SP-1234 Personal Protective Equipment

SP-1234 Personal Protective Equipment

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Petroleum Development Oman L.L.C.

Personal Protective Equipment

Document ID SP-1234

Document Type Specification

Security Unrestricted

Discipline Health Safety & Environment

Document Owner CFDH, Operational Safety

Month and Year of Issue Aug 2012

Revision

3.0

Keywords PPE, HEMP, Risk Assessments

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

Copyright: This document is the property of Petroleum Development Oman, LLC. Neither the whole nor any part of this document may be disclosed to others or reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means (electronic, mechanical, reprographic recording or otherwise) without prior written consent of the owner.

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Document Authorisation

Authorised for Use

– August 2012

Document Owner

Naaman Ali Naamani

Corporate HSE Manager

Date: 29

th

June 2012

Document Custodian

Hamad Khalfeen

CFDH, Ops Safety

Date: 29

th

June 2012

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

Document Author

Nivedita Ram

Sr. Behavioural Safety

Advisor

Date: 29

th

June 2012

Revision History

The following is a brief summary of the four most recent revisions to this document.

Details of all revisions prior to these are held on file by the Document Custodian.

Revision

No.

Month &

Year

Author’s Name and Title

Scope / Remarks

3.0 29/06/12 Nivedita Ram

Sr. Behavioural

Safety Advisor

1. Revamped and revised version of SP1234

which is now retired. The current document

aligns fully with the revised CP-122

2. Alignment to CMF template

3. Inclusion of RASCI, Implementation monitoring checklist, visitors / contractors

PPE requirements

4. Inclusion of all types of PPE relevant to PDO

operations

5. Reference to current PPE standards in

AS/BS/EN

2.0

1.0

24/06/02 Hamed Khalfeen

CSM/11

18/02/02 Wayne Austin

CSM/32

Minor editorial changes. Change of Custodian and Author to Hamed Khalfeen (CSM/11).

Initial issue. Supersedes HSE Standards

Manual - Chapter 4 and SRD/01.

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User Notes:

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

1. The requirements of this document are mandatory. Non-compliance shall only be authorised by a designated authority through STEP-OUT approval as described in this document.

2. A controlled copy of the current version of this document is on PDO's live link. Before making reference to this document, it is the user's responsibility to ensure that any hard copy, or electronic copy, is current. For assistance, contact the Document

Custodian .

3. Users are encouraged to participate in the ongoing improvement of this document by providing constructive feedback .

Related Business Processes & CMF Documents

Related Business Processes

Code

122

Business Process (E

Parent Document(s)

PBM 4.0)

Health Safety & Environment

Doc. No. Document Title

Other Related CMF Document(s)

Doc. No.

SP1157

Document Title

HSE Training

The related CMF Documents can be retrieved from the Corporate Business Control

Documentation Register

CMF

.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Document Authorisation ..................................................................................................................... 2

Authorised for Use

– July 2012 ................................................................................................... 2

Revision History .................................................................................................................................. 2

Related Business Processes & CMF Documents .............................................................................. 3

1 Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 6

1.1

Purpose ................................................................................................................................. 6

1.2

Scope and Applicability ......................................................................................................... 6

1.3

Review and Improvement ...................................................................................................... 7

1.4

Distribution ............................................................................................................................. 7

1.5

Compliance Requirements General ...................................................................................... 7

1.6

General Requirements for PPE ............................................................................................. 7

1.7

PPE Identification - Risk Assessment ................................................................................... 8

1.8

Responsibilities ...................................................................................................................... 9

1.9

Performance Monitoring ...................................................................................................... 10

2 Personal Protection Equipment ................................................................................................. 11

2.1

Clothing in the Workplace .................................................................................................... 11

2.2

Head Protection ................................................................................................................... 12

2.3

Personal Hearing Protection ................................................................................................ 15

2.4

Eye Protection ..................................................................................................................... 16

2.5

Foot Protection .................................................................................................................... 18

2.6

Hand Protection ................................................................................................................... 18

2.7

Fall Protection ...................................................................................................................... 20

2.8

Safety Harnesses, Lanyards and Lifelines .......................................................................... 21

2.9

Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) ............................................................................ 21

2.9.1

Air Supplied Respirators .................................................................................... 26

2.9.2

2.9.3

SCBA ................................................................................................................. 26

Air-line Respirators ............................................................................................ 26

2.9.4

2.9.5

2.9.6

2.10

Emergency Escape Breathing Apparatus (Escape Set) .................................... 27

Emergency Escape Hoods ................................................................................ 27

Fitness of SCBA or Air-line Users ...................................................................... 28

Other Personal Protective Equipment ............................................................... 28

2.11

Training of Users................................................................................................ 28

3 Visitors and Contractors ............................................................................................................ 30

3.1

Visitors ................................................................................................................................. 30

3.2

Contractors .......................................................................................................................... 30

4 Definitions and Abbreviations .................................................................................................... 31

5 Formats, Templates & additional information ............................................................................ 32

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5.1

Appendix 1

– H2S Detection System .................................................................................. 32

5.2

Appendix 2

– Gas detectors ................................................................................................ 33

5.3

Appendix 3

– OSHA Standard ............................................................................................ 35

5.4

Appendix 4

– Glove Types for Chemical Handling ............................................................. 35

5.5

Appendix 5

– Additional information on Different Glove Types .......................................... 37

5.6

Appendix 6

– PPE Checklist ............................................................................................... 41

5.7

Appendix 7

– PPE Management flow-chart ........................................................................ 43

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1 Introduction

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) comprises a range of clothing and equipment which is worn by the individual to protect or shield their bodies from workplace hazards.

Employers shall, provide their employees with sufficient, fit for purpose personal protective clothing and equipment to protect them against workplace hazards, without any cost to the employees.

In the Hierarchy of Controls (Elimination, Substitution, Isolation, Engineering,

Administration and PPE), personal protective equipment is considered the least satisfactory method in the prevention of work-related injury or illness and is only to be used when other measures are not feasible or cannot be implemented immediately. Provision of

PPE shall always be accompanied with information, instruction and training as to the correct use and limitations. PPE shall be selected following a documented risk assessment and shall meet the minimum protection standard outlines for specific PPE in this HSE

Specification

1.1 Purpose

This Specification describes PDO's minimum standards for the design, selection, use of

Personal Protective Equipment selected to reduce workers exposures to workplace hazards.

This specification establishes the various roles and responsibilities involved in selection, issue and maintenance of PPE. Check

The PPE checklist referred to in this specification is designed as a tool to evaluate the effectiveness of the PPE program

1.2 Scope and Applicability

This document applies to all PDO employees, Contractor and Sub-Contractor personnel & visitors.

PPE can be considered in the following categories, based on the type of protection afforded by the equipment

Respiratory protection - e.g. half-face disposable, cartridge type (half and full-face), air line ( half and full face), Self Contained breathing apparatus

Eye protection

– e.g. spectacles/goggles, shields, visors

Hearing Protection

– e.g. ear muffs and plugs (or combination)

Hand Protection

– e.g. chemical gloves and gauntlets

Foot protection

– e.g. shoes/boots, metatarsal guards

Head Protection

– e.g. helmets, caps, hoods, broad rim hats

Protection from falls - e.g. restrictive lanyards, harness and fall arrest devices

Skin Protection

– e.g., , Long sleeved cotton coveralls, disposable coveralls, , chemical protective suits,

Biological Protection

– i.

e. Gas badge, radiation badges

Specialty personal protective equipment - eg protective clothing for cryogenic, electrical gloves, Hazmat teams e.g. fire fighting.

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1.3 Review and Improvement

This document shall be reviewed in case of any major changes resulting from recommendation of Audit, changes in industrial standards or changes in regulation/law as advised by regulatory authority. The Document Custodian will update the changes as applicable, but no less frequently than every four years. Any user of this document who encounters a mistake or confusing entry is requested to immediately notify the Document Custodian

1.4 Distribution

This document shall be distributed to all the HSE Team Leaders, HSE Managers, HSE

Advisors, through HSE MS Web Page with specific communication to the above.

1.5 Compliance Requirements General

Legal requirements for industrial safety in Oman are stipulated in Article 18 of Chapter 3 of the

Ministerial decree no 286/2008; Issued on the 22nd June 2008 and Effective as on 1st July

2008

It is the duty of the Employer to ensure safety in work area and provide PPE as per the above

Ministerial Decree

Additional Legal requirements for industrial safety in Oman are stipulated in Chapter 6, article 87 of Labour Law published in the Official Gazette No. 742, dated May 3, 2003.

Inspectors appointed by the Ministry have the power to examine the worker-related records of an establishment and to enter places of work. Inspectors also have the authority to question whoever they wish and to publish reports on the results of their investigations.

1.6 General Requirements for PPE

PPE is defined as equipment designed to be worn by personnel to protect themselves against potential risk arising from the hazards, which may endanger their health or safety. PPE shall not be a substitute for effective engineering controls, safe working conditions or sound work practices. . Given the climatic temperature extremes in Oman, PPE shall be selected following a risk assessment and typically for only short durations. PPE that may increase the net heat load on an individual shall be included in the risk assessment process.

PPE will only protect workers from injury not prevent incidents, it is the last resort.

Employers shall ensure that adequate PPE is selected in accordance with the following criteria.

PPE shall:

Give protection against risk(s) without leading to any increased risk in itself

Be suitable for the personnel, including correct fitting and comfortable

Be compatible with the work activity and other types of PPE worn

Comply with a recognised national or international standard of design or construction defined in each of the following sections of this Specification

Senior Managers will ensure that appropriate resources are provided to enable the purchase and supply of appropriate PPE.

Senior Managers will ensure that PPE identified and stated in formal risk reviews (HEMP) is of the correct standard for the stated control for each and every recorded threat.

Supervisors of every worksite shall be responsible for ensuring that all personnel on site are:

Provided with adequate PPE required for the particular activity and environment of the work

Trained in the inspection, use and proper storage of the PPE in use

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Supervisor shall inform their staff of the requirement to wear PPE and show them which PPE is appropriate

Wearing PPE (if appropriate PPE is not worn, the Supervisor shall be responsible for discontinuing work until PPE is in place)

PPE and the necessary training in its use shall be provided by the employer.

