minor) or two (if major) movement points to cross,
unless they are bridged. They provide usually a bonus to the defender on the first round of battle versus a crossing
attacker.
Mountain (or hill) regions 3 are usually shown with an explicit icon or look and cost more in movement points than
the average land region, and thus may even stop it. They also usually provide a bonus to the defender and prevent
pursuit. They are often difficult terrains, i.e. limiting the stacking of land combat units in them (6 maximum, while
there are otherwise no stacking limits)
Marshes/Swamps Regions 4 showing an explicit decoration (icons or pictures). cost more in movement points than
the average land region, and thus may even stop it. They also usually provide a bonus to the defender and prevent
pursuit or breakthroughs. They are often difficult terrains, i.e. limiting the stacking of land combat units in them (6
maximum, while there are otherwise no stacking limits)
Clear/Plain Region 5: have no particular effect on movement (1 PM/region) or combat (no effect).
Forest/Jungle Regions 6 are usually shown with an explicit icon or look and cost more in movement points than the
average land region, and thus may even stop it. They also usually provide a bonus to the defender and prevent
pursuit. They are often difficult terrains, i.e. limiting the stacking of land combat units in them (6 maximum, while
there are otherwise no stacking limits)
Structure 7: are located on regions and show their name and content (ports, airports, fortifications - the latter with
their value in a diamond symbol). The name plate is colored as per the controlling side. When a star is displayed, it
means the structure controls brings VP. When units are inside a structure, the black background circle becomes
colored. More details can be seen by right-clicking on the structure (see 7b). When clicking on a structure, you enter
it (useful to see content and proceed to load/unload operations, in particular in harbors and airports).
Roads and Railroads 8: those transportation networks, when present, reduce the land movement cost of a region
to a flat ½ PM (or even 0 for railroads) as long as the land move is done through a friendly region with such a
transportation network. The full terrain movement cost must be paid when entering an enemy region, even it has
roads or railroads.
Region details 9: are accessible for every region, just by right-clicking on it (don't do on units stacks or structures
though), the window thus opened giving more useful details (name, terrain, income, owner, value in VP, etc…)
Border between Regions 10: their style may vary but aside from rivers and mountain ranges sometimes, they have
usually no impact on the game. Rivers crossing and landings from the sea however have a strong impact on
movement and combat.
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Areas and Theaters:
The mapboard is frequently divided into Areas or Theaters. This is used in simple scenarios for VP collection or for some
specific movement prohibitions (e.g. neutral territories or friendly but not open regions, etc...), or also to help cards or
events gameplay. Last but not least it is quite useful for the game AI.
B / Regions, Terrains and Connections
As presented above, the board is divided into theaters, themselves composed of areas, which are groups of regions.
Different region types can appear on a mapboard.
TERRAIN TYPES AND EFFECTS
As a rule, each terrain costs an expense in Movement Points (MP) to enter it. This cost is always 1 MP for all air units,
whatever the terrain or the region (including over sea regions). Terrain types provide bonus or penalties to combat units
in battle. (NB: terrain illustration may vary according to the scenario look)
Sea/Lake (only air and sea units may enter): 1 MP (Movement Point).
Clear: 1 MP / no combat modifier.
Forest (difficult terrain) 2 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « C » (cavalry/armor). No pursuit allowed.
Urban (difficult terrain) 2 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « C » (cavalry/armor). No pursuit or Breakthrough
allowed.
Mountain (difficult terrain) 2 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « M » (mountain troops). No pursuit or Breakthrough
allowed.
Hills : 1 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « M » (mountain troops).
Marshes/Swamps (difficult terrain) 2 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « M » (mountain troops). No pursuit or
Breakthrough allowed.
Jungle (difficult terrain) 2 MP / -1 to combat for attackers of type « M » (mountain troops). No pursuit or Breakthrough
allowed.
Desert (difficult terrain) 1 MP . No stacking limit but usually supply through not allowed.
CONNECTIONS TYPES
As a rule, a connection joins two regions together (not necessarily adjacent ones). Most of the time they cost 0 MP but
some may have a cost - as listed below - and may impact on combat resolution.
River (small) / River Bridge (small): +1 MP / +1 bonus to defenders on 1st battle round only. No PM cost if a bridge is
present.
River (large) / River Bridge (large) / Strait: +2 MP / +2 bonus to defenders on 1st battle round only. No extra PM cost
if there is a bridge. A strait links two land regions separated by a sea region. If enemy naval units are present in the
intervening sea region, crossing of the strait is impossible.
Beaches: uses up all movement / +2 bonus to defenders on the 1st battle round only.
Mountain Crest: +1 MP / +1 bonus to defenders on 1st battle round only.
Mountain Pass: -1 MP / +1 bonus to defenders on 1st battle round only.
Roads: ½ MP if the whole move is over friendly regions with road. No combat modifier for the road itself (applies the one
link to terrain).
Rail: free movement for all land units that follow the railroad lines as long as this is inside friendly regions.
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See also Illustration 4.2b below (see Structure - §C) to see the information about terrain depicted inside the Terrain
Information Details Window (right-click on any empty part of any region to have it pop-up)
VP AND OTHER VALUES
Regions of importance are usually shown with a star symbol. When you right click on them, the detail shows more
information for the sides in play as to how many VP they gain or lose for conquest or loss of region, as well as potential
gains in money or tension. See also Illustration 4.2a below.
Illustration 4.2a: shows how much the ‘strategic’ region of Pusan (Korea 1950) is valued for both sides.
C / Structures
Structures are mostly cities (of different sizes, but that is not relevant in the current version of the game). They can hold
in addition ports and airports, and they can be fortified (with a fortress value). See illustration 4.2b below for the
Structure information detail window.
Illustration 4.2b: on the left, Oswego is a fortified town (level 5). On the right, terrain details of Adirondack region.
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You can click (left) on your own structures to enter them - See Illustration 4.2c below – which will display to you which
units (if any) are currently inside the structure, its port (if any) or airport (if any).
Illustration 4.2c
D / Units
There are three types of units in the game: combat units (CC), support units (SU) and leaders units. The information
presented on the units is always displayed along the same pattern. One can see the units inside the units detail panel
(click on a friendly stack on map and click on the small tank button), where the most useful data is presented (combat,
movement, morale, name, type). See illustration 4.3 below.
Illustration 4.3
with a right-click on a unit counter, you can have the full unit information window opened, with extra data presented (See
illustration 4.4 below).
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Illustration 4.4
TYPOLOGY OF UNITS
Combat Units (CU)
The information on the unit counter, whether numerical or iconic, is presented likewise:
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Top right, the Morale Factor (MF)
Bottom right, the Movement potential in points, known as Movement Points (MP),
Bottom left, the Combat Factor (CF).
Important note if this factor is displayed on a square,
the unit is considered as Heavy (H)
Located between Moral and Movement, in the middle right, an indicator of either Guerrilla, Breakthrough,
Skirmisher, Elite or Guard: if the Gu guerrilla indicator is present, the unit can usually camouflage. If the
Breakthrough indicator is there (a green arrow), the unit can breakthrough (note: on armored units, this is de
facto, so the indicator is not present). If the Sk indicator (or a bow or crossed rifles icon) is there, this is a
skirmisher unit (inflicts only panics). The E indicator (or a medal, or laurels) shows an Elite unit (which re-rolls
failed dices). The Gd indicator is displayed on Guard units (they never panic). Suicide units (eliminated after
fire) are represented by skull and crossbones. When a siege indicator, the unit gives a siege resolution bonus
(in attack or defense).
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Last, top left, there the Role of the unit, displayed either as a graphical icon or a letter (details in Appendix):
(C = cavalry/armor, M = Mountain, G = Guerrilla,
T = Transport, A = Archers/Artillery, N = Naval/Marines,
Air = Air units [B = Bomber],
CV = Aircraft Carrier,
SS = Submarine,
S = Siege, D = Discovery, I = Interceptor, P = Para, H = Helicopter, AA = Anti-Air units,
L = Logistics
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In some scenarios, there may be extra specific elements displayed on CU's.
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The unit name is also displayed (a short version on the counter, a more complete one in the unit window), as well as a
silhouette, photo or illustration. The counter background color is that of the nation to which the unit belongs. There can
be different colors within the same side or nation (e.g. for a given nation we could have a different color for army, navy
and/or air force), this to help visual identification.
Illustration 4.5
The size of a unit is represented by a small green dot just above the combat value. See red arrow in Illustration 4.5
above. The unit size varies according to scenarios, from a small company or body of men to divisions, corps or even
whole armies.
Land Units
They can only move on land regions by themselves. They may be transported by sea by naval transport units (usually
with a T symbol on their role) or even air transport units. This may vary according to the scenarios.
Camouflaged Units
Some units (in particular the guerrillas) can camouflage (see section XXX below). They often display the Gu indicator.
Illustration 4.6
during the movement phase, the player may click on the camouflage button inside the unit panel, in order to uncamouflage them (otherwise they can't attack), or to camouflage (hide) them. see red arrow in Illustration 4.6 above.
Naval Units
They can only move through sea regions (or sometimes lakes). They may enter some land regions adjacent to sea
regions if those land regions hold a port structure (generally showing an anchor).
Air Units
They must be located an airport structure (except helicopters which can base on any land regions). Some air units may
also land on naval units of the aircraft carrier type (which are kind of mobile airbases).
All air units pay a single 1 PM cost for every region (land or sea) they fly over.
Illustration 4.7
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Some air units have no numerical value for movement (movement points for air units is also called range) but instead the
infinite symbol (horizontal 8 - See red arrow in Illustration 4.7 above), showing that they can go all over the map board
no matter how many regions they fly over. In other words, they have unlimited range.
Support Units (SU)
They are essentially Artillery (A) or Logistical (L) units.
Most of those SU only display a Movement Factor and no combat or moral values, as those units never fight directly on
the battlefield (see section XXX combat below). SU never count for stacking or terrain restrictions.
When SU are found alone in a region and attacked by an enemy, they are eliminated.
Leaders
Leaders are units which illustrate the commanders (or key political commanders) that are particularly active or influential
in the conflicts represented in the scenarios.
Information (graphical or numerical) on leaders is the following:
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Top right, the Morale Factor (MF)
Bottom right, the Movement potential in points, known as Movement Points (MP),
Bottom left, the Combat Factor (CF). In rare cases, it may even be negative.
Last, top left, the leaders' Rank, shown by stars or anchors (for admirals); they rank from 1* to 3*** (and in
some cases a monarch, an emperor, supreme leader is shown by a crown, an eagle or something different than
stars).
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In some scenarios, there may be extra specific elements displayed on CU's.
Hierarchy: shown only in the leaders detail panel, it's a letter that allows distinguishing the hierarchical order of
leaders of same rank.
Maximum Command and Command Penalties
The * leaders may command without penalty up to 5 combat units (CU)
The ** leaders may command without penalty up to 10 combat units (CU)
The *** leaders and monarchs may command without penalty an unlimited number of combat units (CU)
If a leader commands more units than his allowed maximum, he receives a penalty of -1 to its MF (Moral) and-1 to its CF
(Combat), cumulative for each extra 5 full CU in excess.
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V – Game Duration and Victory
A / Duration
Each scenario has its own duration, usually between12 (for the shortest) and 24 (for the longest) turns. The time unit of
the scenario may vary (hour, day, week, month, season, and year) according to the theme and scope. See Illustration
4.1, info 6 above for the location of the information.
B / Victory Conditions and Victory Points
Each scenario gives the detailed victory conditions for each side, usually inside the scenario information document? A
VP gauge follows the gain or loss of VP phase by phase, turn by turn, till the game is over. See Illustration 4.1 and
4.1a, info 4 above for the location of the information.
In this version of the game, when a side reaches 20 VP or more (although this is sometimes changed in a few scenarios
or can be modded via the editor) at the end of a full turn (i.e. after both players had their turn), that side wins the
scenario.
Victory Points
As a general rule, VP acquired through conflicts and conquests (i.e. outside playing cards gains or losses) for a side are
lost by the other side.
Note: VP never become negative, i.e. lowest value is zero.
The side that has the most VP by the end of the game usually wins the scenario. VP gains are coming from a different
set of sources, as follows:
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

Big Battles: a player earns +3 VP if he wins a battle where at least one of the sides had 6+ combat units
Cards: the gain, or loss, is usually indicated on the card descriptive text.
Battle losses: this is cumulative (positive for winner, negative for the loser)
+ 1 VP for every two units steps killed (in excess of our own losses)
+1 VP if a ** Leader is killed
+2 VP if a *** Leader is killed
+4 VP if a monarch (king, emperor, supreme leader, etc...) is killed
+1 VP if a fortified structure is captured by siege (in addition to whatever the said structure brings by itself)
Other Conditions - Sudden Death
In some scenarios, there are victory conditions called 'Sudden Death' (SD). They can be of many different kinds, such as
killing the enemy main leader, taking its capital city or taking all structures in a given region, or also eliminating all
enemies from the map. The side that achieves the SD conditions wins the game immediately, even if it has less VP than
its opponent or not reached the scenario end.
Other Conditions – Tension Index Limit
Some scenarios have a Tension Index (TI), whose name may vary depending on the context (chrome aspect). See
illustration 4.1, info 5 above for the location of the information. Usually the IT is in favor of only one of the sides. It may
also serve a counter for events, reinforcements arrivals or card play limitation. If this is the case, the information is
explained inside the scenario descriptive text.
If the TI has a victory limit and that limit is reached or exceeded at the end of a turn, the side which benefits from the
Index will win the game
See also Section XIX below.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 21
VI – Number of Players and Multiplayer
A / Number of players
Most WAW scenarios have been created for 2 players. However, there are some games for 3 players (or even 4
players), each playing handling one of the sides of the scenario. You can select the side played in the second page of
the scenario menu. See Illustration 6.1
Illustration 6.1
See also Illustration 4.1a, info 4 above for the aspect that it shows on the interface if there are more than 2 players.
B / Multiplayer
For the moment, this version of WAW handles only the multi players Hot Seat version (i.e. the 2 or 3 players will alternate
on the same PC).
After release, a version with play by email will be prepared. A version with online direct play will come afterwards.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 22
VII – Game Phases
A game of WAW is a turn-based game where each side play after the other, in a set of sequences called phases. The
whole of possible phases (as listed below) may not be fully present in a given scenario. Some can be absent or they can
be present only on certain turns (e.g. frequently the income phase, if present, will be played only every even turns).
Possible phases are the following:













