FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules

FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules
FM-3 and FM-4
Connectivity Modules
Reference Manual
P/N 400508-04
Revision A4
Date: June 30, 2005
© Control Techniques Drives, Inc. 2002-2005
FM-3 and FM-4
Connectivity Modules
Reference Manual
Information furnished by Control Techniques Drives Inc. (Control Techniques) is believed to be
accurate and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by Control Techniques for its use.
Control Techniques reserves the right to change the design or operation of the equipment described
herein and any associated motion products without notice. Control Techniques also assumes no
responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document. Information in this document is subject
to change without notice.
P/N 400508-04
Revision A4
Date: June 30,2005
© Control Techniques Drives, Inc. 2002-2005
© Control Techniques Drives, Inc. 2002-2005
Part Number: 400508-04
Revision A4
Date: June 2005
Printed in United States of America
Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this document may be
reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose,
without the express written permission of Control Techniques.
The following are trademarks of Control Techniques and may not be reproduced in any fashion
without written approval of Control Techniques: EMERSON Motion Control,
EMERSON Motion Control PowerTools, AXIMA, “Motion Made Easy.”
Control Techniques is a division of EMERSON Co.
Control Techniques, Inc. is not affiliated with Microsoft Corporation, owner of the Microsoft,
Windows, and Windows NT trademarks.
This product contains DeviceNet software that is licensed from SST, a Division of Woodhead Limited,
50 Northland Road, Waterloo, Ontario - Canada - N2V IN3.
DeviceNet is a trademark of Open DeviceNet Vendor Association.
RS Network and SLC 500 PLC are trademarks of Allen Bradley. Control Techniques Drives Inc. is not
affiliated with Allen Bradley.
This document has been prepared to conform to the current released version of the product. Because
of our extensive development efforts and our desire to further improve and enhance the product,
inconsistencies may exist between the product and documentation in some instances. Call your
customer support representative if you encounter an inconsistency.
ii
Customer Support
Control Techniques
12005 Technology Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344-3620
U.S.A.
Telephone: (952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
It is Control Techniques’ goal to ensure your greatest possible satisfaction with the operation
of our products. We are dedicated to providing fast, friendly, and accurate assistance. That is
why we offer you so many ways to get the support you need. Whether it’s by phone, fax or
modem, you can access Control Techniques support information 24 hours a day, seven days
a week. Our wide range of services include:
FAX
(952) 995-8099
You can FAX questions and comments to Control Techniques. Just send a FAX to the number
listed above.
Website and Email
www.emersonct.com
Website: www.emersonct.com
Email: [email protected]
If you have Internet capabilities, you also have access to technical support using our website.
The website includes technical notes, frequently asked questions, release notes and other
technical documentation. This direct technical support connection lets you request assistance
and exchange software files electronically.
Technical Support
(952) 995-8033 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Control Techniques’ “Motion Made Easy” products are backed by a team of professionals
who will service your installation. Our technical support center in Eden Prairie, Minnesota is
ready to help you solve those occasional problems over the telephone. Our technical support
center is available 24 hours a day for emergency service to help speed any problem solving.
Also, all hardware replacement parts, if needed, are available through our customer service
organization.
When you call, please be at your computer, with your documentation easily available, and be
prepared to provide the following information:
•
Product version number, found by choosing About from the Help menu
•
The type of controller or product you are using
iii
•
Exact wording of any messages that appear on your screen
•
What you were doing when the problem occurred
•
How you tried to solve the problem
Need on-site help? Control Techniques provides service, in most cases, the next day. Just call
Control Techniques’ technical support center when on-site service or maintenance is
required.
Training Services
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Control Techniques maintains a highly trained staff of instructors to familiarize customers
with Control Techniques’ “Motion Made Easy” products and their applications. A number of
courses are offered, many of which can be taught in your plant upon request.
Application Engineering
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
An experienced staff of factory application engineers provides complete customer support for
tough or complex applications. Our engineers offer you a broad base of experience and
knowledge of electronic motion control applications.
Customer Service (Sales)
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Authorized Control Techniques distributors may place orders directly with our Customer
Service department. Contact the Customer Service department at this number for the
distributor nearest you.
Document Conventions
Manual conventions have been established to help you learn to use this manual quickly and
easily. As much as possible, these conventions correspond to those found in other Microsoft®
Windows® compatible software documentation.
Menu names and options are printed in bold type: the File menu.
Dialog box names begin with uppercase letters: the Axis Limits dialog box.
Dialog box field names are in quotes: “Field Name.”
Button names are in italic: OK button.
Source code is printed in Courier font: Case ERMS.
iv
In addition, you will find the following typographic conventions throughout this manual.
This
Represents
bold
Characters that you must type exactly as they appear. For example, if you are directed to type
a:setup, you should type all the bold characters exactly as they are printed.
italic
Placeholders for information you must provide. For example, if you are directed to type
filename, you should type the actual name for a file instead of the word shown in italic type.
ALL CAPITALS
Directory names, file names, key names, and acronyms.
SMALL CAPS
Non-printable ASCII control characters.
KEY1+KEY2
example: (Alt+F)
A plus sign (+) between key names means to press and hold down the first key while you press
the second key.
KEY1,KEY2
example: (Alt,F)
A comma (,) between key names means to press and release the keys one after the other.
“Warning” indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
“Caution” indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, may result in
minor or moderate injury.
“Caution” used without the safety alert symbol indicates a potentially hazardous situation
that, if not avoided, may result in property damage.
Note
For the purpose of this manual and product, “Note” indicates essential information about
the product or the respective part of the manual.
Throughout this manual, the word “drive” refers to an EN or MDS drive.
Safety Instructions
General Warning
Failure to follow safe installation guidelines can cause death or serious injury. The voltages
used in the product can cause severe electric shock and/or burns and could be lethal. Extreme
care is necessary at all times when working with or adjacent to the product. The installation
must comply with all relevant safety legislation in the country of use.
v
Qualified Person
For the purpose of this manual and product, a “qualified person” is one who is familiar with
the installation, construction and operation of the equipment and the hazards involved. In
addition, this individual has the following qualifications:
•
Is trained and authorized to energize, de-energize, clear and ground and tag circuits and
equipment in accordance with established safety practices.
•
Is trained in the proper care and use of protective equipment in accordance with
established safety practices.
•
Is trained in rendering first aid.
Reference Materials
The following related reference and installation manuals may be useful with your particular
system.
vi
•
Function Module Installation Manual (P/N 400506-03)
•
FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01)
•
FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01)
•
Epsilon Eb and E Series EN Drives Reference Manual (P/N 400501-01)
•
EN Drive Installation Manual (P/N 400501-02)
•
MDS Reference Manual (P/N 400525-01)
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Safety Considerations
Safety Precautions
This product is intended for professional incorporation into a complete system. If you install
the product incorrectly, it may present a safety hazard. The product and system may use high
voltages and currents, carries a high level of stored electrical energy, or is used to control
mechanical equipment which can cause injury.
You should give close attention to the electrical installation and system design to avoid
hazards either in normal operation or in the event of equipment malfunction. System design,
installation, commissioning and maintenance must be carried out by personnel who have the
necessary training and experience. Read and follow this safety information and the instruction
manual carefully.
Enclosure
This product is intended to be mounted in an enclosure which prevents access except by
trained and authorized personnel, and which prevents the ingress of contamination. This
product is designed for use in an environment classified as pollution degree 2 in accordance
with IEC664-1. This means that only dry, non-conducting contamination is acceptable.
Setup, Commissioning and Maintenance
It is essential that you give careful consideration to changes to drive settings. Depending on
the application, a change could have an impact on safety. You must take appropriate
precautions against inadvertent changes or tampering. Restoring default parameters in certain
applications may cause unpredictable or hazardous operation.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Safety of Machinery
Within the European Union all machinery in which this product is used must comply with
Directive 89/392/EEC, Safety of Machinery.
The product has been designed and tested to a high standard. However the level of integrity
offered by the product’s control function – for example stop/start, forward/reverse and
maximum speed – is not sufficient for use in safety-critical applications without additional
independent channels of protection. All applications where malfunction could cause injury or
loss of life must be subject to a risk assessment, and further protection provided where
needed.
General warning
Failure to follow safe installation guidelines can cause death or serious injury. The voltages used in
this unit can cause severe electric shock and/or burns, and could be lethal. Extreme care is necessary
at all times when working with or adjacent to this equipment. The installation must comply with all
relevant safety legislation in the country of use.
AC supply isolation device
The AC supply must be removed from the drive using an approved isolation device or disconnect
before any servicing work is performed, other than adjustments to the settings or parameters
specified in the manual. The drive contains capacitors which remain charged to a potentially lethal
voltage after the supply has been removed. Allow at least 6 minutes for the Epsilon 205, 3 minutes
for Epsilon 202/203 and 30 seconds for E Series drives after removing the supply before carrying
out any work which may involve contact with electrical connections to the drive.
Products connected by plug and socket
A special hazard may exist where the drive is incorporated into a product which is connected to the
AC supply by a plug and socket. When unplugged, the pins of the plug may be connected to the
drive input, which is only separated from the charge stored in the bus capacitor by semiconductor
devices. To avoid any possibility of electric shock from the pins, if they are accessible, a means
must be provided for automatically disconnecting the plug from the drive (e.g., a latching
contactor).
Grounding (Earthing, equipotential bonding)
The drive must be grounded by a conductor sufficient to carry all possible fault current in the event
of a fault. The ground connections shown in the manual must be followed.
Fuses
Fuses or over-current protection must be provided at the input in accordance with the instructions
in the manual.
Isolation of control circuits
The installer must ensure that the external control circuits are isolated from human contact by at
least one layer of insulation rated for use at the applied AC supply voltage.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
EtherNet/IP Declaration of Conformity
Declaration of Conformity
ODVA has found the product(s) as described below to be in compliance with the EtherNet/IP™
Specification, having passed ODVA’s conformance testing at one of its authorized conformance test
service providers at the Composite Test Level specified. Product(s) that have been issued an official
Declaration of Conformity from ODVA have the right to display the ODVA certification marks for
EtherNet/IP conformant products. If a product family approval has been granted in accordance with the
ODVA Conformance Policy, tested family members are listed on the first page of this Declaration of
Conformity with qualifying untested products listed on the attachment.
The vendor referenced below has signed ODVA’s EtherNet/IP Terms of Usage Agreement (see
attached). Therefore agreeing that it is the vendor’s ultimate responsibility to assure that its EtherNet/IP
products conform to the Specification, and that the Specifications are provided by ODVA to the vendor on
an AS IS basis without warranty. NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE BEING PROVIDED BY ODVA.
Test Date:
Composite Test Revision:
22 March 2004
ODVA File Number:
Vendor ID:
Vendor Name:
Vendor Address:
3
10132
553
Control Techniques PLC-NA
12005 Technology Dr.
Eden Pairie, MN 55344 USA
Product Name(s)
(Device actually tested)
FM-E
Product Code(s)
4
Product Revision
1.1
Device Type Code
0
Device Profile Name
Generic Device
Electronic Data Sheet Revision
1.1
Comments:
Passed composite test revision level 3
Approved by:
William B. Henry
Katherine Voss
EtherNet/IP™ is a trademark used under license by Open DeviceNet Vendor Association, Inc.
PUB 00014R0f
Page 1 of 2
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Table of Contents
Safety Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Safety Considerations
vii
EtherNet/IP Declaration of Conformity
ix
DeviceNet Introduction
1
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
3
Connection Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Do Polled Connections Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Do Change Of State Connections Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Do Cyclic Connections Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Do Strobed Connections Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Do Explicit Messages Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Keypad Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
DeviceNet Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Software Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
DeviceNet View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Accessing the EDS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
DeviceNet Network Configuration Quick Start
15
Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
DeviceNet Explicit Messaging Quick Start
19
Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
How to Send Explicit Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Explicit Messaging Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Explanation of PLC program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
DeviceNet Polled Connection Quick Start
27
Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Polled Connection Message Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
DeviceNet Master Configuration File Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
PLC Configuration Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed Connections DeviceNet
Quick Start
35
Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connection Message Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DeviceNet Master Configuration File Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC Configuration Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DeviceNet Network Configuration Quick Start
35
35
35
39
43
45
Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Profibus Introduction
49
Profibus Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminology Note: MODULES and Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profibus Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profibus Messaging and Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profibus Installation
50
50
51
51
53
Mechanical Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Electrical Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Configuring the Profibus Network
57
Connection Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profibus View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Status Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Data Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the .GSD file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profibus Network Configuration Quick Start
57
58
58
64
65
66
67
Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
FM-3/4PB Module Quick Startup Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Profibus Specific Parameter Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
xii
Ethernet Introduction
73
Industrial Ethernet Overview
75
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Device Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
79
Hardware Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Keypad Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Software Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Setup View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Ethernet View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Produced Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Consumed Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Explicit Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Explicit Sources and Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Email View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Email Sources and Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Http View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Ethernet Quickstart
95
Ethernet/IP Implicit Message Quickstart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
FM-3E Ethernet Module Configuration Example:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Add the FM-3E to an Ethernet Configuration:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
EtherNet/IP Explicit Message Quickstart: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Drive Parameters
111
By Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
By Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Glossary
131
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
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DeviceNet Introduction
This section of the manual describes the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet™ Modules and gives
examples for implementing DeviceNet™ protocol with Control Techniques drives. The
Quick Start chapters offer specific examples of various messaging types, as well as a
programming reference that lists functional requirements for the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet
modules.
The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules connect to the front of any EN drive and are capable
of all the functions in the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01)
and FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).
3 Row by 12
C ha ra cter Disp lay
So ft K eys
1 00 -P in C on ne ct or
Dire ctio n Arro w
Ke ys
D evice Net
In pu ts
Exp and ed I/O
Syn c. Inp ut
O utpu ts
Syn c. O utp ut
10-30 V D C
Alignin g Tabs
Fr ont
B ack
Figure 1: FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Modules
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
A unique feature of FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules is the easily configured, usermapped Assembly Block. This feature allows the user to configure a drive with DeviceNet
visually by dragging and dropping parameters from the FM-3 or FM-4 module to the
DeviceNet assembly block. The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules support four connection
paths: Polled having eight bytes in (master send) and eight bytes out (master receive), and
Change of State, Strobed and Cyclic having eight bytes out (master receive). These are
configured through the DeviceNet I/O connections. The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules
also have built-in explicit messaging capability with access to all FM-3 and FM-4 modules
parameters (listed in the Explicit Messages Quick Start chapter).
The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules have not been fully tested for ODVA compliance
as Group 2 Slave devices.
2
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
Connection Types
The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Modules communicate to the DeviceNet network via 4 I/O
connection types and Explicit Messaging. These connection types are selected by the user
based on the application parameters to be read or read/written.
How Do Polled Connections Work
A Polled Message contains I/O data that is read by the PLC every scan. Polled messages are
used for high priority data. Polled Messages are typically used to transmit position, velocity
feedback, and higher performance data, like motion initiates and fault status. Due to the
priority of this connection path, the polled message connection may cause decreased system
performance if used. When multiple devices are used in a network, provisions must be made
while mapping parameters to obtain optimal network performance.
Polled Messages can be used in conjunction with Strobed and either Change of State or
Cyclic, as well as Explicit Messages.
How Do Change Of State Connections Work
Change of State Messages send data from the slave (FM-3 or FM-4 module) to the master
whenever the event data being sent attains a different value. Change of State connections are
generally used to read status bits being sent by the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet modules, such
as Index.6.Accelerating. Change of State connections are an excellent way to transmit data
which changes at a varying rate and can be used in conjunction with Polled, Strobed
connections and Explicit Messaging.
How Do Cyclic Connections Work
Cyclic connections are periodic messages sent from the slave (FM-3 or FM-4 module) to the
master. Cyclic messages are sent from the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet module at set time
intervals. Cyclic connections are generally used when data is required at certain known time
intervals, such as every 20 milliseconds. They are useful for reading data for static motor
positions and other static values. Cyclic connections can be used in conjunction with Polled
and Strobed data connections, as well as Explicit Messaging.
How Do Strobed Connections Work
Similar to Cyclic connections, Bit Strobed connections see a request initiated from the master
and a response from the slave (FM-3 or FM-4 module). Bit Strobed data is unidirectional; data
can only be sent from the slave to the master. Bit Strobed connections are generally used for
transmitting status positions, index presets, etc.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Bit Strobed connections can be used in conjunction with Polled, and either Cyclic or Change
of State connections, as well as Explicit Messaging.
How Do Explicit Messages Work
Explicit Messages are initiated from a user-created program inside a PLC or PC based
software program. In a PLC, these messages are sent via a copy command in the ladder logic,
and are read via another copy command. Using Explicit Messaging, all parameters can be
accessed in the FM-3 and FM-4 modules and drives. These messages allow multiple
parameters to be sent in messages that may take multiple scans of the PLC. Explicit Messages
work in conjunction with Polled, Strobed, and either Cyclic or Change of State connections.
Keypad Interface
Like all of the standard FM-3 and FM-4 modules parameters discussed in the "Operational
Overview" chapters of the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01)
and the FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01), the DeviceNet™
system parameters can be edited from the keypad display (LCD) on the front of the FM-3 and
FM-4 modules. The keypad on the front of the FM-3 and FM-4 modules provides navigation
through a menu of common parameters and displays of current functions. Navigation through
the menu is accomplished with the six keys located below the display. The top two keys are
called the "soft keys" because they relate to the commands located directly above each key
on the LCD. These keys are used to select the operation (e.g. Modify, Ok, Cancel), parameter
group, and/or to validate information. The four arrow keys are used to navigate through
parameter groups, select a specific parameter to be modified, and to modify digital and
numeric data.
The operation of the arrow keys is dependent upon the type of parameter which is being
modified.
On the Menu screen, the drive type and axis address are always shown on the top line of the
display. The second line shows the motor type. The third line shows two parameter group
names, one above each of the soft keys.