All personnel shall be held responsible for proper care and use of any PPE supplied to them.

Employers (PDO & its Contractors) shall replace, free of charge to the employee, any PPE which becomes deficient in any way through normal work usage or wear and tear, such that at all times the worker has adequate protection.

Normal wear and tear shall include the period of effective use specified by the manufacturer and requirements of basic hygiene standards.

Employees will ensure that PPE, where possible, is marked with their company number i.e. indelible marking e.g. inside helmet, collar of coveralls.

Records of maintenance of all breathing apparatus, H2S personal monitors (refer to PR-1078 -

Hydrogen Sulphide Management Procedure and SP-1219 - Well Engineering Hydrogen Sulphide

Specification), safety harnesses, and TLD radiation badges shall be maintained.

Unless specific approval is given by the supervisor, all employees shall wear the appropriate PPE supplied to them at all times while working at their assigned tasks. Supervisors shall enforce strict disciplinary action on any employee who fails to comply.

A worker shall not use PPE that is not in a good condition to perform the function for which it was designed and shall be empowered to request for a replacement for his PPE

PPE shall be inspected regularly as part of the company inspection programme.

PPE shall be replaced based on the condition of the PPE

1.7 PPE Identification - Risk Assessment

A first critical step in identifying the PPE is to identify the chemical, physical, mechanical and biological hazards in the workplace. This process known as a "risk assessment." shall be carried out for each work activity and included in the Job HSE Plan.

Hazard and Effects Management Process (HEMP): - Following the completion of a full HEMP review, to identify the PPE control measures, a physical review, including a site walk-through survey of the facility, is conducted to affirm the statements in the Risk Assessment.

Work Place Risk Assessments: A workplace survey is conducted to determine if likely

 hazards exist. Surveys include the following information:

Identification of the task evaluated.

Identification of the person certifying the evaluation was performed.

Date of the hazard assessment.

Before commencement of any task/activity, the supervisor has to ensure that hazard assessment is conducted. Supervisors participate in the survey of affected areas. As future job stations or tasks are developed, this assessment is completed prior to initial start-up. A new site is inoperable until the HEMP is conducted and the proper PPE has been selected and training provided.

Assessments followed by mapping of all work-areas and maintenance tasks are conducted to determine the PPE relevant for each work-areas and task. Clear signages indicating the mandatory PPE for that area/task shall be clearly posted at the respective work-areas. The assessment results are part of the Risk Assessment. Any assessment changes must be approved

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Effective: August 12 by the Directorate HSE Team Leader. Any changes will form part of a revised HEMP for the contract or project or work site.

The following factors should be considered when assessing the suitability of PPE:

 is the PPE appropriate for the risk involved and conditions at the place where exposure may occur? e.g. goggles are not suitable when full-face protection is required

 does the PPE prevent or adequately control the risks involved without increasing the overall risk?

 can the PPE be adjusted to fit the wearer correctly? e.g. if a person wears glasses, ear defenders may not provide a proper seal to protect against noise hazards

 has the state of health of those using it been taken into account? what are the needs of the job and the demands it places on the wearer? How long will the PPE need to be worn? What are the requirements for visibility and communication?

 if more than one item of PPE is being worn, are they compatible? For example, does a particular type of respirator make it difficult for eye protection to fit properly?

The Supervisor maintains all risk assessment worksheets provided they are applicable to the site;

A copy of the hazard assessment is used by Supervisors to assist in instruction of new or transferred employees.

1.8 Responsibilities

Job Description

Risk Assessment to determine appropriate PPE for the task

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

A R R S S S

Map & determine areas where PPE is applicable

R

Procurement of PPE

PPE Inventory

Issue of PPE

Enforce the use of PPE

A

A

S S

A A S

A A R S S R

S

S

R

R

R

Maintenance of PPE

Reissue of PPE

Destruction of use and returned

PPE

Training in the effective use of

Task-specific PPE

Maintaining the PPE issue records

Evaluation of the effectiveness of the PPE program

A A

A

A

A

A

S

S

R

A

R

S

S

S

S

A S R

R

R

R

R

R

S

S

R

Legend:

1 = Line Manager

2 = Eng & Ops Managers

R = Responsible for doing the action

A = Is held accountable if the activity is not implemented

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3 = DTL

4 = CSR

5 = Production & Maintenance Coordinators

6 = CH

7 = Contractor Managers

8 = Supervisors

9 = HSE TL / Managers / Advisors

10 = Worker

11 = OH & Industrial Hygienists

12 = PPE Focal Points (SAP / Administrative Support)

13 = FPR (Procurement)

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

S = Is expected to provide implementation support when asked for

C = to be consulted regarding the activity

I = to be informed regarding the activity

1.9 Performance Monitoring

When conducting inspections or audits the PE checklist shall be used to capture non-conformance to PPE specification. Bi-annual survey of PPE shall be conducted to determine quality of PPE issued to obtain user feedback.

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2 Personal Protection Equipment

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

As a minimum, Coveralls, Hardhat, Safety Glasses and Safety boots shall be worn at all times in the PDO operational areas including well locations, pipeline and facility

maintenance and construction sites. Hearing protection such as ear plugs or muffs shall be provided in all rigs and stand alone units. Production stations, construction sites, fabrication workshops or areas where noise levels are likely to exceed an average sound pressure level of 85 dB(A).

All PPE provided shall be CE marked or meet one of the relevant international standards. Training of workers to correctly fit, use, test and maintain PPE shall be conducted by competent personnel and documented.

All PPE prescribed and issued to staff shall be issued and replaced at no cost to the employee and employees shall be trained in the correct use and care of the equipment. Facilities for correct storage and maintenance of the PPE shall be provided by the employer.

Note: It is mandatory to conform to the standards mentioned against each of the PPE and pictures of PPE are only indicative examples.

2.1 Clothing in the Workplace

Loose fitting clothing may become trapped in rotating equipment and other machinery and is not suitable for working in the field. Musars and kumma and other forms of loose fitting head coverings are not suitable for field locations and are prohibited from use in PDO field operations, however they may be worn in office environments excluding control rooms.

Coveralls made of 100% cotton with reflective-strips are mandatory while working in fabrication, construction and operational areas. This is applicable to both male and female PDO and

Contractor employees. PDO Assets and Contractors are responsible for delineating appropriate

PPE for specific operations. Female visitors from PDO, Family and Ministerial or Other

Organisations dressed in Abayas or loose fitting clothing are restricted from operational sites unless in a appropriate coverall. These may be issued prior to the visit on request from the respective HSE focal points. These coveralls are to be issued on a returnable basis.

A - Balaclavas shall be available to personnel working in high dust and open areas, especially with high winds. Protective clothing-hood for covering head, ear and neck for use with safety helmet:

100% cotton

B - Some speciality activities may require employees to wear additional coveralls, aprons or chemical protective suites to prevent dermal exposure. Disposable coveralls for Naturally

Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) shall be manufactured from Tyvek or similar breathable material and be antistatic. PDO provides the Sperian Mutex 2 coveralls.

Note: Placing workers in additional coveralls or aprons may significantly increase the workers risk of heat strain and the employer and supervisor shall perform a risk assessment for such activities.

Disposable Coveralls for NORM and Spray Painting shall meet the FFP3; EN149:2001 standards

(Water proof and breathable membrane made through lamination of white micro-porous PE film and white non woven antistatic polypropylene material - Resistant to nuclear particles)

FFP3; EN149:2001

Design Specification

Protection

Skin and coverall protection

Material Outer

Water proof and breathable membrane made through lamination of white microporous PE film and white non woven antistatic polypropylene material -

Resistant to nuclear particles

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Size and colour

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Small

– XXL - White

Coveralls:

Material

Weight, material

Sleeves

Color

Zip fastening

Company logo

Reflective Tapes

Pockets

Belt

Velcro fastenings

Additional requirements

Cotton 100% and 100% antistatic g/m2 200/210

Long sleeve and Short sleeve light blue / dark green (for PDO) heavy duty (preferably brass zipper, 5 mesh auto-lock, double slider, closed end or equivalent) logo fixed on the left breast pocket.

Stitched with reflective 3m scotch tapes on both sleeves, both legs and back panel

Two way side pockets.

No belt

On sleeves, breast and back pockets

Pre-shrunk and suitable in Oman climatic Conditions. Fabric should be thoroughly Pre-shrunk before being used in the production of finished coveralls. This is an important factor as PDO coveralls are laundered at 60 deg c.

2.2 Head Protection

In general, a safety helmet meeting either BSEN 397:1995 or ANSI Z89.1-2003, ANSI Z89.1-1997 and ANSI Z89.1-1986 must be worn where:

 there is a possibility that a person may be struck on the head by a falling object; a person may strike his/her head against a fixed object; or

Inadvertent head contact may be made with electrical hazards.

Mandated such as production stations, rigs and stand alone units, pipeline maintenance, site fabrication and construction locations,

It should be noted that 'bump caps', commonly worn to protect against minimum sideways impact, do not provide protection against any of the hazards described above. EN812 bump caps may only be considered for specific low risk areas and only then after a formal risk has been completed and subsequently approved by TA2 Team Leader. If Bump Caps are provided they must be of the Hi-Viz colour range namely Saturn yellow or orange.

Helmets for Working at Height/Rope Access

Helmets required for certain working at height activities such as rope access and tower access should meet industry standards. The helmets may also be considered for rescue crews particularly in confined space rescue and medic response.).

The helmets shall meet

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Effective: August 12 the BSEN397:1995 specification for industrial safety helmet & Head protection

– BSEN397

Safety helmets (peaked)

Design spec

Material

Accessories:

ISEA Z89.1:2003

POLYETHYLENE

Colour:

Type:

SUSPENSION &3 POINTS CHIN

STRAP

White/Green/Yellow

Protection:

Adjustable size:

Temp. Resistance:

Electrical properties

Sizes:

Other Applicable Reference

Standards

VANGUARD, WITH Company LOGO

TOP AND LATERAL

Class E, Shell

– HDPE (High Density

Polyethylene).