Cards
Reinforcements
Supply
Economy
Naval Movement
Air Movement (Offensive)
Land Movement
Battles (and Breakthroughs)
Second Air Movement (Defensive)
Sieges
Construction Delivery
End of Turn
End of Game
At the start of each game turn (as well as at the start of each of the turn's phases), a warning message or animation is
presented.
A / Cards Phase
The game turn usually starts with this phase (although there could well be a scenario without cards - non existing now
but feasible with the game editor). As a rule a side will draw a new card at this phase in the game (in some scenarios the
draw could be of 2 cards instead).
Illustration 7.1
Gameplay of Cards is described in section X below.
B / Reinforcements
This is the phase that follows cards. It only occurs if the scenario has a planned reinforcement for the turn (by design) or
if a card was played previously (this turn or even the previous one) that is giving reinforcements.
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Illustration 7.2
Gameplay of Reinforcements is described in section XI below
C / Supply
This phase takes place after the reinforcements. It only occurs in scenarios where the supply rules are activated. It
happens also that it is not activated on the first turn(s) of a scenario (as an example in Normandy 1944, this phase is
present but inactivated on the first turn, to help the allied player gameplay in the scenario). Cards that impact supply
must be played at the start of that phase.
Illustration 7.3
As shown in Illustration 7.3, regions where the player's side is supplied are indicated via green stripes (falling towards
the right). Those where the player is not in supply for now are in red stripes (falling towards the left, opposite to those of
the player's). Also, when some regions do not provide supply to any side, they are showing grey stripes (either falling in
the side of player or that of his enemy, depending on who owns those regions for now).
Gameplay of Supply is described in section XV below
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 24
D / Economic Phase
This phase follows that of supply. It only occurs in those scenarios where economy is activated (i.e. players have funds
and use them - among other things - to buy units, repair damaged ones or purchase new cards). This phase usually
takes place only one turn out of two, often on even numbered turns. This can be changed at will via the game editor.
In addition the phase is subdivided into three sub-phases: income collection, units maintenance, purchases. Cards
impacting income, maintenance or purchases must be played at the start of each of those respective sub-phases.
Illustration 7.4 – Tooltip on figures lists where the calculation comes from.
Gameplay of Economy is described in section XII below
E / Naval Movement
This phase always occurs when a scenario has naval regions (seas, lakes) AND there are naval units that can move in it
(as an example, in Saratoga 1777, there are river boats which can move on lakes and navigable rivers). The player can
move his naval stacks (see Illustration 7.5), load land units in a harbor holding land units, or from a land unit adjacent to
the sea/lake/river where the naval units (with transport capacity) are present. He can solve naval battles in regions where
his units and enemy ones are present at the end of the movement. Cards impacting naval movement (not battles) must
be played at the start of this phase.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 25
Illustration 7.5
Gameplay of Naval Movement and Combat is described in section XVI below
F / Air Movement (Offensive)
This phase can only exist in scenario where air units a present for at least one of the sides (for example, in Normandy
1944, where of the Allied side is the only one to have planes). The player with planes may move his air units, as stack or
individually, (see Illustration 7.6), load land units inside airports if a transport plane is present, choose to make recon,
strategic bombardment, paradrops or rebase missions. Once a move is validated, it can't be cancelled.
Illustration 7.6
As a major different from the other movement phases, combats may occur during the movement of air stacks/units
(such as interception by enemy fighters or Anti-Aircraft fire) and those combats will be solved automatically by the engine
(using a similar procedure to the usual battle procedure - see H below) without intervention of the active or inactive
players. Surviving victorious units will pursue their mission till they successfully reach their destination. Units or stacks
which lost those intervening battles automatically abort and return to their original base. At the end of the air movement,
air units of the player may thus be present in regions containing enemy units (or only enemy structures without units, or
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 26
seas) and, if those regions can become site of a battle, they will be solved in the ensuing land phase (if over land
regions) or are solved immediately (if over a sea region). This phase cannot be tweaked inside the editor, it is either
active or not active. Cards impacting air movement or combat must be played at the start of this phase exclusively.
Gameplay of Air Movement and Combat is described in section XVI below
G / Land Movement
This phase can only exist in scenario where land units a present for at least one of the sides. Players may move their
units one at a time or as stacks (see Illustration 7.7), may unload land units onboard ships or air transports, and engage
enemy in battle. In some cases, the enemy may be overrun during moving when entering a region where the enemy is
much weaker than the moving stacks (usually a power ratio of 7:1, the mouse cursor will change to show the possibility).
Note that, unless using some exceptional card, that a region may only be entered by one of the player's stacks maximum
(so no second or more stacks) and that the said stack must be commanded by a leader unit (in other words leaderless
units - except paratroopers - do not attack). On the other hand, enemy regions empty of combat units can be entered,
including if they hold an enemy structure (which is either captured, if unfortified, or besieged if fortified and 2 combat
units are left there). A stack that moved cannot be moved again, and a move already effected cannot be cancelled. This
phase cannot be tweaked inside the editor, it is either active or not active. Cards impacting land movement must be
played at the start of this phase exclusively.
Illustration 7.7
Gameplay of Land Movement and Combat is described in section XVI below
H / Battles
Battles take place only after the corresponding movement phase is over (i.e. naval battle takes place after naval
movement, land battle after land movement). The only exception is that of air movement which can trigger immediate air
combats during the move (see F above). If a battle involves only air units on one side, those being able to attack land or
sea targets, will be resolved during the relevant battle phase (land or sea battle). Players can select battles to be solved
in the order they want, by selecting them from the battle list window (see Illustration 7.8), then each battle is solved
immediately before going to the next (see Illustration 7.9), This phase cannot be tweaked inside the editor, it is either
active or not active. Cards playable during battles must be played upon the opening of the battle window, before the
fighting actually starts. The attacker must play his cards first, followed by the defender. Some cards may even cancel the
whole battle (such as a retreat card), in which case the game moves on the next unresolved battle (or next phase if this
was the last or only battle).
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 27
Illustration 7.8
Illustration 7.9
Battles are always resolved along the same process, described in details in section XVII below.
Note that sea battles are peculiar, in that they last only one single combat round and that it may not be simultaneous like
the other battles. A land battle always lasts two rounds, simultaneously solved (unless a card is played changing the
duration or simultaneousness).
At the end of a battle, a check is made to see if there is a victor, if one side has routed (test effected when losses are
higher than the side's morale), if there is a pursuit (only after a rout or via card play), a breakthrough (see below) and if
leaders are injured or killed.
When a battle generates a breakthrough, the winning player may make an immediate extra move with his breakthroughable units and leaders, limited to an adjacent region (see also section VIII / E and Illustration 8.8), then solve the
breakthrough battle if there is one (however a breakthrough battle does NOT allow another breakthrough).
Battles are one of the main sources of VP, and after all battles have been resolved a summary window will display the
results (see Illustration 7.10) showing gain and losses of all sides involved.
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Illustration 7.10
See the end of the manual for an explanation of a land battle in section XXV below
I / Return to Base and Second Air Movement (Defensive)
The first part - return to base - is automatic and takes place immediately after the battle phase is over. All air units
(except helicopters) which are in regions without friendly airports must return to the airport or base they have originally
moved from (it can be an aircraft carrier for naval air units). Player has nothing to do, just see it (see Illustration 7.11).
While units return to base, no air combat or AA fire takes place (in this version of the game).
Illustration 7.11
Once air units have returned to their base, players may order a second air movement (termed as defensive - see
Illustration 7.12) with their units, with the important restriction that the air units can only end their movement on friendly
or empty non-enemy regions. This process is useful for the player to anticipate the enemy possible moves and position in
advance his airpower to contribute to his future defense (e.g. above the player's own stacks to provide additional air
support, or above regions where he feels his own interceptor air units could intercept enemy air flying by).
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 29
Illustration 7.12
Note that interceptor type air units inside friendly air bases (airports or aircraft-carriers) are not obliged to make a move,
they will automatically intercept enemy air units that would move over their bases during enemy air movement. See also
section XVI below.
J / Sieges
This phase can only take place when at least 2 friendly land combat units are in the same region as a fortified enemy
structure (non-fortified structures are automatically captured). As for battles, a list of ongoing sieges is displayed and the
player has to choose which one and in which order they will be solved (See Illustration 7.13). This phase cannot be
tweaked inside the editor, it is either active or not active. However, sieges themselves can be tweaked by making siege
rules more or less difficult in the editor (e.g. in Hamilkar 264, sieges are only possible for coastal structures of the port
that is inside the structure is considered blockaded, i.e. units friendly to the besieger are located inside the sea region off
the port). Cards playable during sieges must be played upon the opening of the siege window, before the resolution
actually starts. The besieger must play his cards first, followed by the besieged. Some cards may even cancel the whole
siege, in which case the game moves on the next unresolved siege (or next phase if this was the last or only battle).
Illustration 7.13
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 30
See the detailed explanations on Sieges in section XVIII below
K / Constructions Delivery
This phase takes place only on the same turn than a turn with an economic phase during which units where purchased.
In all other cases it is skipped (see A above). Units under construction now appear inside the regions or structures where
they have been placed during the purchase phase. Note that, during the turn phases between the purchase and the
delivery, units under construction are not fully visible but shown grayed-out and with the ball-bearing construction icon on
top of them. A summary window will recap to the player all the units that were delivered and where they have been
delivered (See Illustration 7.14). For now there are no cards impacting construction delivery, but if there were to be
some in the future, they would be playable only at the start of that phase.
Illustration 7.14
See the Constructions detailed explanations in section XII below
L / End of Turn
This phase is there to tell the player that his turn is now complete. In a future version of the game, a turn summary
window will be displayed then. If, during that phase, and when both players have played their full turn for the turn in
question, a check is made to see if one of them wins the scenario, in which case a specific victory window will open (See
Illustration 7.15). Some cards may be played at the start of this phase.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 31
Illustration 7.15
Some specific victory conditions (such as sudden death or tension index limit) may cause at this stage the victory of a
player, even if he is not currently leading in terms of VP. See sections V below and XX & XXI below.
M / End of Game
That phase only occurs at the end of the last turn of the scenario, showing it is now ended. A window displaying the final
VP tally appears with a display of the victorious side (or, rarely, no victor if both sides have strictly the same VP score) .
See Illustration 7.16. No card may be played any longer.
Illustration 7.16
At this stage, the game will end. In another version of the engine, there will be options to continue playing beyond the set
time/turn limit.
NB: Note that, for now, the players may alter a scenario duration through the editor.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 32
N / Note on Chronology of Phases and Actions
Phases are always solved in the above chronological order. However, within the phases themselves, the actions are left
to the player choice in terms of order. See above section IV, Next Phase 8
To go to the next phase, players must click on the top-right arrow button. When the button is not present or grayed-out, it
means players must still solve some actions in the current phase before being allowed to move to the next. For instance,
in the card phase, you can't continue if you have no discarded cards in excess (and the Next arrow button won't be
displayed before the action is satisfied).
Warning: when playing too fast, you may go to next phase by error. In that version of the game, there is no way back.
The only option is to load the autosave of the game (or the player's own save) and restart from that point onwards. It is
advised for new players to leave the autosave function on (which is the default setting).
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 33
VIII – Nations and Sides
Those terms are frequently used all over the manual, inside the game and also inside the various parts of the game
editor. Explanations below are useful to understand the structure of WAW scenarios and game.
A / Nations: generalities
A nation is the base component of a side (see D). Each nation is unique, has two set of colors (one dark and one light),
and has its own colored background counters, victory icons and treasury icons. A nation can be the main nation of a side
(there should always be only one, but one minimum) or it can be secondary (see also B). Each nation has a flag
assigned to it, which is usually placed on the map board when the nation owns a region for the game start. See
Illustration 8.1.
Illustration 8.1. Flags (on board, VP, Money, for the scenario Gulf 1990
Some cards may affect only one nation in particular, or a set of nations
NB: the concept of nation in the game is more that of a game entity rather than the more common sense of 'national' entity
A nation usually has its own pool of units, may own sub-nations, has one main 'capital' region in each of the game's
domains (air, sea, land, which is where units returns in last resort), a preferred play domain and sometimes specific AI
parameters.
There must always be at least 1 nation per side (but no limit up).
B / Nations: sub-nations
A sub-nation is always attached to another nation, at least nominally. The main purpose is to give a visual difference
(colors, counters, flags) and thus to help better identify the various components of the same side. For example, in
Austerlitz 1805, when the French Empire is played, you can see the Imperial Guard or the Kingdom of Italy as subfactions of France, also helping finding out those units easily in the stacks (as knowing where they are can be useful for
card play for instance). See Illustrations 8.2a and 8.2b.
Illustration 8.2a. Flag of subnations (NATO, UNO, GCC) in Gulf 1990
Illustration 8.2b. Counters colors for USA sub factions: US Army, USAF, US Navy in Gulf 1990
A sub-nation has usually its own pool of units, may have a capital region, a preferred gameplay domain (between land,
sea or air) or special AI (Artificial Intelligence) parameters.
There can be as many subnations as desired in a side, as long as the side has at least one nation.
C / Maneuver Advantage, Defections, Radar, Entrenchments
In each scenario, the designer may assign (or not) to nations or subnations some specific parameters that will influence
gameplay. Those designed for now are the following:
Maneuver Advantage
This is used on the war at sea. It gives to the receiving nation a permanent bonus of +1 when calculating, just before the
start of a naval battle, which side will get the tactical advantage and thus which side will shoot first. This advantage is
also using the leader’s combat value and a dice roll to be determined. See Illustration 8.3.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 34
Illustration 8.3.
Defection
This parameter allows a nation to switch side during the course of a game (most often due to the play of a card). This is
only possible in the case when the concerned nation (or sub-nation) still owns its capital region, OR when the said capital
region was captured by the ex-enemy side (the one the defecting nation will join). When this happens, the units of the
nation are assigned to the new owning side. If they are alone in a region, the region property is changed to the new
owning side as well. If they are in stacks with units of their former side, they are teleported to their capital region.
Radar
This parameter is useful only when the nation has air units. If the nation has radar, this gives the nation a +1 permanent
bonus when air interceptions attempts are conducted (even if the opponent also has radars) and also during air-to-air
combat (but in that case only if the opponent does NOT has radar by himself).
Entrenchments
When this parameter is activated for a nation, the land stacks of same may entrench. To do so, the player just click on
the entrench button in the unit panel and the unit will entrench. See arrow in Illustration 8.6 below.
Illustration 8.6.
When a stack is entrenched, a visual indicator is placed on top of it,
showing a trench icon and the red figure -1
(see right here). See Illustration 8.6a.
Illustration 8.6a.
In exchange of getting entrenched, the stack loses its movement capacity for the turn. An entrenchment inflicts to all
attackers of the entrenched units a -1 penalty to the combat value of the attacking combat units (in future versions of the
game, the value of entrenchment will be moddable based on scenarios).
When an entrenched stack leaves the region where it was entrenched, either voluntarily (via movement) or involuntarily
(forced to retreat following a defeat) n it loses its entrenchment. The indicator is removed. The opponent, when capturing
a region where the defender was formerly entrenched does NOT get the benefit of the entrenchment (it is removed).
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D / Sides: generalities
The side is the entity the player controls. It may regroup one (mandatory minimum) or more nations or sub-nations. As
for the individual nations, a side has a color (only one, to identify what it owns) and a flag which is mainly used on the
mapboard when a region is controlled by many nations of the same side or, as default, in most other cases. See
Illustration 8.7
Illustration 8.7
The side owns the playing cards (not the nations) and is the one to play them. Similarly, the victory points (VP) and the
treasury (income) are assigned to the side, not to the component nations. At the end of a game, the victory or defeat also
goes to the side. See Illustration 8.7b.
Illustration 8.7b. Symbols used for sides in Gulf 1990, the last 2 (USSR and Iran) are unplayable neutrals
The various sides (in the current version of the game) are automatically at war against every other side, as long as the
said sides are designed as active (i.e. playable or non neutral). There are no possibilities of alliances or diplomacy,
except via card play changes. When a side is declared as neutral, it is at war with nobody.
Illustration 8.7c. Shows Tannenberg with the sides filter ON (click on side button top left)
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E / Breakthroughs
This special parameter is assigned to a side. All the units of all nations in the side have the possibility to effect a
breakthrough (or follow one) IF the units are breakthrough-able (see section IX below for units parameters). The
breakthrough principle is simple: when the side wins a land battle AND has breakthrough-capable in the victorious stack,
he may move the said units (and all those which can follow them) into an adjacent region and, if a leader is available,
may launch a new attack into the selected target region if enemy forces are present there.
Without a leader, units may only breakthrough into empty regions (i.e. regions without enemy combat units). All allowed
regions (including the one when they are at the moment, which is how you decide NOT to move away from battle region)
are shown on the map in yellow color.
Just click on the target region to effect the breakthrough there. See Illustration 8.8.
Illustration 8.8.
A single unit may only breakthrough once per turn, even if its side wins again a battle that was generated by a previous
breakthrough.
Important: note that breakthrough is not mandatory. If you don't want to take it, just click on the current battle region and
the units won't move. Units unable to breakthrough will always stay 'behind' (i.e. in the battle region).
See Illustration 8.9 next (where the air units, not allowed to follow breakthrough, are staying in the original region).
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 37
Illustration 8.9.
Leaders and Breakthrough: a leader will move with units in breakthrough only if the leader has the ability to do so. This
is represented by an icon located on the leader counter, on the middle-right side.
If the leader in command has not the ability, another leader (even if not commanding)
with the ability will take over and will go on the stack that does the breakthrough.
F / Sides and Victory Points
As indicated above, VP are assigned to the side, whatever the number of nations the side is made of or the nations
which 'gained' the VP by their action. Similarly, cards belonging to the side, their play, when it generates VP, bring the
said VP to the side.
For a given game, there is a VP threshold which is termed as the Victory Level. It is used for all sides in the scenario,
without difference (in most classical scenarios, the threshold is 20 VP).
G / Tension Index
A side may benefit from a parameter that we call the Tension Index (TI). When an IT is activated in a given scenario it
usually receives a 'flavor name' that is contextual. For instance, in Korea 1950 we call it «Chinese Intervention», in Six
Days 1967 its name is «Soviet Diplomatic Pressure», etc… More details in Section XIX below. See Illustration 8.10.
Illustration 8.10: in Kentucky 1861, the Tension represents the level of loyalty of Kentucky towards the Union
The main interest or role of the TI is to give specific tempo, challenge or deadline to the scenario to better reflect the
overall context of the situation represented or a major fact of same (those shown below are not exclusive, they may even
occur at the same time)



When the TI reaches a certain threshold (most frequently 10+), the side that receives its benefit may win the
game, even if it did not meet yet the VP victory level or game special victory conditions,
The TI may also trigger, from different levels/values new things in the game, such as the arrival of new events,
units (as reinforcement or in the pool) or allow play of certain cards. For instance in Korea 1950, when the TI is
standing at 8+, Chinese Communist troops will enter the game. And when it reaches or exceeds 10+, a whole
set of 16 new cards will be added to the scenario deck (for each side)
At a given level of TI, a side may gain (or lose) extra VP. It is also possible that a high TI value provides VP (or
other benefits) to one side while a low TI value will give VPs (and/or advantages) to the other side. For instance,
in Kentucky 1861, a high TI (5+) is in favor of the Union while a low one (-5 or less) is favorable to the
Confederacy.
The TI will fluctuate mostly through card play but also following the capture (or loss) of key locations, such as regions or
structures. The details will be given inside the scenario information sheet that the player can read, and/or by a visual
informational icon or sprite on the board. For instance, in Six Days 1967, key Arab regions of Jerusalem, Ismaïla and
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Suez, when captured by Israel, make the TI rise by +1 each and the map board shows a hammer-sickle Soviet symbol to
illustrate the importance of those regions See Illustration 8.11.
Illustration 8.11.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 39
IX – Units and Stacks
A / Combat Units
The main tool at the disposal of a player in WAW is the Combat Units (CU). Such a unit, be it used on land, air or sea, is
the one that directly fights in battle. CU always have the same type of parameters, as indicated below (see Illustration
9.1):
See examples below to find the disposition of information on various kinds of CUs.
Illustration 9.1.