DeviceNet Menu
From the Menu screen, the user scrolls to and selects the DVNET parameter group from the
main menu items. Up and down buttons scroll through different DeviceNet parameters on the
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules including:
Master MacID
Connection Type
Net OK
Module Sts
Network Sts
4
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
Baud Rate
Mac ID
Receive Counter
Transmit Counter
Baud Rate
Three standard baud rates can be configured for the DeviceNet network: 125k, 250k, and
500k.
MacID
The MacID is the number assigned to a particular node. Every node on a DeviceNet network
must have a unique MacID. The range is 0-63. The MacID is read/write accessible with the
keypad display on the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules.
Receive Counter
The Receive Counter counts the number of packets received from the DeviceNet master to
the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules and displays a running total on the LCD display.
Transmit Counter
The Transmit Counter counts the number of packets transmitted from FM-3 and FM-4
DeviceNet modules to the DeviceNet master and displays a running total on the LCD display.
Master MacID
The master MacID displays the node number of the DeviceNet master to which the FM-3 and
FM-4 DeviceNet modules are slaves. This node address is read-only and defaults to a MacID
of 255 when the device is not connected to the DeviceNet system. Upon configuration, the
module will find the appropriate master and display its coinciding MacID.
Connection Type
The allocation choice menu displays all of the connection types conforming to the group 2
classification a ODVA DeviceNet device. These connections can be scrolled through using
the left and right arrows. The FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules indicate a connection type
in use by underlining the name of the connection type when it is scrolled past. This parameter
is a read only parameter and includes “ACK Suppression” and the connection types:
Poll
Strobe
COS (change of state)
Cyclic
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
NET O.K.
The NET O.K. menu displays either YES or NO to indicate the status of the DeviceNet
network. Faults on the system will cause a No to appear and a halt in data transfer.
Module status
When the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet module is operational, the Module status indicates
Device Operational. When the module is not operational, the module status shows either, “no
network power”, “Device in Standby” (needs commissioning), "Minor fault", or
"Unrecoverable fault".
Network Status
Network Status indicates the current status of the DeviceNet network. When the network is
communicating properly, CONNECTED appears on the LCD screen and the online tab of the
DeviceNet View in PowerTools Pro software. When communications or voltages do not fall
within range, either a NOT POWERED, NOT CONNECTED, TIME-OUT, or CRITICAL
LINK FAILURE (Duplicate MacID or Bus-off condition) fault appears on the LCD screen
and the online tab of the DeviceNet View in PowerTools Pro software.
6
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
VCAN_L
DRAIN
CAN_H
V+
Figure 2:
DeviceNet Wiring Diagram
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Software Interface
This section discusses how to configure a DeviceNet Network in the PowerTools Pro
software and discusses the parameters that appear on the views related to DeviceNet
configuration.
DeviceNet View
The DeviceNet View is in the Network group on the hierarchy tree used to navigate the
configuration views in PowerTools Pro software. The DeviceNet View is used to set MacID
and network BaudRate for the FM-3 and FM-4 modules. This is necessary to attach the FM3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module onto a DeviceNet system. In addition, it maps the individual
FM-3 and FM-4 modules parameters to assembly blocks.
MacID
The MacID is the number assigned to a particular node. Every node on a DeviceNet network
must have a unique MacID. The range is 0-63. The MacID is also read/write accessible with
the keypad display on the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules.
BaudRate
Three standard baud rates can be configured for the DeviceNet network: 125k, 250k, and
500k.
Word Swap
Word Swap is used in the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet module to change the order that the user
will see the 32 bit parameters sent to the network. Because many PLCs transfer data in
different formats, the endian feature is used to make the conversion to the PLC’s format
easier. MSW-LSW is the default and transfers 32 bit data with the Most Significant Word
(MSW) first, then the Least Significant Word (LSW) second. LSW-MSW transfers LSW first
and MSW second.
Example:
Index 0 Distance = 100.0000 revs
Note
The DeviceNet network doesn’t take decimal places into consideration. The user will the
must remove the decimal point and transform the number, 1000000.
Binary equivalent for 1000000 is 0000000000001111 0100001001000000b
MSW-LSW Displays:
Register #1
8
MSW
0000000000001111b
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
Register #2
LSW
0100001001000000b
LSW-MSW Displays:
Register #1
LSW
0100001001000000b
Register #2
MSW
0000000000001111b
Figure 3:
DeviceNet View
Assembly Blocks Tab
To map the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet module parameters, first the connection type must be
selected from the Connection Path Summary (see figure 4). When selecting the connection
type, click on either Change of State, Cyclic, Polled or Strobed and then click either Master
Send or Master Receive. This selection will be displayed Connection Block field of the
Assembly Block Data Map.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Assembly
Block Data
Map
Connection
Path
Summary
Variables List
Figure 4:
Assembly Block Tab
Individual parameters are mapped by dragging and dropping the parameters from the
Variables list (see figure 4) to the desired bit or word in the Assembly Block Data Map (see
figure 4). The bit or word will change color indicating that the bit or word is mapped. Color
assignment is random; the colors may change as the bits are mapped to contrast bit fields.
To rearrange or delete parts of the mapping, click on the assigned bit or word in the Assembly
Block Data Map, then drag the assigned bit to a different bit or word (rearranging) or to the
right side of the mapping box (deleting). A deletion confirmation box will appear when the
assigned bit or word has been fully dragged to the right. To switch Connection Types, select
a new branch on the Connection Path Summary.
The mapping status of the parameters is displayed in the Connection Path Summary. Each
connection type has Master Receive branches, and Polled I/O has Master Send branches also,
displaying the parameters mapped.
Note
The Assembly blocks tab is the only tab available offline.
10
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
Online Tab
The online tab displays the status of all connections only when the software is online with the
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules. The online tab is comprised of three groups:
Information, Counters and Status.
Figure 5:
Online Tab
Information Group
The Master MacID is the MacID of the DeviceNet master to the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet
module. The Heartbeat Interval is set by the DeviceNet Master and is the time between
connection checks by the master.
Counters Group
The Transmit Counter and Receive Counter note the data packet exchange between the
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet module and its DeviceNet master. The Bus-Off counts the number
of bus failures. Ten bus-offs in a row initiate the bus-off interrupt (major fault). This
information can be used for troubleshooting.
Status Group
The Status group uses virtual LEDs to display the drive status.
Network Status will display a green LED when the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet module is
communicating correctly. Module Status indicates whether in standby or operational mode.
Established Connections shows through the use of check buttons which connection types are
currently active.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Connections Tab
The Connections Tab displays the Connection Types and their current state (reflects the
current network connection object state), and packet rate. The connection ID allows this tab
to sort the rows.
Figure 6:
Connection Tab
Accessing the EDS File
The EDS file is for Master Configuration software use. The EDS file also contains the class
and attribute IDs of the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules parameters to be used for explicit
messaging, in addition to the I/O connection information.
The EDS files are stored in the software in the EMERSON PTPRO folder; use either FM3.eds
or FM4.eds. They are also available at the www.emersonct.com website.
Note
If the EDS file does not match the device, open it in Notepad and edit the major and minor
revisions to reflect Major Revision 65 and Minor Revision 57. Then retry the installation.
12
Configuring the DeviceNet Network
Troubleshooting
If the connection is not working, check the online interface and the connections hardware:
•
terminating resistors
•
MacID
•
BaudRate
•
physical connections to the network.
13
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
14
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
DeviceNet Network Configuration Quick
Start
This chapter presents an example startup with a FM-3 DeviceNet module using a 1747-SDN
scanner card. All the DeviceNet procedures presented in this chapter can be implemented
with the FM-4 DeviceNet module also.
The example presented is intended as a tutorial. For greater information about the steps in this
chapter, please refer to the "Configuring the Network" chapter.
Equipment
EN-204 Digital Drive
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module
MG-316 Motor
Allen Bradley SLC 500 PLC™; 1747-L542 (4 Slot Chassis); P1 Power Supply; 1747 SDN
Scanner Card (slot three)
1770 KFD RS 232 to DeviceNet Interface module with 96881501 RS232 cable (included)
DeviceNet thin cable and terminating resistors
RS Logix 500 Industrial Programming Software (PLC)
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Parameter Tables from the "Drive Parameters" chapter of this
manual
15
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 7:
Assembly Blocks Tab
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example
Configure PowerTools Pro software for an EN-204 with a MG-316 motor set at 115V. This
example will concentrate on configuring the DeviceNet View and the other DeviceNet
softwares.
1.
Configure FM-3 module parameters using the procedures in the FM-3 Programming
Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01).
2.
In PowerTools Pro, open the DeviceNet View.
a. Set the MacID to 1 and the Baud Rate to 125k baud (see figure 8).
b. Use the Assembly Blocks Tab to map the parameters. Do this by dragging and dropping
FM-3 DeviceNet parameters from the Variables List onto their corresponding Master Send
and Master Receive words and bits. Parameters can be dropped onto either the Assembly
Block Data Map or onto the Connection Path Summary. For further information on this step,
see the "Configuring the Network" chapter of this manual.
16
DeviceNet Network Configuration Quick Start
Figure 8:
Assembly Block Tab
The Assembly Blocks Tab will display a graphical data word layout and a hierarchical tree
layout for the selected connection type.
Change of State Connection
For this example, choose the Change of State connection type. Once selected, "COS" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Change
of State tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the
Change of State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
Strobed Connection
For this example, choose the Strobed connection type. Once selected, "Strobed" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Strobed
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the Change of
State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
Cyclic Connection
For this example, choose the Cyclic connection type. Once selected, "Cyclic" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Cyclic
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the Change of
State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Polled Connection
For this example, choose the Polled connection type. Once selected, "Polled" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Polled
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the "Polled
Messaging Quick Start" chapter.
Explicit Messaging
If Explicit Messages are needed, consult the examples in the "Explicit Messaging Quick
Start" chapter of this manual.
3.
Download the configuration to the drive. To do so, from the toolbar select Device and
then Download.
4.
Run Rs Networx™ and install the FM3.eds file in the PowerTools Pro software in the
Emerson/PTPro folder. Note: The FM-4 DeviceNet module has its own .eds file.
5.
In RS Networx™, Click the "Edit I/O Parameters" button under the scanlist menu and
delete all the connections not used for the node. Examples of this can be found in the
following Quick Start chapters.
6.
Configure offline the DeviceNet system and download it to the scanner card. Examples
of this can be found in the following Quick Start chapters.
7.
Confirm that the module is connected and operational (the Network Status and Module
Status) on the Online Tab of the DeviceNet View display. Green LEDs will confirm this
status. The status can also be monitored on the keypad interface.
If the connection is not working, check the terminating resistors, MacID, BaudRate, and
physical connections to the network.
18
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
DeviceNet Explicit Messaging Quick Start
To send explicit messages, the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules should be configured and
successfully connected to the DeviceNet system as unique nodes. This chapter will present
examples with a FM-3 DeviceNet module that should be used as a tutorial. All the DeviceNet
procedures presented in this chapter can be implemented with the FM-4 DeviceNet module
also.
Equipment
EN-204 Digital Drive
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module
MG 316 Motor
Allen Bradley SLC 500 PLC™; 1747-L542 (4 Slot Chassis); P1 Power Supply; 1747 SDN
Scanner Card (slot three)
1770 KFD RS 232 to DeviceNet Interface module with 96881501 RS232 cable (included)
DeviceNet thin cable
RS Logix 500 Industrial Programming Software (PLC)
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Parameter Tables from the "Drive Parameters" chapter of this
manual
How to Send Explicit Messages
An Explicit Message is compiled using an integer file (for example N10). Format the message
using the following table.
Integer File N10
Message Header
Low Byte
N10:0
TXID
COMMAND
N10:1
PORT
SIZE OF FIELD
N10:2
SERVICE
N10:3
Message Data
High Byte
MAC ID
CLASS
N10:4
INSTANCE
N10:5
ATTRIBUTE
N10:6
VALUE LOW WORD
N10:7
VALUE HIGH WORD
Once formatted, use the copy command to transfer it to the M0 file. The copy initiates the
explicit message transfer from the scanner to the FM-3 DeviceNet module. The FM-3
module response will be placed into the M1 file by the scanner. Using the scanner message
19
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
received status flag (in the example of this chapter the location would be I:3/15), copy the M1
file to an integer file (N11). Once the message has been copied, the results may be examined.
TXID is set at 0x01 for all of the following examples.
PORT will be set to 0x00 indicating a 1 port network.
COMMAND
0x01
EXECUTE
0x04
CLEAR RESPONSE BUFFER
Size of field is the size of the message data section and does not contain the message header.
For GET Service command, size should be 6 bytes; for SET Service command, size should
be 10 (0 x 0A(hex)) bytes.
SIZE OF DATA FIELD
Get Fields
0x06 bytes
Set Fields
0x0A bytes
The service parameter determines whether the data will be sent to or received from the slave.
SERVICE
0x0E
GET DATA
0x10
SET DATA
The Mac ID indicates the node number of the device to be read/written to.
MAC ID
0x00-0x63
The class, instance and attribute IDs for each parameter in the FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet
modules can be found in the back of this manual.
CLASS
INSTANCE
ATTRIBUTE
Note
In order to transmit a new explicit message, the response buffer must be cleared by setting
TXID/Command portion of the message header to 104 hex in the integer file and initiating
a file copy. This copy must be completed every time an explicit message is sent or
received.
20
DeviceNet Explicit Messaging Quick Start
Figure 9:
Description of N10 Integer File
21
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Explicit Messaging Examples
The following two examples of DeviceNet Explicit Messaging will be assuming a PLC
configuration as follows:
Figure 10:
PLC Configuration for Explicit Messaging
Explanation of PLC program
The copy command in Rung 0 will activate when B3:0/0 is turned on. This command will
send out a request to the deviceNet master by copying the N10 integer file into the M0: file.
After this request gets sent out. The PLC indicates when it has all data returned by setting
bit I:3/15 high. Once this occurs bit B3:0/1 can be set high to view the results via a copy
command from the scanner card M1: to integer file N11:.
Once the data is received, the response buffer must be cleared before the next explicit
message can be sent. This is accomplished by setting bit B3:0/2 high. When this is
implemented, the I:3/15 bit will be cleared by the scanner card and the explicit messaging
system is free to use again.
The N7 integer file will stay standard through the examples configured to match the following
box.
22
DeviceNet Explicit Messaging Quick Start
Figure 11:
Description of N7 Integer File
0x104 is used to clear the scanner card when it is placed in the N10:0 word and sent.
Note
After each send a clear response buffer message must be sent in order to continue
communication.
Examples
Example 1 Read Index 0 Velocity
This example will show how to use explicit messaging to capture the current index velocity
in an E Series EN-204 drive.
Create a PowerTools Pro configuration file ensuring that both the MacID (04) and the
network BaudRate (125 Kb) are configured. For this example, set the Index 0 Velocity is to
1000 units. Download this to the module.
Index 0 Velocity is mapped to class 7BH, instance 01H, attribute 19H, as shown in the table
below.
The following parameters will be used to set up this explicit message.
High Byte
Low Byte
N10:0
TXID=01H
COMMAND=01H
N10:1
PORT=00H
SIZE OF DATA FIELD=06H
N10:2
SERVICE=0EH (GET)
N10:3
MAC ID=04H
CLASS=7BH
N10:4
INSTANCE=01H
N10:5
ATTRIBUTE=19H
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
After the N10 file is set, B3:0/0 can be set high to send the explicit message to the scanner
card. After bit I:3/15 is set by the PLC, the message can be viewed by setting B3:0/2 high
which copies the M1: file to the N11: file.
The response from the drive should resemble the following.
Figure 12:
PLC Configuration Example 1
The following table reflects the results of the Index 0 Velocity example. Note that the Low
Data Word is 1000 (3E8H), the velocity requested.
Integer File N10
24
High Byte
Low Byte
N11:0
TXID=01H
COMMAND=01H
N11:1
PORT=00H
SIZE OF DATA FIELD=04H
N11:2
SERVICE=8EH (Successful Response)
N11:3
LOW DATA WORD = 3E8H
N11:4
HIGH DATA WORD = 0H
MAC ID=04H
DeviceNet Explicit Messaging Quick Start
Example 2 Write Index 1 Velocity
This example will show how to use explicit messaging to write the current index velocity to
an E Series EN-204 drive.
Assume the drive configuration for example 1.
Index 1 Velocity is mapped to class 7BH, instance 02H, attribute 19H, as shown in the table
below.
The following parameters will be used to set up this explicit message.
High Byte
Low Byte
N10:0
TXID=01H
COMMAND=01H
N10:1
PORT=00H
SIZE OF DATA FIELD=0AH
N10:2
SERVICE=10H (SET)
N10:3
MAC ID=04H
CLASS=7BH
N10:4
INSTANCE=02H
N10:5
ATTRIBUTE=19H
After the N10 file is set, B3:0/0 can be set high to send the explicit message to the scanner
card. After bit I:3/15 is set by the PLC, the message can be viewed by setting B3:0/2 high
which copies the M1: file to the N11: file.
The response from the drive should resemble the following.
Figure 13:
PLC Configuration Example 2
25
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
The following table reflects the results of the Index 1 Velocity example. These results are
verifiable via the keypad interface.
26
Integer File N10
High Byte
Low Byte
N11:0
TXID=01H
COMMAND=01H
N11:1
PORT=00H
SIZE OF DATA FIELD=04H
N11:2
SERVICE=90H (Successful Transmit)
MAC ID=04H
N11:3
LOW DATA WORD = 7D0H
N11:4
HIGH DATA WORD = 0H
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
DeviceNet Polled Connection Quick Start
To send polled connection messages, the Control Techniques FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet
modules should be configured and successfully connected to the DeviceNet system as a
unique node. This chapter will present examples with a FM-3 DeviceNet module that should
be used as a tutorial. All the DeviceNet procedures presented in this chapter can be
implemented with the FM-4 DeviceNet module also.