30 °C up to max +50°C

VDE-tested (1000 V).

Range (INCH 7.1/2 - 8.1/2)

Head protection: ANSI Z89.1-2003, ANSI

Z89.1-1997 and ANSI Z89.1-1986

Minimum will meet CE :

EN 397 and EN 12492 standards for protection against impact.

EN 397 and EN 50365 standards for electrical insulation.

EN 397 standard for molten metal splash, lateral deformation & use in low temp.

BS EN 12492 - A safety helmet recommends a mountaineering style helmet.

Note that helmets with a chinstrap, compliant with EN 397 but not with EN

12492 are not suitable for working at height, as the strap will not fail, which could result in strangulation. Ideally helmets should comply with both EN

12492 and EN 397.

ANSI Z89.1-2009 Type I Class E

Unsafe Practices

The following practices are considered detrimental to the safe working life and performance of the helmet and shall be avoided.

Storage or placement of helmets near any window, particularly the rear window of motor vehicles, through which excessive heat can be generated. Note: Helmets placed on the rear window ledge of motor vehicles may also become dangerous missiles in the event of an accident or when sudden braking occurs.

Follow manufacturer's cleaning instructions; the helmet may be damaged and rendered ineffective by petroleum and petroleum products, cleaning agents, paints, adhesives etc., without the damage being visible to the user.

Alteration, distortion or damage to the shell, eg. splits and cracks, or to the harness.

The use of safety helmets for any other purpose than that for which they are designed, eg. as seats, liquid receptacles, wheel chocks.

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Cleaning

It is recommended that safety helmets be cleaned regularly. In general, normal washing methods using warm water and soap are adequate. The use of solvents, very hot water, or harsh abrasives is not advisable.

Inspection and Maintenance

All safety helmet components and accessories should be visually inspected prior to use by the wearer, for signs of dents, cracks, penetration or other damage due to impact, rough treatment or unauthorised alterations which may reduce the degree of safety originally provided.

Helmets showing damage or deterioration to the shell should be immediately withdrawn from service and discarded (completely destroyed). Helmets with sound shells but with damaged or defective harness components should be withdrawn from service and the complete harness and cradle replaced.

Reissue of Safety Helmets

No safety helmet should be reissued unless the helmet has been thoroughly cleaned and inspected. In general, when a helmet is being re-issued to a different person at least a new sweatband should be fitted.

Working Life

Excessive discolouration of the shell colour or weathering of the surface may indicate a loss of strength. Helmets which have been in service for longer than 3 years should be thoroughly inspected and replaced as necessary.

Plastic components of harnesses may deteriorate more rapidly under aggressive service conditions and in these cases harnesses should be replaced at intervals not longer than 2 years and/or as per manufacturer’s specification

To comply with EN 397, all helmets are marked with the quarter or month and year of manufacture. If helmets are stored in boxes in which they were supplied and do not experience environmental extremes, the shelf life of a helmet is not limited. However, it is not recommended that a helmet should be in use five years after date of manufacture.

If the helmet has been used regularly it should be replaced after three years from the date of issue. The date of issue should be marked on an additional sticker on the inside of the helmet at the back of the shell. The date of issue is not necessarily the same as the date of manufacture

The harness/headband has a life of two years and should be replaced at an earlier date.

Accessories

A wide range of accessories can be fitted to helmets to make them more suitable for variable working conditions. Examples are as follows:

A retaining strap worn either under the chin or at the nape of the neck.

A bracket and cable clip for the attachment of a lamp.

An eye shield, face shield or welding shield.

A wide brim for additional sun protection

Ear Muffs

Care should be taken to ensure that accessories and their attachment systems do not reduce the safety characteristics of the helmet nor adversely affect the balance or comfort of the helmet. Chin straps can introduce a strangulation risk and take care in the choice of straps. Particular care should be given to the electrical resistance.

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2.3 Personal Hearing Protection

A personal hearing protector is a device, or pair of devices, designed to be worn over, cover the ear canal entrance, or inserted in the ears of a person to protect their hearing. Personal hearing protectors should be used when levels of excessive noise cannot be reduced by using other control measures. Workers or others at the workplace should be:

 supplied with personal hearing protectors of correct rating and suitable for the work conditions

 instructed in their correct use instructed to wear them when exposed to noise monitored to ensure they wear hearing protection.

Personal hearing protectors should not be used as a substitute for engineering or administrative noise control measures.

Owing to the variance in individual’s ear canal sizes, the employer shall provide at least three types of hearing protection. Employees shall be trained in how to correctly fit and maintain if necessary, the hearing protection provided meeting EN352 or Australian Standard AS1270.

It is a statutory obligation for an employer to provide personal hearing protection where a worker is exposed to a continuous noise level exceeding 85 dB(A) for 8-hours or 82 dB(A) for 12-hours or an instantaneous or peak Limit of 140 dB(C). Where the noise level exceeds 85 dB(A) it shall be signposted e.g. in production stations and rigs. Many hand held tools such as grinders, jackhammers, drills exceed 85 dB(A). Any person directly working with or near noisy hand held power tools shall be provided with appropriate hearing protection even for intermittent use.

The selection of hearing protection shall be based on sound level measurements and octave band analysis for tonal noise or noise levels exceeding 100 dB(A). Hearing protection shall be selected to attenuate the in-ear protection to between 80 -75 dB(A). e.g. for an average sound pressure level of 95 dB(A), hearing protection of 18-21 dB(A) should be selected.

Workers required to wear hearing protection for their daily activities shall be included in an audiogram program.

Types of Hearing Protection

Hearing

Protection

Description

Ear Muff

Helmet

Mounted

Ear Muff

Earmuffs completely enclose the ear with a hollow cup.

Earmuffs use a spring tensioned headband to hold the cups in place over our ears at a certain clamp force to provide the desired reduction.

For situations were workers enter and exit noisy areas or need hearing protection intermittently, muff mounted hearing protection may be beneficial. It is easier to fit, affords good comfort and is ease to carry,

Disposable

Ear Plugs

Earplugs are inserted in the ear canals. They must be fitted sufficiently deep to completely block off our ear canals and to be self-supporting. There are three main types of earplugs, i.e. pre-moulded earplugs, individually moulded earplugs and adaptable earplugs.

A minimum of two types shall be provided by employers to account for individual variability.

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Flat attenuating earplugs

These plugs give a more uniform sound reduction than normal industrial type plugs. This type of earplug may be especially beneficial for people who already have a hearing loss, as they do not distort the high frequency sound as much as normal industrial type plugs

Ear Canal

Cap

Seal the ear canal at or near its entrance. They are held in position by a tension band which is normally worn under the chin or behind the neck. Normally give approximately 10-15 dB(A) attenuation.

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

Marking

The following information shall be marked on every hearing protection device, except earplugs for which the information shall be on the packaging :

The name or registered trade name or mark of the manufacturer.

Product identification or catalogue number.

Directions to indicate how the hearing protection device has to be worn if it cannot be worn symmetrically, e.g. correct technique for fitting ear plugs.

The SLC80 or Noise Reduction Rating (NRR)

No hearing protection device shall be used unless it complies with current relevant Australian and or British Standards and carries the AS1270 or EN 352 compliance mark. Other Applicable

Reference Standards are;

BS EN 352-1 Hearing protector requirements and testing Ear Muffs/Defenders

(worn with safety helmet)

BS EN 352-3 Hearing protector requirements and testing Ear Plugs

BS EN 352-1 Hearing protector requirements and testing

2.4 Eye Protection

The employer shall provide appropriate hazard specific eye protection for all workers where a risk of eye injury (mechanical, physical or chemical) exists. In PDO interior locations, the minimum standard is to provide safety sunglasses with 100% UV protection for daylight operations and clear safety glasses for night operations. Other hazards include: flying particles, dust, chemical splashes,

, aerosols, mists and high intensity radiation from welding operations, lasers, transilluminators and strong heat sources. Safety eyewear shall be worn at all times in operational and industrial areas.

Safety eyewear frames and lenses shall be tested and marked with the CE symbol, the manufacturer’s logo and the standard. Eye protection shall meet the EN 166:2002 standards and

EN172 for UV protection. Fashion eye-wear is not acceptable unless prescribed. Prescription safety glasses shall be provided to employees who require to wear prescription glasses. Other applicable standards are: Eye and face protection: ANSI Z87.1-2003, ANSI Z87.1-1989 (R-1998) and ANSI Z87.1-1989.

Eye Protection Description

Safety glasses shall have a 100%

UV protection for daylight operations which is a minimum of

Class 5.

For example 5

– 2.5 1FT

The 5 indicates 100% UV protection. The figure that follows immediately afterwards indicates they have a shading level of 2.5 (the third highest in the

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They shall be marked with the:

Radiation Protection, Lens shielding, Optical quality range). Next are the EN166 ratings for optical quality and strength. 1 is the highest optical class and then the letters 'F' and 'T' indicate they are capable of withstanding impacts from small objects travelling no faster than 45m/s even at extreme temperatures

Revision: 3.0

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Faceshield

A device which includes a transparent visor, supported in front of the face to shield the eyes.

Welding helmet with lens

Face shields are intended to protect the entire face or portions of it from impact hazards such as flying fragments, objects, large chips, and particles. When worn alone, face shields do not protect employees from impact hazards. Use face shields in combination with safety spectacles or goggles, even in the absence of dust or potential splashes, for additional protection beyond that offered by spectacles or goggles alone

.

A rigid eye protector which is worn by the welder to shield the eyes, face, forehead from UV radation and sparks during welding activities.

Hand held shields shall not be used for welding activities either by the welder or helper.

The helper for arc welding etc shall also wear a welding helmet as safety glasses do not afford sufficient protection to protect against welders flash.

The Lens shade shall be selected based on the welding process and amps. There are a range of lens from 7

– 14. As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark to see the weld or cut zone.

