Software Reference, Frame Relay

Software Reference, Frame Relay
1
FRAME RELAY
August 2000
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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2
Frame Relay
Software Reference
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
FRAME RELAY
A
REFERENCE
5
1
Frame Relay
6
1.1
An Overview of Frame Relay Technology
7
1.2
Protocol Structure
9
1.2.1
Frame Relay Protocol Stack
9
1.2.2
Frame Relay Frame Format
11
1.2.3
Frame Relay Addressing
11
1.2.4
Congestion Notification
11
1.2.5
Virtual Circuits
12
1.2.6
Data Link Connection Identifier
12
1.3
Frame Relay Services
13
1.3.1
Committed Information Rate
13
1.3.2
Committed Burst Rate
13
1.3.3
Excess Burst Rate
13
1.4
The Frame Relay Subsystem
14
1.4.1
Overview: Frame Relay System Tables
14
1.4.2
Frame Relay Setup Tool Menus
15
1.4.3
Setup Tool Menus
17
1.5
Example Configuration using Setup Tool
25
1.5.1
Frame Relay over ISDN Lines
25
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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Table of Contents
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
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A
Software Reference
REFERENCE
Frame Relay
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A
Frame Relay
1
Frame Relay
In this chapter we will give you an overview of Frame Relay technology.
Secondly, we will describe the protocol structures of Frame Relay.
After that some Frame Relay services will be introduced.
Following that, the Frame Relay subsystems will be described.
Concluding, we will describe some example configurations using Setup Tool.
Frame Relay on BinTec Routers
Frame Relay is officially supported on the BIANCA/BRICK-XL2, BIANCA/
BRICK-XMP, BIANCA/BRICK-XM with 2MB flash, BIANCA/BRICK-XS with
2MB flash, and on the BinGO! Plus/Professional. The BinTec router (the expression BinTec router in the further text of this Chapter also includes the BinGO! Plus/Professional) can be used as a Frame Relay Switch or a Frame Relay
Router and supports the following official and defacto standards:
■ RFC 1490 Multiprotocol Interconnect over Frame Relay
■ RFC 1293 Inverse Address Resolution Protocol
■ ITU-T Q933a, Appendix II, X6 Line Management Extensions
■ FRF 1.1 Congestion Management
Frame Relay requires a separate license to be installed on the BinTec router
and may be purchased directly from BinTec Communications AG or your local
distributor.
Frame relay is a connection-oriented technology that provides a fast packetswitching service for access to Wide Area Networks. It makes optimum use of
available bandwidth using a complex statistical multiplexing algorithm. Due to
the omission of some layer three network functions, Frame Relay is often
thought of as a “streamlined version for X.25”.
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
An Overview of Frame Relay Technology
Frame Relay is a flexible and cost-effective alternative to existing WAN technologies best suited for network installations exemplifying any of the following
characteristics:
■ Applications generate significant amounts of bursty traffic.
■ Network traffic is delay-sensitive.
■ High network availability is a major priority.
■ Dispersed enterprise (locations separated by long distances).
■ Integration with existing public and/or private, packet-switched networks is
required.
1.1
An Overview of Frame Relay Technology
As the name suggests, it works by breaking data streams into variable length
frames and forwards (relays) these frames into the network via predetermined
logical connections called Permanent Virtual Circuits, or PVCs.
Some of the key concepts of Frame Relay are listed below:
■ Small, variable length frames are used to transport user data;
this makes frame relay well suited for data applications (particularly those
generating bursty-traffic) - video and voice transmissions are generally not
appropriate.
■ Improved overall performance (compared to X.25 - a result of limited error
correction and acknowledgment routines.
■ Users are guaranteed a minimum amount of bandwidth which is always
available (the Committed Information Rate section A, chapter 1.3.1,
page 13, or CIR).
■ High network availability is achieved through statistically multiplexing virtual connections (data streams) onto logical connections, or Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs).