Equipment
EN-204 Digital Drive
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module
MG 316 Motor
Allen Bradley SLC 500 PLC™; 1747-L542, 4 Slot Chassis, P1 Power Supply, 1747 SDN
Scanner Card (slot three)
1770 KFD RS 232 to DeviceNet Interface module with 96881501 RS232 cable (included)
DeviceNet thin cable
RS Logix 500 Industrial Programming Software (PLC)
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Parameter Tables from the "Drive Parameters" chapter of this
manual
Polled Connection Message Example
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example
Configure the PowerTools Pro software for an EN-204 with a MG 316 motor set at 115V. For
help configuring the drive, please refer to the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual
(P/N 400508-01). This example will concentrate on configuring the DeviceNet View and the
other DeviceNet softwares.
27
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 14:
Assembly Block Tab
Open the DeviceNet View from the hierarchy tree in the PowerTools Pro software. Set the
MacID to 1 and the Baud Rate to 125 K baud (see figure 14).
The Assembly Blocks Tab will display a graphical data word layout for the selected
connection type. For this example, choose the Polled connection type. Once selected,
"Polled" will be displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then
expand the Polled tree in the Connection Path Summary (see figure 14).
Individual parameters are mapped by dragging and dropping the parameters from the
Variables list to the desired bit or word in the Assembly Block Data Map. The bit or word will
change color indicating that the bit or word is mapped.
The following parameters should be mapped to the following Master Send bits (see figure
15): Jog Select0 to Word 0, Bit 2; Jog Plus Activate to Word 0, Bit 9; Jog Minus Activate to
Word 0, Bit 15; Jog 0 Vel to Word 2 & 3.
28
DeviceNet Polled Connection Quick Start
Figure 15:
Polled Master Send Mapping
The following parameters should be mapped to the following Master Receive bits (see figure
16): Jog 0 At Vel to Word 0, Bit 0; Jog 0 Command In Prog to Word 0, Bit 1; Jog 0
Accelerating to Word 0, Bit 2; Jog 0 Deceleration to Word 0, Bit 3; Jog 0 Command Complete
to Word 0, Bit 4; Velocity Feedback to Word 2 & 3.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 16:
Polled Master Receive Mapping
When these are all mapped, download these parameters to the FM-3 DeviceNet module.
DeviceNet Master Configuration File Example
Using RS NetWorx for DeviceNet, access the EDS Wizard to install the .eds file from
PowerTools Pro. The .eds file gives the class instance and attribute for each parameter in the
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules. The wizard will ask which icon to use. Direct it to use
the FM-3 icon (FM3.ico) installed in the Emerson/PTPro folder. (The FM-4 DeviceNet
module will use the FM-4.ico and FM-4.eds files.)
After the .eds file is installed, create a DeviceNet network consisting of the Master Scanner
Card (1747 SDN) and the FM-3 DeviceNet module. To do so, double click on the scanner
card icon. A Scanner Module window will appear. On the Module tab, set the slot to show the
correct PLC slot. On the Scanlist tab, move the FM-3 DeviceNet icon over to the Scanlist
window (see figure 17).
30
DeviceNet Polled Connection Quick Start
Figure 17:
Scanner Module Window, Scanlist Tab
On the Scanlist tab, click the Edit I/O Parameters button, and check the Polled Connection
Type only. Configure it for 8 bytes in and 8 bytes out (see figure 18). Once this dialog box is
configured, click ok to return to the Scanner Module window.
Figure 18:
Edit I/O Parameters Dialog Box
The Input tab, will initially display four words of data broken up throughout the Input Lines
(see figure 19). To resolve this, click the Unmap button and then click the AutoMap button
immediately afterwards. This will correctly map the 8 Polled data bytes in respect to the PLC
Words.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 19:
Scanner Module Window, Input Tab
Once finished with the inputs tab, repeat the same procedure to map the 8 Polled bytes on the
Output tab.
This configuration should now be downloaded to the Scanner Module. Then the FM-3
DeviceNet module can be connected to the DeviceNet network and power can be cycled to
the network to initialize it.
PLC Configuration Example
The PLC will be configured with the same ladder program described in the "Explicit
Messaging Quick Start" chapter. This program allows the user to send and receive Explicit
Messages, as well as Polled I/O Connection. The Polled I/O Connection can be set in the line
to initialize the scanner (see figure 20).
32
DeviceNet Polled Connection Quick Start
Figure 20:
PLC Configuration Example
Once online with the PLC, the Velocity and the Jog Activate can be modified by means of the
Input table. The Input table reads back the device’s velocity feedback and some status bits, as
defined in the PowerTools Pro DeviceNet View. Motion can be initialized by placing a "1"
into either Word 0, Bit 9 or Word 0, Bit 15 (see figure 21).
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 21:
PLC Mapping Example
Note
In all four connection types, if the transmit and receive counters are continuously
counting, communications are set up and parameters will be transferred.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed
Connections DeviceNet Quick Start
To send Change of State, Cyclic, or Strobed connection messages, the Control Techniques
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet modules should be configured and successfully connected to the
DeviceNet system as a unique node. This chapter will present examples with a FM-3
DeviceNet module that should be used as a tutorial. All the DeviceNet procedures presented
in this chapter can be implemented with the FM-4 DeviceNet module also.
Equipment
EN-204 Digital Drive
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module
MG 316 Motor
Allen Bradley SLC 500 PLC™; 1747-L542, 4 Slot Chassis, P1 Power Supply, 1747 SDN
Scanner Card (slot three)
1770 KFD RS 232 to DeviceNet Interface module with 96881501 RS232 cable (included)
DeviceNet thin cable
RS Logix 500 Industrial Programming Software (PLC)
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Parameter Tables from the "Drive Parameters" chapter of this
manual
Connection Message Example
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example
Configure the PowerTools Pro software for an EN-204 with a MG 316 motor set at 115V. For
help configuring the drive, please refer to the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual
(P/N 400508-01). This example will concentrate on configuring the DeviceNet View and the
other DeviceNet softwares.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 22:
Assembly Block Tab
Open the DeviceNet View from the hierarchy tree in the PowerTools Pro software. Set the
MacID to 1 and the Baud Rate to 125 k baud (see figure 22).
The Assembly Blocks Tab will display a graphical data word layout for the selected
connection type.
Change of State
Choose the Change of State connection type. Once selected, "COS" will be displayed in the
Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Change of State
tree in the Connection Path Summary (see figure 22).
Individual parameters are mapped by dragging and dropping the parameters from the
Variables list to the desired bit or word in the Assembly Block Data Map. The bit or word will
change color indicating that the bit or word is mapped.
Note
Due to ODVA specifications, Change of State connections can only be mapped for Master
Receive bits.
The following parameters should be mapped to the following Master Receive bits (see figure
23): Index.0.PLSEnable to Word 0, Bit 0; Index.0.Accelerating to Word 0, Bit 1;
Index.0.CommandComplete to Word 0, Bit 2; Index.0.CommandInProgress to Word 0, Bit 3;
Index.0.Decelerating to Word 0, Bit 4; Index.0.Vel to Word 2 & 3.
36
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed Connections DeviceNet Quick Start
Figure 23:
Change of State Master Receive Mapping
When these are all mapped, download these parameters to the FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet
module.
Once downloaded, these DeviceNet parameters can be verified by initiating Index.0 using the
keypad interface on the FM-3 module (only a FM-3 DeviceNet module output event will
initiate a message when the state of the event changes).
Cyclic
Choose the Cyclic connection type. Once selected, "Cyclic" will be displayed in the
Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Cyclic tree in the
Connection Path Summary (see figure 24).
Note
Due to ODVA specifications, Cyclic connections can only be mapped for Master Receive
bits.
Individual parameters are mapped by dragging and dropping the parameters from the
Variables list to the desired bit or word in the Assembly Block Data Map. The bit or word will
change color indicating that the bit or word is mapped.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
The following parameters should be mapped to the following Master Receive bits (see figure
24): Index.0.PLSEnable to Word 0, Bit 0; Index.0.Accelerating to Word 0, Bit 1;
Index.0.AtVel to Word 0, Bit 2; Index.0.CommandInProgress to Word 0, Bit 3;
Index.0.Decelerating to Word 0, Bit 4; Index.0.Vel to Word 2 & 3.
Figure 24:
Cyclic Master Receive Mapping
When these are all mapped, download these parameters to the FM-3 DeviceNet module.
Once downloaded, these DeviceNet parameters can be verified by initiating Index.0 using the
keypad interface on the FM-3 module.
Strobed
Choose the Strobed connection type. Once selected, "Strobed" will be displayed in the
Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Strobed tree in
the Connection Path Summary (see figure 25).
Individual parameters are mapped by dragging and dropping the parameters from the
Variables list to the desired bit or word in the Assembly Block Data Map. The bit or word will
change color indicating that the bit or word is mapped.
The following parameters should be mapped to the following Master Receive bits (see figure
25): Index.0.PLSEnable to Word 0, Bit 0; Index.0.Accelerating to Word 0, Bit 1;
Index.0.CommandInProgress to Word 0, Bit 2; Index.0.Decelerating to Word 0, Bit 3;
Index.0.Vel to Word 2 & 3.
38
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed Connections DeviceNet Quick Start
Figure 25:
Strobed Master Receive Mapping
When these are all mapped, download these parameters to the FM-3 DeviceNet module.
DeviceNet Master Configuration File Example
Using RS NetWorx for DeviceNet, access the EDS Wizard to install the .eds file from
PowerTools Pro. The .eds file gives the class instance and attribute for each parameter in the
FM-3 DeviceNet module. The wizard will ask which icon to use. Direct it to use the FM-3
icon (FM3.ico) installed under the Emerson file under PTPro. (The FM-4 DeviceNet module
will use the FM-4.ico and FM-4.eds files.)
After the .eds file is installed, create a DeviceNet network consisting of the Master Scanner
Card (1747 SDN) and the FM-3 DeviceNet module. To do so, double click on the scanner
card icon. A Scanner Module window will appear. On the Module tab, set the slot to show the
correct PLC slot. On the Scanlist tab, move the FM-3 DeviceNet over to the Scanlist window
(see figure 26).
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 26:
Scanner Module Window, Scanlist Tab
On the Scanlist tab, click the Edit I/O Parameters button, and check the appropriate
Connection Type. Configure it for 8 bytes Master Send and, if appropriate, 8 bytes Master
Receive (see figure 27). Once this dialog box is configured, click ok to return to the Scanner
Module window.
Figure 27:
40
Edit I/O Parameters Dialog Box, Change of State
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed Connections DeviceNet Quick Start
Figure 28:
Edit I/O Parameters Dialog Box, Cyclic
Figure 29:
Edit I/O Parameters Dialog Box, Strobed
The Input tab, will initially display four words of data broken up throughout the Input Lines
(see figure 30). To resolve this, click the Unmap button and then click the AutoMap button
immediately afterwards. This will correctly map the 8 Polled data bytes in respect to the PLC
Words.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 30:
Scanner Module Window, Input Tab, Change of State
Figure 31:
Scanner Module Window, Input Tab, Cyclic
This configuration should now be downloaded to the Scanner Module. Then the FM-3
DeviceNet module can be connected to the DeviceNet network and power can be cycled to
the network to initialize it.
42
Change of State, Cyclic and Strobed Connections DeviceNet Quick Start
PLC Configuration Example
The PLC will be configured with the same ladder program described in the "Explicit
Messaging Quick Start" chapter. This program allows the user to send and receive Explicit
Messages, as well as other connection types.
Figure 32:
PLC Configuration Example
Once online with the PLC, Index 0 can be initiated through the keypad interface and the
feedback can be read through the input file.
Even without initiating an index, feedback can be seen through the input file by manually
trying to move the shaft of the motor.
Note
In all four connection types, if the transmit and receive counters are continuously
counting, communications are set up and parameters will be transferred.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
DeviceNet Network Configuration
Quick Start
This chapter presents an example startup with a FM-3 DeviceNet module using a 1747-SDN
scanner card. All the DeviceNet procedures presented in this chapter can be implemented
with the FM-4 DeviceNet module also.
The example presented is intended as a tutorial. For greater information about the steps in this
chapter, please refer to the "Configuring the Network" chapter.
Equipment
EN-204 Digital Drive
FM-3 or FM-4 DeviceNet Module
MG-316 Motor
Allen Bradley SLC 500 PLC™; 1747-L542 (4 Slot Chassis); P1 Power Supply; 1747 SDN
Scanner Card (slot three)
1770 KFD RS 232 to DeviceNet Interface module with 96881501 RS232 cable (included)
DeviceNet thin cable and terminating resistors
RS Logix 500 Industrial Programming Software (PLC)
FM-3 and FM-4 DeviceNet Parameter Tables from the "Drive Parameters" chapter of this
manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 33:
Assembly Blocks Tab
FM-3 DeviceNet Module Configuration Example
Configure PowerTools Pro software for an EN-204 with a MG-316 motor set at 115V. This
example will concentrate on configuring the DeviceNet View and the other DeviceNet
softwares.
1. Configure FM-3 module parameters using the procedures in the FM-3 Programming
Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01).
2. In PowerTools Pro DeviceNet, open the DeviceNet View.
a. Set the MacID to 1 and the Baud Rate to 125k baud (see figure 34).
b. Use the Assembly Blocks Tab to map the parameters. Do this by dragging and dropping
FM-3 DeviceNet parameters from the Variables List onto their corresponding Master Send
and Master Receive words and bits. Parameters can be dropped onto either the Assembly
Block Data Map or onto the Connection Path Summary. For further information on this step,
see the "Configuring the Network" chapter of this manual.
46
DeviceNet Network Configuration Quick Start
Figure 34:
Assembly Block Tab
The Assembly Blocks Tab will display a graphical data word layout and a hierarchical tree
layout for the selected connection type.
Change of State Connection
For this example, choose the Change of State connection type. Once selected, "COS" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Change
of State tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the
Change of State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
Strobed Connection
For this example, choose the Strobed connection type. Once selected, "Strobed" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Strobed
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the Change of
State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
Cyclic Connection
For this example, choose the Cyclic connection type. Once selected, "Cyclic" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Cyclic
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the Change of
State, Cyclic and Bit Strobed Messaging Quick Start chapter.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Polled Connection
For this example, choose the Polled connection type. Once selected, "Polled" will be
displayed Connection Block field of the Assembly Block Data Map. Then expand the Polled
tree in the Connection Path Summary. Map the configuration as suggested in the "Polled
Messaging Quick Start" chapter.
Explicit Messaging
If Explicit Messages are needed, consult the examples in the "Explicit Messaging Quick
Start" chapter of this manual.
3. Download the configuration to the drive. To do so, from the toolbar select Device and then
Download.
4. Run Rs Networx™ and install the FM3.eds file in the PowerTools Pro software in the
Emerson/PTPro folder. Note: The FM-4 DeviceNet module has its own .eds file.
5. In RS Networx™, Click the "Edit I/O Parameters" button under the scanlist menu and
delete all the connections not used for the node. Examples of this can be found in the
following Quick Start chapters.
6. Configure offline the DeviceNet system and download it to the scanner card. Examples of
this can be found in the following Quick Start chapters.
7. Confirm that the module is connected and operational (the Network Status and Module
Status) on the Online Tab of the DeviceNet View display. Green LEDs will confirm this
status. The status can also be monitored on the keypad interface.
If the connection is not working, check the terminating resistors, MacID, BaudRate, and
physical connections to the network.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Profibus Introduction
This section of the manual describes the FM-3 and FM-4 Profibus Modules (FM-3PB and
FM-4PB) and gives examples for connecting Profibus protocol with Control Techniques
drives. The user should have knowledge of basic Profibus concepts as described in the
Profibus "Specification for PROFIBUS Device Description and Device Integration Volume
3". In addition, the user should be familiar with the functionality of the FM-3/4 module in
combination with the drive. The FM-3 and FM-4 Profibus modules connect to the front of any
drive and
is capable of all the functions described in the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual
(P/N 400508-01) and FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).The
Quick Start chapters offer specific examples of various messaging types, as well as a
programming reference that lists functional requirements for the FM-3 and FM-4 Profibus
modules.
Fastening Latch
3 Row by 12
Character Display
Soft Keys
Direction Arrow
Keys
100-Pin Connector
FM-3 PB
Sync. Input
Inputs
Sync. Output
Profibus
Profibus
Outputs
10-30 VDC
Aligning Tabs
Front
Figure 35:
Side
FM-3 and FM-4 Profibus Modules
49
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
The FM-3/4PB configuration is easily set within PowerTools Pro software. In PowerTools,
the user has the option to select the number and size of data “MODULES” to be sent to and
from the Profibus master. PowerTools also allows the user to place any parameter into these
MODULES to be transferred.
Profibus Overview
Profibus is made up of three busses classified under the general heading. Profibus FMS
(Fieldbus Message Specification) is a high level network designed for communication
between PLC's and PC's or higher level monitoring nodes. Profibus DP (Decentral Periphery)
are mainly used to connect automation systems (such as programmable controllers) via a fast
serial link to input/output devices, sensors, actuators and to smart devices. Profibus PA
(Process Automation) is as a lower-speed intrinsically safe counterpart to Profibus DP for
applications in process environments. All three busses have specifications managed by
Profibus International (PI) which is an independent supplier organization that manages the
Profibus specification and supports the worldwide growth of Profibus.
The FM-3PB and FM-4PB are capable of communicating via Profibus DP with any Profibus
DP compliant Master.
Terminology Note: MODULES and Modules
Profibus DP refers to the word MODULE as a block of data that may be added to the cyclic
data to transmit more info over the Profibus network. Not to be confused with the FM-3/4PB
programming "Module", the Profibus specific form of MODULE will be shown in capital
letters throughout this document.