The Morale Factor MF (top right), 1
A Movement Factor expressed in movement points MP (bottom right), 2
A Combat Factor CF (bottom left), 3 sometimes displayed over a dark grey rectangle for heavy Units 7
Sometimes, when necessary, a descriptive icon for a particularity, such as E (Elite), Gd (Guard), Sk
(Skirmisher), Guerrilla (Gu), Suicide (skulls and crossbones), etc…4
A number steps (above the CF) shown by small green dots (one or two), 5
In the top left, a general type or role of the units, identified by a letter (F = fighter / chasseur, T = Transport, C =
cavalry/armor, M = Mountain…), or an explicit icon (e.g. a tank to show it is an armored unit), 6
If the unit is a two-steps units that was previously damaged (one step left, shown with a red+green dots), a
white stripes is displayed behind the unit picture, across the middle of the counter 8
Potentially some specific or decorative icons may appear, depending on the scenario.
All this information (and many other) are also to be found inside the unit detail window – see Illustration 9.1a – that can
be opened at any time via a right-click on the unit counter inside the unit panel or any panel showing those counters.
Illustration 9.1a.
A unit has a name, a picture, and a colored background corresponding to its nation or sub-nation (see § VIII above)
according to the side it belongs to. Some units can enter the game camouflaged; according to scenario setups (see
special cases, section XXX below).
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B / Support Units
The support units (SU) are units whose effects will influence indirectly stacking, maintenance, supply, battle resolution
or even sometimes particular aspects of the game. Among them we find Artillery units (A), logistics units (L), or Electronic
Warfare units (EW). See Illustration 9.2.
I
llustration 9.2.
 The Morale Factor MF (top right), 1
 A Movement Factor expressed in movement points MP (bottom right), 2
 In the top left, a general type or role of the units, identified by a letter (F = fighter / chasseur, T = Transport, C =
cavalry/armor, M = Mountain…), or an explicit icon, 6
 Potentially some specific or decorative icons may appear, depending on the scenario.
All this information (and many other) are also to be found inside the unit detail window – see Illustration 9.1a above –
that can be opened at any time via a right-click on the unit counter inside the unit panel or any panel showing those
counters. As CU, a support unit has a name, a picture, and a colored background corresponding to its nation or subnation (see § VIII above) according to the side it belongs to.
They have no MF (moral) as they are not directly involved in battles and they don’t affect battle morale calculations.
SU do not count for stacking. They will be destroyed if found alone (i.e. without friendly CU) in a region with only enemy
combat units.
C / Leaders and Command
Leaders are special units representing generals, admirals, kings or other influential rulers and leaders. They are
represented on their counters as follows:
Illustration 9.3.
A leader has






a Morale Factor MF (top right), 1
A Movement Factor expressed in movement points MP (bottom right), 2
A Combat Factor CF (bottom left), 3 sometimes also called Tactical Factor or Tactical Value.
sometimes, when necessary, a descriptive icon for a particularity, such as Br (Breakthrough) which indicates the
leader will move along with the units in breakthrough 4
a hierarchical rank from 1* to 3*** (stars for generals, anchors for admirals), or a crown for monarchs, 6
Potentially some specific or decorative icons may appear, depending on the scenario.
Naval leaders (displaying a marine anchor) can only stack with naval units. Air leaders (showing a wing symbol) must
stack on air units.
All this information (and many other) are also to be found inside the unit detail window – see Illustration 9.3 below – that
can be opened at any time via a right-click on the unit counter inside the unit panel or any panel showing those counters.
As CU, a support unit has a name, a picture, and a colored background corresponding to its nation or sub-nation (see §
VIII above) according to the side it belongs to.
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Illustration 9.2a.
Ranks and Hierarchy
Monarchs are usually using a crown symbol, or an Eagle (for emperors), or another context-related icon. Their rank is
displayed as indicated above. They always rank before all other leaders.
Hierarchy is a way to sort leaders of same ranks. It is displayed via the use of a bold letter in the Leader detail window
(see Illustration 9.3a symbol 6), the higher the letter in the alphabet the higher the position of the leader within the rank
(A is before B, etc...)
Command
Command order
Command is sorted by rank, and within same ranks by hierarchy. Monarchs are always in top command position,
followed by 3*** leaders, then the 2** leaders and lastly the 1* leaders.
If two friendly leaders (i.e. of the same side, whatever the nation or sub-nation) of same rank are on the same stack in a
battle, the hierarchy will tell who is in effective command (thus a 1*A will lead a battle before a 1*B or 1*C, but not before
a 2**H for example).
Command Limit and Penalties
Leaders may effectively command a limited number of Combat Units (CU). This limit is calculated by batches of 5 CU, as
follows:
1* leaders: may command without penalty up to 5 CU
2** leaders: may command without penalty up to 10 CU
3*** leaders and monarchs: may command without penalty any size stacks.
Penalties: -1 to Morale and -1 to Combat for each missing star * / rank for a leader exceeding the maximum CU number
(cumulative for each batch of 5 in excess), but those values cannot become negative (so minimum modified value will be
0 for morale or CR).
Leaders and Combats
Leaders are essential in battle, on two grounds. First a leader is mandatory to start a land battle. Second their CF will
influence the combat of their CU and their MF value influences both the stack morale (the higher it is the better as it is
used to determine when the stack is demoralized) and the enemy performance (which is lowered if the opponent MF is
higher than his own). See Combat Section XVII below
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Leaders may be removed from the game at the end of combat if they get injured or killed in battle. See Combat Section
XVII below.
Land Units without leaders cannot attack (but they can defend). See Combat Section XVII below. Air and Naval CU
may attack without leaders. NB: Paratroopers may attack also without leaders.
D / Stacking
In the game, stacking is in principle unlimited, be it on land, sea or air. However, on land, stacking may sometimes be
restricted inside what is called difficult terrains, where the limit is 6 combat units (leaders and support units are never
counted for stacking). Those terrains are not so frequent (see section XXX below) and the information about difficulty is
show in the terrain detail as a forbidden symbol with a big 6 figure in it, in red color. It is shown only in the region detail
window (right-click on a region to access it). See Illustration 9.4 below.
Illustration 9.4
E / Overruns
When during movement a land stack with CU and a leader moves over an enemy region that contains enemy CU, there
can be an overrun situation. A calculation is made between the moving stack and the defending stack. If the ratio is 7:1
(seven to one) or more, the defending CU are overunned and eliminated. The operation uses up 1 PM of the moving
stack which may continue moving if it has MP left. Overrun is solved without battle. If not enough PM are available or if
the ratio is not met, a land battle will occur. See Illustration 9.5 below.
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Illustration 9.5.
F / Units, Stacks and Maintenance
During the maintenance phase, which takes place during the economic phases of the game, immediately after income
collection, calculations are made for maintenance of the side’s stacks and units. The engine will make a difference
between naval and air units on one side, and land stacks on the other. See section XIII below.
Air and Naval Units
For those two categories, maintenance is a flat fee paid according to the total number of naval (on one side) or air (on
the other) units currently on the mapboard. See Illustration 9.6 below (note you can click on the selected units to see
them in details inside the unit panel).
Cost of maintenance is the following:
* Fleet total is 1 to 3 units: $1
* Fleet total is above 4 units (but less than 7): $3
* Fleet total is 7 or more units: $5
* Air Force total is 1 to 3 units: $1
* Air Force total is above 4 units (but less than 7): $3
* Air Force total is 7 or more units: $5
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Illustration 9.6.
For land stacks, calculation of maintenance is made for each individual stack present on the mapboard. The cost is
higher for bigger stacks, to avoid players creating massed ‘doom’ stacks. If they do big stacks, which is allowed (barring
suffering command penalties or having issues in difficult terrains because of stacking), they will pay more. Costs are the
following:
* Each land stack having less than 5 CU: $0
* Each land stack having more than 5 CU: $1
* Each land stack having more than 10 CU: $3
* Each land stack having more than 15 CU: $5
When a Logistics support unit (letter « L ») is present in a stack, the said stack is considered being one level less
(example : a stack with 11 CU and a L unit will pay only $1 instead of $3, as it is considered as being the level just lower
than the one it is actually). However, the reduction for the L units is maximum of one, whatever the number of « L » SU
present inside the stack. See Illustration 9.7 below.
Illustration 9.7.
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Lack of Maintenance
When maintenance for Air or Naval units is not paid, the whole of the Fleet or Air Force concerned is “grounded”, those
units are not allowed to move this turn. Ships will move to closest friendly port at once. Those units may still fight and
defend when attacked though.
If a land stack is not able to pay its maintenance (See Illustration 9.8 below), it suffers an immediate attrition of 20% of
its combat units steps, rounded down, which are inflicted as losses at once.
Illustration 9.8.
G / Information Windows
As a rule, a right-click on a unit, stack, structure or region will open the information window on same, as shown in
previous paragraphs. This function is always active on friendly elements, and only on regions and structures (not units)
for enemy elements. Those windows remain open until the player decides to close them by click on the X symbol located
on the top right of the window.
H / Manipulation in the different phases
Most of the time, a left click on a game element will select it (stack of units, card, region). A right-click will open an
information window if there is one (see G above).
When it comes to manipulating stacks and units on the game board, see the following sections.
Handling Units from or to Windows
You can use drag-drop method to do so. Left-click on the selected unit and drag it towards the section of the window
where you want it. This is used mostly in structures such as ports and airports, to ease operations of loading and
unloading units from or to transport units (ships or planes). See Illustration 9.9 below.
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Illustration 9.9.
Handling of Cards
See Section X next. Here also click-drag function is used. Left-click on the card, then drag it to the location of the screen
where required (it is usually shown with a highlight).
Handling Units and Stacks on the Mapboard
The same click-drag function is used within a region for units. Just left-click on the selected unit and drag it to the
location within the same region where you want it. This is useful for example when a player want to split different units
from a stack, or wants to move a unit from a stack into a structure within the region. The most common use is when you
have many air units inside the same airport (e.g. in Normandy 1944) and you need to send them individually to different
targets, it is advisable to split them locally before moving, in order to avoid moving the whole stack by mistake See
Illustration 9.10 below
Illustration 9.10.
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When moving stacks (or even a single unit which is de facto a stack by itself) to another region on the map, you need
to click and then drag or push the whole stack towards the destination, without releasing the click. Releasing the mouse
is equivalent to ending the movement where the mouse pointer is located. See Illustration 9.11 below
Illustration 9.11.
I / Fog of War
The player is not allowed to examine the content of enemy stacks. The only thing he can see is the stack on the map,
with no other indication than the shape of the background counter (which gives a hint as to the stack size). See
Illustration 9.12 below.
Illustration 9.12: small, medium, large stack background aspect
In addition, the restriction also appears when the opponent receives reinforcements, although this time there is an
indication on the number of units in the received reinforcements. See Illustration 9.13 below.
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Illustration 9.13
Last, some cards allow the player to examine the enemy stacks (via spying, reconnaissance, leaks, etc…). When such a
card is played, the player will see the stacks he is allowed to examine with a yellow highlight. Clicking on the stack deactivates the highlight and shows the stack content in a separate window. See Illustration 9.14 below.
Illustration 9.14
Note that the information thus received is only valid during the current player’s phase and will be lost in another phase. It
will be lost also if you play another card immediately after it, so be careful to take good note of the feedback as it will not
be possible to re-access it later.
J / Various
To be completed.
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X – Playing Cards
Each game turn will start with the Cards Phase. As a rule, the playing side will draw card(s) at that point.
A / Typology
All cards are displaying a front (where the cards information is displayed) and a back (generic, to keep the details
masked to the opponent). There are two kinds of cards: the black ones that can be drawn and playable any number of
time in the same game and those, in red, that are usually playable only once and have effects that may be temporary,
unique or permanent. The above-mentioned colors are used in the card title texts, in addition to any other information
that can also be present on the card itself. See Illustration 10.1 below.
Illustration 10.1.