Guidance can be obtained from ANSI Z49.1, 1999.

Welding goggles or glasses

Welding Goggles are available with both Shade 3 and Shade 5 filter lenses. Welding Goggles are designed for Gas Welding and

Oxygen Cutting applications.

Welding Goggles should not be used for Arc Welding as these applications require a stronger, darker filter len

Welding Goggles are designed to provide protection for certain types of Gas Welding or

Oxygen Cutting applications. Welding Goggles protect your eyes from the heat and flying debris, but also from intense ultraviolet and infrared light.

Failure to use proper Welding Goggles can result in Photokeratitis, a painful condition similar to receiving a severe sunburn of the cornea.

In addition, Welding Safety Glasses help protect welders against Photokeratitis, also known as

"welder's flash". Welding Safety Glasses are designed with Shade 3 or Shade 5 Lenses and are primarily used for torch soldering, brazing and cutting. Welding Safety Glasses are not intended for arc welding, which requires a darker lens found in Welding Helmets.

Eye Protection Against Stray Radiation

Arc welding and similar operations should be carried out in screened enclosures to prevent stray UV radiation. Where this is not possible, the use of mobile screens is mandatory to shield other persons from stray radiation.

Maintenance and Re-Issue

Measures should be taken to ensure proper maintenance of eye protectors. These measures include the following:

The provision of proper facilities for storage, cleaning, servicing, and replacement of eye protectors and lenses.

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A system to ensure that all personnel are familiar with the arrangements for cleaning, repairing and replacing damaged or faulty equipment, and for correcting or adjusting uncomfortable eye protectors.

Inspection and cleaning of all eye protectors at regular intervals, after use, and before re-issue to another person.

The manufacturer's instructions for the cleaning of eye protectors should be adhered to.

Replacement

Eye protectors and lenses should be replaced when usage, accidental damage or age has resulted in deterioration of the properties of the eye protectors to a stage where continued use could itself by hazardous, or where the eye protectors no longer comply with the relevant standard.

In particular, lenses which have been scratched, abraded, pitted or otherwise damaged should be replaced because the protection afforded by them may be reduced and vision impaired.

2.5 Foot Protection

Application

Tasks where foot protection may be required include: construction, demolition, building repair, manual handling where there is a risk of heavy objects falling on the feet, work in extremely hot or cold environments, work with chemicals and forestry. Safety footwear shall be worn at all times in operational and industrial areas.

There are a number of types of safety footwear: safety boots or shoes. Normally have steel toecaps but can have other safety features (e.g. steel mid-soles, slip resistant soles, insulation against heat and cold).

Where there is a risk of slipping that cannot be avoided or controlled by other measures, attention must be given to the slip resistance of soles and replacement before the tread pattern is overly worn.

Fitting and Care of Footwear

When issuing new safety shoes/boots ensure the following:

Feet are measured for the correct size.

Have shoes fitted whilst standing and towards the end of the day.

Properly and comfortably fitted footwear shouldn’t need to be ‘broken in’.

Footwear should be kept clean and stored in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. No unauthorised alterations should be made to the footwear. Safety shoes should meet the standards:

BS EN 15090:2006 Footwear for firefighters

BS EN ISO 20345:2004 Safety footwear

BS EN ISO 20346:2004 Personal protective equipment. Protective footwear

BS EN ISO 20347:2004 Occupational footwear

2.6 Hand Protection

Where there is a danger to a worker’s hand(s) or arm(s), the supervisor shall ensure that the worker wears properly fitting hand or arm protection that is appropriate to the work being done and the hazards involved. A comprehensive list of hazards must be compiled for each workplace and suitable hand protection obtained for each process.

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Basic Requirements

A. Gloves MUST be worn when performing work tasks outside the accommodation, office, or control room. Gloves SHOULD be worn any time the worker is outside the accommodation, office, or control room, unless the task procedures or work practices specifically advise against wearing gloves.

Note: Construction and maintenance tasks (cleaning, carpentry, electrical, moving furniture, etc.) in the accommodation, office, or control room are included in the scope of this specification. Office-based tasks such as writing and keyboarding are excluded from the scope of this specification

B. Tasks MUST be evaluated to determine applicable hazards and appropriate hand protection.

Gloves suitable for the task (i.e. impact resistant, cut resistant, electrically insulated, etc.)

SHOULD be worn until the task is complete.

Note: There may be times when gloves are temporarily removed during a task (i.e. for a specific action requiring high dexterity such as writing or adjusting small electrical/communications components). Prior to glove removal the worker MUST appropriately evaluate and mitigate potential hand hazards present.

C. Gloves SHOULD be used, maintained, and discarded according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.

D. Prior to each use, gloves SHOULD be inspected for damage or excessive wear. Cuts, punctures, holes, or cracking may render the gloves ineffective. Properly dispose of damaged gloves.

E. When performing tasks involving chemical handling or potential exposures, the Material Safety

Data Sheet (MSDS) or equivalent safety information SHOULD be checked to verify the appropriate glove type. Using the wrong glove may result in the rapid degradation of the glove material, negating the desired protective properties.

Note: Chemically resistant gloves may degrade after repeated chemical exposures. Swelling, cracking, shrinking, or discoloration may indicate a change in the glove material, preventing it from providing the necessary chemical protection. Properly dispose of damaged gloves.

F. Barrier creams are not adequate protection from chemical exposures. Appropriate chemically resistant gloves MUST be worn when handling potentially harmful chemicals.

G. Gloves SHOULD be the proper size for the hand of the worker. Improperly fitting gloves can decrease the effectiveness of the worker in performing the required tasks, and can increase the potential for inadvertent contact with hazards.

Note:

“One Size Fits All” is NOT appropriate in selecting most glove types.

H.

Where multiple glove types are required, use of a break-away glove clip is recommended to ensure the appropriate gloves are readily available.

The gloves shall meet the following Standards for their intended use:

EN 420 for general requirements

EN 388 standards for Protective gloves against mechanical risks.

EN 60903:1993 Specification for rubber gloves for electrical purposes.

EN 374 Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms

EN455 Part 1 & 2, EN420 & ASTM D3578. The gloves are used for those with skin allergies. A complete list of Glove Types are in Appendix 5:

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2.7 Fall Protection

Where there is a danger to a worker of falling, the supervisor shall ensure that:

The worker is provided with a safety harness and a lifeline in such a fashion to prevent the worker from striking a surface below his workplace, and;

The fall protection devices protect the worker from receiving a serious injury due to the action of the devices

Fall protection systems are generally defined as either active or passive. A passive system requires no action on the part of the user. An active system requires action by the user, such as connection to a tie-off point.

In some instances, working at elevated levels requires the construction or assembly of a scaffolding system or a harness support structure. Depending on the height above the floor or ground, various guardrails and toeboards may be required. Design and construction of scaffolding systems are beyond the scope of this manual chapter.

Safety harnesses and lifelines shall be provided, worn and properly secured in all work situations where any of the following dangers exist:

Falling from a height greater then 2m

’;

Occurrence of toxic atmospheres or oxygen deficiency. Where this involves working in a confined space, the requirements of PR-1148 "Entry Into a Confined

Space" shall be followed, as well as the specific precautions identified by the

Permit to Work, Job Safety Plan and Confined Space Entry Certificate

Such situations include, but are not limited to:

Work on any high structure, including petroleum processing plants, drilling rigs, storage tanks, etc. without a proper working platform (i.e. a platform with handrail, knee and toe boards) whether in construction or maintenance

Work over water

Rescue work, in fire fighting, from high structures and from hazardous atmospheres

Abrasive or hydro blasting from high structures

Safety belts shall not be used, only safety harnesses shall be used.

Specific written risk assessment will be required prior to purchase and/or use of such equipment.

The risk assessment will determine the safety requirements and measures needed to be taken prior to use, including information instruction and training. All safety harnesses and lifelines shall be manufactured and inspected in accordance with:

BS EN 361 - Personal Protective Equipment Against Falls From a Height - Full

Body Harnesses

BS EN 363 - Personal Protective Equipment Against Falls From a Height - Fall

Arrest Systems

BS EN 354 - Personal Protective Equipment Against Falls From a Height -

Lanyards

Guidance is available in;

BS EN 358 PPE for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height: Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards

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BS EN 360 PPE against falls from height: retractable type fall arresters (e.g. blocks)

Many other BS EN standards may be applicable depending on the equipment required.

2.8 Safety Harnesses, Lanyards and Lifelines

Safety harnesses, lanyards, and lifelines are the most common fall protection systems used by

PDO employees. Safety harnesses and lifelines are used according to the applicable regulatory requirements. Some general requirements for harnesses, lanyards, and lifelines include:

The anchorage point for the system must be a structural member capable of supporting at least a 5,400 pound (2,450 kg) dead weight load.

Lanyards must be a minimum of one-half inch diameter nylon or equivalent. The maximum length must allow for a maximum fall of six feet. The rope must have a nominal breaking strength of 5,400 pounds (2,450 kg).

Safety harnesses are used in lieu of safety belts.

For other than rock-scaling operations, lifelines must be a minimum of threequarter inch manila or equivalent with a minimum breaking strength of 5,400 pounds (2,450 kg).

In general, employees shall use a safety harness system, secured to a lifeline or substantial structural member, whenever:

Using a powered platform (short lanyard)

Using a scaffolding system 20 feet (6m) or more above the ground or floor e.g. tower system

Working at a height of six feet (1.8m) or greater above the ground or floor

Retractable fall arrest equipment should be inspected and function checked by a trained competent person at least every 6 months. In addition it should be sent annually for full servicing and testing by a manufacturer approved facility

Guidance is available in:

BS EN 361 PPE against falls from height: full body harnesses;

 BS EN 363 Fall arrest systems;

2.9 Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE)

There are certain activities that require the employer to provide respiratory protective equipment

(RPE) such as confined space entry, fire fighting, emergency rescue and escape, spray painting, welding.