Figure 36:
50
Shows the difference between Modules and MODULES.
Profibus Introduction
Profibus Communications
Profibus has two primary purposes:
1.
Transport of control-oriented information associated with low-level devices.
2.
Transport of other information that is indirectly related to the system being controlled,
such as configuration parameters.
The list below presents a summary of the Physical/Media specific characteristics of Profibus:
1.
Support for up to 126 nodes
2.
2 wire RS 485 twisted pair with a shield cable
3.
Straight bus without repeaters, much branching can be accomplished with repeaters.
4.
Nodes must be self powered and provide the power for active termination. No "on-bus"
power.
5.
External Node address setting.
6.
Protection from wiring errors.
7.
Standard DB9 configuration for connection to the network
Profibus Messaging and Communications
Master/Slave Relationship
The Profibus Specification Normative Parts -2 from 1997 defines the current master as "the
Master station that now holds the token (the token holder), the initiator of all transmissions.
The slave is a node that receives transmissions from the master. The main purpose of Profibus
DP is the fast cyclic exchange of data between a powerful Master and several simple Slaves
(peripheral devices). Thus, this system uses mainly the Master-Slave-type of communication
services.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Profibus Installation
Mechanical Installation
Follow the instructions for mechanical installation of an EN-Series and FM-3 as detailed in
the EN-Series Installation Manual (P/N 400501-02) and the Function Module Installation
Manual (P/N400506-03)
Profibus Hardware Components
The following components are necessary to design a Profibus communications system:
cables, Nodes/devices, Connectors, Power Supplies, Terminating resistors.
•
Cables: Profibus cabling consists of a 2 wire twisted pair with a braided shield. Control
Techniques offers this cable as model number PBC CABLE-xxx.
Figure 37:
Cross-sectional view of the PBC Cable-XXX
•
Nodes/Devices: A Profibus node is any device that is addressable through Profibus Media
and contains Profibus communications circuitry. Profibus Slaves must comply with the
following: Slaves must be Profibus-compatible devices. 126 Slaves can be supported on
one network. Each Slave must be assigned a unique Profibus node address.
•
Connectors: Due to the high speed nature of the Profibus network, the recommended
connector is a 35 degree Siemens Profibus Connector. Control Techniques offers this
connector as model number PBCONN.
53
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
PBCONN
35o Cable outlet
Figure 38:
•
54
Recommended Connector for Profibus Communications
Terminating Resistors: Terminating resistors are used to reduce the reflection of signals
over the network. Due to the high bit rates of Profibus, terminating resistors must be used
at both ends of the network in order to guarantee communications stability. When using
the Profibus connector offered by Control Techniques, the terminating resistor is built into
the connector and is turned on when the red switch on the back of the connector is turned
to the "on" position. When not using this connector (not recommended) terminating
resistors of 220 ohms must be installed between A and B.
Profibus Installation
Electrical Installation
Physical Connections to the Profibus Network: A two wire configuration is used to connect
the FM-3/4PB to the Profibus network. When multiple FM-3/4PB nodes are connected to the
network, connectors will be daisy chained by making use of the incoming and outgoing lines.
Pin Number
Name
Insulation Color
8
A1
Green
Incoming
3
B1
Red
Incoming
8
A2
Green
Outgoing
3
B2
Red
Outgoing
Switch = “OFF”
(terminating resistor
deactivated)
Direction
A1 B1 A2 B2
Cable shield must make
good contact with the metal
part.
Figure 39:
Connector Wiring
The connector provided for Profibus is a standard DB9 female connector.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Configuring the Profibus Network
Connection Types
Profibus DP communicates with the FM-3/4 in two ways, cyclic, and acyclic messages. A
cyclic connection is set up to transfer a specified amount of data at a set time in the Profibus
scan cycle.
Cyclic connections transfer a block of Inputs and a block of Outputs between the Profibus
Master and the FM-3/4PB. These message transfers occur at a highly repeatable rate on the
Profibus network. Once the master has parameterized and configured all of the slaves on the
network, the poll rate will remain a constant.
Profibus
PLC with Profibus Communications
Drive #1
5 Words Input
5 Words Output
Drive #2
5 Words Input
2 Words Output
Drive #3
10 Words Input
15 Words Output
Example:
Once the Master has gone into Data Exchange with all of the slaves, the network displays a
repeatable cycle time between Master and Slaves.
Typical Profibus Network Traffic
Network Cycle Time (Set by Master)
Master
Master
Master
Send
Send
Send
5 Words
10 Words
5 Words
Drive#2
Drive#3
Drive#1
Master
Master
Receive
Receive
5Words
2Words
Drive#1
Drive#2
Figure 40:
Time Base Varies Depending on Baud Rate of the Profibus Network
Master
Receive
15Words
Drive#3
Master
Master
Receive
Send
Message Message
Example of Cyclic Messaging
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Software Interface
This section discusses how to configure PowerTools Pro software to create a FM-3/4PB
Profibus slave and discusses the parameters that appear on the tabs related to the Profibus
configuration. Other tabs within PowerTools Pro software are described in the FM-3
Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01) and FM-4 Programming Module
Reference Manual (400509-01).
Profibus View
The Profibus View is in the Network group on the hierarchy tree used to navigate the
configuration views in PowerTools Pro software, see Figure 41. The Profibus View is used
to set the node address for FM-3PB and FM-4PB (FM-3 and FM-4 Profibus) Modules. The
node address is necessary to attach the FM-3PB or FM-4PB Module to the Profibus network.
In addition, the node address is used to map the individual FM3/4PB Module parameters to
the Profibus MODULES to be transferred.
Figure 41:
58
Profibus View in PowerTools Pro
Configuring the Profibus Network
Node Address
The node address is the number assigned to a particular node on the Profibus network. Every
node on a Profibus network must have a unique node address with a range between 0-124.
The node address is also read/write accessible with the keypad display on the FM-3PB and
FM-4PB Module.
Baud Rate
The FM-3/4PB is pre-configured to an autobaud setting. Accepted Profibus baud rates for the
FM-3/4PB include: (9.6k, 19.2k, 31.25k, 45.45k, 93.75k, 187.5k, 500k, 1.5M, 3M, 6M,
12M).
Word Swap
Word Swap is used in the FM-3PB and FM-4PB to change the order that the user will see the
32 bit parameters sent to the network. Because many PLCs transfer data in different formats,
the MSW-LSW feature is used to make the conversion to the PLC’s format easier. MSWLSW is the default and transfers 32 bit data with the Most Significant Word (MSW) first, then
the Least Significant Word (LSW) second. LSW-MSW transfers LSW first and MSW
second.
Example:
Index 0 Distance = 100.0000 revs
Note
The Profibus network doesn’t take decimal places into consideration. The user will the
must remove the decimal point and transform the number, 100.0000 to 1000000.
Binary equivalent for 1000000 is 0000000000001111 0100001001000000b
MSW-LSW Displays:
Register #1
MSW
0000000000001111b
Register #2
LSW
0100001001000000b
LSW-MSW Displays:
Register #1
LSW
0100001001000000b
Register #2
MSW
0000000000001111b
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Profibus Performance
By design, the time to update Profibus parameters is allocated out of the user program time
slice of the Trajectory update. When a program is initiated, the user programs will split their
update time with that of the Profibus update time. Because in demanding program
applications, more program time may be needed to realize the full performance out of the FM3/4 programming environment, the Profibus Performance parameter has been added. This
parameter allows the user to allocate a different percentage of the program time slice to the
Program and Profibus update.
The default value for the Profibus Performance parameter is 50%. This means that the time
allocated to Profibus performance will never reach below 50% of the total programming
update time (see graphic below). When Programs are not running, or when Programs are well
written and not processor hungry, Profibus will maximize its update time to fill in the
remaining programming time slice.
60
Configuring the Profibus Network
Profibus Performance Example:
The following graphic gives a basic usage example of the Profibus Performance Parameter. Times in this
example are relative to the trajectory update rate of the FM-3/4 as selected in the initial setup screen of
PowerTools Pro.
Control
Loop
Control
Loop
Msg.
Prog
Msg.
Prog
Control
Loop
Msg.
Prog
Trajectory Update Time (800usec, 1200usec, or 1600usec)
Performance of a Well Written Program
The following program demonstrates a well written
program in PowerTools Pro. If DriveInput.1
is not on, the processor will stop running programs and
allow Profibus to update for the remaining dedicated
program time.
Well Written FM-3/4 Program:
Main:
Wait for DriveInput.1 = on
var.var18 = var.var18 + 1
goto main:
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Programs use the processor time that they need
within the update, the rest of the allocated Program
time is used to update Profibus data.
Profibus
Performance
= 50%
Performance of a Processor Hungry Program
The following program demonstrates a processor hungry
program in the FM-3/4. Because this loop is continuous
without a "Wait For" command, the processor continues to
update and loop for the full program time slice.
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Processor Hungry FM-3/4 Program:
Main:
If DriveInput.1 = on then
var.var18 = var.var18 + 1
goto main:
endif
Profibus
Performance
= 10%
This program would normally use up 100% of the
dedicated program time slice, but since Profibus
is running, the maximum time given to the program
update is set by the Profibus Performance Parameter.
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Program
Usage
Figure 42:
Profibus
Usage
Profibus Performance Examples
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Master Send and Master Receive Tabs
The Master Send tab is used to configure the modules and data that will be sent from the
Profibus Master(PLC) to the Profibus Slave(FM-3/4PB) while the Master Receive tab
configures the MODULES and data from the Drive to the PLC. Within the Master Send and
Master Receive tabs there are two configuration areas, MODULE Configuration, and Data
Configuration.
Figure 43:
MODULE Configuration
The MODULE Configuration area is used to set up the number of Profibus MODULES that
will be sent between the Master and the Slave on every data cycle. MODULES have
preconfigured data lengths of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 words of data. A MODULE may be added
to the MODULE Configuration list by highlighting the desired MODULE and pressing the
“add” button. When a MODULE is added, it will show up in the right hand screen of the
MODULE configuration as well as the tree portion of the Data Configuration. MODULES
may be added so long as the number of data words from all of the combined MODULES does
not exceed 122 words of data. When 122 words of data is reached the MODULE will not be
62
Configuring the Profibus Network
added to the display. MODULES may not be added when PowerTools is on-line with the
drive.
The Data Configuration area is used to map parameters from the Variables list, into the
MODULES that have been added to the Data Configuration area. Individual parameters are
mapped by dragging and dropping the parameter from the Variables list (see Figure43) to the
desired bit or word in the Data Configuration area. 32 bit parameters may be assigned to any
MODULE that is larger than 1 word, but parameters may not be assigned between
MODULES (example: low word assigned to the last 16 bits of MODULE #3 and the high
word assigned to the first 16 bits of module #4 will not work). Bits may be assigned to any of
the MODULES. To rearrange or delete parts of the mapping, click on the assigned bit or word
in the Data Configuration area, then drag the assigned bit to a different bit or word
(rearranging) or to the right side of the mapping box (deleting). A deletion confirmation box
will appear when the assigned bit or word has been fully dragged to the right.
Figure 44:
Assigning MODULES in PowerTools Pro software.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Online Status Tab
The Online Status tab displays the status of all connections only when the software is online
with the FM-3/4PB Module. The Online tab is comprised of three groups: Information,
Counters, and Status.
Figure 45:
Online Status Tab View
Information Group
The Master Node is the node address of the Profibus Master to the FM-3/4PB Module. The
Baudrate displays the current Baud Rate that the Master is using to communicate to the
Slaves.
Counters Group
The counter group includes the Processed Message Counter parameter which keeps a running
total of the number of messages that the FM-3/4PB has processed from the Profibus network.
A packet consists of the transfer of all MODULES, Master Send and Master Receive. The
numbers of packets processed in the FM-3/4PB does not necessarily reflect the number of
packets transmitted and received from the Profibus network.
Status Group
The Status group displays the current MODULE Status and Network Status for the FM-3/
4PB.
64
Configuring the Profibus Network
Module Status
Module status is displayed as one of the following: Parameterizing, Configuration, Data
Exchange, Invalid Setup.
Network Status
Network Status is displayed as one of the following: Network OK, or Size Mismatch (Cyclic
data size configured does not match network configuration)
Online Data Tab
The Online Data tab is an extremely useful tab that becomes available when online with the
FM-3/4PB. This tab lists each Profibus MODULE that the FM-3/4PB has been configured
for, and then displays the raw data that is being transferred in that word through the Profibus
network. This Online view is useful for validating proper communications setup, or
confirming data placement to and from the PLC.
Figure 46:
Online Data View
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Accessing the .GSD file
The .GSD file is for Master Configuration software use. The .GSD files for both the FM-3PB
Module (FM3.gsd) and the FM-4PB Module (FM4.gds) are stored in the PowerTools Pro
software directory (folder). They are also available on the Motion Made Easy web site at
www.emersonct.com.
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Profibus Network Configuration
Quick Start
This chapter presents an example startup with an FM-3/4PB Module using a Siemens S7
processor as the Profibus Master.
The examples presented are intended as an abridged tutorial. For greater information about
the steps in setting up a Profibus Network, refer to your Profibus Master Technical Manual.
Equipment
(1) EN-204 Digital Drive
(1) FM-3PB or FM-4PB Module
(1) NT-207 Motor
(1) CMDS-XXX Motor Power Cable
(1) CFCS-XXX Motor Feedback Cable
(1) TIA-XXX Serial Communications Cable
(1) Siemens S7 PLC
(1) Siemens I/O Module
(2) PBC CABLE-XXX
(2) PBCONN
(1) PowerTools Pro Software
(1) Siemens Simatic Manager (Siemens P/N 6ES7810-4CC05-0YX0)
FM-3/4PB Module Quick Startup Process
1.
In PowerTools Pro, configure the software for the particular drive (EN-204) and motor
(NT-207).
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 47:
2.
In PowerTools Pro, configure the node address (Address) of the FM-3/4PB Module
(slave).
Figure 48:
3.
68
PowerTools Pro Setup View - Drive/Motor Configuration
PowerTools Pro Profibus View - Node Address Configuration
Add MODULES for both Master Send and Master Receive data.
Profibus Network Configuration Quick Start
Figure 49:
Master Send View
Figure 50:
Master Receive View
4.
Download the PowerTools Pro configuration to the FM-3/4PB Module.
5.
Open the PLC Master configuration software and install the .gsd file for the FM-3/4PB
Module.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
6.
Add the FM-3/4PB to the scanlist and configure it for the proper node address.
7.
Configure the FM-3/4PB for the number of MODULES that were originally set in
PowerTools Pro. (Make sure that the MODULES are mapped in the same order with the
Output (Master Send) MODULES mapped before the Input (Master Receive)
MODULES.
Figure 51:
Mapping the MODULES.
Profibus Specific Parameter Definitions
Profibus.Configuration.Address:
This parameter represents the Profibus node address of the FM-3/4PB. This parameter is
configured via PowerTools Pro or the LCD keypad interface.
Profibus.PbPercent
This parameter displays the minimum percentage of time that the processor is given to
process Profibus messages. When other threads (programs) are running, the percentage of
processor time given to updating profibus parameters will not fall below this minimum
percent.
Profibus.PBStatus.BaudRate
This parameter displays the Baud rate of the network as defined by the Profibus Master.
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Profibus Network Configuration Quick Start
Profibus.PBStatus.DataExchnageEvent
This source is activated when the Profibus network enters data exchange. The bit becomes
inactive during a communications break or if the network status falls into configuration or
parameterization.
Profibus.PBStatus.GroupIdent
Up to 8 groups of slave devices may be defined by the master. The PBStatus.GroupIdent
parameter displays the current group/groups that the FM-3/4 is associated with. Each group
may receive multi-cast commands from the master. One slave can be a member of more than
one group. The FM-3/4 supports only the clear command in group assignments.
Profibus.PBStatus.IdentNumber
The FM-3/4 Identification Number is defined in the GSD file. using parameterization, the
master sends the Identification Number. The Identification number for the FM-3PB is
(0x675) and the FM-4PB is (0x676)
Profibus.PBStatus.MasterNode Address
Master Node address parameter displays the address of whichever Master parameterized the
FM-3/4PB.
Profibus.PBStatus.PBModuleStatus
Module Status displays the current status of the Profibus related portion of the module. This
status indicates when the master is parameterizing, configuring and when it enters data
exchange.
Profibus.PBStatus.PBNetworkStatus
Network Status displays the feedback of the network from the modules perspective. This
status indicates Network OK, Size mismatch, or no modules configured.
Profibus.PBStatus.ProcessedMessageCounter
The Processed Message Counter is a 32 bit register that stores the number of messages that
have been successfully processed from the Profibus network in the FM-3/4.
Profibus.PBStatus.V1CfgMode
Reserved for future use.
Profibus.PBStatus.V1Enabled
The V1 enable bit allows a V1 Parameterization message to be transmitted and received but
with all V1 extensions disabled.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Profibus.PBStatus.V1Wd1ms
Reserved for future use.
Profibus.PBStatus.WatchdogFault
This source is activated when the Profibus network exits data exchange for a certain time
configured by the Profibus Master. A Watchdog fault will create a "Y" fault on the drive and
will also display the fault on the LCD keypad interface.
Profibus.PBStatus.WDValue
WDValue is a parameter that displays the current value of the Watchdog timer as set by the
Profibus Master.
Profibus.PBStatus.WDEnabled
The bit indicates whether or not the watch dog timer is enabled. 1 = Enabled, 0 = Disabled
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Ethernet Introduction
This section of the Connectivity manual describes the FM-3 and FM-4 Ethernet Modules
(FM-3E and FM-4E) and gives examples for implementing Ethernet protocols with Control
Techniques drives.
The FM-3 and FM-4 Ethernet modules connect to the front of any EN or MDS drive and are
capable of all the functions described in the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual
(P/N 400508-01) or the FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).