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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A
Frame Relay
■ Integrated bandwidth allocation (true bandwidth on demand) allows users
to take up additional bandwidth, when available, at no extra charge - based
on the user’s Committed Burst Rate section A, chapter 1.3.2, page 13
(CBR) and Excess Burst Rate section A, chapter 1.3.3, page 13 (EBR).
There are different types of equipment found in a typical Frame Relay Network
based on the various tasks they perform.
Frame Relay Network
Frame Relay Router
End System
Figure A-1: Frame Relay Network
■ End Systems
End systems are typically end-user devices that take advantage (make use
of) the underlying Frame Relay network. Depending on the application running on the end stations bandwidth requirements of end systems on the
LAN can be different. Some applications generate large amounts of intermittent bursty traffic (typical of data applications, telnet, ftp, www) while others (like voice or video) require a constant bitrate.
■ Frame Relay Routers
Frame Relay Routers are used to connect point–to–multipoint networks
(LANs) to a public (or private) Frame Relay network. It is the router’s job to
encapsulate data into Frame Relay frames for transport over the network
link. A Frame Relay Router encapsulates LAN frames in frame relay frames
and feeds those frames to a Frame Relay Switch for transmission across
the network. A Frame Relay Router also receives frame relay frames from
the network, strips the frame relay frame off each frame to product the orig-
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
Protocol Structure
inal LAN frame, and passes the LAN frame on to the end device. A Frame
Relay Router communicates directly with one or more Frame Relay Switches to negotiate the opening/closing of virtual circuits and to control network
congestion.
■ Frame Relay Switches
Switches are typically owned by public network providers but may be
owned by private sites implementing private Frame Relay Networks. Aside
from the FECN, BECN, and DE frame fields (used for congestion management) the content and final destination of individual frame is of no interest
to the switch. Using a simple mapping scheme frames are passed from one
interface (DLCI) to another.
1.2
Protocol Structure
1.2.1
Frame Relay Protocol Stack
Although similar in concept to X.25, frame relay operates at layer 2 of the OSI
reference model. This is where the main differences between the two lie. Frame
relay simply leaves out the extensive error detection/correction and end–to–end
flow control found in X.25. This greatly simplifies the tasks a frame relay switch
must perform.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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Frame Relay
OSI Layer 3
• Frame acknowledgement
• End–to–end flow control
• Sequence verification
• Packet segmentation
7
OSI Layer 2
6
•
Error
correction
routines
• Verify FCS
• Layer 2 flow control
5
• Verify connection (DLCI)
• Sequence verification
4
3
2
X.25
FR
1
OSI Reference Model
OSI Layer 2
Figure A-2: Frame Relay in OSI Reference Model
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
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Protocol Structure
1.2.2
Frame Relay Frame Format
As shown below frame relay is a streamlined protocol that uses HDLC framing.
Virtual frame relay connections are routed based on the DLCI field of incoming
frames.
Frame Relay Frame
1 byte
Flag
2 bytes
0 bytes
Address Control
1 - 296 (4096) bytes
User Data Field
Byte 1
1 byte
FCS
Flag
Byte 2
Upper DLCI
C/R
EA
6 bits
1 bit
1 bit
Flag
FCS
DLCI
C/R
EA
FECN
BECN
DE
2 bytes
Lower DLCI FECN BECN DE
4 bits
1 bit
1 bit
1 bit
EA
1 bit
HDLC Flag (bit sequence: 01111110)
Frame Checksum Sequence
Data Link Connection Identifier
Command / Response Indicator
Extended Address bit
Forward Explicit Congestion Notification
Backward Explicit Congestion Notification
Discard Eligibility Indicator
Figure A-3: Frame Relay Frame
1.2.3
Frame Relay Addressing
The basic (unextended) Frame Relay specification only supports locally significant addressing. These addresses are up to 2 bytes long. Using the EA fields
extended addresses can be used which may be up to 4 bytes long.