The Employer shall ensure that no person at the workplace is exposed to an atmospheric contaminant at concentrations in excess of the occupational exposure limits or an unsafe atmosphere as outlined in Royal Decree Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 2009. These include;

Oxygen deficient atmospheres;

Acutely toxic atmospheres e.g. H2S, Acrolein

Airborne contaminants e.g. Gases, vapours, fumes, mists, dusts and fibres

Types of Protective Devices

1. Air-purifying respirators: These respirators are designed to filter or clean contaminated air from the workplace before it is inhaled by the RPD wearer. They are available as either disposable respirators, or as non-disposable respirators with disposable filters.

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2. Air-supplied respirators: These respirators deliver clean, breathable air from an independent source to the wearer. Air-supplied respirators are typically used for high-risk environments, such as oxygen-deficient atmospheres and confined spaces.

There are numerous standards for the design, maintenance and safe use of RPE, however all respiratory protection shall selected shall conform with the basic health and safety requirements

(BHSRs) of the EC Personal Protective Equipment Directive (89/686/EEC) and carry the CE mark, a. The relevant European Standard for filtering facepieces against particles FF P1, P2, P3 is

EN 149:2001 b. The relevant European Standard for valved filtering half masks for use against gases or gases and particles is EN 405:2001 c. The relevant European Standard for - Self-contained open circuit compressed air BA with full face mask is EN 137:2006

Respiratory Protection Description

Air purifying devices:

e.g. Dust filter or canister type

Disposable Dust masks

– used for protection against nuisance dusts such as environmental and wood dust,particulates, fibres and

NOTE: These can not be used in oxygen depleted atmospheres

Half-Face & Full-Face

Cartridge/respirator:

Cartrdige type for half or full-face.

Filters have limited use and storage lives and are specific to certain gases or vapours. Filters are also mask specific (ie. filters are matched to a particular make of mask).

Filters fitted into a half face mask, full face mask or hood, suitable for removing low concentrates of certain gases and vapours.

Filters remove concentrations of different types of gases, those which are of interest, are classified as noted below:

A Organic gases and Vapours

B Inorganic gases and Vapours

E Acidic Gases

K Ammonia and certain amines

Half and Full-face air supply

Hg Mercury vapour

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Self Contained

Breathing Apparatus

Revision: 3.0

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Escape Hood

Air line equipment

Used in conjunction with Half/full face mask or

SCBA or solely with air line to mask configuration.

Disposable Respirators for NORM: For working with NORM contaminated equipment or debris

Design Specification

Protection

FFP3; EN149:2001

Respiratory Protection

Material Outer

Assigned

Factor

Protection

Polypropylene filter

20

Size

Small/Medium and Medium/Large

In addition, a Classification of 1-3 follows the gas type which identifies capacilty of filtration of low, medium or high. This is the external concentration of gas which can be filtered without breakthrough for a certain duration at the standard test conditions

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

1,000ppm

5,000ppm

10,000ppm

Filter requirements a re provided in accordance with EN14387:2004 and EN 403:2004. I don’t know this

Particulate Filters - These are used to remove finely divided solid or liquid particles from the inhaled air. Particulate filters have a prefix 'P' and a number indicating a class corresponding to

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Effective: August 12 filtration efficiency against a laboratory challenge aerosol of sodium chloride. P1, P2 and P3 filters roughly correspond to the former L, M and H cartridges.

There are 3 types of particulate filter suitable for filtering finely divided solid or liquid particles, or both, from the inhaled air. These are classified, in accordance with tests in EN149:2001 as follows: o CLASS (P1) Intended for use against mechanically generated particulates, (e.g silica, asbestos). o CLASS (P2) Intended for use against both mechanically and thermally generated particulates, (e.g metal fumes). o CLASS (P3) Intended for use against all particulates including highly toxic materials, (e.g beryllium, NORM). Class P3 requires a full face mask.

Note: Cotton fibre or plastic foam pads are not permitted.

Combined gas and particulate filters Filter combinations are used where both hazard types may exist.

Devices which Supply Air

These include airline respirators and self contained breathing apparatus. Use of this equipment requires detailed training. Example of use areas may be spray painting , abrasive blasting, confined space entry .

Respiratory Protection Program

PDO projects, maintenance, operations and contractors who decide to use respiratory protection to reduce workers exposures to hazardous airborne contaminants must develop a respiratory protection program.

The program shall include:

1. An evaluation of the respiratory hazard(s) in the workplace (contaminant and concentration), identifying relevant workplace and user factors, and the base respirator selection on these factors. The respiratory hazard evaluation shall include “a reasonable estimate of employee exposures to respiratory hazard(s)”.

The respirator type or class is then selected by comparing the employee’s exposure to the occupational exposure limit and determining the minimum necessary respirator assigned protection factor. Where the employer cannot identify or reasonably estimate the employee exposure, the employer shall consider the atmosphere as IDLH.

2. Any employee required to wear tight seal fitting respiratory protection shall perform a medical evaluation SP1230 (fitness to work)?. This is mandatory use of all respirators or voluntary use of elastomeric face-pieces, and recommended for voluntary use of filtering face-pieces.

3. Qualitative and quantitative tit testing is mandatory for workers required to use tight-fitting face-pieces. The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight-fitting face-piece respirator is fit tested prior to initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator face-piece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter. PDO and contractors shall maintain records of fit testing conducted to demonstrate employees are trained and understand how to correctly fit their respiratory protection. Examples of quantitative fit testing devices readily available in the market are the Portacount

Respiratory Fit Tester.

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4. Hoods for bearded wearers, teams of same type?

5. Effective training is required before workers are required to use respirators. The training must be comprehensive, understandable, and recur annually and more often as necessary. It shall include; when to use RPE, maintenance requirements, limitations of the RPE,

Selection

Employers and Respiratory Protection Coordinators shall when selecting and maintaining respirators consider the Assigned Protection Factor (APF). The APF is the workplace level of respiratory protection that a respirator or class of respirators is expected to provide to employees when the employer implements a continuing, effective respiratory protection program as specified by the regulations.

Instruction

Training in the correct use of equipment is required by law. Instruction shall include:

How to recognize the need to wear the device.

Importance of conscientiously wearing the device.

How the device works.

Application and limitations of the device.

How to determine if it is working properly.

The time for which the device will give protection.

Procedure for dealing with an emergency when the device is being worn.

Importance of not removing the device until it is safe to do so.

Importance of taking care of the device, cleaning, maintenance, storage etc.

Maintenance

The Supervisor shall ensure that all respiratory protective devices are regularly checked, properly stored and maintained, cleaned and replaced (both mask and cartridges as appropriate) according to applicable standards and manufacturers advice. Appropriate supervision shall be exercised to ensure that equipment is used in accordance with instructions.

Employers and Respiratory Protection Coordinators shall consider the breakthrough when selecting and determining when to change out respiratory protection. Breakthrough is defined as the penetration of challenge material(s) through a gas or a vapor air-purifying element. The quantity or extent of breakthrough during service life testing is often referred to as the percentage of the input concentration. Workers shall not wait for the contaminant to breakthrough before changing out their canisters or cartridges. The exposure shall be determined and if breakthrough is exceeded the canisters shall be replaced more frequently. As a minimum cartridge type respirators shall be replaced within six (6) months of opening the plastic seal.3.9.1 Air Purifying Respirators a. Air purifying respirators are respirators with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants by passing ambient air through the air-purifying element. b. Air purifying respirators shall meet the requirements of BSEN 141/143/371/372 as applicable", or be approved jointly by Mines Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for

Occupational Safety and Health (MSHA/NIOSH). c. Air purifying respirators shall not be used for protection in areas where H atmosphere.

2

S is present in the

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2.9.1 Air Supplied Respirators

Air Supplied Respirators are respirators that supply the user with breathing air from a source independent of the ambient atmosphere, and includes supplied-air respirators (SARs) and selfcontained breathing apparatus (SCBA) units.

SCBA or SAR shall be provided where:

 airborne contaminants exceed levels safe for filter masks

 there is an atmosphere deficient of oxygen

 the atmosphere is immediately dangerous to life or health

2.9.2 SCBA

SCBA is required to be worn in a sour facility when performing any breaking of system containment until the work area has been tested for H

2

S and declared safe to proceed without BA (e.g. breaking flanges, opening of vessels, opening of pump casings, pipelines, etc). For any BA activity, the

Buddy System shall apply (Refer to PR-1081

– The Buddy System) and the Buddy must remain at a safe vantage point to provide aid or response. Refer PR1078.

BA is also required to be worn when:

 Entering any Red Zone

 Any gas leak occurs, BA should continue to be worn until mustered in a safe location

 Working in an area where the concentration of H

2 ppm or where a build-up of H

2 level areas). Refer to

S in air has been tested > 10

S could exceed the TLV (e.g. bunded areas and low-

PR-1148 – Entry into a Confined Space

.

 Performing wellhead activities, e.g. bleeding down to a pit, flowline operations etc. where H

2

S may be present in gaslift systems.

Performing any sour sampling activity (refer to PR-1096 - Sampling of Oilfield Liquids and Gases

Procedure

The SCBA sets to comply with the requirements of the Personal Protective Equipment Directive

(89/686/EEC) & must comply with the requirements of the European Standard EN 137 : 2006.

SCBA must comply with any one type: Type 1 for industrial use and Type 2 for fire fighting.

The working duration for the SCBA sets should be selected based on the estimated escape time or exposure time for the related activity;

To ensure safe working in High Risk Sour areas or facilities SCBA sets with enhanced face protection factor to be used;

2.9.3 Air-line Respirators

Air-line respirators shall:

conform to BSEN 138:1994/BSEN 139:1995/BSEN 269:1995/BSEN 270:1995 or latest as applicable, or

be approved jointly by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for

Occupational Safety and Health (MSHA/ NIOSH)

In situations where a contractor's respiratory protective equipment is required to be compatible with

PDO equipment, any modifications or adaptations shall be constructed so as not to void the original equipment manufacturers approvals.

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2.9.4 Emergency Escape Breathing Apparatus (Escape Set)

An Escape set is defined as a breathing apparatus that has a portable air supply of compressed air and is designed for the sole purpose of enabling a person to escape from a hazardous atmosphere.