3 Row by 12
Character Display
Soft Keys
100-Pin Connector
Direction Arrow
Keys
100-Pin Connector
Ethernet
Ethernet
Inputs
Sync. Input
Outputs
Sync. Output
10-30 VDC
Aligning Tabs
Front
Figure 52:
Side
FM-3 and FM-4 Ethernet Module
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
This portion of the connectivity manual is broken up into three sections and includes topics
ranging from physical connections to network layers descriptions to PLC connections. These
sections guide the first time user in creating an application quickly and successfully.
The Industrial Ethernet Overview chapter highlights the make-up of an Ethernet network
from the hardware layer down to the application layer and details functions pertinent to the
FM-3E and FM-4E modules.
The FM-3E and FM-4E Setup chapter details the hardware and software features of the
module and attempts to answer many configuration questions.
The Quick Start chapters offer specific examples of various Ethernet protocols to aid in setup
of the Ethernet Network. Finally the Troubleshooting Guide and the Glossary chapters are
located at the end of this manual.
Industrial Ethernet Protocols Supported:
Protocol
74
Supporting Organization
Major Contributions
EtherNet/IP
ODVA
A/B Rockwell
Modbus TCP/IP
Modbus Organization
Modicon
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Industrial Ethernet Overview
Hardware
This section describes the hardware required/suggested for setting up an industrial ethernet
network
Device Definitions
Hub
A Hub is a device that is used to connect multiple Ethernet capable products together. A hub
does little for bandwidth conservation on the network as it simply takes incoming ethernet
packets and sends them to all other devices connected to the hub. Because of its limited logic
functionality, standard ethernet hubs are inexpensive and compatible with most ethernet
devices.
Switch (Switching Hub)
Like a hub, a switching hub is used to connect multiple Ethernet devices onto one network.
Unlike a standard hub, most industrial ethernet switches use internal tables to map IP
addresses to the port that they are attached to. Using these tables, the industrial switch is
capable of reading incoming data packets and sending the data to corresponding port without
sending the data to the other ports.
Note
Not all Industrial Switches are compliant with the ODVA multicasting functionality to
support EtherNet/IP.
Connections and the FM-3/4E
The FM-3/4E contains up to six connections that it allocates on a first come first serve basis.
A connection consists of a link between the FM-3/4E and a object in the application layer.
The FM-3/4E may run on an EtherNet/IP, Modbus TCP/IP, and have its web server being
accessed simultaneously. In this example the FM-3/4E would have 3 connections used. When
the web server isn’t polled for the timeout period of (0.5 secs), this connection is canceled and
added back to the available connections list.
Application Objects that use a connection include:
Implicit Messaging on EtherNet/IP
Explicit Messaging on EtherNet/IP
Modbus TCP/IP
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
SMTP (Email) messaging
HTTP (web server)
Ethernet/IP
EtherNet/IP is the name for a CIP layer on Ethernet hardware. This data is transferred using
TCP/IP and UDP/IP protocol. CIP stands for Control and Information Protocol and is used in
DeviceNet, ControlNet, and EtherNet/IP. This protocol includes objects for transferring data
for realtime control (implicit messaging) as well as for passing large amounts of information
in the background of the realtime data (explicit messaging).
EtherNet/IP and the FM-3/4E
Because the EtherNet/IP protocol is based on CIP, the FM-3/4E modules were designed with
the same standards as the FM-3/4DN modules. Because of the expanded operability of
EtherNet/IP, more I/O has been allowed in the FM-3/4E that was not available in the FM-3/
4DN. Class, Instance, and Attribute ID’s are the same for the FM-3/4DN and the FM-3/4E
making explicit messaging straightforward for each of these protocols. The list of Class
instance and attribute ID’s can be found in “Drive Parameters” on page 111 at the end of this
manual.
Modbus TCP/IP
Modbus TCP/IP embeds Modbus protocol into a TCP frame. The protocol works in a request/
response format (each request connection waits for a response) much like explicit messaging.
Because it is based on commonly used Modbus protocol, Modbus TCP/IP makes use of the
same commands available in Modbus RTU. The commands supported by the FM-3E and FM4E include:
Supported Function Codes:
Function Code
76
Description
Registers
(5-Bit Addressing)
Registers
(6-Bit Addressing)
Usage
Read a Read/Write bit
1
Read Coil Status
1-9999
1-99999
2
Read Input Status
10001-19999
100001-199999
Read a Read Only bit
3
Read Holding Registers
40001-49999
400001-499999
Read a Read/Write Register
4
Read Input Registers
30001-39999
300001-399999
Read a Read Only Register
5
Force Single Coil
1-9999
1-99999
Write one Read/Write bit
6
Preset Single Register
40001-49999
400001-499999
Write one Read/Write Register
15
Force Multiple Coils
1-9999
1-99999
Write multiple Read/Write bits
16
Preset Multiple
Registers
40001-49999
400001-499999
Write multiple Read/Write Registers
Industrial Ethernet Overview
Note
The Maple Systems OITware 200 configuration software and other HMI and PLC
softwares use a 6 digit addressing base. The first digit is an indication of register or bit
type. Thus 400001 in OITware is equal to 40001 in Control Techniques Modbus RTU.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Hardware Interface
Keypad Interface
Like all of the standard FM-3 and FM-4 module parameters, discussed in the “Operational
Overview” chapter of the FM-3 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01)
and FM-4 Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01), the Ethernet system
parameters can be edited from the keypad display (LCD) on the front of the FM-3E or FM4E module. The keypad on the front of the FM-3E and FM-4E module provides navigation
through a menu of common parameters and displays current functions. Navigation through
the menu is accomplished with the six keys located below the display. The top two keys are
called the “soft keys” because they relate to the commands located directly above each key
on the display. These keys are used to select the operation (i.e. Modify, Ok, Cancel),
parameter group, and/or to validate information. The four arrow keys are used to navigate
through parameter groups, select a specific parameter to be modified, and to modify digital
and numeric data.
The operation of the arrow keys is dependent upon the type of parameter which is being
modified.
Ethernet Menu
From the menu screen, the user scrolls to and selects the “E-net” parameter group from the
main menu items. Up and down buttons scroll through different Ethernet parameters on the
FM-3E and FM-4E modules including:
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Gateway Address
MacID (Read Only)
Current Data Rate (Read Only)
Module Status
Network Status
Link Status
Transmit Counter
Receive Counter
IP Address
This 32 bit parameter indicates the IP address of the FM-3E or FM-4E. This parameter is
configured via the LCD keypad display or through PowerTools Pro.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Subnet Mask
This 32 bit parameter indicates the subnet mask used for this node. The subnet mask is used
to group devices that are connected on the same physical connection. For a detailed
description of Subnet mask refer to the Industrial Ethernet Overview section. This parameter
is configured via the LCD keypad display or through PowerTools Pro.
Gateway Address
This 32 bit parameter indicates the default Gateway address for the FM-3/4E. When
attempting to communicate with a device on a different Subnet, the message must go through
this gateway to reach its destination. For a detailed description of the Gateway address refer
to the Industrial Ethernet Overview section. This parameter is configured via the LCD keypad
display or through PowerTools Pro.
Mac ID
Very different from the DeviceNet MacID, the MacID for Ethernet devices is the hardware
Media Access Identifier. This unique parameter is burned into NVM and is unchangeable.
Current Data Rate
The data rate is a read-only parameter that indicates the bit rate of communications over the
Ethernet Hardware. Supported Data rates include 10Mbps Full Duplex and 100 Mbps Full
Duplex. The FM-3/4E defaults to autodetect of the network data rate.
Module Status
Module status is an Ethernet/IP protocol specific parameter that gives feedback data on the
FM-3/4E. Module Status as displayed on the LCD keypad indicates one of the following
conditions: Standby, Operational, Minor Flt, Major Flt.
Standby—Module is not configured
Operational—Module operating correctly
Minor Flt—A recoverable fault occurred. This fault does not require a power reset.
Major Flt—A non-recoverable fault occurred. The module needs to have its 24V power
cycled to reset.
Network Status
Network Status is an Ethernet/IP protocol specific parameter that gives feedback data on the
Ethernet/IP network as it relates to the corresponding FM-3/4E. Network Status as displayed
on the LCD keypad indicates one of the following conditions: No IP, No Conn, Conn est,
Conn Timeout, Dup IP.
No IP—The FM-3/4E does not have an IP address configured.
No Conn—The FM-3/4E has no established connections.
Conn est—The FM-3/4E has at least one established connection.
Conn Timeout—At least one of the established connections has timed out.
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FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Dup IP—The FM-3/4E has detected that its IP address is already in use on the network.
Link Status
The Link Status is a parameter that indicates whether or not the Ethernet 802.3
communications interface is connected to an active network. Link Status as displayed on the
LCD keypad indicates one of the following conditions: Active link, Inactive link.
Active Link—FM-3/4E is physically connected to a network.
Inactive Link—FM-3/4E is not physically attached to an operating Ethernet network.
Transmit Counter
The Transmit Counter keeps track of IP data packets sent from the FM-3/4E. This counter is
useful when commissioning the FM-3/4E to verify outgoing communications.
Receive Counter
The Receive Counter keeps track of all IP data packets received by the FM-3/4E. This counter
is useful when commissioning the FM-3/4E to verify incoming communications.
Software Interface
This section discusses how to configure PowerTools Pro software to implement a FM-3/4E
module onto an Ethernet network. The section includes a breakdown of all Ethernet related
parameters in PowerTools Pro and defines additions to the programming language set in the
programs view. Other tabs within PowerTools Pro software are described in the FM-3
Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01) and FM-4 Programming Module
Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).
Setup View
The FM-3E or FM-4E should have a minimum of an IP address and Subnet Mask configured
before attaching it to a Ethernet hardware setup.
IP Address
This 32 bit parameter indicates the IP address of the FM-3E or FM-4E. This parameter is
configured via the LCD keypad display or through PowerTools Pro.
Subnet Mask
This 32 bit parameter indicates the subnet mask used for this node. The subnet mask is used
to group devices that are connected on the same physical connection. For a detailed
description of Subnet mask refer to the Industrial Ethernet Overview section. This parameter
is configured via the LCD keypad display or through PowerTools Pro.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Gateway Address
This 32 bit parameter indicates the default Gateway address for the FM-3/4E. When
attempting to communicate with a device on a different Subnet, the message must go through
this gateway to reach its destination. For a detailed description of the Gateway address refer
to the Industrial Ethernet Overview section. This parameter is configured via the LCD keypad
display or through PowerTools Pro.
Configuring IP settings:
The IP address, Subnet Mask and Gateway address are user configured. If the industrial
network is to be attached to a company computer network it is highly recommended that the
network be configured with the assistance of qualified IT professionals.
IP Address:
Decimal:
192.168.001.005
Binary:
Subnet Mask:
255.255.255.192
For the above example:
The following IP addresses may communicate with the Target
without the use of a gateway:
192.168 . 001 . 000 to 192 . 168. 001. 063
Figure 53:
Mask
Ethernet View
The Ethernet View is found under the Network Group on the hierarchy tree. This view is used
to navigate through the Ethernet related setup for the FM-3/4E.
82
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Figure 54:
Ethernet View
Word Swap
Word Swap is used in the FM-3E and FM-4E module to change the order that the user will
see the 32 bit parameters sent to and received from the network. Because many PLC’s transfer
data in different formats, the word swap feature is used to make the conversion to the PLC’s
format easier. LSW-MSW is the default for Ethernet and transfers 32 bit data with the Least
Significant (LSW) word in the first register, then the Most Significant Word (MSW) in the
second. MSW-LSW transfers MSW first and LSW second.
For example:
Index 0 Distance = 100.0000 revs
Note
The Ethernet network does not transfer decimal points. The user must remove the decimal
point and multiply to transform the number on the PLC side of the network, 100.0000 to
1000000.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Binary equivalent for 1000000 is 0000000000001111 0100001001000000b
MSW-LSW Displays:
Register #1
MSW
0000000000001111b
Register #2
LSW
0100001001000000b
LSW-MSW Displays:
Register #1
LSW
0100001001000000b
Register #2
MSW
0000000000001111b
EtherNet/IP Performance
By design, the time to update parameters passed over the TCP/IP connection is allocated out
of the user program time slice of the Trajectory Update Rate. When a program is initiated, the
user programs will split their update time with that of the TCP/IP update time. In demanding
program applications, more program time may be needed to realize the full performance out
of the FM-3/4 programming environment, the Ethernet Performance parameter has been
added. This parameter allows the user to allocate a different percentage of the program time
slice to the Program and TCP/IP update.
The default value for the Ethernet Performance parameter is 50%. This means that the time
allocated to Ethernet performance will never reach below 50% of the total programming
update time (see figure 55). When programs are not running, or when programs are well
written and not processor hungry, the TCP/IP connection will maximize its update time to fill
in the remaining programming time slice.
84
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Ethernet Performance Example:
The following graphic gives a basic usage example of the Ethernet Performance Parameter. Times in this
example are relative to the trajectory update rate of the FM-3/4 as selected in the initial setup screen of
PowerTools Pro.
Control
Loop
Msg.
Prog
Control
Loop
Msg.
Prog
Control
Loop
Msg.
Prog
Trajectory Update Time (800usec, 1200usec, or 1600usec)
Performance of a Well Written Program
The following program demonstrates a well written
program in PowerTools Pro. If DriveInput.1
is not on, the processor will stop running programs and
allow Ethernet to update for the remaining dedicated
program time.
Well Written FM-3/4 Program:
Main:
Wait for DriveInput.1 = on
var.var18 = var.var18 + 1
goto main:
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Programs use the processor time that they need
within the update, the rest of the allocated Program
time is used to update Ethernet data.
Ethernet
Performance
= 50%
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Performance of a Processor Hungry Program
The following program demonstrates a processor hungry
program in the FM-3/4. Because this loop is continuous
without a "Wait For" command, the processor continues to
update and loop for the full program time slice.
Processor Hungry FM-3/4 Program:
Main:
If DriveInput.1 = on then
var.var18 = var.var18 + 1
goto main:
endif
Ethernet
Performance
= 10%
This program would normally use up 100% of the
dedicated program time slice, but since Ethernet
is running, the maximum time given to the program
update is set by the Ethernet Performance Parameter.
Dedicated Program Time Slice
Program
Usage
Figure 55:
Ethernet
Usage
Ethernet Performance Examples
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Produced Tab
The Produced Tab is used to configure the specific blocks and data that will be sent from the
EtherNet/IP server (FM-3E, FM-4E) to the EtherNet/IP client (PLC or HMI). Within the
Produced Tab there are two configuration areas, Block Config, and Data Config.
Available
Blocks
Block
Config
Data
Config
Figure 56:
Produced Tab View
Consumed Tab
The Consumed Tab is used to configure the specific blocks and data that will be sent from the
EtherNet/IP client (PLC or HMI) to the EtherNet/IP server (FM-3E, FM-4E). Within the
consumed Tab there are two configuration areas, Block Config, and Data Config.
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FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Figure 57:
Consumed Tab View
The Block Config area is used to set up the number of EtherNet words that will be transferred
on the network. To add a block, highlight a word block from the "Available Blocks" area and
click on the "add" button. This will transfer the data block to the right side as well as the Data
Config area below. When the block is opened using the "+" sign, data can be mapped to the
block by simply dragging and dropping from the variables list onto the block.
Since all data blocks are combined to be sent on one TCP/IP connection, if more than one data
block is configured in the FM-3E or FM-4E, the EtherNet/IP connection setup needs to reflect
the sum of all blocks Consumed.
Data allowed to be mapped to blocks in the consumed tab include all destinations in the FM3 as well as all read/write user parameters, booleans, and bits.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
The Block Config area is used to set up the number of EtherNet words that will be transferred
on the network. To add a block, highlight a word block from the "Available Blocks" area and
click on the "add" button. This will transfer the data block to the right side as well as the Data
Config area below. When the block is opened using the "+" sign, data can be mapped to the
block by simply dragging and dropping from the variables list onto the block.
Since all data blocks are combined to be sent on one TCP/IP connection, if more than one data
block is configured in the FM-3E or FM-4E, the EtherNet/IP connection setup needs to reflect
the sum of all blocks Produced.
Data allowed to be mapped to blocks in the produced tab include all sources in the FM-3, all
read only user parameters as well as all read/write user parameters, booleans, and bits.
Explicit Tab
As with the FM-3/4DN modules, the FM-3/4E modules support an explicit messaging object
which allows a DeviceNet master or a Explicit producer to read/readwrite many parameters
using a class, instance, and attribute ID as detailed in “Drive Parameters” on page 111.
The Explicit tab is used to set up an initial configuration for explicit messages that the user
wishes to PRODUCE on the network. These messages will be generated by the FM-3/4E and
sent to another Ethernet/IP compatible device. To produce an explicit message on the network
the following parameters must be configured: Target IP, Operation, Class #, Instance #, and
Attribute #.
Note
The Explicit Message tab is used to generate explicit messages only. Explicit messages
RECEIVED by the FM-3E and FM-4E are handled completely by the firmware and
require no special setup on the FM-3E or FM-4E.
Figure 58:
88
Explicit Tab
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Explicit #
The explicit number parameter displays which explicit setup the user is editing and allows
them to scroll through multiple explicit setups using the up and down arrows.
Name
Allows the user to assign a descriptive name to the Explicit sequence up to 10 characters in
length.
Target IP
The Target IP address is the IP address of the module that the explicit message will be sent to.
Class
The EtherNet/IP Class is a top level DeviceNet classification for all parameters and bits. Each
class is given a unique number ID found in the drive parameters chart found in the “Drive
Parameters” on page 111 of this manual.
Instance
The EtherNet/IP Instance is a sub-classification for a parameter or bit. The instance is
grouped directly under the more broad category of attribute and allows for multiple
occurrences of a parameter.