When a frame is read the first EA bit that is set (i.e., it’s value = 1) determines
the address.
1.2.4
Congestion Notification
The FECN and BECN bits (see above) are used to notify neighboring frame relay devices of possible congestion.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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Frame Relay
1.2.5
Virtual Circuits
In Frame Relay multiple connections are mapped to a single physical network
connection.
1.2.6
Data Link Connection Identifier
The DLCI field is used to route virtual frame relay connections. A standard DLCI
(2 byte address field) consists of 10 bits and is based on the frame’s Upper and
Lower DLCI fields. These 10 bits establish an upper limit of 1024, 210, possible
simultaneous virtual channels that can be multiplexed on to a PVC.
The DLCI field is used to route virtual frame relay connections. A standard DLCI
(2 byte address field) consists of 10 bits and is based on the frame’s Upper and
Lower DLCI fields. These 10 bits establish an upper limit of 1024, 210, possible
simultaneous virtual channels that can be multiplexed on to a PVC.
DLCI
Use (Q.922)
Use (LMI)
0
Signalling
Reserved
1 - 15
Reserved
Reserved
16 - 511
Available (except when the D-channel is
used)
Available
512 - 991
Available
Available
992 - 1007
Layer 2 management
Available
1008 - 1018
Reserved
Reserved
1019 - 1022
Reserved
Multicasting
1023
Consolidated Link Layer Management
Signalling
A DLCI is only significant to the local station. Though it is used locally to identify both directions of a virtual circuit it has no meaning to the next station (or
the destination) in the frame relay network.
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
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Frame Relay Services
1.3
Frame Relay Services
Frame relay access can be purchased in a variety of configurations depending
of your site’s needs. Characteristics of the service you will receive include:
1.
The type of physical connection you have to the frame relay network, ISDN
or X.21.
2.
The amount (from 56Kbps up to 2Mbps) and type of bandwidth available
via this connection; this will include your guaranteed and excess rates. See
CIR, CBR, and EBR earlier.
3.
The number of PVCs you are receiving.
1.3.1
Committed Information Rate
When purchasing frame relay services from your provider, you will be assigned
a Committed Information Rate. This defines the minimum amount of bandwidth
that your provider guarantees to be available to your site at all times.
1.3.2
Committed Burst Rate
You will also receive a Committed Burst Rate with your service package. This
is an additional amount of bandwidth (in excess of your CIR) you may use when
network resources are available. The CBR is free of charge, but be aware that
all frames that are in excess of your CIR will be DE (Discard Eligible) flagged
and may be discarded by intermediate switches if the network becomes congested.
1.3.3
Excess Burst Rate
As Excess Burst Rate is also available; it defines the maximum data rate the
service provider’s network will attempt to sustain. Also note that all EBR traffic
is flagged Discard Eligible.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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Frame Relay
1.4
The Frame Relay Subsystem
Frame Relay on the BinTec router consists of 5 SNMP system tables contained
in the BinTec router’s fr group. An overview of these tables is shown below. The
full description of each SNMP object is contained on the following pages.
1.4.1
Overview: Frame Relay System Tables
Variable
Meaning
frGlobals
Global settings for Frame Relay on the BinTec
router. Currently only contains the frTrapState
object which is used to enable/disable
frDLCIStatusChange traps on the BinTec
router. (This trap indicates that the state of a
particular Virtual Circuit has changed.)
frDlcmiTable
Contains parameters for each DLCM (Data
Link Connection Management) interface for
each instance of frame relay service on the
BinTec router.
frCircuitTable
Contains information for each Data Link Connection Identifiers and corresponding virtual circuits.
frErrTable
Used to store important status messages
reported for interfaces configured with Local
Management Interface.
frMprTable
Contains Multiprotocol Routing over Frame
Relay interfaces (MPFR) on the BinTec router.
These interfaces are Virtual interfaces since
they do not necessarily map to a single hardware interface. MPFR interfaces may be used
by higher level protocols.