Back of the card, usually displaying the side emblem and a discreet on-context decorative background 1,
Card title, in red if unique (and usually not replayable), 2
Card title in black for those cards that can be played and re-drawn without limitation, 3
A decorative image illustrates the theme of the card, 4
An icon is sometimes present to remind, on a non-exclusive way, which main phase of the game the card can
be played into, 5, a useful indication when the card is first drawn (or when already in hand at start of a game)
Below are the most frequent card icons that can be found (see also Appendix)
Combat
Cards
End of turn Various
Movement Siege
Tension
Victory Points
 When the card requires one (or more) specific conditions to be played, those are shortly reminded right below
the decorative image, 6
 A summary of the cards effects is presented right below the conditions, 7
 Last, for red cards, a short texts reminds the player of the card’s fate (removed, remain in play, etc…) 8
Player Hand
Cards drawn and not yet played are sent to the «hand» of the player, which is physically located on the bottom left of the
main screen, and can be opened by simple click on it.
Deck
The Deck is made of all cards not yet drawn by the player AND all those (non one-time only) already played. The latter,
when returning to the deck, are placed at the bottom of same.
So except for red ones, most cards return to the deck, allowing some of them to be drawn – and played – more than
once in the same scenario.
B / Drawing Cards
Cards are drawn at the start of each player’s turn. Cards are drawn from the deck. During this phase, the whole screen
gets darker. This is normal and used to help players focus on the newly drawn card. See Illustration 10.1bis below.
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Illustration 10.1bis
Illustration 10.2.
If a card can be played immediately during the Card Draw phase, it twill be shown with a light green blinking
highlight around it (see also Illustration 10.4 hereafter). When a card is selected (by clicking on it), the card goes into the
middle of the screen, and the place where it can be played appears with a green halo too. To play the card, just click and
drag it on to the green zone (usually on the left-hand side of the screen). Card will be considered as played, even if its
effect may apply only in a later game phase (at that point, the card will be shown again as a reminder).See Illustration
10.2 supra and Illustration 10.3 below.
If one card (or more) must be played (this phase or any other), it will be shown with a purple blinking highlight
around it (see also Illustration 10.3 hereafter). The card button on the top right side will also show a purple halo, as well
as the location where the card must be dragged. In that case, you can’t move out of the phase till you have played the
said card(s).
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 51
Illustration 10.3.
A played card goes to the bottom left of the screen, but can be read or checked again at any time, just by single click on
it. See Illustration 10.4 below.
Illustration 10.4.
C / Card Play
When a card is playable after the Draw Card phase, as indicated above, a green blinking halo appears around it inside
the player deck, at the start of the concerned phase. It is indeed impossible to play a card after action of the said
phase at started, even if the phase is not yet ended. In other words, cards must be played at the beginning of a phase
(excepted battle cards). You will notice on the top interface a small cards icon
reminder.
next to the phase name as a
As a rule, a card that does not show a green halo around it is potentially available and valid, but cannot be played at the
current moment. But that can change at a later phase in the same turn.
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You are not forced to play a card when it is possible (or even play it at all), and you can always wait for another time.
However make sure the card does not have a turn or special conditions limit. Also remember that the number of cards in
hand is limited (see next) and when the limit is exceeded there is a risk to lose a card not yet played.
Note however that some rare cards must be played at required moments. If this is the case, the card will be in purple
halo and the button for next phase will not unlock till the card is played.
D / Discarding
The overall principle of card play in the game is that a player cannot have a hand made of more than 5 cards at the end
of the Card Draw phase. So the player may play cards during Card Draw, if allowed, but will be forced to discard every
card in excess of 5 after that. Discarding is mandatory and prevents moving to the next phase till solved.
When discarding is required, the game screen becomes much darker and a specific button appears with the number of
cards to be discarded indicated (see Illustration 10.5 below). The player hand pops up. When moving the mouse over
the cards, they are shown in bigger size (to ensure better readability).
Illustration 10.5.
To select a card to discard, just click on it. It will move to the bottom right of the screen (towards the discard zone - see
Illustration 10.6 below). You can always cancel your choice by re-clicking on a discarded card; it will send it back to the
hand. And so forth.
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Illustration 10.6.
When the player is happy with his choice(s), it can be validated by clicking on the arrow button on the message box.
Cards as selected will return to the deck (where they can be drawn again later) as if they had been played. Red cards will
also return to the deck (they are not considered as ‘played’). Game will then move on to next phase.
E / Red Cards (Unique)
As indicated in paragraph A above, red cards are unique. Both because they are relatively important for the player in
terms of effects, but also because they can usually be played only once.
After the card play, the effects are implemented in the relevant phase. The cards are then removed and NOT placed
back in the deck.
Note that some red cards are mandatory: usually the information is clearly indicated on the card and the system forces
the player to play the card (purple halo and lock of next phase). Those cards are rare but designed so that they can give
a tempo or a balance to the scenario. The most characteristic of those are cards related to weather conditions, seasons
or natural disasters. Very often they impact both players.
F / Permanence of Effects
When cards effects are deemed permanents (for example the card giving an extra income to one side in each
subsequent economic phase), the card will remain visible (by both sides) on the left-hand side of the screen, in the area
where played cards are stored. This allows for anytime check and read of the card, a useful reminder in some games. It
also helps remembering what other cards or conditions (if any) could cancel them. When and if such a card is cancelled
or ceased to be effective at a later point in the game, it is removed and disappears from view.
G / Players Hands
Active player hand is located at the bottom left of the screen. The opponent’s hand is not visible, except in the case when
a player’s card allows inspecting it (see Illustration 10.7), or even to draw or discard opponent’s cards. If this happens,
the opponent’s hand is displayed in the top middle part of the screen.
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Illustration 10.7.
H / Handling of cards in different phases
In most phases, clicking on card (playable or not) make it appear bigger and closer, in order to enhance readability. To
play a cord (which must show a green – sometime purple – blinking halo – see above), just click on it and drag it to
where the game system requires, namely:
 Most frequently on the left-hand side of the screen which is also displayed in green/purple. See again
Illustration 10.2 above
 In the economic phases, or during battles and sieges, there are specific locations inside the different windows
and screen to drag the playable cards. Here again, click and drag the cards where the game tells you...
I / Cards with Variable Results
Some cards will not provide the same results every time they are played because they have effects which are Dice
dependant. When a dice roll is required to effect the card results, a special window pops up and the player is prompted to
roll the dice, and can see the results there. As an example, see Illustration 10.8 below for the Israel card “Focus
Operation”.
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Illustration 10.8
J / Various
To be completed.
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XI –Reinforcements
This is the phase that follows card draw. It only happens when the game turn has reinforcements appearing, either as
per scenario design schedule, or because of previous card play (in a previous game phase).
A / Reinforcements (scheduled or card-generated)
Reinforcements are units given to a player at different turns of a scenario. This can be either from the scenario design or
because a card was played to provide them. In both case, a summary window will appear at the end of the phase (so you
can play card before) which gives all the information about the said reinforcements. See Illustration 11.1 below.
Illustration 11.1.
 Each reinforcement (can be made of one or more units) appears on its own line, with the units part of it (not
detailed if this is the opponent’s reinforcement summary),
 The place where they appear is indicated and clickable: when you click on it, the game will zoom on to the
reinforcement arrival region.
 Last, at the right of the window, an icon will indicate if the reinforcement is the consequence of a card play
(you’ll see a card icon) or if it is coming as per the scenario schedule.
B / Placement of Reinforcements and Removals
Most of the time reinforcements will arrive at a pre-determined location. In such a case, no action from the player is
required. The summary window will give all relevant details.
However, some reinforcements, be they by card play or scenario schedule, can enter the game after the entry location
has been chosen by the player. See Illustrations 11.2 and 11.3 hereafter.
Illustration 11.2.
Illustration 11.3.
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First step will consist in selecting the destination region of the reinforcement. Valid regions are displayed with a yellow
overlay, as shown in Illustration 11.2.
The player clicks on the region where he wants the reinforcement, and this region now has a green overlay. It still
possible to unselect the region by clicking at nay moment and any number of times to another yellow-colored region. To
confirm the selection, click on the validate button. Once this is done, the choice cannot be undone. See Illustration 11.3.
C / Case of Leaders
Leaders can also be received as reinforcements, either alone or with other units. Procedure is identical as the one
described above.
There is however one automatic arrival case, when a leader was wounded in battle (see section XXX Combat); it will
appear automatically as a reinforcement in the next reinforcement phase of the same player, in the capital region of the
player. Similarly, if a leader was killed AND the scenario has a scheduled replacement leader for it, the latter will also
arrive inside the capital region.
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XII –Economy
This phase takes place after the supply phase (see later). It only occurs in the scenario where Economy was planned
and is active (i.e. players have income, treasury and use it – among other things – to maintain, buy or repair their units).
In most scenarios where it is active, the phase takes place only one turn out of two, usually (but not always) on evennumbered turns. The phase can be modded with the editor.
It is divided into 3 sub-phases: income collection, unit’s maintenance, purchases. Cards impacting income, maintenance
or purchases must be played at the start of the phase.
A / Treasury and Region Income
Each side has its own treasury (cannot combine or transfer with that of another side). Treasury remains active as long as
the side is in play, and can never become negative (lowest value will always be zero). Reminder: see Illustration 4.1
above for the location of the treasury information on the game interface.
Illustration 12.1
In most scenarios, red figures on the map will show Economic Values of the regions 1 (see Illustration 12.1). This
economic income information is also reminded inside the detailed region window. Most of the time income comes from
land 1 regions on the map board, but there are cases where it can come from water 2 regions. Some regions / boxes on
the map 3 can sometime be interdicted to some sides, but they can still provide income.
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When a maritime region has income (see 2 Illustration 12.1), that one will only go to one side (usually the map will use
that side’s color code or another kind of indicator). During the Economic phase, that maritime income is only received
when the said region is not occupied solely by enemy naval combat units. If this is the case, the ‘sea’ in question
provides no income (consider it raided).
Global Income
When adding the figures from the controlled regions (and also that of structures or cards, if any), you obtain the financial
income of the player. If some income is shown in brackets, it means it is linked to a card or event.
Some scenarios also have extra income arriving to the player from "off map" sources. Whatever the time period of the
scenario, the look of the income window is the same (see. Illustrations 12.2a and 12.2b below)
Illustration 12.2a
I
llustration 12.2b
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B / Income from Structures
In some scenarios, it is possible that particular structures can bring income too (it's less frequent but possible. The
structure detailed window shows more information if necessary). Usually the structure income is indicated by a big red
figure on top of the structure icon. See Illustration 12.3 below.
Illustration 12.3
C / Other particular Income: Sea Zones
In some scenarios, it is possible that some sea zones bring income to one side (or even both). Usually those seas
display a merchant boat silhouette and a figure next to unit, which is the income value of that sea. This particular income
can be temporarily “removed” by Raids. A raid is the presence of the enemy in a sea zone, with naval combat units and
no presence of units friendly to the side that receives the sea income. When this happen, the benefitting side receives no
income from the sea. But the raiding side does not gain it either, its main “success” being to deprive the opponent of the
sea income. See Illustration 12.4 below.
Illustration 12.4
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D / Cards Income
Lastly, as indicated in section X above, some cards will bring income by themselves, either punctual (black or red cards
when played), or on a more regular manner (previously played red cards). See Illustration 12.5 below.
Illustration 12.5
E / Various
To be completed.
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XIII – Maintenance
The maintenance phase takes place during the economic phase too, right after income collection. As indicated in section
IX / F above, a calculation is made for maintenance of the player's units and stacks. As explained, a distinction is made
between land stacks and the air/naval units.
A / Naval and Air Maintenance
This maintenance is based on a flat value set on the actual total number of units of the concerned type on the mapboard,
whatever the number of stacks or their location. A summary is made and shown in the summary window for the
concerned types (see Illustrations 13.1a Naval and 13.1b Air below) showing with a blue figure the amount of the
maintenance cost.
Illustration 13.1a
Illustration 13.1b
When clicking on the stack of Air or Naval units, you can see all of them inside the unit panel (see above), but it does not
mean they are all located in the same place. This feature is just here to help you figure out which units are concerned.
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That cost is the following:
* Fleet total is 1 to 3 units: $1
* Fleet total is above 4 units (but less than 7): $3
* Fleet total is 7 or more units: $5
* Air Force total is 1 to 3 units: $1
* Air Force total is above 4 units (but less than 7): $3
* Air Force total is 7 or more units: $5
B / Land Maintenance
Land units maintenance is based on the stacks of such units, not the total number of units on map. That's one key
difference between land and air/sea units. One important factor is the number of units inside a stack: if that stack is big, it
will pay maintenance more than a smaller one. This is done to avoid people trend to 'over-stack' units. The can still stack
at will (barring command or stacking limits), but this has a cost.
Illustration 13.2
The cost of each stack is shown as a blue figure on it (see Illustration 13.2) and is calculated likewise:
* Each land stack having less than 5 CU: $0
* Each land stack having more than 5 CU: $1
* Each land stack having more than 10 CU: $3
* Each land stack having more than 15 CU: $5
C / Role of Logistical Units (Supports)
When a Logistics support unit (letter « L ») is present
in a stack, the said stack is considered being one level
less (example : a stack with 11 CU and a L unit will pay
only $1 instead of $3, as it is considered as being the
level just lower than the one it is actually).
However, the reduction for the L units is maximum of
one, whatever the number of « L » SU present inside
the stack. See Illustration 13.3 below from the WAW
Tutorial Bulge 1944.
Illustration 13.3
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D / Lack of Maintenance
When maintenance for Air or Naval units is not paid, the whole of the Fleet or Air Force concerned is “grounded”, those
units are not allowed to move this turn. Ships will move to closest friendly port at once. Those units may still fight and
defend when attacked though.
If a land stack is not able to pay its maintenance (See Illustration 13.4a and Illustration 13.4b below), it suffers an
immediate attrition of 20% of its combat units steps, rounded down, which are inflicted as losses at once. You need to
select the number of indicated units to remove for each stack, indicated by a red figure on the stack (see Illustration
13.4a)
Illustration 13.4a
Once the selection is complete for each stack (see Illustration 13.4b), you can proceed to next phase. Note that you can
see in the unit panel which units you have selected for elimination.
Illustration 13.4b
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XIV – Constructions
The purchase phase (used for constructions) takes also place during the Economic phase, after income collection and
maintenance. The player can use what treasury is left from the previous phase(s) for those constructions.
A / Construction Window
When the phase starts, the player can see at the bottom of the screen (the usual unit panel location) a section of the
interface where is displayed everything that can be purchased. See explanations in Illustration 14.1 below.
Illustration 14.1.