For example: Class = Index, Attribute = Index Dwell, Instance1 = Index 0, Instance2 Index.1.
Each Instance is assigned a unique number under its respective attribute.
Attribute
The EtherNet/IP Attribute is a sub-classification for a parameter or bit. The attribute is
grouped directly under the more broad category of class.
For example:
Class = Index, Attribute = Index Dwell.
Each Attribute accessible to the user is assigned a number as detailed in the “Drive
Parameters” on page 111 of this manual.
Size
The Ethernet Explicit size parameter is the number of bytes of data that will be sent/received
using the explicit message. If the explicit message target is another FM-3/4E, then this
parameter will default to the correct value based on the class, instance, and attribute. If this is
not the case then this parameter may be accessed and changed in a user program before the
explicit message is sent.
Parameter Display Window
When a class, Instance, and Attribute ID is entered into the explicit tab, the Parameter display
window gives the associated parameter in the FM-3/4E.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Operation List Box
The operation can be one of two values, “GET” or “SET”. The “GET” command defines an
explicit message that will be querying another device for data. The “SET” command defines
an explicit message that will be sending data to another device.
As with all destinations in the FM-3/4E modules, Explicit.Instance.Initiate may be initiated
via a program, assignment, or a network connection. When this parameter is changed from
within a program or over a network connection, the following values correspond to the terms
GET and SET.
GET = 0
SET = 1
Value
This parameter gives an initial value to “SET” data that will be sent from the FM-3E or FM4E out onto the network. This parameter is also used to store the data coming in from an
explicit message from a “GET” command.
Decimal
Because the FM-3/4 does not support floating point data format, all parameters are sent as
integers.
For example:
100.1 is sent as 1001 or 1111101001b.
The Decimal parameter sets the number of decimal places for the Explicit.instance.data.
Signed Data
The Signed Data check box is used for explicit message read commands. When data for the
read command comes in, it is stored in the parameter Ethernet.EthernetExplciit.0.Value. The
signed data check boxes determines whether this data is consumed as a 32 bit signed, or 32
bit unsigned value.
Explicit Sources and Destinations
Sources
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandComplete
This source becomes active when the explicit message process is complete. An Explicit
message is complete when it is sent to another EtherNet/IP device, and the device responds.
Note
This parameter does not indicate a successful explicit message. The
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandComplete bit turns "off" when the corresponding
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate is activated and then turns "on" when the command is
complete.
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FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.MessageFailed
This source becomes active when the explicit message fails to either send a valid command
to another IP address, or when the explicit message is not accepted from another address. The
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.MessageFailed source is cleared when the corresponding
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate is activated.
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandInProgress
This source activates when the corresponding Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate becomes
active and deactivates when the corresponding
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandComplete becomes active.
Destinations
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate
This destination starts the explicit messaging process using the data in the corresponding
explicit message.
Email View
The email function allows a user to send a SMTP (email) message to one or more email
addresses when initiated by a source or through a program. The Email view in the Network
group on the hierarchy tree allows the user to set up the Relay Host, Addresses, Subject, and
text for the email Message.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 59:
Email Setup View
In order to avoid a situation of accidentally sending repeated emails which overwhelm the
network, a clear command is needed to re-arm the email message after the last message is
sent.
Email #
The email number parameter displays which email setup the user is editing and allows them
to scroll through multiple email setups using the up and down arrows.
Relay Host
Instead of a direct delivery method of sending a SMTP message which wouldn’t be practical
for an industrial device implementing many other critical functions simultaneously, the FM3/4E makes use of a relay host. Relay Hosts are used in many networks to connect a local
network to the “outside world”.
To specify a relay host, simply enter the IP address of the host you wish to use.
For example:
92
192.168.100.100
FM-3/4 Ethernet Setup
Address
The Address indicates the email address of the email’s destination. Use a semicolon (;) to
separate multiple Email addresses.
For example:
[email protected]; [email protected]
From
The From address gives the SMTP message an address to return any undeliverable mail. This
From address will receive updates on any messages that were not completed successfully.
Subject
The Subject indicates the subject of the email. This is a text string and follows the SMTP rules
for Subject lines.
Text
The user has the ability to edit the text message sent by each email that is configured. Length
of the message is limited to the amount of memory that the FM-3/4E has available, but users
should take caution not to overload the module with long messages as performance may be
affected.
Email Sources and Destinations
Sources
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.RelayHostFailure
This source becomes active when an SMTP (email) message is not accepted, or cannot find
the corresponding Mail.#.RelayHost.
Destinations
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.Initiate
This destination attempts to send an email message via a SMTP connection over the Ethernet
port of the FM-3E or FM-4E.
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.MailReset
This destination re-arms the email message so that it may be re-initiated. When this event
becomes active, the mail.#.mailtriggered becomes false.
Note
The FM-3E and FM-4E are limited to sending 75 emails per hour. This acts to lessen the
affect of a user mistakenly programming a run-away email loop.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Http View
The Http view is used to enable the access to and set a password for password protected web
pages in the FM-3/4E. If the enable check box is not checked, or no password has been
entered into the string box, these pages will not be available to the user.
Figure 60:
94
Http View
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Ethernet Quickstart
Ethernet/IP Implicit Message Quickstart
This section presents an implicit message example startup with a FM-3E Ethernet module
over an EtherNet/IP network. The client will be a 1756 ENBT/A -- EtherNet/IP bridge with
an Allen Bradley™ 1756-L1 ControlLogix™ controller. All Ethernet procedures presented
in this chapter may be implemented with the FM-4E Ethernet module also.
Equipment:
EN or MDS Digital Drive
FM-3E or FM-4E Ethernet Module
NT-316 Motor
Allen Bradley™ ControlLogix™ PLC; 1756-A7/B (7slot chassis); 1756-PA72/B (Power
Supply); 1756-L1 (Controller, slot 0); 1756 ENBT/A (EtherNet/IP bridge module, slot 1)
Category 5 Industrial Ethernet Patch cable
5-Port Industrial Ethernet Switch, ETH-405TX
PowerTools Pro configuration software for the FM-3 and FM-4 modules (version 2.5 or
higher)
RS Logix 5000 ™ Programming Software for PLC
FM-3 and FM-4 CIP parameter tables from the “Drive Parameters” chapter of this manual.
FM-3E Ethernet Module Configuration Example:
This application example focuses on Ethernet and its associated devices and software; for
questions on configuring other parameters in the FM-3 or FM-4 refer to the FM-3
Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01) or the FM-4 Programming
Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 61:
Ethernet View
Configure the FM-3E Module:
1.
Configure PowerTools Pro software for the drive and motor type that is being used. In
this application a EN-204 and a NT-316 will be used.
2.
In the IP configuration area on the Setup view, see Figure 62, set the IP parameters to the
following:
a. IP address: 192.168.001.005
b. Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
c. Gateway Address: 0.0.0.0
3.
From the hierarchy tree open the Network tree and select Ethernet view see Figure 61.
Configure the following parameters.
a. Word Swap: LSW-MSW
b. Performance: 50%
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Ethernet Quickstart
Figure 62:
4.
Ethernet View IP Configuration Area
Click on the Produced Tab in the connection setup area. This area will configure data that
will be sent FROM the FM-3E TO the PLC.
a. Add Blocks to the Block configuration list as shown in Figure 63. For this application
example the following Blocks will be added:
i. Block #0: 1 Word
ii. Block #1: 2 Words
iii. Block #2: 16 Words
Figure 63:
Block Configuration - Adding Blocks
b. Make the assignments as shown below by dragging and dropping variables from the
variables list to the Data configuration area.
Assignments
Block #0
Word 0
Bit 0
DriveOK
Bit 1
DriveEnableStatus
Bit 2
FaultFaulted
Bit 3
Index.0.CommandComplete
Bit 4-15
Not Assigned
Block #1
Word 0-1
Position Feedback
Word 0-1
Velocity Feedback
Word 2-15
Not Assigned
Block #2
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 64:
5.
Ethernet View with Assignments made on the Produced Tab
Click on the Consumed Tab in the connection setup area. This area will configure data
that will be sent FROM the PLC TO the FM-3E.
a. Add Blocks to the Block configuration list as shown in Figure 65. For this application
example the following Blocks will be added:
i. Block #0: 1 Word
ii. Block #1: 16 Words
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Ethernet Quickstart
Figure 65:
Block Configuration - Adding Blocks
b. Add the assignments shown below by dragging and dropping variables from the
variables list on the left to the Data configuration area.
Assignments
Block #0
Word 0
Bit 0
Index.0.Initiate
Bit 1
Program.0.Initiate
Bit 2
Jog.0.PlusActivate
Bit 3
Gear.Activate
Bit 4
Bit.B0
Bit 5-15
Not Assigned
Block #1
Word 0-1
Index.0.Dist
Word 2-3
Index.0.Vel
Word 4-5
Index.0.Accel
Word 6-7
Index.0.Decel
Word 8-9
Gear.Ratio
Word 10-15
Not Assigned
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 66:
6.
Ethernet View with Variables Assigned on the Consumed Tab
Download the configuration to the drive. From the menu bar select Device then
Download.
Add the FM-3E to an Ethernet Configuration:
100
7.
Run RSLogix 5000™ software and configure the PLC for the correct processor, rack and
slot configurations.
8.
Right click on the I/O configuration folder located on the bottom of the hierarchy tree and
left click to add a new device to this folder.
Ethernet Quickstart
9.
Choose the 1756-ENBT/A. After selecting a name for the device, specify the IP address
as 192.168.001.007 and then select “Finish”. This will be the IP address of the scanner
module.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
10. Right click on the 1759-ENBT/A and left click on “New Module” to add a device under
the Ethernet Bridge.
11. Choose the selection labeled, “Ethernet-Module -- Generic Ethernet Module” and click
“OK”. Set the module name, IP address, Assembly Instances, and Size according to
Figure 67. Then click “Next”.
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Ethernet Quickstart
Figure 67:
PLC Configuration
12. Enter the Request Packet Interval. This number represents the interval that data will be
transferred to and from the PLC. Then click “Next” or “Finish”.
EtherNet/IP Explicit Message Quickstart:
This section presents an explicit message example startup with a FM-3E Ethernet module
over an EtherNet/IP network. The client will be a 1756 ENBT/A -- EtherNet/IP bridge with
an Allen Bradley™ 1756-L1 ControlLogix™ controller. All Ethernet procedures presented
in this chapter can be implemented with the FM-4E Ethernet module also.
Equipment:
EN or MDS Digital Drive
FM-3E or FM-4E Ethernet Module
NT-316 Motor
Allen Bradley™ ControlLogix™ PLC; 1756-A7/B (7slot chassis); 1756-PA72/B (Power
Supply); 1756-L1 (Controller, slot 0); 1756 ENBT/A (EtherNet/IP bridge module, slot 1)
Category 5 Industrial Ethernet Patch cable.
5-Port Industrial Ethernet Switch, ETH-405TX
PowerTools™ Pro configuration software for the FM-3 and FM-4 (Vs. 2.5 or higher)
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
RS Logix 5000 ™ Programming Software for PLC
FM-3 and FM-4 CIP parameter tables from the “Drive Parameters” chapter of this manual.
FM-3E Ethernet Module Configuration Example:
This application example focuses on Ethernet and its associated devices and software; for
questions on configuring other parameters in the FM-3 or FM-4 refer to the FM-3
Programming Module Reference Manual (P/N 400508-01) or the FM-4 Programming
Module Reference Manual (P/N 400509-01).
Configure the FM-3E Module:
1.
Configure PowerTools Pro software for the drive and motor type that is being used. In
this application a EN-204 and a NT-316 will be used.
2.
In the IP configuration area (see Figure 68) set the IP parameters to the following;
a. IP address: 192.168.001.005
b. Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
c. Gateway Address: 0.0.0.0
d. Word Swap: MSW-LSW
e. EtherNet/IP Performance: 50%
3.
104
From the hierarchy tree open the Network tree and select Ethernet View.
Ethernet Quickstart
Figure 68:
4.
IP Configuration Area in the Ethernet View
Download the configuration to the drive. To do so, from the toolbar select Device and
then Download.
Note
For Explicit Message communications data may be, but does not need to be mapped under
the produced and consumed tabs. Each parameter in the FM-3/4E is given a class,
instance, and attribute ID which is accessed in the explicit messaging setup.
Add the FM-3E to an Ethernet Configuration:
5.
Run RSLogix 5000™ software and configure the PLC for the correct processor, rack and
slot configurations.
6.
Right click on the I/O configuration folder located on the bottom of the hierarchy tree and
left click to add a new device to this folder.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 69:
7.
106
Adding a New Module using the PLCs software
Choose the 1756-ENBT/A. After selecting a name for the device, specify the IP address
that this device as 192.168.001.007 and then select “Finish”.
Ethernet Quickstart
Explicit Message READ
The following ladder diagram demonstrates the ladder instructions needed to send explicit
message requests from the Contrologix Ethernet gateway 1756-ENBT/A to any other device
that is Ethernet/IP compatible.
Figure 70:
Ladder Diagram
Explicit Message setup contains several elements including Message Type, Service Type,
Class, Instance, and Attribute.
The Message Type drop down should be set for CIP Generic when attempting to explicit
message over either Ethernet or DeviceNet.
The Service Type describes the function that the explicit message will be initiating.
Get Attribute Single
Read Parameter
Set Attribute Single
Write Parameter
For this example the Get Attribute Single service will be selected.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Figure 71:
Message Configuration - PLC software
Class, Instance, and Attribute ID’s for FM-3/4 parameters and bits may be found in “Drive
Parameters” on page 111 of this manual. The above example is configured to read position
feedback from the FM-3E. Class (0x66), Instance (0x01), Attribute (0x0B).
Explicit Message Write
Using the same setup and ladder diagram that was used for reading parameters, the MSG
Service Type will be set to Set Attribute Single. In this example Index.0.dist will be written
to via EtherNet/IP explicit messaging. Class (0x7B), Instance (0x01), Attribute (0x0A).
108
Ethernet Quickstart
Figure 72:
8.
Message Configuration - PLC software
In the Message Configuration section for Message_1 click on the Communications Tab.
This tab will allow the setting of the target device to receive the explicit message.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Port on
Scanner Scanner
Name
(2)
Figure 73:
IP addreess
of the FM-3E
Communication Tab - PLC software
Control Techniques offers no technical assistance on competitors products including PLC
products such as the ControLogix or SLC500.
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Drive Parameters
This section lists all parameters available for FM-3 and FM-4 Ethernet and DeviceNet modules. The
tables provide the following information about each parameter:
Name
The parameter’s name.
Data Type
INT8, UINT8 = 8 bit value
INT16, UINT16 = 16 bit value
INT32, UINT32 = 32 bit value
BOOL = 16 bit boolean value
DESTINATION = 16 bit boolean value
SOURCE = 16 bit boolean value
String: XXX = ASCII characters of XXX length, padded with white space
Class, Instance, Attribute
The path necessary to access the parameter.
By Name
*NOTE 1*
The instance number will be one more than the number of the index, jog, pls, program, input
or output. For example, Index0 will have an instance of 1 (01H) and Index 24 will have an
instance of 25 (19H). If the parameter is unnumbered, the instance will be one (see the tables
in this chapter).