Table A-1: Frame Relay System Tables
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
The Frame Relay Subsystem
biboAdmSyslogMessage
-Level
Attach link <ifindex> failed
debug
Attach link <ifindex>
debug
Bind link <ifindex> failed
debug
Link <ifindex> bound; starting LMI
debug
Be exceeded - packet discarded
debug
Want open ifc <ifindex>
debug
Unknown ARP protocol <proto>
debug
No license
info
DLCI out of range: <dlci>
notice
No more than 256 interfaces allowed
error
Create: illegal index <ifindex>
error
Create: index <ifindex> already exists
error
Table A-2: biboAdmSyslogMessage
1.4.2
Frame Relay Setup Tool Menus
Several menus have been added to Setup Tool to allow for easy configuration
of Frame Relay on the BinTec router. An overview of the menu structure is
shown below. Individual submenus are described in detail on the following pages.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
15
Frame Relay
Setup Tool Main Menu
A
FR
Link Configuration
<Edit>
—enable/disable Link Management
—DTE or DCE Mode
Advanced Settings
—Virtual Channels to support
—Polling Interval?
—Full Enquiry Interval?
—Monitored Events?
Switching
<Add>
—Source ifc/DLCI
—Destination ifc/DLCI
—Cbr, Ebr, and Throughput
Multiprotocol over Frame Relay
<Add>
—Partner Name
—Enabled Protocols
—P–to–P or P–to–MP
—enable/disable inverse ARP
Virtual Circuits
<Add>
—Source ifc/DLCI
—Destination ifc/DLCI
—Cbr, Ebr, and Throughput
IP
—Transit network?
—IP address/Netmask
Advanced Settings
—RIP send/receive?
—VJHC/IP accouting?
IPX
—IPX NetNumber
—RIP/SAP Updates?
Figure A-4: Setup Tool Menu Structure
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
The Frame Relay Subsystem
1.4.3
Setup Tool Menus
Frame Relay on the BinTec router can be configured from Setup Tool using the
three menus available here.
BinTec router Setup Tool
[FRAME RELAY]: Frame Relay Configuration
BinTec Communications AG
MyRouter
Link Configuration
Switching
Multiprotocol over Frame Relay
EXIT
Press <Ctrl-n>, <Ctrl-p> to scroll through menu items, <Return> to
enter
Field
Meaning
Link Configuration
contains the settings relative to the layer 2 of
Frame Relay interface.
Switching
lists settings for each Frame Relay Virtual Circuit.
Multiprotocol over
Frame Relay
lists all existing MPFR interfaces configured on
the BinTec router.
Table A-3: FR ➧ FRAME RELAY CONFIGURATION
➤ Go to FR ➧ LINK CONFIGURATION.
This menu lists the available links that may be configured as the transport
layer of a Frame Relay interface. Use the menu shown below (First select
the link and press Enter) to edit link’s settings.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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A
Frame Relay
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][LINK][EDIT]: Frame Relay Link Configuration
MyRouter
Link
Line Management
Mode
Advanced Settings
SAVE
CANCEL
Press <Ctrl-n>, <Ctrl-p> to scroll, <Return> to edit/select
Field
Meaning
Link
Shows the link that is currently being edited.
Line Management
Determines whether or not link management is
being performed on this link. Currently, the
method described in Q.933 is supported.
Mode
Defines the mode (DTE or DCE) the BinTec
router operates at for this connection. Note that
one side of the link must operate as DTE and
one as DCE.
Table A-4: FR ➧ LINK CONFIGURATION
➤ Go to ADVANCED SETTINGS.
This menu can be used to configure special settings relating to line management for Frame Relay interfaces on the BinTec router. Some options
only apply to BinTec router operating in DTE or DCE mode.