On the left, a reminder of the treasury 1,
and the expenses already made so far (obviously 0 when first opened) 2
Purchasable cards are shown next 3, each click on the icon purchasing one card
Replacements are shown after the cards 4, here again a click will purchase one replacement. Note that when a
forbidden symbol is displayed on the soldier silhouette, no replacement can be bought,
The unit list shows all units that are available, 5, their prices shown in blue
The arrow at the top left 6 allows to reduce/close this section of the interface, which then allows the pop-up of a
purchase summary window (see Illustration 14.3 in E section next)
Important Note: each unit in WAW is unique.
B / Purchase and Pool of Units
To purchase a unit, you need to have enough funds 1 din the treasury to buy it, then you can click on it. Each region of
the board where the unit can be placed is showing a green overlay 7(there can be one or more possible regions for one
same unit). At anytime during the purchase, by clicking on the arrow (6) - See Illustration 14.2 - you can get the
summary of your ongoing purchase (Illustration 14.2b ).
When you feel ready to conclude, exit the window to validate the purchases done. See Illustration 14.2 and 14.2b
below.
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Illustration 14.2
Illustration 14.2b
C / Placement of Purchases on Map
Once a unit is purchased (payment is made when unit is clicked on, and can't be cancelled), just drag and drop it on a
suitable green region of the mapboard (see 7 in Illustration 14.2 above). During the drag move, the unit image will
appear in a smaller size. When the unit is released above a suitable region, a construction icon is displayed on the
mapboard.
When the player moves a unit over a region where the build is not possible, the map is shown with a red overlay and a
forbidden icon appears also on top of the reduced unit image (see 8 in Illustration 14.2 above). If the unit is dropped in
such a region, nothing happens (impossible build).
Reminder: don't forget to right-click on a unit to show up the details when needed (see 9 in Illustration 14.2 above)
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D / Purchasing Replacements Points
Replacement points (see 4 in Illustrations 14.1/14.2 above) are used to repair units that have been damaged
previously, either in battle or via events or card play. Damaged units are showing a white stripe across their counter.
To buy replacements, click on their button in the interface, one click giving one purchase. When the forbidden symbol is
placed on top of the replacement button then none can be purchased. It may be because you have no currently
damaged units to repair, or because you already purchased enough replacements for your current needs.
WARNING: unused replacements are lost.
E / Purchasing Cards
Cards (see 3 in Illustrations 14.1/14.2 above) can also be purchased, within the limits of those which are still inside the
player's deck.
To buy cards, click on their button in the interface, one click giving one purchase. When there are no cards left in the
deck (rare) or no money left (more frequent), purchase is no longer possible.
F / Following-up on your Purchases
On the mapboard, you can click on the construction symbol and you can see to what purchase of units it corresponds.
Illustration 14.3
During the units delivery on map (at the end of the turn – see Illustration 14.3 above), a summary will also be provided
(not for replacements or cards) in a window similar to that of the reinforcements.
G / Various
To be completed.
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XV – Supply
The supply phase follows the Card Draw phase. It only takes place in scenarios where the rule is active. It can
sometimes be inactivated for gameplay reasons on some game turns in specific scenarios (for example in Normandy
1944, that phase is omitted on the first turn, to ease the Allied player gameplay).
Supply plays an important role in WAW, as unsupplied units may suffer serious penalties, and can even be eliminated
from the board.
A / Sources and Supply Lines
Each side has one (or more) supply sources, where supply lines originate from.
Sources
Those are regions on the map board that display an icon of supply, the style of which varies according to the time period
of the scenario, as follows:
Ancient
Medieval-Renaissance
Contemporary
Modern
Each source is either exclusive to a given side, or valid for both sides. The relevant information is present inside the
region detail window, where the emblem of the supplied side(s) is present next to the supply icon. When a supply source
becomes inoperative, the supply icon displays the forbidden symbol (see the icon on the right-hand side in the list
above).
Lines
The game engine considers that a supply line is a group of contiguous regions, un-occupied by the opposing side and
where the terrain type allows supply. In the supply phase, all the regions located in valid supply lines are shown with
green stripes (leaning towards the bottom right of the screen) overlay. Those regions which are not inside valid supply
lines are shown with red stripes (leaning towards the left of the screen). Last, regions that are not in supply lines
because terrain does not allow are showing grey stripes. See Illustration 15.1 below.
Illustration 15.1.
When a line exists between a stack and a source, the stack is deemed to be 'In Supply'. If the stack is not in such a line
(i.e. stack located inside a red-stripes region), the stack is unsupplied.
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Warning/Reminder: some terrains, such as Desert or Wilderness/Jungles do not allow supply to pass in most scenarios
(unless there is a road, rail, port or airport).
B / Case of Ports and Naval Supply
Each port in the game (usually a structure with a port displays an anchor) can be used to relay supply. This means that if
a port is part of a supply line (or a supply source itself), every other unblockaded friendly port is considered as being part
of the same line, and supply is relayed/goes through the said port(s).
A port is considered as blockaded when an enemy naval stack is situated in the sea zone where the port has its exit. See
Illustration 15.2 below.
C / Situations of Non-Supply
When a stack is out of supply in the supply phase (i.e. not in a supply line), a white icon showing the unsupplied situation
is placed on top of the stack on map, as follows:
Ancient
Medieval-Renaissance
Contemporary
Modern
The same icon is also displayed on each unsupplied unit inside the unit panel of the stack.
D / Role of Logistical Units (supports)
The main role of the support units of type «L» (logistics), in addition to the above-mentioned impact on land maintenance
cost, is to give temporary supply to the stack in the case it would become unsupplied.
In such a case, the engine will remove one «L» support unit from the stack, which in turn is now supplied for the
remaining phases of the current turn (till next supply phase). None of the effects described in E hereafter will be
implemented in such a case. When the logistical unit is removed, it is shown as ‘killed’, as per Illustration 15.2. below.
Illustration 15.2.
E / Effects of Absence of Supply and Adjustments
At the start of their side's supply phase, stacks of land units not inside a valid supply line will become unsupplied. In such
a case, those units will suffer the following penalties:
* Movement potential is limited to 1.
* Combat Factor is reduced by -3.
* Morale Factor reduced by -1
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Note 1: air units that become unsupplied are stuck on the ground and can no longer fly any air missions (including
interceptions). Naval units are locked in harbor and cannot move out to sea.
Note 2: land combat units of the Guerillas (Gu) type usually do not suffer from the lack of supply as they do not require
any. This category of units is considered as always in supply and does not check for supply lines.
The summary of effects will appear in a window as described in Illustration 15.3. below.
Illustration 15.3.
Second successive non-supply situation
When at the start of a supply phase units are already unsupplied (from the previous turn), they will be eliminated from the
game.
Reminder: a stack with support units of «L» type will gain one turn of respite via the 'consumption' of one such support
unit.
Fortified Structures
A fortress or any structure with a fortification value provides supply to all units that are inside it (leaders, land, air, sea
units), even if besieged.
F / Various
To be completed.
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XVI – Movement and Stacking
During the movement phase (be it air, naval or land), the player moves his stacks (or even individual units if he wishes
so). On any given region of the mapboard he can constitute one or more stack of units and then can move them in any
order he wishes.
A / Movement Points, Creating and Moving Stacks
Each unit (including leaders) has a given number of Movement Points (MPs), either set 1 or infinite 2. The number of
MPs of each unit is indicated both on the unit counter in the unit panel and inside the unit details window 3 (see
illustration 16.1 and the detail window. Section XXX supra).
Illustration 16.1
A player can move his units either in complete stacks (the most frequent case), or unit by unit, even if the last case is
equivalent to moving stacks made of 1 unit each. When a stack has completed its move (see below), its movement factor
displays a red 0 (see Illustration 16.2). A stack that moved and when at least one of the units inside the stack has no
PM left receives a little red diamond activation indicator (see 1 in Illustration 16.2 below)
Illustration 16.2
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Manipulating and Creating Stacks
Within the Region
To move or select only part of the units in a stack, you must first select it (click on the stack, it is slightly enlarged and an
animated circle displayed around it), then select the unit(s) you want to separate and drag and drop the selection
inside the same region in any empty space in that same region, such as a space next to the initial stack for instance.
See Illustrations 16.3a and 16.3b
Illustration 16.3a: selected stack, slight enlargement and animated spiked circle around it
Illustration 16.3b: selected unit 2, drag-dropped in same region (which displays a green overlay) - See arrows
To the Friendly Structure in Same Region
When you drag and drop your selection on top of the structure in the same region, a colored overlay appears (blue for
now) and selection will enter the structure upon release of the mouse (you can't do that on to an enemy besieged
structure). See Illustrations 16.4a and 16.4b hereafter.
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Illustration 16.4a: drag the selection on top of the friendly structure, which is now rounded by green highlight
Illustration 16.4b: release mouse, the stack enters the structure
NB: Note that entering inside a structures does not use any MP from the units in the stack
IMPORTANT HANDLING RESTRICTION: the engine makes it impossible to drag and drop a stack on top of an
opposing stack (it will return an invalid move message).
Moving Stacks: click-drag
To move a stack, select it (the animated green circle is shown around it by then) and then drag the stack, without
releasing the mouse button, to the next adjacent region, and the next, and so forth till you reach the region where you
want to go, and then release the mouse button to validate the move. Note that if you exceed your MP capacity, the
movement arrow will change color - see next - and tooltipped information will tell you why you won't move further. See
Illustrations 16.5a, 16.5b and16.5c next.
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Illustration 16.5a: when crossing regions during move, information on move cost is displayed
Illustration 16.5b: forbidden regions are shown in gray and with a red explicit message
Colored overlays are displayed on each of the crossed regions during the movement drag, and information on MP
expenses is given. As long as the overlay keeps the same color, movement is accepted. When color changes to purple,
it is no longer possible and the move won't be implemented. See Illustration 16.6
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Illustration 16.6
In order to help visualizing the movement, an arrow will follow your dragging of the stack. The arrow will keep the green
color when the move is valid, then will change to red when the move has become impossible.
When a move is suitable, it is only implemented (if valid) when the player releases the mouse button. An animation will
display the actual movement of the stack, usually physically following the path of the movement arrow that was drawn
during the drag. CAREFUL: a valid movement, when implemented (mouse button released in a different region than the
origin one) cannot be cancelled (at least in version 1.00 of WAW). See Illustration 16.7
Illustration 16.7: the unit moves physically on the map, region by region (NB: the green arrows are just here to show, it does
not happen like this in the game, you just see the movement)
When a stack move is completed, the movement/activation indicator located on the left-hand site of the stack counter
turns to red (it is green when the stack has not moved, orange when a move was done but some MP remains and a
move is still possible). It is possible that within a same stack some units (the slowest) have no MP left, which will stop the
whole stack. If you want to check if some units have MP left, you can double check inside the stack panel and see the
MP value on the individual unit’s counters. See Illustration 16.8
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Illustration 16.8: units may have a different number of PM left after the move
B / Costs of Regions and Connections
Movement always takes place from one region to the next, each region having its own cost in MP based on the region's
terrain, modified by the type of transportation network in the region (none, road, railroads), and adding to the that the cost
of the Connections between the regions (such as rivers, mountain ranges, straits). Some specific connections or
movements may use up the entire stack's MP, even if the balance after the move is still positive (for instance, paradrops
or amphibious landings use up all the movement capacity).
Terrains
Names of terrains vary according to the scenarios played, but overall the terrain typology in WAW is rather
homogeneous and most terrains work the same from a scenario to the next. Information pertaining to terrains can be
seen in the top part of the region 1 details window when selected, right below the region name. There you can see the
MP cost of terrain 2 (both on the decorative sprite and inside the texts of the window) and, in some cases, for difficult
terrains, the stacking limit in combat units, if any 3. See Illustration 16.10
Illustration 16.10
We usually have the following (rather standard) types of terrains in WAW:
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Clear Terrains: these are open terrains such as plains, deserts, savannah or steppes. Their MP cost is usually 1 and
they don't have specific constraints. Sometime Desert may disallow passage of supply lines (not always).
Sea Terrains: these are open terrains only allowed to naval units. Their MP cost is usually 1 and they don't have specific
constraints.
Wooded Terrains: we can find there woods and forests. They usually cost 2 MP and stacking may be limited in forests
(not woods) to a maximum of 6 combats units (see stacking below). They also impact pursuit (see Combat) and/or
Breakthroughs (see below).
Rough Terrains: such as hills, wooded hills, mountains or urban zones. They usually cost 2 MP and stacking may be
limited in some of them to a maximum of 6 combats units (see stacking below). They also impact pursuit (see Combat)
and/or Breakthroughs (see below).
Difficult Terrains: here we have high (alpine) mountains, jungles, marshes and swamps, icefields or wilderness. They
usually cost 2 MP and stacking may be limited in forests (not woods) to a maximum of 6 combats units (see stacking
below). They also impact pursuit (see Combat) and/or Breakthroughs (see below)
Connections
Connections exist between most regions. Most of the time they have nothing specific, they are present just to tell
movement from a region to the next is possible via them. However, there are connections of specific types (list below)
that will affect movement and/or combat. Usually they can be seen on the mapboard directly via a graphical
representation, such as a river line, a bridge, a strait etc....
Main connection types in WAW are the following:
Minor Rivers: no impact on movement, but some on combat (see below).
Major Rivers: they cost 1 PM to cross. They also have combat effects (see below). If a stack has not enough PM left to
both pay the next region terrain cost and the crossing cost, then movement through them is not allowed. Otherwise the
cost is paid and if there are PM left, movement can continue beyond them.
Straits: their particularity is that they link two land regions over a sea region. Their cost is like that of major rivers, i.e. +1
PM to cross. See Illustration 16.11a below. If a stack has not enough PM left to both pay the next region terrain cost
and the crossing cost, then movement through them is not allowed. Otherwise the cost is paid and if there are PM left,
movement can continue beyond them.
Illustration 16.11a
Warning: in addition, if enemy naval units are present in the intervening sea zone (the one 'crossed' by the strait), then
movement across the strait is impossible, even if there are more than enough PM left to the stack. See Illustration
16.11b below.
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Illustration 16.11b.
Mountain Passes: their presence between a region and a region with mountain reduces the cost of entering the
mountain region by -1 MP
Mountain Crests: work like Major Rivers (+1 PM to cross)
Beaches: they are the connections between land regions and sea regions. They are used for landings (move from
onboard ships at sea to the land) and loading (from the land to ships into the sea). Such a connection uses up all the MP
capacity of any land unit that uses it. They also inflict serious penalties on combat. Last, but no least, beaches prevent
passage of supply (unless there is a port structure inside the land region).
C / Minimal Movement
Stacks which have not spent any PM may always move to an adjacent region (with a valid connection), whatever the
entry cost (terrain + connection) would be and even if higher than their remaining PM. If they use that possibility, stacks
can no longer move this turn after entry in the adjacent region.
This minimal move is not allowed if any unit in the moving stack has used already part of its MP allowance.
D / Naval Movement
Naval Movements only takes place between sea regions or from a land region with a friendly port to the connected
adjacent sea region (or vice versa). Moving by sea is strictly equivalent to moving by land, knowing that usually the sea
terrain costs only 1 PM and there are no special connection costs for those linking sea regions between themselves or
connections between seas and ports. Sea regions have no owner or controller, no impact on combat and no stacking
limits.
Blockade and Supply
Blockade is the fact for a naval stack (called also fleet) to be
located in the sea zone where an enemy port has its connection
exit. Such a port is then blockaded (or under blockade). In some
scenarios, blockade is a requirement for besieging a port structure
(if the scenario has the blockade rule active, besieging
unblockaded harbors will bear no effects). See Illustration 16.11c
right
A blockade will cut the possibility for the blockaded harbor to relay
supply lines (so supply will not enter or leave the blockaded port).
Illustration 16.11c
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Naval Movement and Control
At the difference from land regions, sea regions have no owner or controller. As a consequence, moving through a sea
region will not alter its status
However, the engine checks for the presence of naval stacks (or not) of both sides in sea regions. An enemy naval stack
off a port will entail blockade of the latter (see above). Similarly, if the sea region is supposed to bring income to a side,
the presence of an enemy naval stack alone in that sea region will prevent income collection by the beneficiary side (see
Economy above). Lastly, an enemy stack in the sea region crossed by a strait prevent usage of the strait connection by
opposing land units (see above)
Loading from Ports
You can load land units from inside a port structure into the transport ships also present inside the same port. The
loading takes place during the naval movement phase. Click on the structure icon to open it. See Illustration 16.12
below
Illustration 16.12
In the window thus opened (window title is the name of the structure), you can see below the structure picture a line
displaying all land units currently present inside the structure, then another line with the naval units inside the harbor. If
the structure is also an airport, the third line will display air units present in the airport. If a line is shown with a gray
overlay, it means the structure has no units of the relevant type inside it.
To load land units (or unload them, use reverse process as described hereafter), just drag them from the top line (land)
to the middle line (ships) on to the counter of a naval transport unit. If a unit is not allowed to board/load on to a ship,
either because it is too big or the ship is already fully loaded, a forbidden symbol will be displayed on the land unit being
currently dragged.
Loading from the shore, and Landings
To load a land stack from the land to ships in the adjacent sea (provided the latter have enough transport capacity to
accommodate the land units); just move the land stack on to the naval stack, during the land movement phase.
Similarly, to land from ships on to a connected (via beach) adjacent land region, select the land units (and only them)
aboard the ships (during the land movement phase) and move them to the land region.
In both cases, the moves use up all the MP capacity of the land units. See special aspects below.
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Naval Attacks
In the current version of the game, you can attack enemy naval stacks with your own without the need to have a leader
commanding your attacking stack (while on land, you must have a leader to do so).
Nevertheless, as in land warfare, ONE naval stack of yours may enter a sea region and attack the enemy there. If a sea
region is already the site of a naval battle, you can't move extra stacks inside that sea region (unless you have specific
cards allowing it).
E / Air Movement
Air movement is allowed between all connected regions, be they land or sea. Moving an air stack is similar to the general
movement case presented above, with the limit and advantage that terrains bear no importance on the movement (all
regions have an equivalent air move cost of 1 MP) and connections have no movement cost at all. In addition presence
of enemy stacks do not stop movement in any case (unless voluntary)
Handling of Aircrafts
When the air movement phase is active, the engine will make the air units pop up from inside their airports, so that the
player can easily spot his available units. Air units can be moved in whole stacks or individually. See Illustration 16.13
below
Illustration 16.13
Air Range
All planes that have a numbered MP factor (other than the infinite symbol) can move a number of regions equal to this
value without any constraint. This value is called 'Range' and includes the cost of returning base (in other words, this is
the cost of the single flight; the return flight will be done automatically with the same value). Planes with infinite range can
move anywhere (if allowed) on the mapboard.
Aircrafts, Maintenance and Supply
Unsupplied air units are not allowed to fly. Similarly, air units whose maintenance was not paid are also stuck on the
ground.
Anti-Aircraft (AA)
Anti-aircraft (AA) is taken care of automatically during air movement. If an air stack flies over or into an enemy region that
has at least one AA unit, the latter will shoot automatically at the said air unit(s). The AA fire lasts only one round. No
battle is displayed for view, the engine handles it behinds the scene automatically (information and animation will tell the
player what happens). Only the AA unit(s) fires, air unit(s) do not reply. Battle is resolve like the normal battle, it's only
not shown.
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According to that "battle" results:
* All panic result(s) inflicted on the air units by the AA make that number of air unit return immediately to their airport of
origin
* All Hit/loss result inflicted by the AA unit is taken immediately (may lead to plane destruction if it has only one step), and
the surviving planes (including one hit but not destroyed) continues their movement
* No moral or rout test is made, all surviving non-panicked planes keep on flying
* AA fire takes only one round
In the current version of the game, AA only shoots during the initial air movement phase and not when planes return to
their airports of origin in the return to base phase. AA shoots during every region crossed, including the one where air
units end their movement.
Interceptions
Interceptions are dealt like AA fire, in an automatic manner. Interception takes place when an air stack moves into an
enemy region that contains at least one air combat unit with interceptors (usually they display the F - for Fighters - letter
on their counters). Those interceptors can either be already flying inside the region of interception or be located in an
airport in that same region. Again, no battle resolution needs to be handled manually by the player, the engine solves it
automatically. Results will be displayed via message and animation.
However, the main difference is that the intercepted air units, if allowed to fight in the air, will react during the combat and
return fire. Battle is solved as a standard battle.
According to that "battle" results:
* All panic result(s) inflicted on the air units by the intercepting plane make that number of air unit return immediately to
their airport of origin
* All Hit/loss result inflicted by the interceptor unit is taken immediately (may lead to plane destruction if it has only one
step),
* Air battle lasts two rounds, like a normal battle. Winner and loser are determined normally too. If the winner is the
moving player, he may continue his movement normally. If he loses the battle, he must return to his origin airport.
In the current version of the game, interceptions only take place during the initial air movement phase and not when
planes return to their airports of origin in the return to base phase. Interception may occur over every region crossed,
including the one where air units end their movement.
Air-Sea Attacks
Those attacks take place when air units end their movement on a sea region with enemy naval stacks. The battle is then
solved at the end of all air moves of the active player.
The battle is solved normally but only the planes with a capacity to attack naval targets will shoot effectively, and only
those naval units with an AA fire value will participate in returning fire (including if they already effected AA fire in the
previous move). That air-sea battle will last two rounds.
Air-Land Battles
Those battles take place when air units end their move on a region with enemy land units, except if the air units are
effecting a strategic bombing attack (see below). The air-land battle is solved during the ensuing land phase only, in two
ways:
* If the planes are alone in the enemy land region with only enemy land units (and no friendly land units), the battle is
resolved normally and only the planes with land attack values will participate, and only the AA units of the defending side
will return fire. This air-land battle will last two rounds.
* If the planes are 'joined' later during the land movement phase by friendly land units in the same enemy region, the
battle is solved normally as a land battle with friendly air units presents, in two rounds. On the defending side, only the
AA units, if any, can shoot down air units, the enemy land units will inflict loses only to their adversary land counterparts.
Loading and Unloading Air Transports
In the present version of the game, units may board air transports only inside airports. The transported land units must
be inside the structure to be loaded, as well as their air carriers. To proceed with the loading, during the air movement
phase, click on the airport structure to access its content.
The procedure is equivalent to the one of loading units on boats inside harbors (see above).
The only way to unload units from an air transport directly on to a region without a friendly airport is to use paradrops.
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Changing Base
Planes always return to the base they come from in the Return to Base phase of air units. The only case when this does
not happen is for planes when they change bases. To do so, you select to move your plane(s) from their current friendly
airport onto another friendly airport, by dragging the air stack directly on top of the destination structure (on the structure
circle). The destination structure is now highlighted with a green circle. See Illustration 16.14 below.
Illustration 16.14
When the move is completed, all of the air units MP allowance is used. During the ensuing 'return to base' move, those
units which changed based won't be concerned and will stay where they were sent to. In practice, changing base will
prevent the concerned air units to do anything else during their turn.
Paradrops
In the current version of the game, Paratrooper type units (showing the P letter or a parachute icon) will load air
transports inside friendly airports. Those transports will fly till destination region during the air movement. In the
destination region, the paratroopers will drop, using the paradrop button in the stack panel to instruct them to do so.
Paradroping will use up the total MP complement of the paratroopers for the turn.
Important Note: paratroops may drop onto enemy regions with enemy units inside them and are allowed to launch an
attack versus those enemies even if there are no leaders in the paradroping stack. This is an important exception to the
role that prevents from attacking without a leader.
Helicopters
Helicopter units (usually with the H letter or an icon of a helicopter silhouette) consider any friendly land region of nondifficult terrain as their airport. This is where they will return after the completion of their air movement. However, if they
reach a region that becomes friendly during the ensuing battle, they will stay there instead of returning to where they
initially came from.
If the destination region of helicopters is NOT friendly after the battle (failure to conquer it), the helicopters will return to
the region they came from initially.
F / Roads and Railroads
The main purpose of roads (they will be physically drawn on the map) is to replace the various MP costs of the different
terrain by a standard flat value of 0.5 MP per region (rounded up when at the end of movement). In other words, a unit
moving alongside a road will pay 1 MP every two regions only. See Illustration 16.16a below
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Illustration 16.16a
The main effect of railroads (also drawn on the map board graphics) is to cancel completely the MP cost of terrains in all
regions with railroads, as long as those regions are friendly. In other words, a stack will be able to move from a region to
any other region on the map if all regions crossed (first as well as last) has railroads and is friendly. Connection costs will
be also 0 if the railroad takes the said connections. See Illustration 16.16b and Illustration 16.16c below
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Illustration 16.16b
Illustration 16.16c
Important: roads and railroads bring no MP advantages in regions that are enemy-controlled (including when empty
upon entry by the moving stack).
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G / Enemy Presence and Overruns
Enemy presence in a region blocks movement. To enter such regions with land units, a leader must be present in the
moving/attacking stack (see section J below). Upon entry inside the enemy region, the moving stack halts and all its
remaining MP are used up (unless in overrun, see next)
Nevertheless there is one case when movement is not halted, which is what is called overrun.
An overrun is considered and checked when the sum of the combat factors of combat units in the moving stack is much
higher than the sum of those in the defending stack, at the rate of 8:1 now. When this happens, the defending stack is
eliminated entirely and the moving stack pays a cost of 1 MP at once. If it has sufficient MP to continue moving, then this
is possible. If not, movement ceases immediately. Note that when doing an overrun, the shape of the mouse cursor will
change and show a specific animation.
H / Structures and Sieges
Friendly structures will cost no MP to enter or leave (see section A above). Enemy regions which hold enemy structures
(without enemy units outside them) can either become besieged or can be occupied and captured, depending on the fact
they are fortified or not.
* If the structure is not fortified, it is automatically captured during the movement, at the same time the region holding it is
captured. Any unit inside the structure, if unable to fight, is immediately destroyed.
* If the structure is fortified, the region outside it is captured, but the structure remains in control of the original owner and
will become besieged IF the attacker has at least 2 Combat Units. Units inside a fortified structure are unaffected by
the entry of the besieger in the region, as they will suffer adverse results only after the siege is resolved.
In the case the attacker has only 1 combat unit; he will capture the region with a fortified structure, but not the structure
and won't be able to make a siege of the same.
I / Stacking during Movement on the Board
Each region may, in theory, hold an unlimited number of units. Nevertheless, some terrains – known as difficult - will limit
the number of combat units that may enter them. This limit is set to 6 units. An indication of this difficulty level and
stacking limit is presented in the detail window of the region. You can also see the information when dragging your units
for movement, as the tooltip will adjust to inform you about it. See Illustration 16.17 below
Illustration 16.17
J / Leaders Requirement and Number of attacks
Those are the two main principles to keep in mind:
Land attacks (I.e. entering an enemy region that contains enemy combat units) are only possible for stacks with a
leader.
Secondly, a single region may be the target of only one single land attack in the same turn by the same side.
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There are some rare exceptions to that principle: some units – rare - may initiate attacks without leaders (e.g.
Commandos in Korea 1950) and paratroops may cause attacks even in the absence of attacking leaders.
In addition, it is sometimes possible to attack the same single region with two different stacks (each having a leader
however) coming from two different regions, but this may only occur upon the play of a specific game card. When such a
card is played, the second stack that moved into the target region will most often join the ensuing battle during the
second round of that same battle.
K / Entrenchments and Camouflage
Those two notions are present in some scenarios and are more the exception than the rule.
Entrenchments
When the scenario rules allow, the stacks of the different sides (one of them or both) may entrench. There is a special
button in the units stack panel to allow it (See Illustration 16.18a) that can be clicked on during the movement phase
(only), allowing the trade the whole MP allocation against an entrenchment. In other words, the stack won't move and
does nothing else in its movement phase than entrenching.
Illustration 16.18a: Entrenching Button
When a stack is entrenched, it receives some benefits, such as the fact that all enemy attacking entrenched units will
suffer a -1 penalty to their combat factors. A reminder indicator is placed on the entrenched stack to tell both the
defender and the attacker (visible by both sides). See Illustration 16.18 below
Illustration 16.18: Entrench markers on stacks
The entrenchment remains in place for as long as the entrenched stack does not move away from the region where it
was entrenched. Moving away can be voluntary (the stacks moves in a future movement phase) or non-voluntary (the
stack must retreat following defeat in battle).
When a friendly unit moves into a region with a friendly entrenched unit, it also becomes entrenched.
Camouflage
When the rules allow, units may become camouflaged. A special button in the stack panel will show up when selecting a
camouflage-able unit. The camouflage button (See Illustration 16.19 below) can be used during the movement phase.
It can only apply to the whole stack if all the units in the stack can all camouflage, otherwise it is grayed-out and shows
un-gray unit by unit if the said unit is camouflage-able.
Illustration 16.19: camouflage button
Camouflage does NOT prevent the stack or units to move, but prevent them from attacking as long as camouflaged
(except for some rare units that can attack and stay camouflaged as well, such as submarines for instance). On the
board the camouflage stacks will show a different-looking counter, using most often a black shadow silhouette. See
Illustration 16.20
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Illustration 16.20: Simbas camouflaged stacks (Congo 1964, red stacks).
When a stack is camouflaged, the opponent must still stop when entering their region, BUT the ensuing battle is not
automatic and may well not occur. For a battle to start, the attacker needs to find and reveal the camouflaged units. This
is done via an automatic 'Search' test that is handled via the roll of a D10, which succeeds if the modified result is 0 to 3.
Modifiers than can apply are:
* +/- Combat value of the searching leader
* -1 if the terrain has a 'Search Penalty' modifier (usually the case for most non-clear terrains)
If the Search test succeeds, the camouflaged units are all revealed and a battle normally takes place. If it fails, nothing
happens, there will be no combat. This second situation is the sole case where stacks of two sides may share the
same region.
Note that planes may, in some cases, undertake reconnaissance air mission. Those are basically search tests and are
handled at the end of the air movement phase in all regions where air units and camouflaged stacks co-exist. If the test
succeeds, the camouflaged stack is revealed. This air mission, if successful, can be quite useful because the friendly
land units, in the ensuing land phase, will be in position to spot and attack enemies that would otherwise be hidden and
sometimes hard or impossible to catch (typical Guerrilla warfare behavior here)
L / Various
To be completed.
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XVII – Combats
Battles usually take place when all movement in the concerned domain has been executed (i.e. naval battle after naval
movement, land battle after land movement). The only exception concerns air movement and the ensuing air battles and
AA fires (see F above). A battle which shall see on one side only land-attack able air units would be dealt with in the land
battle resolution (and naval-attack able air vs. naval units would be in the naval battle segment).
A player can choose to resolve his battles in the order he whishes, by selecting them in the Battles List window, each
battle being resolve one at a time, after the previous and before the next.
Cards impacting battles are playable at the start of each individual battle (attacker first, followed by defender).
Note that some cards may cancel battles completely (e.g. retreat card in some scenarios).
A / Generalities
When there are stacks of two different sides in the same region (land or sea, or even air when dealing with
interceptions), there is a battle.
When the Battle Phase opens, all combats initiated by the active side will be displayed inside the Battle List window (see
Illustration 17.1) which allows the player to select which battle is resolved before which, provided that, in the end, all
battles have been resolved (not possible to skip un-resolved battles)
To launch a battle, click on the arrow button in the battle list window.
Illustration 17.1
A land battle will last two rounds, a naval battle will last only one.
Once cards have been played, resolution of battle rounds is simultaneous (on land) or based on the maneuver
advantage (at sea). See C below.
The player selects the order in which battles are resolved. This is rather important because due to the fact it is not
allowed to retreat into enemy regions OR into regions where battle is unresolved. There may be cases where some
enemy troops can find themselves trapped and unable to retreat, thereby risking full elimination in case of defeat. See
also Breakthroughs in the next section I below and see also Retreats.
B / Battle Window and Card Play
Once the player has selected its battle, it is resolved immediately. Explanations on what you see in the window are
shown in Illustration 17.2 below.
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Illustration 17.2
 Battle window reminds both sides where it takes place, and between which sides, 1,
 As well as the terrain type and the round in session, 2
 On both sides of the central information display, the portrait of commanding generals is present, 3, and the
side’s morale level is indicated below, next to the side’s shield (see C below) 4,
 On the sides of the top part, a box summarizes the bonus and penalties for each side, with the overall total on