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
Accelerating
Name
SOURCE
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelType
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.Name
String:12
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.TimeScale
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
136 (88H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT32
135 (87H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.InvertAccel
AnalogInput.MaxUserValue
AtVel
Bit.#.BitValue
BitRegister.#.Value
Brake.Activate
Brake.Disengaged
FM-3
FM-4
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
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FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Brake.Release
BtiRegister.#.ValueMask
Capture.#.CaptureActivate
Data Type
Class
Instance
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
Attribute
13 (0DH)
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
135 (87H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN
E and DN
UINT32
Capture.#.CaptureClear
NONE
131 (83H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
Capture.#.CapturedMasterPosHomed
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedMasterPosition
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedPositionCommand
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedPositionFeedback
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedTime
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureEnable
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureReset
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN
131 (83H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
Capture.#.CaptureTriggered
ClearFollowingError
SOURCE
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
E and DN
25 (19H)
E and DN E and DN
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
INT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
INT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.DeviceType
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.HeartbeatInterval
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.VendorID
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BaudRate
UINT16
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BusOffCounter
UINT8
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BusOffInterrupt
BOOL
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
DN
DN
Devicenet.DeviceNetObject.MacID
UINT16
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.MacID
UINT16
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
DN
DN
DistUnits.CharacteristicDistance
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.CharacteristicLength
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
22 (16H)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.Decimal
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.Name
String:12
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
24 (18H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAmbientTemp
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
CommandingMotion
CommutationAngleCorrection
CommutationTrackAngle
CommutationVoltage
Decelerating
DefineHome
DefineHomePosn
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.DeviceStatus
SOURCE
SOURCE
INT32
BOOL
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.Decimal
UINT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.LowPassFilterFrequency
UINT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.MinUserValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.MinVoltageValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.RawValue
INT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.SetMax
DESTINATION 128 (80H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.SetMin
DESTINATION 128 (80H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.ChannelEnable
DriveAnalogInput.MaxVoltageValue
DriveAnalogInput.ValueIn
112
INT32
Drive Parameters
By Name
Name
Data Type
Class
BOOL
129 (81H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.Feedback
INT16
129 (81H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MaxOutputValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MaxUserValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MinOutputValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MinUserValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
129 (81H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
113 (71H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Force
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Raw
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Status
SOURCE
113 (71H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
DriveOK
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
DriveAnalogOutput.#.ChannelEnable
DriveAnalogOutput.#.Source
DriveInput.#.Debounced
DriveInput.#.DebounceTime
Instance
Attribute
14 (0EH)
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.Force
BOOL
115 (74H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.Force
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
115 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.State
DESTINATION 115 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.State
DESTINATION 116 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutputEncoder.Scaling
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.DataRate
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.Gateway
UINT32
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.IpAddress
UINT32
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.IpPerformance
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
BOOL
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.ModbusPortNumber
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.SubnetMask
UINT32
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.WordSwap
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailAddress
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailMessage
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailReplyAddress
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailSubject
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.Initiate
DESTINATION 138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.MailReset
DESTINATION 138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
DriveOutputEncoder.ScalingEnable
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.ModbusGatewayEnable
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.RelayHost
UINT32
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.RelayHostFailure
SOURCE
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.TermCounter
UINT32
139 (8BH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Attribute
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Class
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Decimal
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
113
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.ExplicitMessageSize
Data Type
Class
Instance
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
14 (0EH)
E
E
DESTINATION 140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
UINT16
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Instance
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.MessageFailed
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Name
NAME
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Operation
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E
E
BOOL
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.TargetIP
UINT32
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Value
UINT32
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E
E
BOOL
141 (8DH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
STRING:12
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.SignedData
Ethernet.EthernetHTTP.EnablePassword
141 (8DH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetModules.Assignments
BLOB2
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetModules.NrModuleInstances
UINT16
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetModules.RawDataRecv
BLOB2
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord1
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord2
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord3
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetModuleStatus
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetNetworkStatus
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetOK
SOURCE
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.LinkState
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.ProcessedMessageCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.RcvCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.XmitCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetHTTP.Password
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.Active
SOURCE
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.Counts
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.SubFault
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveFaultsBitmap
UINT32
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT32
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.#.ValidEntry
BOOL
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.ClearLog
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.FaultType
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.PowerUpCount
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.PowerUpTime
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.ModulePowerUpCount
UINT16
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.ClearModuleCounts
Fault.EncoderStateFaultEnable
Fault.Faulted
Fault.LowDCBusFaultEnable
Fault.ModuleFaultsBitmap
Fault.Reset
FaultLog.#.SubFault
FeedforwardsEnable
Feedhold
FeedholdDecelTime
114
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
Drive Parameters
By Name
Name
FeedRateDeactivate
Instance
Attribute
DESTINATION 103 (67H)
Data Type
Class
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
FeedRateDecelerationTime
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
FeedRateOverride
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Foldback RMS
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
FoldbackActive
SOURCE
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
FollowingError
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
FollowingErrorEnable
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
FollowingErrorLimit
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Friction
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Accel
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.AccelEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Accelerating
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 133 (85H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Activate
Gear.AtVel
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.CommandComplete
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Decel
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DecelEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Decelerating
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DistanceRecoveryActive
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DistanceRecoveryEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.MaximumRecoveryRatio
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.RecoveryDist
INT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
15 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.SerialActivate
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Accel
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Accelerating
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.AtVel
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.CommandComplete
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Decel
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Decelerating
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 118 (76H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Ratio
Home.0.CalculatedOffset
Home.0.EndPosn
Home.0.Initiate
Home.0.LimitDist
BOOL
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
13 (ODH) E and DN E and DN
Home.0.OffsetType
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
Home.0.OnSensorAction
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Reference
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 118 (76H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.LimitDistEnable
Home.0.LimitDistHit
Home.0.SensorTrigger
Home.0.SpecifiedOffset
Home.0.TimeBase
E and DN E and DN
115
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
Home.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
117 (75H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.AnalogLimitType
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.AnalogOperator
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.AtVel
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.Decel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.Decelerating
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.TimedIndexEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#AnalogLimitValue
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Vel
Index.#.IndexTime
Index.#.RegistrationType
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
Index.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
Index.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
18 (12H)
Index.IndexInstance#.Accel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Accelerating
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
123 (7BH) See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Dist
Index.IndexInstance#.Initiate
INT32
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) See Note 1 13 (ODH) E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSOffDist
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSStatus
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationOffset
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowEnd
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowStart
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) See Note 1 21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.LimitDistHit
Index.IndexInstance#.SensorTrigger
Index.IndexInstance#.TimeBase
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 22 (16H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Type
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 24 (18H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Vel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 25 (19H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#PLSOnDist
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.ProfileLimited
SOURCE
123 (7BH) 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
29 (1DH)
E and DN E and DN
Inertia
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosn
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosnTime
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosnWindow
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Accel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Accelerating
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.AtVel
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Decel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.ResetProfileLimited
116
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) 1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
Drive Parameters
By Name
Name
Data Type
Class
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.SerialMinus
BOOL
120 (78H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.SerialPlus
BOOL
120 (78H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Vel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
119 (77H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.MinusActivate
DESTINATION 119 (77H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.PlusActivate
DESTINATION 119 (77H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.Select
DESTINATION 121 (79H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Keypad.DisplayTest
DESTINATION 100 (64H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Keypad.KeypadTest
DESTINATION 100 (64H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Decelerating
LineVoltage
UINT16
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
LowPassFilterFrequency
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Master AccelUnits.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAccelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.AbsolutePosnValid
SOURCE
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
36 (24H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.CompensationValue
UINT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 101 (65H)
LowPassFilterEnable
1 (01H)
12 (OCH) E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.DefineHomePosn
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.EnableFilter
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
29 (1DH)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
35 (23H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.FilterSamples
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
33 (21H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.Interpretation
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
37 (25H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.Polarity
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.PosnFeedback
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.PosnFeedbackInCounts
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.RotaryRolloverPosn
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
22 (16H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 101 (65H)
1 (01H)
31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.DefineHome
MasterAxis.EncoderMarker
MasterAxis.FeedforwardsEnable
MasterAxis.Source
MasterAxis.UndefineHome
MasterAxis.VelFeedback
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
25 (19H)
MasterAxis.VelocityFilterBandwidth
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.CharacteristicDistance
UINT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Counts
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterVelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterVelUnits.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
Modbus.BaudRate
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleFirmwareRevision
String:4
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Debounced
ModuleInput.#.DebounceTime
ModuleInput.#.Force
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
114 (72H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
117
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Raw
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Status
SOURCE
114 (72H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleOutput.#.Force
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 116 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.ForceEnable
ModuleOutput.#.State
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
ModuleOutputEncoder.Source
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleSerialNumber
String:16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Motion State
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Motor Type
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.AbsolutePosnValid
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.BusVoltage
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.DriveInputSignal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
38 (26H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.EncoderMarker
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.FreeRunTime
UINT32
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
E and DN E and DN
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
MotorAxis.MotionStop
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.SoftDriveDisable
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.HeatSinkTemperature
MotorAxis.TempCurrentLimitActive
MotorAxis.TorqueFeedback
MotorAxis.UndefineHome
SOURCE
INT32
Name
String:12
100 (64H)
Name
Data Type
Class
Attribute
FM-3
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Overspeed Fault Count
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
OverspeedVel
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
PeakTorque
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.Direction
UINT16
109 (6DH) See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.OffPosn
INT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.OnPosn
INT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 109 (6DH) See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
109 (6DH) See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.RotaryRolloverPosn
UINT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.Source
UINT16
109 (6DH) See Note 1 10 (OAH) E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.Status
SOURCE
109 (6DH) See Note 1 11 (OBH) E and DN E and DN
ObserverEnable
PLS.PLSInstance#.PLSEnable
PLS.PLSInstance#.RotaryRolloverEnable
PositionIntegralEnable
Positive Direction
PosnCommand
PosnErrorIntegralTimeConstant
FM-4
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
UINT16
PosnFeedback
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
PosnFeedbackInCounts
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
PowerStageEnabled
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
PowerSupplyReady
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
PowerUpCount
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
118
Drive Parameters
By Name
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
UINT32
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
ProductSubGroup
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Profile.#.Accelerating
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 4 (01H)
E and DN
Profile.#.AtVel
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN
Profile.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN
Profile.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN
Profile.#.Decelerating
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 15 (0FH)
E and DN
134 (86H)
See Note 1 14 (0EH)
E and DN
PowerUpTime
Profile.#.DefineHome
Profile.#.DefineHomePosn
INT32
Profile.#.Feedhold
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN
Profile.#.FeedRateDeactivate
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 13 (0DH)
E and DN
134 (86H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN
Profile.#.FeedRateOverride
Profile.#.MotionStop
UINT16
Profile.#.PosnCommand
INT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN
Profile.#.RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
134 (86H)
See Note 1 11 (0BH)
E and DN
UINT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 12 (0CH)
E and DN
INT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN
SOURCE
126 (7EH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
126 (7EH) See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Profile.#.RotaryRolloverPosn
Profile.#.VelCommand
Program.#.ProgramRunning
Program.#.RunAnytimeEnable
Program.#.Stop
Program.AnyActive
Program.AnyComplete
Program.ProgramInstance#.Initiate
Program.ProgramInstance#.ProgramComplete
DESTINATION 126 (7EH)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
125 (7DH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
125 (7DH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
126 (7EH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 126 (7EH)
SOURCE
Queue.#.DataIn
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN
Queue.#.DataOut
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN
Queue.#.ExitPosition
INT32
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN
UINT16
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueClear
DESTINATION 130 (82H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueCompareEnable
DESTINATION 130 (82H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN
E and DN
Queue.#.FullLevel
Queue.#.QueueEmpty
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
Queue.#.QueueExit
SOURCE
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
Queue.#.QueueFull
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN
E and DN
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 13 (0DH)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueOverflow
SOURCE
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueSize
UINT16
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN
Queue.#.Source
UINT16
130 (82H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
Queue.QueueInstance#.QueueOverflow
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
Response
UINT16
Queue.#.QueueOffset
E and DN
E and DN
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
RotaryRolloverPosn
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
SegmentDisplay
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
RotaryRolloverEnable
Selector.Select
Selector.Selection
DESTINATION 111 (6FH)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
112 (70H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
119
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Selector.SelectorInitiate
Data Type
Class
DESTINATION 110 (6EH)
Instance
Attribute
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
FM-3
FM-4
ShuntActive
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
ShuntPowerRMS
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
15 (OFH)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitMinusPosn
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitPlusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitEnable
SoftwareTravelLimitMinusActive
SoftwareTravelLimitPlusPosn
Stop
StopDecel
UINT32
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
SwitchingFrequency
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
INT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueCommand
INT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLevel
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLevelActive
SOURCE
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLimit
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLimitActive
SOURCE
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 105 (69H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueCommandLimited
TorqueLimitEnable
TorqueUnits.Decimal
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.Name
String:12
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.PercentContinuousCurrent
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.Torque
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
TotalPowerUpTime
UINT32
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
UINT32
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitDisable
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
29 (1DH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitMinusActivate
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
26 (1AH)
E and DN E and DN
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitDecel
TravelLimitMinusActive
TravelLimitPlusActivate
SOURCE
TravelLimitPlusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
Var.#.Decimal
UINT16
132 (84H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Var.#.Value
INT32
132 (84H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
VelCommand
INT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
VelFeedback
INT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
VelLimitActive
SOURCE
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.Decimal
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.DistVelScale
UINT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.Name
String:12
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
BOOL
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.ScalingEnable
VelocityUnits.TimeScale
120
Drive Parameters
By Class
By Class
*NOTE 1*
The instance number will be one more than the number of the index, jog, pls, program, input
or output. For example, Index0 will have an instance of 1 (01H) and Index 24 will have an
instance of 25 (19H). If the parameter is unnumbered, the instance will be one (see the tables
in this chapter).
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.VendorID
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.DeviceType
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
DN
DN
ProductSubGroup
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleFirmwareRevision
String:4
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.DeviceStatus
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
DN
ModuleSerialNumber
String:16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetIdentityObject.HeartbeatInterval
UINT16
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
DN
DN
Devicenet.DeviceNetObject.MacID
UINT16
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BaudRate
UINT16
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BusOffInterrupt
BOOL
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
DN
DN
DeviceNet.DeviceNetObject.BusOffCounter
UINT8
3 (03H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
DN
DN
DriveAmbientTemp
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DN
LineVoltage
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Motor Type
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
Name
String:12
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
Positive Direction
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutputEncoder.ScalingEnable
BOOL
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutputEncoder.Scaling
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Keypad.DisplayTest
DESTINATION 100 (64H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Keypad.KeypadTest
DESTINATION 100 (64H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Modbus.BaudRate
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
SwitchingFrequency
UINT16
100 (64H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleOutputEncoder.Source
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAccelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Master AccelUnits.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.CharacteristicDistance
UINT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Counts
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterDistUnit.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.CompensationValue
UINT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.DefineHome
DESTINATION 101 (65H)
1 (01H)
12 (OCH) E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.DefineHomePosn
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
MasterAxis.PosnFeedbackInCounts
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.Polarity
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.PosnFeedback
INT32
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
121
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
MasterAxis.RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
FM-4
MasterAxis.RotaryRolloverPosn
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
22 (16H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.Source
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.VelFeedback
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
25 (19H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterVelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterVelUnits.Name
String:12
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.EncoderMarker
SOURCE
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
29 (1DH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.VelocityFilterBandwidth
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.UndefineHome
DESTINATION 101 (65H)
1 (01H)
31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.EnableFilter
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.FilterSamples
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
33 (21H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.FeedforwardsEnable
BOOL
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
35 (23H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.AbsolutePosnValid
SOURCE
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
36 (24H)
E and DN E and DN
MasterAxis.Interpretation
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
37 (25H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.DriveInputSignal
UINT16
101 (65H)
1 (01H)
38 (26H)
E and DN E and DN
DefineHome
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DefineHomePosn
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
FollowingErrorEnable
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
PosnFeedbackInCounts
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
FollowingError
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
FollowingErrorLimit
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosn
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosnTime
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
InPosnWindow
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
PosnCommand
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
PosnFeedback
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
RotaryRolloverPosn
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitEnable
BOOL
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
15 (OFH)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitMinusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitMinusPosn
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitPlusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
SoftwareTravelLimitPlusPosn
INT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitMinusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitPlusActive
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.CharacteristicLength
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
22 (16H)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.Decimal
UINT16
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.Name
String:12
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
24 (18H)
E and DN E and DN
ClearFollowingError
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
25 (19H)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitMinusActivate
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
26 (1AH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitPlusActivate
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
E and DN E and DN
DistUnits.CharacteristicDistance
UINT32
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitDisable
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
29 (1DH)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.UndefineHome
DESTINATION 102 (66H)
1 (01H)
30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
122
Drive Parameters
By Class
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
MotorAxis.EncoderMarker
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
FM-4
MotorAxis.AbsolutePosnValid
SOURCE
102 (66H)
1 (01H)
32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
AtVel
SOURCE
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