Emergency Escape Breathing Apparatus is never to be used to provide protection in normal work situations. All personnel working with a Critical High Risk Sour Site SHALL carry an Escape set, as SHALL those individuals working within the Inner SIMOPS Zone of such a facility.

Immediately upon activation of the device, the wearer is to leave the area of hazardous atmosphere. The breathing apparatus shall be selected such that the time required to allow the wearer to escape to a suitable location shall be within the capacity of the apparatus.

Emergency Escape Breathing Apparatus (Escape Set) shall:

 conform to BSEN 1146:1997 or latest

“Respiratory protective devices for self-rescue, Selfcontained Open-circuit Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus Incorporating a Hood

(compressed air escape apparatus with a hood)”, or

 be approved jointly by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (MSHA/ NIOSH)

2.9.5

Emergency Escape Hoods

An emergency escape hood is an air purifying device which shall be carried by all personnel working within the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). They SHALL confirm to EN403:2004 and

EN14387:2004. They will be used as the primary emergency respiratory protection for use only in the Emergency Planning Zone and the Outer SIMOPS Zone of a Critical High Risk Sour Facility.

These escape hoods shall be used in the EPZ and Outer SIMOPS Zone where the individual is distant from the hazard initiating event, and the H

2

S content in the air will be lesser.

The escape hoods to be used in EPZ and SIMOPS Zones SHALL be approved by PDO prior to use. The hoods SHALL, as a minimum, be fitted with a filter which provides protection against the following type of gases; B (inorganic gases) and E (acidic gases). The resistance time of the hood and filter contaminant removal, is to be selected as appropriate, taking into account likely concentrations and time to remove personnel from the affected area. Class B2/E2 filters are considered suitable for use.

Qualifications of Maintenance Personnel

Personnel designated as Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) maintenance personnel shall be trained and certified in the maintenance and servicing of the equipment that they are expected to maintain by the manufacture r or the manufacturer’s appointed agent. No attempt should be made to replace components, make adjustments or make repairs beyond the manufacturer's recommendations.

Air Purity (Quality)

Breathable air supply meeting the quality and purity requirements of EN 12021:1999

The employer shall ensure that compressed air, compressed oxygen, liquid air, and liquid oxygen used for respiration meets with the following specifications:

Oxygen content (v/v): 19.5

– 23.5%

Carbon Monoxide: shall not exceed 5 parts per million

Carbon Dioxide: shall not exceed 500 parts per million

Oil Mist: shall not exceed 0.5 mg/m

Odour: Lack of noticeable odour

3

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2.9.6 Fitness of SCBA or Air-line Users

From a health perspective and to assure safety, it is important that the wearer is capable of using

SCBA/SABA properly, which requires:

A good fit of the face mask to the face. The standard of fit shall be demonstrated by qualitative or quantitative test procedures. Difficulty is sometimes encountered in fitting masks to workers with small faces, those who wear dentures or have skin conditions that may interfere with the mask to face seal

Hair on the face and/or head that is in contact with the seal of RPE will impair the efficiency of the seal and thus constitute an avoidable hazard to the safety of the wearer. Personnel who may be required to wear RPE shall be clean shaven ( This is not a policy in PDO and we have procured the Hooded Mask for bearded workers)

Medical fitness of SCBA/SABA users shall be determined by a physician using the standards in the PDO Fire Fighter’s Routine Medical Examination, CAA Airport Firemen's Medical or equivalent medical fitness standard acceptable to PDO's Chief Medical Officer. A validity of not longer than two years shall apply to the certificate of fitness.

2.10 Other Personal Protective Equipment

This may include PPE for specific tasks such: lead aprons for x-ray protection; sleeve protectors, aprons, chemical spill suites when handling toxic or corrosive chemicals; leather jackets, trousers and spats for welding; thermal and cold protective clothing for work near furnaces and freezer rooms.

2.11 Training of Users

Personnel designated as users of SCBA shall be trained in its usage

(SP 1157 “Specification for HSE Training”).

3.

4.

5.

6.

Training is provided to all employees who are, or may be expected to use PPE when performing their job. This training includes:

1.

2.

How to determine when PPE is necessary?

What PPE is required for the task?

Where to obtain company-provided PPE?

How to wear or adjust PPE?

How to care for and maintain PPE, including disposal?

PPE is secondary protection used in conjunction with guarding and other

7.

8.

9. engineering controls to minimize hazards to employees.

Employees must demonstrate that they understand all of the above provisions before they are allowed to begin working while using PPE. The Personal Protective

Equipment Training and Certification Log (Refer Appendix) is used for documentation of all training. Training is repeated whenever any of the following events occur:

Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete.

Changes in types of PPE render previous training obsolete.

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10. Supervisors, Project Safety Coordinator and/or Site Manager have reason to believe the employee does not understand its proper use.

11. Training and certification records are retained by the respective Training Coordinator for the length of employment. Records are stored in the employee's training file.

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3 Visitors and Contractors

3.1 Visitors

Visitors, both male and female travelling into areas of the project controlled by PDO are offered PPE for protection. This includes hearing protection, safety glasses, and hard hats.

These items are provided to our visitors at no cost. Visitors shall not be provided with safety shoes or other forms of PPE by PDO. The tour guide shall not allow the visitor to wander into an area of increased hazard without the necessary PPE.

Personnel from Government Bodies visiting the sites shall be issued PPE such hardhats, and safety glasses on a returnable basis and PPE such as ear-plugs are issued on a nonreturnable basis.

Lady visitors in abayas are restricted from entering operational area. If inspections of instruments and other moving parts/quipment are required, then the tour guide shall ensure that coveralls are used. All visitors shall bring with them their own coveralls, safety shoes.

3.2 Contractors

Contractors hired by PDO to perform work under the direct supervision of a PDO employee are required to wear the appropriate PPE. Specialty items such as face shields or gloves to protect against chemical exposure and inexpensive items such as ear plugs or non prescription safety glasses are to be provided by Contractor. Since prescription safety glasses and steel-toed shoes are considerably more c ostly, contractor’s employees reporting to work at PDO project sites are required to provide their own safety shoes and prescription safety glasses.

When a contractor has been hired to perform a specific task under the direct supervision of the contractin g company, the contractor’s employees provide their own PPE. The contractor must be advised, before the start of a project that PDO expects the contractor to comply with applicable regulatory standards. Since safety glasses, safety shoes, ear plugs, and/ or hard hats may be required for the employees at this project site, contractors’ employees may not work at the project site unless they wear the appropriate equipment.

PDO does not provide this equipment.

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4 Definitions and Abbreviations

Corrosive: A compound that strongly irritates, burns, corrodes, or destroys living tissue. These are bases (alkalis) that are soluble in water (i.e., sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, etc.) or acids such as hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid

EPZ

Energency Planning Zone

The Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) is a geographical area surrounding a well, pipeline, or facility containing hazardous product that requires specific emergency response planning. It defines the extent of the hazard to the 100 ppm H2S end point (for 60 minutes) given the worse case release. The EPZ is typically measured in kilometers.

Inner

Zone

Lanyard:

SIMOPS

A simultaneous operations (SIMOPS) zone is defined as an area where two activities (e.g. production and drilling) are undertaken simultaneously under different control systems in overlapping spheres of influence or hazards zones. The extent of the Inner SIMOPS Zone is where a level of 300 ppm H2S end point occurs with 1E-

03 per year frequency.

A short flexible rope, strap, or webbing connecting the employee to the anchorage point or lifeline.

Lifeline:

Permissible

Exposure Limits

(PEL):

An anchoring cable rigged between two fixed anchorage points on the same level.

The exposure limit for a substance adopted by PDO based on published and mandated exposure limits. The PEL indicates the permissible concentration of air contaminants to which nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed eight hours a day, 40 hours a week, over a working lifetime (30 years) without adverse health effects.

Outer

Zone

SIMOPS

Safety Harness

A simultaneous operations (SIMOPS) zone is defined as an area where two activities (e.g. production and drilling) are undertaken simultaneously under different control systems in overlapping spheres of influence or hazards zones. The outer extent of the Inner SIMOPS Zone is where a level of 300 ppm H2S end point occurs with frequency.of 1E-4(i.e.10 less likely that you will have H2S at a concentration of

300ppm than the Inner SIMOPS Zone)

Chest, chest-waist, and full-body harnesses that encompass the torso and are attached to other parts of the fall protection system.

Standard Safety

Shoe:

Qualitative

Test (QLFT)

Fit

For PDO employees, a foot covering consisting of a solid vinyl or leather upper and slip-resistant sole. This is the minimum acceptable footwear for employees.

A pass/fail test to assess the adequacy of respirator fit that relies on the individual’s response to a test agent.

Quantitative Fit

Test (QNFT)

Means an assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit by numerically measuring the amount of leakage into the respirator.

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5 Formats, Templates & additional information

5.1 Appendix 1

– H2S Detection System

Personal Detection and Protection Equipment

– extract from SP1219 (WE H2S Specification)

This section describes detection equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE) that shall be used in all PDO oil and gas drilling and well servicing and work over operations where the work area atmospheric concentration of Hydrogen Sulphidecould exceed the action levels of 10 ppm of

Hydrogen Sulphide or 2 ppm of Sulfur Dioxide. In addition to providing personal protective equipment, personnel should be trained in the selection, use, cleaning, inspection, and maintenance of the PPE. The following H

2

S Protective equipment shall be available at all H

2

S designated well sites or where H

2

S suspected (this includes all exploration and development wells): a. PDO approved personal H

2

S monitors (Compur or equivalent), with an audible and visual alarm set at 10 ppm, one per person on site plus 2 spare for visitors; b. When H

2

S well fluids are burnt then S0

2 monitors are provided by the H

2

S Service Provider. c. two H

2

S gas generators (or equivalent) for testing the H

2

S monitors; d. PDO approved self-contained 15-minute escape sets, one per person (in line with BSEN

1146:1997 “Respiratory protective devices for self-rescue, Self-contained Open-circuit

Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus, incorporating a Hood (compressed air escape apparatus with a hood)”); e. a minimum of 6 Self-contained 30-minute breathing apparatus (SCBA) sets in line with

1234, Personal Protective Equipment

and BSEN 137:1993 "Specification for Respiratory

SP-

Protective Devices: Self-Contained Open-Circuit Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus" f. a minimum of 3 spare cylinders (pop comes in bottles with 30-minute capacity for above; g. resuscitation equipment; h. a minimum of 2 Draeger Hand pump testers with adequate full-range supply of H

2

S and CO

2 tubes; i. a portable explosive gas tester (JW sniffer or equivalent). Continuous monitors are normally used on Well Pulling Hoist operations only. j. Site monitors with audio and visual alarms placed around well head, flare pit and muster area.