top of the box, 5, while the details which have been added for that total are displayed one by one inside the box
itself 6.
The two squares, 7, between the modifiers and the leaders, show panics (top, white flag) and hits (bottom,
skull) suffered cumulatively during the battle round in progress.
On the lateral sides, on the edges of the battlefield itself, there are sections used to received the panicked units,
8 (top), the support units present, 9 (middle) and the unit lost, 10 (bottom)
The battlefield is located right in the middle of the window (a semi transparent generic photo in the background
reminds the player of the terrain environment), with the units of both sides facing each other, 11,
Finally, right in the center of the screen, a dice-looking button, 12, allowing starting battle resolution.
Naval battles offer a quasi identical look (see Illustration 17.3 below), organized in a similar way. However, they last
only one round and, before the shooting, a special phase takes place to determine which side has the maneuver
advantage (naval battles are not simultaneous normally – see D below).
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Illustration 17.3
 When one side (or both) has no leader, a silhouette showing a ‘generic’ leader (with 0 values) is displayed on
the leader box, 13,
C / Battle Sequence
When the battle opens, you see the battlefield with the units present (and their leaders). Players will be offered the option
to play cards if they have some (attacker first, followed by defender). Morale values and modifiers are then calculated
and adjusted when relevant, as they may be altered by card play.
Card Play
The attacker plays all the cards he wants first (the only limitation being the number of playable cards in his hand). When
a card is playable, it receives a green halo and when it is dragged on the center part of the battlefield, the location where
to release it also becomes green-highlighted. See Illustration 17.3b below.
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Illustration 17.3b
Then the defender proceeds similarly. See Illustration 17.3c below.
Illustration 17.3c
Once both sides have played (or not) their cards, the active player can click on the dice button (middle of battlefield) to
actually launch the fighting. In each of the subsequent battle rounds, action is simultaneous (except at sea) and as
follows:






Each combat unit shoots (Elite units re-shoot if they fail their first shot)
Panics are applied, then the losses
A rout test is made when panics and losses exceeds the morale (battle ends if one side routs)
Pursuit test if there was a rout
Leaders survival test at the end of the battle
Surviving units of the loser may retreat; a breakthrough may take place for the attacker (not for the defender in
this version of the game).
Role of the Leaders
Leaders are essential in battles, on TWO GROUNDS: they impact on the morale of the stack in battle (see Battle Morale
below) and they influence the performances of their units via their tactical and moral factors (see below and next
paragraphs). See Illustration 17.3d below



At sea (see paragraph E next), the tactical value (i.e. combat value) influences the maneuver test,
This same tactical value is compared between the 2 opposing leaders: the one with the highest obtains, for all
its units, a combat value bonus equivalent to the difference (shown in 5, 6 above)
Then the morale value of the leaders is compared: the one with the lowest suffers, for all its combat units, a
combat value penalty equivalent to the difference (shown in 5, 6 above)
Illustration 17.3d
Battle Morale and Demoralization
The main factor contributing to the duration of a battle is called BATTLE MORALE (or BM – see 4 in section B above). It
is a calculated value that includes the leader’s morale factor and the average mean of all morale values of combat units
engaged in the battle (mean rounded to the next closest full value).
The higher his BM value, the longest the duration of the battle.
Indeed, a side ‘lasts’ in battle for as long its BM has not fallen below 0 (zero) AND has not routed.


When the BM is below 0, a ROUT test is made (see G below) and battle end may occur when failed (it may
even generate a pursuit in some cases).
When the test is passed (i.e. no rout) and another round remains to be done, battle goes on.
The BM is lowered by 1 for every CU completely eliminated or panicked in the force engaged in the battle (when a
unit moves from the battlefield to sections 8 or 9 in the battle window.) See Losses and Panics below.
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Rounds and shoots
A land (or air) battle lasts a maximum of 2 rounds, and can be ended earlier if one of the involved sides (or both) has no
combat units left on the battlefield at the end of the first round, or if it has routed. Sea battles last only one round (see D
below).
In a battle, each combat unit only shoots once, whatever the number of steps it has. Elite units may shoot twice, as they
are allowed a second shoot if the first one failed to score hit or panic (see below).
Modifiers
The sum of all modifiers applying to combat units is presented on the top left and right sections of the battle window (see
5 and 6 in B above). Those modifiers can come from leaders, terrains, connections or units. They are classified as
follows:
Leaders

As a bonus the difference of their Combat values, in favor of the side whose leader has the highest value

As a Malus (penalty) the difference of their Morale values, inflicted to the side whose leader has the lowest
value
Terrains

May vary according to terrains: as a rule, usually a +1 or +2 in favor of the defender in non-clear terrains, and
sometimes -1 penalty to the attacker in some difficult terrains. You can check terrain details window for value.
Long Range

See below, naval battles only: if the side with the maneuver advantage chooses Long Range, all combat units of
both sides suffer a -2 penalty.
Connections

May vary according to type: as a rule a +1 or +2 bonus to the defender when fighting against an attacker that
crossed a river, mountain pass, major river, strait or did an amphibious landing. However this modifier is only
effective in the first round of the battle
Cards

All kind of modifiers can in theory be inflicted by cards, be they positive or negative, according to the card
definition and purpose. This is the most random and uncertain modifying factor in a battle (aside from the die
itself) and adds a lot to the game's replayability.
Units and Superiorities

Cavalry / Tanks / Armor: if a side has twice as many Combat Units of the «Cavalry/Tanks/Armor (C)» type as
his opponent, all its combat units gain a +1 combat factor modifier. For thrice as many, the modifier is +2, for
four times (or more) as many, modifier is +3. If one side has a C-type unit while the other has none, the modifier
is +1 (and is +2 for 2 units, +3 for three or more).

Artillery: if a side has twice as many Support Units of the «Artillery (A)» type as his opponent, all the
opponent's combat units suffer a -1 penalty to their combat factor. For thrice as many, the modifier is -2, for four
times (or more) as many, modifier is -3. If one side has an A-type unit while the other has none, the modifier is 1 (and is -2 for 2 units, -3 for three or more).