CommandingMotion
SOURCE
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
FeedRateOverride
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
OverspeedVel
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
VelCommand
INT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
VelFeedback
INT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
VelLimitActive
SOURCE
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.Decimal
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.DistVelScale
UINT32
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.ScalingEnable
BOOL
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.Name
String:12
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
VelocityUnits.TimeScale
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
FeedRateDeactivate
DESTINATION 103 (67H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
FeedRateDecelerationTime
UINT16
103 (67H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.Decimal
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.InvertAccel
BOOL
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.Name
String:12
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelUnits.TimeScale
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Accelerating
SOURCE
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
AccelType
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Decelerating
SOURCE
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Feedhold
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
FeedholdDecelTime
UINT16
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Stop
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
StopDecel
UINT32
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
TravelLimitDecel
UINT32
104 (68H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.MotionStop
DESTINATION 104 (68H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
FoldbackActive
SOURCE
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
105 (69H)
Foldback RMS
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
PeakTorque
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
TorqueCommand
INT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
TorqueCommandLimited
INT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.TorqueFeedback
INT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLevel
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLevelActive
SOURCE
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLimit
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLimitActive
SOURCE
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueLimitEnable
DESTINATION 105 (69H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.Decimal
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.Name
String:12
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.PercentContinuousCurrent
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
TorqueUnits.Torque
UINT32
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
123
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
MotorAxis.BusVoltage
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
FM-4
MotorAxis.HeatSinkTemperature
UINT16
105 (69H)
1 (01H)
FeedforwardsEnable
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
ObserverEnable
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
PositionIntegralEnable
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Friction
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Inertia
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
LowPassFilterEnable
BOOL
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
LowPassFilterFrequency
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
PosnErrorIntegralTimeConstant
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Response
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
CommutationAngleCorrection
INT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
CommutationTrackAngle
UINT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
CommutationVoltage
INT16
106 (6AH) 1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveFaultsBitmap
UINT32
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.EncoderStateFaultEnable
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.Faulted
SOURCE
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.ModuleFaultsBitmap
UINT32
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.Reset
DESTINATION 107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.LowDCBusFaultEnable
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.ClearModuleCounts
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.ClearLog
BOOL
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.ModulePowerUpCount
UINT16
107 (6BH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.Active
SOURCE
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.Counts
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Fault.DriveEncoderState.SubFault
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.FaultType
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.PowerUpCount
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.FaultLogInstance.PowerUpTime
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.#.SubFault
UINT16
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
FaultLog.#.ValidEntry
BOOL
108 (6CH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.Direction
UINT16
109 (6DH) See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.OffPosn
INT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.OnPosn
INT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.PLSEnable
DESTINATION 109 (6DH) See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
109 (6DH) See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.RotaryRolloverPosn
UINT32
109 (6DH) See Note 1 8 (08H)
PLS.PLSInstance#.Source
UINT16
109 (6DH) See Note 1 10 (OAH) E and DN E and DN
PLS.PLSInstance#.Status
SOURCE
109 (6DH) See Note 1 11 (OBH) E and DN E and DN
Selector.SelectorInitiate
DESTINATION 110 (6EH)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
Selector.Select
DESTINATION 111 (6FH)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Selector.Selection
SOURCE
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
112 (70H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Debounced
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.DebounceTime
UINT16
113 (71H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
124
Drive Parameters
By Class
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
DriveInput.#.Force
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Raw
BOOL
113 (71H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveInput.#.Status
SOURCE
113 (71H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Debounced
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.DebounceTime
UINT16
114 (72H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Force
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Raw
BOOL
114 (72H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleInput.#.Status
SOURCE
114 (72H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.State
DESTINATION 115 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.Force
BOOL
115 (74H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
115 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.State
DESTINATION 116 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleOutput.#.State
DESTINATION 116 (74H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.Force
BOOL
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
116 (74H)
ModuleOutput.#.Force
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
ModuleOutput.#.ForceEnable
BOOL
116 (74H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
117 (75H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Accelerating
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Accel
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.AtVel
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.OnSensorAction
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.CalculatedOffset
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.CommandComplete
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Decelerating
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Decel
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Initiate
DESTINATION 118 (76H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
Home.0.LimitDist
UINT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.LimitDistEnable
BOOL
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.LimitDistHit
SOURCE
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
13 (ODH) E and DN E and DN
Home.0.OffsetType
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.EndPosn
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Reference
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.SensorTrigger
DESTINATION 118 (76H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.SpecifiedOffset
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.TimeBase
UINT16
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
Home.0.Vel
INT32
118 (76H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
119 (77H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.MinusActivate
DESTINATION 119 (77H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.PlusActivate
DESTINATION 119 (77H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Accelerating
SOURCE
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
120 (78H)
125
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Jog.#.Accel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
Attribute
E and DN E and DN
FM-3
FM-4
Jog.#.AtVel
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Decelerating
SOURCE
120 (78H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Decel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.SerialMinus
BOOL
120 (78H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.SerialPlus
BOOL
120 (78H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.#.Vel
UINT32
120 (78H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Jog.Select
DESTINATION 121 (79H)
Index.AnyCommandComplete
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Motion State
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Overspeed Fault Count
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
PowerStageEnabled
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
PowerUpCount
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
PowerUpTime
UINT32
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
SegmentDisplay
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
ShuntActive
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
ShuntPowerRMS
UINT16
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
TotalPowerUpTime
UINT32
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Brake.Disengaged
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Brake.Activate
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
Brake.Release
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
DriveOK
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
PowerSupplyReady
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.TempCurrentLimitActive
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.AnyCommandComplete
SOURCE
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.SoftDriveDisable
DESTINATION 122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
MotorAxis.FreeRunTime
UINT32
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
122 (7AH) 1 (01H)
Index.IndexInstance#.Accelerating
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Accel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.AnalogLimitType
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#AnalogLimitValue
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.AtVel
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.Decelerating
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.Decel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Dist
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Initiate
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) See Note 1 13 (ODH) E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.LimitDistHit
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 14 (0EH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 15 (0FH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSOffDist
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
126
Drive Parameters
By Class
Name
Data Type
Class
Index.IndexInstance#PLSOnDist
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 17 (11H)
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationOffset
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowEnd
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 19 (13H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.RegistrationWindowStart
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.SensorTrigger
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) See Note 1 21 (15H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.TimeBase
UINT16
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.PLSStatus
SOURCE
123 (7BH) See Note 1 23 (17H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Type
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 24 (18H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.IndexInstance#.Vel
UINT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 25 (19H)
E and DN E and DN
Index.ProfileLimited
SOURCE
123 (7BH) 1 (01H)
27 (1BH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.IndexTime
INT32
123 (7BH) See Note 1 28 (1CH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.ResetProfileLimited
DESTINATION 123 (7BH) 1 (01H)
Index.#.AnalogOperator
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 30 (1EH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.RegistrationType
UINT16
123 (7BH) See Note 1 31 (1FH)
E and DN E and DN
Index.#.TimedIndexEnable
BOOL
123 (7BH) See Note 1 32 (20H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.AnyActive
BOOL
125 (7DH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.AnyComplete
SOURCE
125 (7DH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.ProgramInstance#.Initiate
DESTINATION 126 (7EH) See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.ProgramInstance#.ProgramComplete
SOURCE
E and DN E and DN
123 (7BH) See Note 1 22 (16H)
29 (1DH)
126 (7EH) See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.#.Stop
DESTINATION 126 (7EH) See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.#.ProgramRunning
SOURCE
126 (7EH) See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Program.#.RunAnytimeEnable
BOOL
126 (7EH) See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.Decimal
UINT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
AnalogInput.MaxUserValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.MaxVoltageValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.MinUserValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.MinVoltageValue
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.RawValue
INT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.SetMax
DESTINATION 128 (80H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.SetMin
DESTINATION 128 (80H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.ValueIn
INT32
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.LowPassFilterFrequency
UINT16
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogInput.ChannelEnable
BOOL
128 (80H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.Source
UINT16
129 (81H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.Feedback
INT16
129 (81H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.ChannelEnable
BOOL
129 (81H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MaxUserValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MaxOutputValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MinUserValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
DriveAnalogOutput.#.MinOutputValue
INT32
129 (81H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN E and DN
Queue.#.DataIn
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN
Queue.#.DataOut
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueEmpty
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueFull
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN
127
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Queue.#.QueueOverflow
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
E and DN
Queue.#.ExitPosition
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN
Queue.#.FullLevel
UINT16
130 (82H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueClear
DESTINATION 130 (82H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueCompareEnable
DESTINATION 130 (82H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueExit
SOURCE
130 (82H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueSize
UINT16
130 (82H)
See Note 1 11 (0BH)
E and DN
Queue.#.Source
UINT16
130 (82H)
See Note 1 12 (0CH)
E and DN
Queue.#.QueueOffset
INT32
130 (82H)
See Note 1 13 (0DH)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureActivate
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureClear
NONE
131 (83H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedMasterPosition
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedPositionCommand
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 4 (04H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedPositionFeedback
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedTime
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureEnable
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureReset
DESTINATION 131 (83H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CaptureTriggered
SOURCE
131 (83H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN
Capture.#.CapturedMasterPosHomed
INT32
131 (83H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN
Var.#.Decimal
UINT16
132 (84H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Var.#.Value
INT32
132 (84H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Activate
DESTINATION 133 (85H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Ratio
INT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.AtVel
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.CommandComplete
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.AccelEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Accelerating
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Accel
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DecelEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Decelerating
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.Decel
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.RecoveryDist
INT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
15 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DistanceRecoveryEnable
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
16 (10H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.DistanceRecoveryActive
SOURCE
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
17 (11H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.MaximumRecoveryRatio
UINT32
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
18 (12H)
E and DN E and DN
Gear.SerialActivate
BOOL
133 (85H)
1 (01H)
20 (14H)
E and DN E and DN
Profile.#.MotionStop
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
Profile.#.PosnCommand
INT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN
Profile.#.VelCommand
INT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 3 (03H)
E and DN
Profile.#.Accelerating
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 4 (01H)
E and DN
Profile.#.AtVel
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 5 (05H)
E and DN
Profile.#.Decelerating
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 6 (06H)
E and DN
Profile.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 7 (07H)
E and DN
128
E and DN
Drive Parameters
By Class
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Profile.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
134 (86H)
See Note 1 8 (08H)
Attribute
FM-3
E and DN
FM-4
Profile.#.Feedhold
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 9 (09H)
E and DN
Profile.#.FeedRateOverride
UINT16
134 (86H)
See Note 1 10 (0AH)
E and DN
Profile.#.RotaryRolloverEnable
BOOL
134 (86H)
See Note 1 11 (0BH)
E and DN
Profile.#.RotaryRolloverPosn
UINT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 12 (0CH)
E and DN
Profile.#.FeedRateDeactivate
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 13 (0DH)
E and DN
Profile.#.DefineHomePosn
INT32
134 (86H)
See Note 1 14 (0EH)
E and DN
Profile.#.DefineHome
DESTINATION 134 (86H)
See Note 1 15 (0FH)
BitRegister.#.Value
UINT32
See Note 1 1 (01H)
135 (87H)
E and DN
E and DN E and DN
BtiRegister.#.ValueMask
UINT32
135 (87H)
See Note 1 2 (02H)
E and DN E and DN
Bit.#.BitValue
BOOL
136 (88H)
See Note 1 1 (01H)
E and DN E and DN
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.DataRate
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.ModbusGatewayEnable BOOL
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.Gateway
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
UINT32
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.IpAddress
UINT32
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.IpPerformance
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.ModbusPortNumber
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.SubnetMask
UINT32
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetConfiguration.WordSwap
UINT16
137 (89H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailAddress
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailReplyAddress
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailMessage
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.EmailSubject
BLOB2
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.MailReset
DESTINATION 138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.RelayHost
UINT32
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.RelayHostFailure
SOURCE
138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.#.Initiate
DESTINATION 138 (8AH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetEmail.TermCounter
UINT32
139 (8BH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Attribute
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Class
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandComplete
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.CommandInProgress
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Decimal
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Initiate
DESTINATION 140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Instance
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.MessageFailed
SOURCE
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Name
NAME
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Operation
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.TargetIP
UINT32
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
11 (0BH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.Value
UINT32
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
12 (0CH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.SignedData
BOOL
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
13 (0DH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetExplicit.#.ExplicitMessageSize
UINT16
140 (8CH) 1 (01H)
14 (0EH)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetHTTP.EnablePassword
BOOL
141 (8DH) 1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetHTTP.Password
STRING:12
141 (8DH) 1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
129
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Name
Data Type
Class
Instance
Attribute
FM-3
FM-4
Ethernet.EthernetModules.Assignments
BLOB2
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetModules.NrModuleInstances
UINT16
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetModules.RawDataRecv
BLOB2
143 (8FH)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord1
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
1 (01H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord2
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
2 (02H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetMacIdWord3
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
3 (03H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetOK
SOURCE
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
4 (04H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.LinkState
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
5 (05H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetModuleStatus
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
6 (06H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.EthernetNetworkStatus
UINT16
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
7 (07H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.ProcessedMessageCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
8 (08H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.RcvCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
9 (09H)
E
E
Ethernet.EthernetStatus.XmitCounter
UINT32
144 (90H)
1 (01H)
10 (0AH)
E
E
*NOTE 1*
The instance number will be one more than the number of the index, jog, pls, program, input
or output. For example, Index0 will have an instance of 1 (01H) and Index 24 will have an
instance of 25 (19H). If the parameter is unnumbered, the instance will be one (see the tables
in this chapter).
130
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference
Manual
Glossary
.GSD File
Text based configuration file used to configure a DP Master for the slaves it will receive
cyclic data from.
Application Objects
These implement the intended purpose of the product.
Attribute
A sub-classification for a parameter or bit. The attribute is grouped directly under the more
broad category of class. Example: Class = Index, Attribute = Index Dwell. Each Attribute
accessible to the user is assigned a number (See “Drive Parameters” on page 111.)
Baud Rate
The number of times the communication signal changes per second. In the case of a digital
communication signal, it is equal to the number of bits per second.
Class
A top level DeviceNet classification for all parameters and bits. Each class is given a unique
number ID found in the chart #.
Consumer
A device that acts as a data destination over Ethernet Hardware.
Cyclic Data (Profibus)
A Profibus connection that allows data to be transferred quickly to and from the master every
time the master polls the slave for its data.
Cyclic Message (DeviceNet)
Cyclic messages allow for consistent data exchange at a certain time cycle as set by the user.
Cyclic data will only transfer master receive parameters.
Connection Class
This DeviceNet specific object allocates and manages internal resources associated with both
I/O and Explicit Messaging connections.
Connection Object
This DeviceNet specific object manages the communication specific aspects associated with
both I/O and Explicit Messaging connections.
131
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
CIP
Control and Information Protocol, the EtherNet/IP application layer. In this model one
producer broadcasts (multicast) the data once to all the consumers. All consumers see the data
simultaneously, and may choose whether to consume (receive) the data or not.
Daisy Chain
A slang term for a wiring process that goes from one device to the next connecting wire A to
A, B to B, etc.
DeviceNet
A communications link to connect industrial devices (limit switches, photoelectric switches,
motor drives, and position controllers) as well as control devices (programmable controllers
and computers) to a network. All references to DeviceNet in this document refer to ODVA
DeviceNet Specifications Volumes 1 and 2, release 2.0.
DeviceNet Object
This provides the configuration and status of a physical DeviceNet network connection.
Drop Line
A DeviceNet cable that runs from the trunk of a system to a device.
EDS
Electronic Data Sheet file is a formatted ASCII file that contains configuration information
of the device.
Ethernet/IP
An industrial Ethernet protocol managed by ODVA that uses the CIP application layer
common to DeviceNet and ControlNet.
Explicit Message
A DeviceNet or EtherNet/IP message constructed within the master to poll a device for a
single parameter. Explicit Messages occur in the background of implicit messaging.
Explicit Messages
Non-time critical messaging used for device configuration and data collection.
Explicit Messaging Connections
Provide generic, multi-purpose communication paths between two devices. Explicit
Messages provide the typical request/response oriented network communications.
132
Glossary
FM
Function modules are attached to the front of a servo drive to provide additional functionality.
Gateway
A module or set of modules that allows communications between nodes on dissimilar
networks.
Hub
A central connecting device that joins devices together in a star configuration. A hub takes
network requests and transmits them to every device connected to the hub.
I/O Connections
These provide dedicated, special-purpose communication paths between a producing
application and one or more consuming applications. Application specific I/O data moves
through these ports.
Implicit Message
A message sent from the master to the slave as a way of passing data. Implicit messages
transfer a predefined amount of data to and from the Master at a constant rate.
Implicit Messages
Real time messaging of I/O data over Ethernet/IP.
Index
An index is a set of parameters that defines position based motion including target position
and velocity, and other parameters. The different types of indexes specify basic operation.
Indexes are associated with digital input and outputs for the purposes of providing control and
indication of the Index status.
Instance
A sub-classification for a parameter or bit. The instance is grouped directly under the more
broad category of attribute and allows for multiple occurrences of a parameter. Example:
Class = Index, Attribute = Index Dwell, Instance1 = Index 0, Instance2 = Index 1. Each
instance is assigned a unique number under its respective attribute.
IP address
32-bit identification number for each node on an Internet Protocol network. These addresses
are represented as four 8-bit numbers (0 to 255), with periods between them. Each node on
an Ethernet network must have a unique IP address.
133
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Link Consumer Object
This DeviceNet object is used by a Connection Object to receive data from DeviceNet.
Link Producer Object
This DeviceNet object is used by a Connection Object to transmit data onto DeviceNet.
MacID (DeviceNet)
DeviceNet specific term for a node address.
MacID (Ethernet)
Media Access Identifier. In Ethernet applications the MacID is a unique number 48 bits long
given to Ethernet hardware. This number is burned in at the manufacturing facility and is not
changeable by the customer. In DeviceNet applications a MacID is the number assigned by
the user to each individual node on the DeviceNet network.
Master
A master is a device on an industrial network that sets up data connections with other
industrial devices. The Master is responsible for initiating commands and requests for data.
Master Address
Master Address is the node number of the master on the network.
Master Receive
Master Receive data is information that is transferred from the drive (slave) to the PLC
(master).
Master Send
Master Send data is information that is transferred from the PLC (master) to the drive (slave).
Message Router
This DeviceNet object distributes Explicit Request Messages to the appropriate handler
object.
Nodes
Each Device on a DeviceNet or Profibus network is called a node
ODVA
The Open DeviceNet Vendor Association is an organization that manages the DeviceNet
specification and supports the worldwide growth of DeviceNet.
134
Glossary
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller. An Idustrial device used to control Inputs and Outputs in a
systematic fashion on a device.
Producer
A device that acts as a data source over Ethernet Hardware.
Profibus DP
Profibus Decentral Periphery is a communications link used to connect industrial devices
(limit switches, motor drives, position controllers) as well as control devices (programmable
controllers and computers) to a network. Profibus DP is a two wire RS485 based
communications network. All references to Profibus Dp in document refer to the
“Specifications for PROFIBUS Device Description and Device Integration Volume 3”.
Profibus International
(PI) The parent organization of all Regional Profibus Associations (RPA). Worldwide is the
worlds largest organization for industrial communications.
Serial Port
Digital data communications port configured with a minimum number of signal lines. This is
achieved by passing binary information signals as a time series of 1’s and 0’s on a single line.
Slave
A slave is a node on an industrial network that accepts a poll for data from a master. This node
generally responds with data sent back to the master.
Subnet Mask
An extension of the IP address that allows a site to use a single net ID for multiple networks.
Switch
A network device that cross connects devices or network segments. A switch or switching
hub learns where devices are connected and transmits packets directly and only to the proper
branch of the switch. This “smart switching” saves bandwidth and allows for more reliable
Ethernet communications.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/InternetProtocol. A transport-layer protocol (TCP) and a
network-layer protocol (IP) commonly used for communication within networks and across
inter-networks.
135
FM-3 and FM-4 Connectivity Modules Reference Manual
Terminating Resistors
Resistors used to decrease reflection and noise in a serial communications network.
Generally terminating resistors are placed at the ends of the network on the lines that transmit
messages.
Trunk Line
The main branch of a DeviceNet network. This branch generally attaches to the main power
supply and is capable of carrying more current than the drop lines hanging off of it.
UCMM
The Unconnected Message Manager processes DeviceNet Unconnected Explicit messages.
136
Since 1979, the “Motion Made Easy” products, designed and manufactured in
Minnesota U.S.A., are renowned in the motion control industry for their ease of
use, reliability and high performance.
For more information about Control Techniques “Motion Made Easy” products
and services, call (800) 893-2321 or contact our website at
www.emersonct.com.
Control Techniques Drives, Inc.
Division of EMERSON Co.
12005 Technology Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344
U.S.A.
Customer Service
Phone: (952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Fax: (952) 995-8129
Technical Support
Phone: (952) 995-8033 or (800) 893-2321
Fax (952) 9995-8020
Printed in U.S.A.
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