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
The Frame Relay Subsystem
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][LINK][EDIT][ADVANCED]: Advanced Link Configuration
MyRouter
Supported Virtual Channels
250
Polling Interval
Full Enquiry Interval
Idle Interval
Error Threshold
Monitored Events
10
6
15
3
4
OK
CANCEL
Enter integer range 1...250
Software Reference
Frame Relay
19
A
Frame Relay
Field
Meaning
Supported Virtual
Channels
This field can be used to control how many Virtual Channels this Link supports; a maximum of
250 (default) VCs are possible.
Polling Interval
When set for DTE mode (client) and q933a line
management is enabled this field determines
the number of seconds between successive
status enquiry messages sent out by the
BinTec router. (Default 10 seconds).
Full Enquiry Interval
When set for DTE mode (client) and q933a line
management is enabled this field determines
the number of status enquiry intervals that pass
before issuing a full status enquiry message
(default 6 intervals).
Idle Interval
When set for DCE mode (server) and line management is enabled this field defines the number of seconds within a status enquiry
messages should be received (default 15 seconds).
Error Threshold
When line management is enabled, this field
defines the maximum number of unanswered
Status Enquiries the BinTec router accepts
before declaring the interface down (default 3
messages).
Monitored Events
When line management is enabled this field
defines the number of status polling intervals
over which the error threshold (previous field) is
counted. For example, if within
MonitoredEvents number of events the station
receives ErrorThreshold number of errors, the
interface is marked as down (default 4 intervals).
Table A-5: FR ➧ LINK CONFIGURATION ➧ ADVANCED SETTINGS
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
The Frame Relay Subsystem
➤ Go to SWITCHING.
This menu is used to configure frame relay switching functionality on the
BinTec router. When used as a Frame Relay switch this menu can be used
to configure routes, or mappings (i.e., from incoming interface/DLCI to outgoing interface DLCI).
Frame Relay routes can be added, removed, or changed here.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][SWITCHING]: Frame Relay Switching
MyRouter
Source
Interface
DLCI
ADD
Destination
Interface
DLCI
Bc
Be
DELETE
Throughput
EXIT
➤ Select ADD to create a new Frame Relay route.
➤ Select DELETE to remove a Frame Relay route entry that has been tagged
(using the spacebar) for deletion.
➤ Select EXIT to accept the list of Frame Relay routes and return to the previous menu.
To edit a Frame Relay route, highlight the entry and then enter Return.
When adding or changing an entry the following information must be provided.
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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A
Frame Relay
Field
Meaning
Source Interface
Use the spacebar and scroll through the list of
Frame Relay interfaces to select the source
interface for this route.
Source DLCI
Defines the DLCI of the source interface for this
route.
Destination Interface
Use the spacebar to scroll through the list of
Frame Relay interfaces and select the destination interface.
Destination DLCI
Use the spacebar to scroll through the list of
Frame Relay interfaces and select the destination interface.
Committed Burst Rate
(Abbreviated Bc)
This field defines the maximum amount of data
(in bits) to transfer under normal conditions.
Excess Burst Rate
(Abbreviated Be)
This field defines the maximum amount of
uncommitted data (in bits) to attempt deliver.
Throughput
This field defines the physical throughput for
this interface (and defaults to ifSpeed).
Table A-6: FR ➧ SWITCHING
➤ Go to MULTIPROTOCOL OVER FRAME RELAY.
This menu lists Multiprotocol Routing over Frame Relay interfaces on the
BinTec router. MPFR interfaces can be added, removed, or changed here.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
FRAME RELAY][MPR]: Frame Relay Multiprotocol Routing
MyRouter
Interface Name
ADD
22
Frame Relay
Type
DELETE
EXIT
Software Reference
A
The Frame Relay Subsystem
Field
Meaning
Interface Name
Identifies the interface name (taken from the
ifDescr object from the ifTable).
Type
Specifies whether the interface is a point–to–
point, or point–to–multipoint interface.
Table A-7: FR ➧ MULTIPROTOCOL OVER FRAME RELAY
ADD
➤ Go to ADD.
