quickie with barry du bois sanding 101

quickie with barry du bois sanding 101
 QUICKIE WITH BARRY DU BOIS
SANDING 101
Sanding is one of those jobs that everybody hates and you just wish you could take short
cuts. However, in just 60 seconds, Baz demonstrates why it’s worth following the rules when
it comes to sanding.
SANDING BASICS
Sanding back a surface aims to remove a layer of material either to smooth it in preparation
for finish, or make it rougher – in preparation for gluing or similar jobs.
Sand paper is an abrasive product and is graded based on the grit, which is the amount of
abrasive material per square inch. The higher the grade, the more grit on the paper and the
finer the finish.
Sand paper is used for sanding by hand and power tool.
STEP 1: ROUGH CUT
There are three basic principals to getting the perfect finish on your timber, every time.
The first step is called a rough cut. The aim is to remove as much material as possible to get
the surface level and remove all
imperfections.
You want to use a low-grade sand
paper for this step. For example, 40
– 80 grit.
For the rough cut, it is the only time
you can sand at a 45-degree angle
to the grain. This will allow you to
remove as much material as
possible, quickly. You must finish
this stage by sanding with the grain, in preparation for the medium cut.
For larger jobs, you may wish to use a belt sander for faster, even coverage.
STEP 2: MEDIUM CUT
The medium cut is the next stage in the process. It is designed to smooth over your rough
cut and prepare for your finish.
A good mid-range sand paper
has a grade of between 80 - 180.
From this stage on, you must
always sand with the grain.
An orbital sander is a medium
duty sander and is a great allrounder. You can interchange
your paper to suit the finish you
desire.
STEP 3: FINE CUT
To finish your job, you need to end with a fine sand. Aim for a paper with a 180 – 240 grit as
this will achieve the smooth finish you desire.
For a professional result when applying a varnish or polyurethane coating, you should
always do a fine sand between coat finishes. Each time you sand back, in preparation for the
next coat, you need to increase the grit until you’re happy with the finish.
A final tip to achieve ultimate perfection - and a glass-like finish - is to use 4/0 steel wool.
WEBLINKS
Bunnings Warehouse
www.bunnings.com.au
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