Note: wireless H

2

S sensors are not allowed as they interfere with current other radio

frequencies

Note: Continuous H

2

S monitoring equipment is not always considered necessary during Well

Services operations as points of discharge are controlled. Accidental discharge is possible due to system failure but this would not necessarily be detected by a fixed monitoring system with limited sensors. Personal monitors are considered to be sufficient for, and more suited to, detecting accidental discharges of this kind. However for known Level 3 areas (Greater Birba, Ghaba, etc) the H

2

S Continuous monitoring system and cascade system are mandatory.

The following additional PDO approved H

2

S protective equipment is required on High Risk wells:

a) Full-face escape sets:

These escape sets shall be in accordance with the requirements of the PDO HSE

Standards Manual, now described in SP-1231, HSE Specification - Occupational Health.

The distribution and control of use is administered directly by the Well Site Supervisor.

b) Compressed air supplied BA:

sets for two persons with trolleymounted compressed air bottles, operated in “cascade mode”, and fitted with high pressure airlines and positive pressure face mask sets.

Such BA sets shall be fully compatible and comply with

SP-1234, Personal Protective

Equipment

and each face mask set shall also be fitted with a quick release connection, check valve and 10 minute backup compressed air bottle to permit use as a self-contained

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Effective: August 12 escape set. These systems shall be used for extended operations such as rigging up and down of equipment or other operations where a SCBA might be cumbersome.

All safety equipment shall be visually checked at every rig up, especially the air content of

the escape sets, BA Sets and spare bottles and standard tests shall be performed.

A comprehensive safety equipment inspection shall be carried out once per week including a complete check of all BA equipment, which should ideally be combined with a BA exercise.

If the atmospheric concentration could exceed action levels for Hydrogen Sulphide or Sulfur

Dioxide, detection instruments shall be available on location. In those instances where the

Hydrogen Sulphide atmospheric concentration may exceed the measurement range of the detection instruments in use, an alternative instrument shall be available on location that can measure atmospheric concentrations up to 300 ppm. If Sulfur Dioxide levels could exceed the action level for Sulfur Dioxide (e.g., during flaring or other operations producing Sulfur Dioxide), either portable Sulfur Dioxide detection instruments or length-of-stain detectors, with a supply of detector tubes, shall be available on location for determining the Sulfur Dioxide concentration in the area and to monitor areas impacted by Sulfur Dioxide gas when fluids containing Hydrogen

Sulphideare burned. An adequate number of fixed or portable or both type detectors should be provided for the safety of personnel working. Prior to commencement of operations, there shall be a clear understanding as to who will provide detection equipment.

5.2 Appendix 2

– Gas detectors

Gas detectors are referred to as portable, personal & transportable gas detectors.

Operation and maintenance

All detectors must have been proven to be in good physical condition and to operate satisfactorily in a non-hazardous area, before any attempt is made to operate them in any hazardous area.

Therefore, prior to use, all monitors shall be inspected for physical condition and be subjected to a

‘Bump test’ by users.

Dents, kinks, bends, blockages and holes in the sample probe may affect the sample and give a false reading. A damaged battery, damaged fuel reservoir or cracks in the casing could make the instrument unsafe or unreliable or both. Contamination, e.g. water or dust, could give false readings and may damage the instrument.

A damaged display would make the instrument difficult or impossible to read and a broken alarm may not register a hazardous situation. Any air inlet filters should be clean in order to allow an unrestricted airflow into the instrument. It is also important to check the integrity of other parts such as the carrying handle or case and shoulder strap.

All ‘bump tests’ and maintenance of ‘portable meters’ shall be carried out in a non-hazardous area and in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, using the recommended test kit / equipment.

All ‘portable detectors’ for use in hazardous areas are certified as Intrinsically Safe by an approved certifying body. No modification to the apparatus is permitted, EVEN THE USE OF AN

ALTERNATIVE BATTERY TYPE, as this will automatically invalidate certification and render the instrument dangerous for use in flammable atmospheres

A low battery indicator, distinguis hable from the ‘set-point’ alarm, is normally present on personal instruments. This may not shut down the instrument immediately but the instrument should not be taken into service until it has been recharged. If the low battery indicator annunciates when work is underway then the work area should be cleared and only re-started when a fully functioning instrument becomes available. The instrument should only be recharged in a safe area, away from the area being monitored.

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Before being repaired or maintained the gas monitor should be moved to a safe place outside the area being protected, e.g. a workshop or office. If hazards are still potentially present then it will be necessary to use a replacement personal gas monitor until the original is repaired.

Failure to comply with these requirements may render the instrument unreliable and therefore dangerous for use.

Type

Flammable gas

Alarm Level

10 and 20% LFL

Hydrogen Sulphide (H

2

S) 5 ppm & 10ppm

Carbon Monoxide (CO) 30 ppm & 50ppm

Chlorine (Cl

2

)

Oxygen Deficiency

1 ppm (vol)

19.5% (vol) or 19%

Oxygen Enrichment

Sulphur dioxide (SO

Carbon dioxide (CO

2

2

)

)

23% (vol) or 23.5%

2 ppm & 5ppm

5000 ppm (vol)

Frequency of checks

It is important that procedures for inspection including, function check (bump test), calibration and maintenance routines for personal monitors are put in place to ensure correct operation.

Monitor performance may degrade with time and accuracy will reduce depending on the type of monitor and operating conditions.These factors will have an effect on the frequency of inspection, maintenance and calibration.

The user shall consider the sensor type, operating conditions, required use / accuracy of the monit or and manufacturers’ guidance to assess the frequency of inspection and/ or calibration. For example:

Any personal gas monitor used to check the atmosphere inside a confined space shall require a bump test before and after testing before allowing entry.

Any personal gas monitor used to check for toxic chemicals shall require Bump testing before use or once in a day.

Calibration

It may not be possible to measure the required gas with the same monitor. As a minimum a full calibration check using the new gas should be carried out as per manufacturer recommended practicefor the type of gas detectors.

Calibration of personal gas monitors is normally done using a gas mixture from a cylinder; it is convenient and accurate. In many cases obtaining a calibration gas in a cylinder is a physical impossibility so calibration must be done with another gas mixture and calibration factors used. Use of calibration factors must only be done with the recommendation of the manufacturer.

Many gas sensors are sensitive to pressure and care must be taken when calibrating instruments, that true readings are produced. When using a gas mixture cylinder to calibrate a diffusion instrument the gas should be passed through a calibration chamber and out to atmosphere.

Excessive flow through the chamber may lead to over pressuring the sensor and raise the possibility of false readings. For pumped (aspirated) systems it is normal to flow the gas to waste and allow the instrument to draw the mixture from a tee-piece or reservoir in the line. Again care must be taken not to set the flow too high or low as similar problems may occur as for diffusion

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Effective: August 12 instruments. On aspirated systems care must be taken to ensure that all joints in the sampling system are secure as leakage into the system will cause false readings.

Procurement

PDO and its contractors shall buy only calibrated type and each of these gas detectors shall follow the manufacturer recommended standard or shall calibrate every six months , whichever is lower frequency shall be adopted. No disposal type detectors shall be used within PDO concession areas.

PDO approved models shall only be used by contractors within PDO concession area.

5.3 Appendix 3

– OSHA Standard

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/eyeandface/employer/requirements.html#Criteria

PPE

1. For General Requirements: for

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=

9777&p_text_version=FALSE

2. For General Industry:

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=

9778&p_text_version=FALSE

3. For Construction:

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=

10665&p_text_version=FALSE

5.4 Appendix 4

Glove Types for Chemical Handling

This table provides the recommended glove type for handling specific chemicals.

(List is not all-inclusive).

Acetone

Chemical/Product Name Recommended Glove Type

Butyl Rubber

Amines Nitrile

Breaxits with Naptha, Toluene, and Xylene Polyvinyl Alcohol

Chlorine

Cleaning Solvents

Neoprene

Nitrile

Corexit (s) with Isopropanol

Corexit (s) with Gluteraldehyde

Crude, Condensate, NGLs

Diesel Fuel

Ethylene Glycol

Nitrile

Neoprene

Nitrile

Nitrile

Nitrile

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Gasoline

Greases

Inorganic Acids (i.e., Sulfuric Acid)

Inorganic Bases (i.e., Caustic Soda)

Lube Oils/Napthas

Methanol

Methylethyl Ketone

NAF (Non-Aqueous Fluid)

OBM (Oil Base Mud)

Pesticides

Sulfur Compounds

Trichloroethane, 1, 1, 1

Varsol

Nitrile

Nitrile

Neoprene or Nitrile

Neoprene or Nitrile

Nitrile

Butyl Rubber

Butyl Rubber

Neoprene or Nitrile

Neoprene or Nitrile

Nitrile

Neoprene

Polyvinyl Alcohol

Nitrile

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5.5 Appendix 5

Additional information on Different Glove Types

Description

EN 420 for general requirements

EN 388 standards for Protective gloves against mechanical risks.

Require heavy-duty mechanical protection against hazards and should be Washable

Leather padded palm which are Breathable and flexible

EN 60903:1993 Specification for rubber gloves for electrical purposes. Gauntlet Gloves Electrical

EN 374 Protective gloves against chemicals and microorganisms

EN455 Part 1 & 2, EN420 & ASTM D3578 gloves used for those with skin allergies.