This menu is used to create (or change) MPFR (Multi-Protocol routing over
Frame Relay) interfaces on the BinTec router.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][MPR][ADD]: Configure Frame Relay MPR Partner
MyRouter
Partner Name
Interface Type
Inverse ARP
multipoint
enabled
Virtual Circuits>
IP>
IPX>
SAVE
CANCEL
Enter string, max length = 25 chars
Field
Meaning
Partner Name
Define a unique name to identify this MPFR
partner.
Interface Type
Determines the interface type as being either
“multipoint” or “point to point”.
Inverse Arp
Enables/disables inverse ARP over this interface.
Table A-8: FR ➧ MULTIPROTOCOL OVER FRAME RELAY ➧ MULTIPROTOCOL ROUTING
Software Reference
Frame Relay
23
A
Frame Relay
➤ Go to VIRTUAL CIRCUITS.
This menu should only be used by sites receiving multiple DLCIs from their
Frame Relay service provider. Depending on the number of DLCIs and type
of service being received use this menu to define the appropriate data
rates.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][MPR][VC]: Configure Frame Relay Virtual Circuits
MyRouter
Source
Interface
DLCI
ADD
Destination
Interface
DLCI
DELETE
BC
Be
Throughput
EXIT
Field
Meaning
Source Interface
Using the spacebar, scroll through the list of
Frame Relay interfaces.
Source DLCI
Defines the DLCI used on this interface.
Committed Burst Rate
The maximum amount of data that is guaranteed to be transferred by the service provider.
Excess Burst Rate
The amount of additional data that is uncommitted by the service provider.
Throughput
The physical throughput of this interface.
Table A-9: FR ➧ MULTIPROTOCOL OVER FRAME RELAY ➧ VIRTUAL CIRCUITS
IP
➤ Go to IP.
This is where you configure the IP settings for this remote MPFR partner.
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Frame Relay
Software Reference
A
Example Configuration using Setup Tool
The settings used in this menu are the same as those used in the WAN
PARTNER ➧ ADD ➧ IP menu described in the User’s Guide but only apply to
this MPFR partner.
IPX
➤ Go to IPX.
This is where you configure the IP settings for this remote MPFR partner.
The settings used in this menu are the same as those used in the WAN
PARTNER ➧ ADD ➧ IPX menu described in the User’s Guide but only apply
to this MPFR partner.
1.5
Example Configuration using Setup
Tool
1.5.1
Frame Relay over ISDN Lines
Frame Relay
Network
Frame Relay
Router
DLCI=y
C
C
A
DLCI=z
DLCI=x
10.5.5.2
10.5.5.3
B
DLCI: 26
10.5.5.1
192.168.25.1
(DTE)
DLCI: 99
192.168.25.2
(DTE)
Figure A-5: Scenario: Frame Relay over ISDN Lines
Requirements
Software Reference
Frame Relay requires a separate license to be installed on the BinTec router.
Frame Relay
25
A
Frame Relay
➤ After installing your license verify the Frame Relay is listed as “valid” in Setup Tool’s License menu (or the Status field for the frame_relay entry in the
biboAdmLicInfoTable shows valid_license).
Step 1
Define the physical
interface
➤ In Setup Tool’s main menu select the ISDN interface where the Frame Relay service is being received.
BinTec router Setup Tool
[WAN][ADD]: WAN Interface
BinTec Communications AG
MyRouter
Result of autoconfiguration:
Euro ISDN, point to multipoint
ISDN Switch Type
autodetect on bootup
D-channel
B-channel
B-channel
dialup
dialup
dialup
Incoming Call Answering>
Advanced Settings>
SAVE
CANCEL
Use <Space> to select
➤ You should verify the Result of autoconfiguration field is correct. If this
interface is a leased line or it was not properly detected set the Switch Type
and D/B channel fields appropriately here and SAVE the settings.
Step 2
Configure a new
WAN Partner
26
➤ Create a new interface in the WAN PARTNER ➧ ADD menu.