Archers/Missiles: if a side has twice as many Combat Units of the «Archers/Missile (M)» type as his opponent,
all its combat units gain a +1 combat factor modifier. For thrice as many, the modifier is +2, for four times (or
more) as many, modifier is +3. If one side has a C-type unit while the other has none, the modifier is +1 (and is
+2 for 2 units, +3 for three or more).

Heavies (shown by dark square under the combat value figure): if a side has twice as many Heavy Combat
units (H) type as his opponent, all the opponent's combat units suffer a -1 penalty to their combat factor. For
thrice as many, the modifier is -2, for four times (or more) as many, modifier is -3. If one side has an H-type unit
while the other has none, the modifier is -1 (and is -2 for 2 units, -3 for three or more).
Visually: in addition to the details (value and type) of each modifier shown in the modifiers boxes on the battle window
(and the summation of them above the boxes), all combat units whose values have been modified are colorized, in light
green if their value has increased, red if it has decreased. Combat values in white have remained unmodified.
Hits, Losses and Panics
The two 'positive' effects (i.e. a successful shoot) are Panics and Hits. A missed/failed shoot has no effects. There is a
Panic when the dice roll is strictly equal to the modified combat value of the shooting unit. There is a hit when the die
rolled is strictly inferior to that modified value. Every other roll is failures.
Each Hit inflict a loss on the opponent (barring a few exceptions)
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Hits and Panics are accounted for individually during the fighting and their total is accrued in the 7 part of the battle
window. Their implementation takes place globally when the round's shooting is over (i.e. shooting on both sides
simultaneously in land battles, or of the active side in a naval battle).
Panics are always implemented first, and the units going into panic are moved to the
are assigned in priority on the combat units with the lowest morale first.
Hits are then assigned, with the destroyed units going to the
step left.
8 box of the battle window. Panics
9 box of the battle window if the said units have only 1
Units with 2 steps suffer the loss on the battle and are turned back there, showing their damaged side – a white stripe
across the midst of the unit's counter – and losing a step, but not leaving the battlefield (and this not impacting the side's
battle morale). The choice of which of those units on to which to inflict hits is left to the player (or to the AI for the
opponent).
Visual and Sound Aspects
Each time a units shoots, the unit counter is a bit magnified and animated. If the shoot is successful, the animation
moves the unit counter a bit closer to the opponent too. The numerical value displayed in big on the unit is the die roll
result (a value between 0 and 9) and it will be colored according to the end result: in red 1 if a failed shoot, in yellow 2
for a panic and in green 3 for a hit inflicted on to the adversary. See Illustration 17.4 below.
Illustration 17.4
NB: the roll values remain on the unit counters till the end of the ongoing round.
End of Battle - Victory and Defeat
A battle ends when one side is completely eliminated from the battlefield (units all destroyed or in panic) or has retreated.
The winner of a battle is, in decreasing and exclusive order of importance:



the side which is the only one with combat unit on the battle field, else
the side that did NOT retreat, else
the defender.
The defeated side, if it has surviving units, must retreat. See Illustration 17.5 below.
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Illustration 17.5
Demoralization, Rout, Pursuit and Retreat
See below for all precisions on leader’s survival, demoralization, rout and pursuits. Once all of those steps are solved,
the battle ends with the actual retreat of the loser (if any of his units survived). Details in J below.
D / Naval Battles
The three main differences of naval battles (i.e. on sea or lake regions) compared to land battles are the Maneuver
Phase, the Range choice, and the duration (1 round) of the battle.
Maneuver Phase
The objective of that phase is to determine which side is prevailing over the other in the battle, due to better maneuvering
of his naval (or naval-air) force. It is called sometimes also the tactical advantage or wind gauge, depending on the
scenario. See Illustration 17.6 below.
Illustration 17.6
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This process is solved automatically by the engine, which adds for each side the following factors:




Combat value of the commanding leader, if any (0 if none)
A +1 bonus if the concerned side has a majority of units from a nation said to have the naval advantage (a
scenario parameter, covering many diverse aspects such as crew quality, naval tradition, better ships or
equipment, technological edge, training, etc...)
The value of a die (between 0 and 9)
Possibly a bonus added by a card
Important: the main difference here compared to the other parts of the battle is that leader’s combat values are received
in full by their own side (no calculation of difference here).
Illustration 17.6a
Result: the side with the highest modified total obtains the maneuver advantage. As a consequence it will shoot first and
will be allowed to choose the combat range (see below). In case of ties results in the test, no one gets the advantage,
and as a consequence there is no range selection (short by default) and, most important, combat is simultaneous (as in a
land battle).
Combat Range
The side with the advantage must select the battle range, which is either long or short.


If short is selected, the battle is solved normally, without any range modifier, and the side with the advantage
shoots first.
If long, then all combat units of both sides suffer a -2 penalty to their combat values, and the side with the
advantage still shoots first
Reminder: in case of ties, combat is simultaneous and range de facto short. See Illustration 17.6b below.
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Illustration 17.6b
Anti-Aircraft (AA) and Naval Air
Only ships (i.e. naval units) with AA values may shoot at air units. Otherwise their hits can only affect other naval (sea)
units. Similarly only air units with naval attack capability may shoot at ships and can inflict results on to them (else they
can only fight other air units).
Admirals
Only leaders who are admirals (with anchors symbols on their counters) may influence the various aspects of a naval
battle (maneuver advantage, actual fighting). Land leaders transported on board ships are ignored.
Note that in some scenarios, certain leaders may command on land and at sea equally. They usually show stars (like
generals) but some information (like an anchor on the leader counter) tells players about that capacity (this is for instance
the case of Roman leaders in the Hamilkar 264 scenario).
Demoralization, Rout, Pursuit and Retreat
Excepted in some rare specific scenario cases, they are handled as in the general case (see next)
E / Anti-Aircraft (AA) and Air Combats
As a major difference with all other combats, combats exclusively involving air units and AA units will be handled
during the movement of air units (interception by enemy fighters and AA fire) and dealt with automatically by the game
engine without player intervention.
This said, the procedure is strictly identical to the general unfolding of battles, without player intervention AND no
battle window display. A player that would want to play a card that can influence air battles or AA must do so at the
start of the air movement phase (and not during the battle itself, as in other cases, because it won't be possible).
Anti-Aircraft (AA)
In every region crossed by air units during their movement (including their final destination) where there is an enemy AA
unit, an immediate AA combat takes place when the air unit(s) enters the region. It is solved as follows:
Warning: only the AA fires, air units won't shoot back (as a non-simultaneous combat where AA shoot first)
Modifiers: there are only two of them, cumulative, that apply on the combat factors (CF):


+1 to the CF of the AA if their owning nation has radars (a national parameter set in the scenario).
-3 to the CF of the AA if ALL opposing air units are of the SL (Stealth / Invisible) type.
Results implementation is automatic: panics are assigned to air units with the lowest moral values (chosen at random
among those concerned). Hits are assigned totally randomly on the surviving non-panicked air units.
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Panics are flying back immediately to the base they started from (and can no longer move). All other planes will continue
their movement. An AA fire never inflicts any retreat.
Interceptions
In every region crossed by air units during their movement (including their final destination) where there are enemy air
units (flying or not) AND at least one of the two sides has Interceptors (also called Fighters, F letter on the unit), there is
an Interception test as follows:
•
•
If one side only has Interceptor, it will handle the test
If both sides have some, the defender (inactive side) handles it
An Interception is deemed successful on a modified die roll of 0 to 3, modified as follows:







-1 if the intercepted air stack has reached its final destination
-3 if at least one nation of the intercepting side has Radar,
-3 if the intercepting side has EW (electronic warfare) type units in the region,
+5 if none of the inactive side air units is of Fighter type
+1 if all intercepting air units where originally on the ground (in an airport structure), and lastly
+3 if all planes in the intercepted stack are of SL «Stealth » type
+/- ? if a card was played at the start of the air movement phase
In case of successful interception, an air battle is resolved. In case of failed interception, nothing happens and the
moving stack will pursue its movement to the next region (where another test could happen if the conditions are met),
and so forth, till all possible interception attempts have been tested or the stack has reached its final destination without
being intercepted.
Air Combat
It is solved automatically with one battle round for each side, simultaneously. All air units with an air-to-air combat
capability will fire (be they Fighters or not).
Modifiers: there are only two of them, cumulative, that apply on the combat factors (CF):



+1 to the CF of the Fighters (and them only) if their owning nation is the only one to have radars (a national
parameter set in the scenario). Modifier is 0 if at least one nation on each side has radars.
+2 to the CF of Fighters (and them only) if their side has EW (electronic warfare) type air units in the battle. If
both sides have EW type air units, the modifier is 0
-3 to the CF of the air units of the side if ALL opposing air units are of the SL (Stealth / Invisible) type.
Results implementation is automatic: panics are assigned to air units with the lowest moral values (chosen at random
among those concerned). Hits are assigned totally randomly on the surviving non-panicked air units.
Panics are flying back immediately to the base they started from (and can no longer move). All other planes will continue
their movement ONLY IF they won the air battle. If not they fly back to their base. In case of ties, the defender
(intercepting player) wins the battle.
If the defender lost, it returns to its base (if unknown or unavailable, to the closest friendly airbase).
F / Particular Cases in Land Combats (from Cards)
The general procedure described above applies, but may be changed sometimes due to the play of some specific cards
Retreat Card
If one side plays such a card at the start of the battle, the whole battle will become cancelled and the playing side will
retreat (if the card says so, or it could be the attacker forced to retreat). This 'missed' battle will generate no VP change –
See K below.
Non Simultaneous Battle Card
If a side plays a card that allows it to shoot first in one (or both) round(s), then the combat is no longer simultaneous. The
side benefiting from the card effect will shoot first, and inflict all its results first. The other side will then replicate with its
surviving unit(s), if any.
Intervention of Another Stack (Card Effect)
if a side play a card, during the movement phase, that allows it to attack one region with two different stacks (which is
an exception to the base rule of the game), then the second stack that moved into the battle region will participate and
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intervene in the battle only at the start of the second round (provided the player who benefits from the card did not lose
the battle in the first round)
G / Demoralization, Routs and Pursuits
A rout is the consequence of a test which is made when a side is demoralized, that is when the side's battle morale is
lower than zero. If a rout ensues, it may in some cases imply of pursuit of the routed side.
Rout
When the conditions are satisfied (side is demoralized); a rout test takes place.
If both sides are demoralized, the one which suffered most loss and panics cumulatively is the only one to make the test.
In case of ties of those cumulated loss/panics, the loser is the one which suffered more panics than loss. In case of total
tie, there is no test.
Reminder: if, during a non-simultaneous battle (usually at sea), the enemy may become demoralized even before having
a chance to shoot back, he won't fight and will make a rout test immediately instead. See Illustration 17.7
Illustration 17.7
Rout Test: done via the roll of a D10, modified by +1 for each unit in Panic
Result 0-4: no rout occurred. The demoralized side will retreat, unless the other side is also demoralized and failed its
rout test. See Illustration 17.7a
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Illustration 17.7a

Result 5-9: the side routs, half of its support units are immediately eliminated
Important: Rout is automatic if all combat units of the loser are destroyed or in panic.
Pursuit
There can be a pursuit ONLY if there was a previous rout AND the side not in rout has C-type units (cavalry or armor). In
such a case an extra Pursuit round takes place, where all the C type units of the victor will make another shooting, if
terrain allows (not always possible, some terrains - such as Urban - do not allow Pursuits)
Important Exception: in a pursuit round, all extra 'Panic' results are converted into Hits instead
A modifier is applied to the combat factor of the pursuing C-type units: +1 for each panicked CU of the opponent.
Total Elimination
If at the end of a pursuit all the combat units of a side are eliminated, then all support units also present are fully
eliminated as well.
H / Leaders Injuries
At the end of each battle, another test is made for each leader in command for both sides (the other leaders - not
commanding - remain untested). The test will tell if those leaders are unharmed by the battle, injured or even killed. See
Illustrations 17.7a and 17.7b
Illustration 17.7a
Illustration 17.7b
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Injury Test
The test 'succeeds' if the modified die roll is 9 or higher. Modifiers to the test are:

+ 1 in case of defeat of the leader's side

+ 2 if all of the leader's stack has been eliminated in battle or if has retreated

+ 1 if the leader's side was routed

-1 for a 2** leader

-2 for a 3*** leader or a monarch
If the modified end result is 9+, another D10, this time unmodified, is then rolled to determine the final fate of the leader.
0-5: the leader is injured, removed from the game and will appear as reinforcement in the capital of the leader's side
during the next friendly reinforcement phase.
6-9: the leader was killed and is removed from the game. If the scenario has a replacement leader scheduled for the
dead leader, the replacement will appear in the side's capital region during the following reinforcement phase.
Important: the leader test takes place before the implementation of breakthrough (see I below), so an injured or killed
leader won't be able to breakthrough. But if another leader is present in the stack AND is allowed to breakthrough, then
he will be stacked with the units that are making the breakthrough.
I / Breakthroughs
For a breakthrough to occur at the end of a battle, the following conditions must be met:



The victorious side is allowed breakthrough (it is a scenario parameter)
The victorious side has combat units engaged in the battle that are allowed to breakthrough or follow a
breakthrough (more or less those are armored or mechanized units)
If a victorious leader is allowed to breakthrough, it will accompany the units in breakthrough. If none is present,
those units will move alone (i.e. with no leader, see consequences below).
Target Region of the Breakthrough
The target region must be a region allowing breakthrough (a terrain parameter) and adjacent to the region where the
battle took place.


If a leader is present with the units in breakthrough, an enemy-occupied region can be selected
without a leader, only an empty region can be selected
Valid regions are highlighted in yellow overlay. See Illustration 17.18.
Illustration 17.18.
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Number of Breakthrough
A same stack of units may only breakthrough once per turn; even if it wins a battle generated by the breakthrough stack
and could - theoretically - get another breakthrough.
Important: note that undertaking a breakthrough is never mandatory, and the receiving side may choose NOT to
execute it. To do so, just click on the region where the stack is presently located (i.e. where the battle initially took place)
and the breakthrough will be cancelled.
Also, note that once a breakthrough region is selected, the moving units go there. Then the game returns to the battle list
if there are unresolved battles (including the one potentially created by the breakthrough).
J / Retreats
In this version of the game, retreats are effected automatically, including for the active player when necessary. The
destination region of a retreat is chosen according to the following guidelines:



A retreating attacker goes back to the region from where he entered the battle region.
The defender must retreat towards a friendly region (non occupied by enemy forces), and not the one from
which the attacker entered, that is also not the site of an unresolved battle, and which is closest to the
defender's supply source.
And, in all cases, terrain of and connections into the retreat region must be allowed.
Important: a stack that could not retreat is eliminated instead.
The attacker being forced to retreat from where he initiated the attack, in case this region is no longer friendly to him will
mean he is eliminated instead.
The defender must retreat into an adjacent region free of enemy combat units; it will be eliminated if none can be found.
A region where a battle is yet unresolved does not qualify for defender's retreat. However, if the region of the battle holds
a friendly fortified structure, the defender can retreat inside the structure if no other choice is possible. Also, some rare
cards will allow retreat onto a naval unit in an adjacent sea region.
Last, if the only possible region has a stacking limit, all units in excess are eliminated (the choice being made randomly
by the game engine).
K / Battles and Victory Points
Battles are one of the main sources of gain and loss of Victory Points (VP), mostly based on the side which is victorious,
the number of units involved and the difference in losses between both sides.
Losses and VP
The game engine calculates the losses of each side. The side that suffers the most losses receives a -1 VP penalty for
every 2 losses in excess to those of the other side (rounded up, so basically a 1-loss difference costs no VP)
The VP lost by one side are gained by the other.
Big Battles
If at least one of the involved sides had 6 (or more) combat units (supports are not counted), the battle is a BIG battle.
The winner of such a big battle receives a bonus +3 VP (and the loser thus suffers a -3 VP penalty) which goes in
addition to the losses-generated VP.
Battle Summary Window
When all battles of the same turn have been resolved, a Battle Summary window is displayed with the account of all
those battles. See Illustration 17.19 below
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Illustration 17.19.
It summarizes the various scores, VP, winners and losers and many other details.
M / Various
To be completed.
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XVIII – Sieges
A siege takes place only when at least 2 combat
units of one side are in the same region as an
enemy fortified structure (unfortified structures are
automatically captured).
When the game reaches the siege phase, the
siege list window opens... See Illustration 18.1.
Illustration 18.1.
The window is similar to the battle list window, showing the locations where sieges are to be solved. The player is free to
select them in any order, but all must be processed to be allowed to move to the next phase.
A / Siege Window
For each of the selected sieges to be processed, a specific siege window for the location opens after clicking on the
arrow in the siege list.
See Illustration 18.2 below.
Illustration 18.2.
 The top of the window tells which side is besieged and where it takes place, 1,
 Then the image of the besieged structure is presented, 2
 Under the image there is information concerning the fortification level of the structure and all the modifiers that




are currently pertaining to the ongoing siege, 3 (which will adjust dynamically with the play of cards) and, if
relevant, those units that are currently sheltered inside the structure 4,
On the right-hand side, a place is reserved to drag the siege-relevant cards that both sides can play, the top one
5 for the besieged side, and the bottom one 9. for the besieger.
A reminder is made of the side who is besieging, 6, as well as the besieging units currently outside of the
concerned structure 7,
When the besieger has unit(s) providing siege bonus, such as engineers, artillery or bombers, those units are
shown just below the besieging combat units, in a specific box, 8,
Last, the siege start dice-looking button 10, will allow to start rolling for the current turn siege result which will
be then displayed (see next)
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B / Siege Resolution
Siege is resolved automatically and there are only two possible outcomes for now: success or failure. See Illustration
18.3 and 18.4 below.
Reminder: following movements or combats in the field, if at least 2 combat Units are in a region with an enemy fortified
structure (a.k.a. fortress), those units will effect a siege. No leader is necessary to besiege.
The siege test consists in getting a modified die-roll result which is below the surrender level (including modifiers) of the
besieged structure, as shown in the siege window. The list of the modifiers is the following:
•
•
•
•
•
-1 for each siege engine / unit present
-1 if one or more 'A' type (i.e. artillery) units or Bombers are present
-1 for every 5 steps of combat units sheltered inside the structure
-2 for the "S" bonus of the besieging leader, if it has one (shown on the leader counter or detail if so)
+2 for the "S" bonus of the besieged leader, if there is one.
Illustration 18.3.
Success: the fortress surrenders, all units and leaders inside are eliminated.
Failure: the fortress keeps on resisting, nothing else happens, siege continues.
Illustration 18.4.: showing failure (left) or success (right) in the summary.
C / Sieges, Blockade and Supply
Units inside a besieged fortress are always in supply, even if the region is isolated or cut from supply sources or lines.
Units outside the fortress still follow the normal supply rules.
In some scenarios, fortresses that are also ports can only be besieged if they are at the same time suffering from a
blockade. That means that the siege test only takes place if a naval stack friendly to the besieger and/or enemy to the
besieged structure owner is present in the sea region where the port of the structure exits (it twill also, via the blockade,
cut the normal supply lines via port – see above).
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XIX – Tension Index
In some scenarios, there is a Tension Index (TI, the name of which may vary as a flavor depending on the scenario). See
Illustration 4.1, info N°5 above and Illustration 8.11a next to locate where the information and icon are displayed. The
tension index usually benefits only one side, leading to its ultimate victory, or it is sometimes used as a counter without
impact on victory (see the scenario details information for more).
Illustration 8.11a
A / General Facts
In a given scenario, the IT usually bears a flavor name in context of the scenario theme (for example in Korea 1950 it is
named «Chinese Intervention», in Six Days 1967 the name is «Soviet Diplomatic Pressure», etc…).
If the Index is used for determining victory, then the side benefitting from it will win the game if it reaches or exceeds a
certain level or value at the end of a game turn (or sometimes the end of a scenario).
Sometimes the TI has also other effects in the game, such as providing access to new sets of playing cards or allowing
entry of additional reinforcements, in units, cards or finance.
In other words, the purpose of the TI is mostly to give to players a particular tempo or pressure in the frame of a
scenario, such as (non exclusive or limitative list):

When the TI reaches a certain threshold (usually 10+), the side that benefits from it will win the game, even if it
has not reached the final VP score or even if the last game turn has not been reached

The IT may also trigger, according to different levels or values, the entry in the game of new units (as direct onmap reinforcements or force pools additions) or receipt of new game cards, in the card deck. For instance, in
Korea 1950, an 8+ TI will make Chinese Communist troops enter the game, and on 10+ new cards will be
added to both players’ decks.

At a certain level of TI, a side will earn (or lose) VP. Some high-level TI will generate VPs (or other advantages)
to one side and the same TI, if at a low level, can give similar - or not - advantages to the other side. For
example, in Kentucky 1861, a high TI (5+) is in favor of the Union while a low one (-5 or less) is favorable to the
Confederates.
The TI will essentially fluctuate by the play of game
cards and by the capture (or loss) of some regions
or structures on the map, by one side or the other.
In such cases, the information is displayed inside
the Scenario descriptive sheet and also via symbolic
icons on the map. It is also indicated inside the
regions or structures detailed windows.
For example in Six Days 1967, the key Arab regions
of Jerusalem, Ismaïla and Suez, when captured by
Israel, will make the TI increase by +1 each
(paradoxically favoring an Arab "Victory" because of
Soviet ultimate intervention). Each can sport a
hammer-sickle icon on the map (which is also the
scenario TI icon) as a reminder...
See Illustration 8.11b
Illustration 8.11b
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 106
XX – Special Rules
A/ Camouflage and Reconnaissance
As indicated above, some units can camouflage. They must be revealed to engage in battle, or to be attacked by their
opponents. A side with air units can make a Reconnaissance, which mainly consists in sending a stack of air units in a
region with camouflaged enemy stack, and then click on the ‘Reconnaissance’ button in the air units stack panel.
When the button is clicked on, the air stack will make a Discovery test (see below) when the air movement is completed,
as follows:
Discovery Test
Discovery is successful on a roll of 0 to 3, modified as follows:




-1 if there is an helicopter in the air stack
+/- ? according to card bonus or penalty if any
-1 if region terrain is clear
+? (Usually +2) if the terrain is not clear and inflicts a discovery test penalty, may vary with types such as forest,
jungle, marsh, mountain, etc…
If successful, the camouflaged stack is immediately revealed (and can be attacked later on). If failed, nothing happens
and the enemy stack remains camouflaged.
B/ Paradrops
In the current version of the game, an air transport unit with a land unit onboard of the Paratroop type (as a rule they bear
a P letter or a parachute icon on the counter) can move to its destination region. When this one is reached, the player
can click on the Parachute button in the unit panel during the air movement phase, to get the Paratroopers on the
ground. Alternatively he can drag and drop them from the unit panel to the region itself directly in the land movement
phase. In the land phase, the P unit 'lands' and uses up all its MP capacity of the turn.
Note that this creates one of the exceptions to the rule that prevents leaderless land units from attacking other land
stacks. The P unit will attack all enemy units present where it lands. Similarly, this P unit will not be considered as a
friendly stack during the land movement phase of the owning player and another friendly stack will be allowed to join her
in battle (but the latter stack will need a leader however).
C/ Landings and Amphibious Assaults
Amphibious assaults are landings through beaches connections on land regions that are occupied by enemy combat
units. Landings are the same, but on empty regions
Beaches: those are connections that link land and sea regions. They are used for landings (movement from the sea to
the land). A Beach connection will use up all the PM of a stack. In addition, in case of battle, the attacker will suffer
serious penalties (see Amphibious assaults next.
To land from the sea, while embarked on board ships, the land unit inside the ship must be selected (during the land
movement phase) and the transporting ship must be in a sea region adjacent to a land region where the landing is
possible via a beach.
To make an Amphibious Assault, a leader is mandatory (as it is a land attack).
D/ Strategic Bombing
Strategic Bombing is an air action consisting in using an air unit stack with land-attack capability versus an enemy region
with an economic production (i.e. income, usually a red figure directly visible as print on the mapboard).
During the air movement phase, the player shall click on the 'Bombardment' button when the air stack has reached its
destination. The button is only active when the destination has an economic production. NB: if the button is not clicked
upon, the bombardment will not take place (but air units will attack enemy land or naval units present there if any).
The bombing value of air units in 'Bombardment' is not modified, except for those air combat units called 'Strategic
Bombers' (SB) which value is then doubled in such a case.
Damages and Repairs
Every hit inflicted by the bombardment will reduce the economic production of the region by 1, till it reaches a value of 0
(can't become negative).
During each subsequent economic phase, the bombed region will produce only with what economic value it has left. At
the end of the economic phase, it regains its economic potential back.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 107
E/ Changing Air Bases
In this version of the game, to change base, the player just need to target a friendly airport region within range and order
the stack to move there. To target the airport, drag and drop the stack on to the airport structure big circle. See
Illustration 16.14 below.
Illustration 16.14
The movement is executed normally, and when the stack reaches its destination, it ceases all movement for that phase.
The new base is now its airport of origin and will be used as such in all ensuing air phases, till another base change
takes place. In other words, air units will return to the newly reached base, and not to the one they initially left from.
Air units that rebased in the initial air movement phase can fly in the following Air Defense move of the same turn.
F/ Various
To be completed.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 108
XXI – Windows and Messages
A/ Scenario Presentation
When the game starts, each player can see a button with the letter "I" (Information) on the bottom left of the window. By
clicking on it, the player will open the scenario descriptive sheet that explains summarily all what is necessary to know
about the peculiarities of the scenario. See illustration 21.1., 1a, 1b, 1c below.
Illustration 21.1
Illustration 21.1a
Illustration 21.1b
Illustration 21.1c
NB: the Information sheet can be re-accessed at the start of any new turn.
After the first turn, the I button is accessible in the 'New Turn' window that pops up at the start of each new turn. In the
next version of the game, the information sheet will also be accessible from the player's side shield in the top interface.
See Illustration 4.1, info N°2 above
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 109
B/ Information on Sides
In a future version of the game, more information on the side you play will be made available at any time during the
game, by clicking on the active side shield. At the moment, the only effect is to color regions with the side’s color.
C/ Tooltips
Tooltips are present on a great number of game elements, such as unit’s stacks on the map. Tooltips will appear not
immediately but after a short delay of 1 or 2 seconds.
Illustration 21.3
D/ Battle Log
In the battle screen, at the bottom middle of the battlefield, there is a battle log that lists all the events that occurred
during the battle. It can be an interesting feature for those who want to examine in details what happened during the
battle.
Illustration 21.4
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E/ Events
In the current game, there are no events besides those generated by card play. Some cards may be in play at the start of
the game, either during the tutorial or during non-tutorial scenarios (such as Six Days 1967 which opens up with the
'Focus Operation' card active). See Illustration 21.5a below.
Illustration 21.5a
Some other cards will make an Event Window pop-up, to give players more hints and advice about what is really
important (just like in the Tutorial). For instance, instance in Normandy 1944, key information about supply and the role of
the Mulberry card (and structure) is presented in an event window. See Illustration 21.5b below.
Illustration 21.5b
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XXII – The Game Editor
The Game Editor is the main tool used for creating WAW scenarios, including the original development team. It can be
used by players who want to mod existing scenarios or create their own.
There will be a specific manual for the Editor in the few weeks following release. But our main goal is also to create
Video Tutorials to help people who want to undertake scenario designs.
Stay tuned and check regularly our website.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 112
XXIII – Hints and Tips
Will be filled progressively with the development of the player’s community. A few key ones are presented here.
Leaders
Keep your best leader(s) with your strongest stack.
If you have spare leaders, place one as backup with the largest army.
Also make sure, if you have units able to breakthrough that you also have a leader that can do so, otherwise your units in
breakthrough won’t be able to generate an attack.
Always respect the command limits, the penalty for exceeding it is too stringent.
Stacks
Always respect the command limits, there is no need to overstack units with a leader who can’t command them.
In difficult terrain, keep your stacks with the maximum allowance of 6 combat units, but you can add as many supports as
you want.
If you plan to move deep into enemy territory and the supply rules are active, beware of supply lines for your stack, or
make sure logistical units are included with them
Coordination of movements
Try to move forces behind enemy stacks if you can, in particular forces that are not too important but good enough to cut
supply and retreat lines. This can do sometimes more damage than a battle.
Don’t forget battles prevent further movement through the battle areas, so beware of the order in which you plan and
time your moves, as you could find out that stacks behinds your lines are prevented to move their full allowance by
battles generated by your forward units.
Order of Resolution of movements and battles
Always resolve those battles where there is a possibility for you to retreat.
Also resolve those where the enemy won’t have many (or any) retreat options, as in case of his defeat, total annihilation
could be your reward. Remember that retreat is not allowed on to the region where the attacker comes from, enemy
regions or regions with yet unresolved battles.
Finance
If you have a navy or fleet, always keep some spare funds after your purchase, or the next maintenance of air or naval
units may eat all your future income (even worse if you have lost revenue in the meanwhile).
When you have damaged units, always buy replacements. They are much cheaper than new units, come directly into
your damaged ones to repair them and thus won’t take ages to reach the front.
Supply
Never put yourself deliberately out of supply, unless this guarantees some serious damage to the enemy (e.g. cutting his
supply lines). If you plan some risky move ahead, take logistical units along, they do marvel to grant you the extra one or
two turns needed to reach or capture the next supply source.
Use naval movement to carry slow logistical units and land them closest to where they are needed, your survival without
supply is a matter of time.
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XXIV – Examples of Play
Will be filled progressively with the development of the player’s community. Our goal is to have many “How to Play”
videos on our website and Facebook pages.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 114
XXV – Appendices & Various
A / Units Icons

Heavy units (H) have their combat factor is displayed on a square,

Located between Moral and Movement, in the middle right, an indicator of either Guerrilla, Breakthrough,
Skirmisher, Elite or Guard: if the Gu guerrilla indicator is present, the unit can usually camouflage. If the
Breakthrough indicator is there (a green arrow), the unit can breakthrough (note: on armored units, this is de
facto, so the indicator is not present). If the Sk indicator (or a bow or crossed rifles icon) is there, this is a
skirmisher unit (inflicts only panics). The E indicator (or a medal, or laurels) shows an Elite unit (which re-rolls
failed dices). The Gd indicator is displayed on Guard units (they never panic). Suicide units (eliminated after
fire) are represented by skull and crossbones. When a siege indicator, the unit gives a siege resolution bonus
(in attack or defense).

Last, top left, there the Role of the unit, displayed either as a graphical icon or a letter
(C = cavalry/armor, M = Mountain, G = Guerrilla,
T = Transport, A = Archers/Artillery, N = Naval/Marines,
Air = Air units [B = Bomber],
CV = Aircraft Carrier,
SS = Submarine,
S = Siege, D = Discovery, I = Interceptor, P = Para, H = Helicopter, AA = Anti-Air units,
L = Logistics
B / Cards Icons
Below are the most frequent card icons that can be found (see also Appendix)
Combat
Cards
End of turn Various
Movement Siege
Tension
Victory Points
C / Mapboard Descriptions
Will be filled progressively with the development of the player’s community.
E / Main Cards Effects
Will be filled progressively with the development of the player’s community.
F / Various
Will be filled progressively with the development of the player’s community.
G / Designer Notes, History and Commentary
Will be entered later by Game Designer.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 115
XXVII – Credits
Game Designers:
Development:
Art Director:
Map(s):
Graphics:
Historical Research:
Executive Producer:
Assistance & Advising:
Sounds SFX:
Documentation:
Proofreading & Localization:
Corporate Communications:
Administration:
Production:
Stéphane PARRIN
SAS STRATEGIAE
Gilles Pfeiffer
Gilles Pfeiffer
Gilles Pfeiffer
Stéphane Parrin, Beta Community
SAS STRATEGIAE
Silverjack Studios, QC
Original documentation by SAS STRATEGIAE
SAS STRATEGIAE
SAS STRATEGIAE
SAS STRATEGIAE
a game produced by SAS STRATEGIAE
Software © 2017 SAS STRATEGIAE. Documentation © 2017 SAS STRATEGIAE. All rights reserved.
SAS STRATEGIAE and the WAW logo are registered commercial trademarks of SAS STRATEGIAE in France, the UE, USA and other
countries. All rights reserved.
SAS STRATEGIAE and the WAW logo are the registered property of SAS STRATEGIAE in France, the UE, USA and other countries.
All rights reserved.
All other commercial brands and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Software © 2017 SAS STRATEGIAE. Documentation © 2017 SAS STRATEGIAE. Tous droits réservés.
SAS STRATEGIAE et le logo WAW sont des marques commerciales enregistrées de SAS STRATEGIAE en France, Union Européene,
USA et autres pays. Tous droits réservés.
SAS STRATEGIAE et le logo WAW sont la propriété et sont enregistrés au nom de la société SAS STRATEGIAE en France, Union
eurpéene, USA et autres pays. Tous droits réservés.
Toutes les autres marques commerciales sont la propriété de leurs auteurs respectifs.
Wars Across the World Manual – v.1.00 116
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