Disposable Nitrile Gloves

Used in chemistry lab, Vinyl and Latex one-way Nitrile Gloves. Feel and perform like latex but contain none of the proteins that can exacerbate latex allergies. These gloves have a tight cuff seal, are stronger that vinyl gloves with gripping tips. -provide protection from chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene oils, greases, acids, caustics and alcohols but are generally not recommended for use with strong oxidizing agents, aromatic solvents, ketones and acetates

BS EN 374-1:2003 Protective gloves against chemicals and microorganisms. Terminology and performance requirements

Non-Latex Soft Nitrile Gloves

Meet internationally accepted standards for protective gloves against chemicals of EN455 Part 1 & 2, EN420 & ASTM D3578. The gloves are used for those with skin allergic.

Latex Soft Gloves

Meet internationally accepted standards for protective gloves against chemicals of EN455 Part 1 & 2, EN420 & ASTM D3578.

Powder Free gloves

Impact Resistant (General Purpose)

Applications:

- Daily routine activities in process/project environment

(operating tools and equipment, turning valves, handling pipe, handling materials with rough surfaces)

Characteristics:

- Protects against abrasions, cuts, impacts, and pinch points

- Thermo Plastic Resin (TPR) or rubber impact protection to dorsal (back) side of hand and fingers

- Adequate/good grip

- Anti-fatigue properties

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- Good dexterity

- Moderate penetration / puncture protection

- Washable (preferred)

Note: Worker should match glove size to hand.

Light Duty

Applications:

- Light duty tasks with little impact exposure

- Tasks requiring dexterity greater than general purpose

(writing, handling small components)

Characteristics:

- Protection from minor abrasions, cuts

- Excellent grip

- Good dexterity

Washable (preferred)

Puncture Resistant

Applications:

- Working with tools/equipment/materials with sharp points

- Task involving needles, barbs, piercing devices

Characteristics:

- Protects against puncture from sharp points

Note: Some Impact Resistant gloves are made with puncture resistant materials.

Cut Resistant

Applications:

- Handling or operating edged cutting tools (knives, chain saw, power saw)

- Handling materials with sharp edges (sheet metal, glass)

- Food preparation (cutting, chopping)

Characteristics:

- Highly resistant to cuts from slicing or abrasion

- Extended cuff for wrist protection

- Can be washed and bleached

- May include slip resistant coating on palm to improve grip

Note: Refer to standards EN388 or ANSI/ISEA105 for definitions and classifications of cut resistance.

Chemically Resistant

Applications:

- Handling chemicals such as acids, caustics, brines, soda ash, hydrocarbons, and drilling fluids

Characteristics:

- Protects against skin contact with chemicals

Skin irritation or chemical burns

Chemical absorption

Chemically Resistant Glove Types:

- Butyl Rubber

Resistant to oxygenated solvents and most oxidizing chemicals

Butyl Rubber

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- Nitrile

Offers excellent abrasion resistance; protects against solvents and chemicals

Note: Nitrile gloves will not survive when immersed in ketone.

- Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA)

Excellent chemical resistance against polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs), aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, aliphatic and organic solvents, and most ketones

Note: Polyvinyl alcohol gloves will melt when immersed in water.

- Neoprene

Protects against cuts, abrasions, organic solvents, oils, greases, and petrochemicals

Note: Neoprene gloves will not survive when immersed in ketone.

- Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

Protects against most acids, fats and petroleum hydrocarbons; excellent liquid and solvent protection

Note: PVC gloves will not survive when immersed in ketone.

Note: Refer to Appendix 4 for

“Glove Types for Chemical

H andling” above for selecting the appropriate glove for a application.

Note: For more information, refer to the Material Safety Data

Sheet (MSDS) for the chemical in use.

Heat Resistant

Applications:

- Welding, flame cutting, burning

- Contact with hot or cold surfaces

Characteristics:

- Protection from heat, cold, sparks, flame

- Extended gauntlet cuff

Usually constructed of leather or insulated leather

Thermally Insulated

Applications:

- Working in cold environments (below -5ºC or +20ºF)

Characteristics:

- Protects against the effects of extreme cold including hypothermia and thermal burns

Waterproof and wrist seals to keep heat from escaping

Extreme Cold

Applications:

- Extreme cold environments (below -25ºC or -15ºF)

Characteristics:

- Heavy duty mitten outer layer

- Thickly insulated inserts

– removable to allow drying

- Minimal dexterity

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Nitrile

Polyvinyl Alcohol

Neoprene

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Electrically Insulated

Applications:

- Work on electrical equipment

Note: Work on electrical systems should be performed only by qualified electricians

Characteristics:

- Protects against electrical burns and shocks

- Constructed of seamless rubber (may be used with leather cover gloves, as shown)

- Glove class marked on the cuff

Note: Electrical gloves are classified based on their protection at various energy levels. Select the appropriately rated glove for the system to which the worker is exposed.

Medical

Applications:

- First Aid or medical emergency response

- Medical examinations, sample handling

- Contact with unhygienic surfaces (cleaning bathroom appliances)

Characteristics:

- Protects against bloodborne pathogens, surface contaminations, and mild detergents

- High dexterity

Note: Some persons are allergic to latex. Do not use latex gloves without first confirming no persons involved are allergic to latex.

Food Handling

Applications:

- Food preparation excluding cutting

- Protective liners used inside other gloves

Characteristics:

- Protects against bloodborne pathogens, contaminations, and mild detergents

- High dexterity

Note: Do NOT use latex gloves for food preparation due to the potential for allergic reaction by a diner.

Nitrile / Latex

Nitrile / Vinyl

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5.6

Appendix 6

– PPE Checklist

PPE Checklist - Appendix 1

OBJECTIVE

PPE requirements are in place to control employee exposure to chemical and/or physical hazards, but should be employed only after feasible engineering controls have been implemented

Implement use of PPE implemented?

QUESTION

Is there a personal protective equipment program?

Does the program include a written assessment describing the specific PPE needed for each task and activity?

Are PPE controls for Industrial Health & Safety hazards used until engineering and/or administrative controls are

Have medical surveillance requirements for PPE been implemented (ex., respirator, noise)?

Are PPE controls reviewed periodically to ensure effectiveness?

Are PPE controls for Industrial Health & Safety hazards reviewed each time there is a change in process or equipment?

Is there documentation that management enforces PPE use?

Is PPE used as determined in the written plan by all employees, contractors and visitors?

Score

Are adequate supplies of required PPE readily available

(appropriate type, style and size)?

Are employees offered a choice of PPE (type, style and size)?

SUGGESTED GUIDE NOTE

Link to PPE Specification - SP1234

PPE assessment records to specific activities

Demonstrate the Risk Assessment using the HEMP tool

Demonstrate the Risk Assessment using the HEMP tool

Records of these reviews to be made available

Demonstrate the Risk Assessment using the HEMP tool

1) Specification to describe the mandate for use of PPE

2) PPE policy to be posted and made visible

3) Consequence Management for non-compliance

1) Support of the HSE Team Leaders in this area will help one verify, through observation and interview, that employees, contractors and visitors use PPE as determined by the Hazard

Assessments, JHA, or other defining document.

2) Document this assessment - Line Audit or the Level 2 & 3 is a good audit report for this

1) Support of the HSE Team Leaders in this area will help one verify, through observation and interview, that employees, contractors and visitors use PPE as determined by the Hazard

Assessments, JSA, or other defining document.

2) Document this assessement - Line Audit or the Level 2 & 3 is a good audit report for this

1) Complete the comprehensive inventory of PPE required / applicable / / issued / kinds / - THIS WILL BE VERIFIED

THROUGH A REVIEW OR AUDIT.

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

QUESTION

Do employees inspect PPE prior to use?

Are employees trained in proper use & selection of PPE?

Do employees inspect PPE prior to use?

Are written Hazard Assessments conducted to define specific

PPE needs?

Is PPE maintained in good condition, properly stored and fitted to employees/visitors?

Are required medical evaluations given to personnel who wear

PPE (i.e., physically capable of wearing respiratory protection)?

Are engineering and administrative controls considered for feasibility before reliance on PPE?

Is PPE used as an interim control until engineering and/or administrative controls are implemented?

Score SUGGESTED GUIDE NOTE

1) File all training records of employees.

2) Take the support of HSE Team Leaders to ensure every line or modality has been issued the appropriate PPE and that all employees have a good understanding of PPE, (when it is required, how it is selected, and the differences in protection.)

1) Take the support of HSE Team Leaders to ensure all relevant personnel have been issued the appropriate PPE and that all employees inspect PPE prior to use.

1) Review the JSA Program and ensure that a Hazard

Assessments have been completed for all PPE applications.

1) Take the support of HSE Team Leaders to ensure all relevant personnel have been issued the appropriate PPE and that all employees inspect PPE prior to use.

Inspection of PPE used by employees

Verify with the OH team on the number of medical evaluations conducted for personnel exposed to the area-specific hazard

Verify the HEMP and relevant JHA Document

Are hazard assessments reviewed annually and prior to any process changes?

Are PPE training records maintained?

Are PPE requirements incorporated into operating procedures?

1) The PPE assessments must be reviewed annually and a

Management of Change process that includes HSE considerations must be implemented

2) Document this PPE assessments for all areas of activity.

1) File every trg. document related to PPE in your program file

2) Training material to be filed.

3) Training material includes use of video tapes, please view it so that the contents are clear to you

Verify training records of personnel

1) SOPs or work instructions to have the use of PPE included in them.

Page

42

SP_1234 - Personal Protective Equipment

The controlled version of this CMF Document resides online in Livelink®. Printed copies are UNCONTROLLED.

Printed 08/09/12

5.7

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Appendix 7

– PPE Management flow-chart

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

Page

43

SP_1234 - Personal Protective Equipment

The controlled version of this CMF Document resides online in Livelink®. Printed copies are UNCONTROLLED.

Printed 08/09/12

Petroleum Development Oman LLC

Revision: 3.0

Effective: August 12

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