Frame Relay
This step defines the (physical) link to the next switch in the Frame Relay
network (host A shown above).
Software Reference
A
Example Configuration using Setup Tool
BinTec router Setup Tool
[WAN][ADD]: Configure WAN Partner ()
BinTec Communications AG
MyRouter
Partner Name
FRprovider
Encapsulation
Encryption
Calling Line Identification
Frame Relay
none
no
WAN Numbers>
PPP>
Advanced Settings>
IP>
IPX>
BRIDGE>
Use <Space> to select
➤ After defining a partner name select the Encapsulation Frame Relay and
configure no other protocol. Under WAN Numbers select the ISDN port
(from step 1) to use and SAVE the settings.
Step 3
Configure the Frame
Relay Link Settings
➤ Go to the FR ➧ LINK CONFIGURATION menu and select the physical link
(partner name) you configured in the previous step and press enter to set
the desired parameters. It is very important that you set the Mode field to
dte here if the BinTec router is operating as a Frame Relay router.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][LINK][EDIT]: Frame Relay Link Configuration
MyRouter
Link
Line Management
Mode
FRprovider
none
dte
Advanced Settings>
SAVE
CANCEL
Use <Space> to select
Software Reference
Frame Relay
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A
Frame Relay
➤ Optionally, you can define whether Link Management should be performed
for this link. If Link management is to be performed on this link, several options are available via the Advanced Settings sub-menu that control how often various LMI packets to send to the server (DCE) and the intervals at
which these enquiries are sent.
Step 4
Configure the
Multi-Protocol Routing
Interface
➤ Go to the MULTIPROTOCOL
OVER FRAME RELAY menu and select ADD to
create a new MPFR (Multi-Protocol routing over Frame Relay) partner interface. This step will define the virtual interface to the end-system (host at
IP address 192.168.25.2 in the diagram above) IP packets will be routed to/
from.
When enabling protocols to route over Frame Relay please note that at current, only IP over Frame Relay has been tested on the BinTec router.
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][MPR][ADD]: Configure Frame Relay MPR Partner
MyRouter
Partner Name
FRpartner
Interface Type
Inverse Arp
point to point
disabled
Virtual Circuits>
IP>
IPX>
SAVE
CANCEL
Enter string, max length = 25 chars
Step 5
Select Frame Relay
Interface
28
➤ Go to VIRTUAL CIRCUITS ➧ ADD to select the interface to use for the
Frame Relay
Frame Relay partner.
Software Reference
A
Example Configuration using Setup Tool
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][MPR][ADD][Switching][ADD]: Configure Frame Relay Virtual
Circuits
MyRouter
Source Interface
Source DLCI
xi2
16
Committed Burst Rate
Excess Burst Rate
Throughput
64000
0
64000
OK
CANCEL
Use <Space> to select
The most important setting, however, is the following (see table A-9, page 24
for the description of the Virtual Circuit parameters):
Field
Meaning
Source Interface
In this field one of the WAN Partners with
Frame Relay encapsulation can be selected.
Table A-10: FR ➧ MULTIPROTOCOL OVER FRAME RELAY ➧ ADD ➧ VIRTUAL CIRCUITS
➧ ADD
Step 6
Configure IP settings
for MPFR Interface
Software Reference
➤ In the IP submenu configure the IP settings for the remote Frame Relay end
station (192.168.25.2 in our example diagram). A transit network is optional. Select SAVE to ensure your Frame Relay setup is saved to a configuration file.
Frame Relay
29
A
Frame Relay
BinTec router Setup Tool
BinTec Communications AG
[FRAME RELAY][MPR][IP]: IP Configuration (FRpartner)
MyRouter
IP Transit Network
no
Partner’s LAN IP Address>
Partner’s LAN IP Netmask>
192.168.25.2
255.255.255.0
Advanced Settings>
SAVE
CANCEL
Enter string, max length = 25 chars
30
Frame Relay
Software Reference
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