Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User`s Guide, v.2012.1

Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User`s Guide, v.2012.1
Sage Fixed Assets
Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Version 2012.1
Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction
Welcome to Sage Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying Your Computer’s Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Steps in Implementing the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why Use More than One Company? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When to Keep Assets in One Company? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How the Application Updates Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-6
Chapter 2. Getting Started
Installing the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Demonstration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening an Existing Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contacting Sage Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sage Live Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Your Customer Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating Your Customer Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Your Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-6
Chapter 3. Navigating the Application Interface
Elements of the Main Application Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Navigating the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Using the Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Using the Right Mouse Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Browsing Your Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Viewing Your Assets - Asset List, Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Asset List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Viewing Asset Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Selecting Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
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Contents
Customizing the Asset List View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring Your Asset List View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting the Asset List to Microsoft Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing Data for All Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Tabs in Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Dates in Date Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Dates in the Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Windows Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
3-15
3-15
3-16
3-17
3-19
3-21
3-23
3-26
3-26
3-27
3-28
Chapter 4. Setting Up the Product
Setting Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Setting the Default Folder for File Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Setting Preferences to Increase Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Creating a New Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Creating a New Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Completing the New Company Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Book Emulation for the ACE Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
Predefined Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Understanding and Specifying Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Creating Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Sorting Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Updating Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Customizing Asset Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Avoiding Field Names Used by the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35
Creating Valid Field Entries with SmartLists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37
Printing a SmartList Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
Chapter 5. Working with Companies
Editing a Company Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Changing Company Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Deleting Companies and Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Using Company Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Copying a Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Setting Up History Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Purging Asset History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Backing Up Your Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Restoring a Backed-Up Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Importing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Exporting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Managing Your Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Using Windows Explorer to Manage Your Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Chapter 6. Working with Assets
Entering New Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Assets in Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the General Information Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Book Information Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents-2
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
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Contents
Editing Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replicating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying Book Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asset Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing an Existing Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Asset Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming a Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying a Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Asset Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing the Asset List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asset History Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Summary View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Detail View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-20
6-21
6-22
6-22
6-24
6-24
6-25
6-26
6-27
6-27
6-28
6-29
6-30
6-32
6-33
6-33
Chapter 7. Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Understanding Asset Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Understanding Activity Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Disposing Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Disposing Individual Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Performing Bulk Disposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Like-Kind Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions After 1/2/2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Entering a Like-Kind Exchange or an Involuntary Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
Editing Disposal Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
Viewing the Disposal Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Viewing Current-Year Disposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Deleting Asset Disposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Inactivating and Reactivating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Inactivating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Reactivating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
Deleting Asset Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
Deleting Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
Chapter 8. Depreciation
Understanding Depreciation Calculation Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Depreciation Calculation Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Obtaining Monthly Depreciation Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Calculating Depreciation for Earlier Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Midquarter Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Multiple Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Resetting Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Running a Budgetary Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Running a Quick Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Quick Projection Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Changing Critical Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
Changing the Beginning Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Conducting a Period Close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Saving Calculations with a Period Close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Relying on the Period Close Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Contents-3
Contents
Period Close and Beginning Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing the Period Close Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electing the 168 Allowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assets That Qualify for the 168 Allowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Depreciation Method of a Single Asset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a 168 Allowance Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electing Out of the 168 Allowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Including Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Depreciation Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New York Liberty Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering New York Liberty Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Section 179 Limits for New York Liberty Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding Section 179 Limits on the Form 4562 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Section 179 Limits for Enterprise Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Section 179 Limits for Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Qualified Recovery Assistance Property (Kansas Disaster Zone) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Section 179 Limits for Kansas Disaster Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Qualified Disaster Assistance Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Section 179 Limits for Qualified Disaster Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Audit Advisor Validations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-18
8-19
8-20
8-24
8-26
8-27
8-28
8-31
8-31
8-33
8-34
8-35
8-37
8-39
8-40
8-41
8-43
8-44
8-45
8-46
8-47
8-49
Chapter 9. Standard Reports
List of Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Running a Standard Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Verifying the Run Date for Each Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Setting the Current Reporting Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Formatting a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Setting the Orientation of a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Setting the Currency Rounding Option on a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Changing the Sort Order on a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
Setting the Page Break Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Adding a Report to the Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Viewing a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
The Report Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
Interpreting Common Report Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
Using the Group Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
Drilling Down for More Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
Exporting a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
Appendix A. Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Tax Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Internal Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The State Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The AMT Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The ACE Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Custom 1 and Custom 2 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Depreciation: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Elements of Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents-4
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-4
A-4
A-5
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Contents
Date Placed in Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Depreciable Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Estimated Life and ADS Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Depreciation Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Tax Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The User Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The State Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The AMT Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The ACE Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asset Disposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disposal Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gains and Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-10
A-13
A-21
A-23
A-23
A-25
A-26
A-26
A-27
A-28
A-29
A-30
Appendix B. Depreciation Methods
MACRS Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
MACRS Formula (Method MF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
MACRS Formula Plus 168 (Method MA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6
MACRS Table (Method MT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
ADS, Straight-Line MACRS (Method AD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10
ADS Straight-Line MACRS Plus 168 (Method AA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-11
MACRS Indian Reservation (Method MI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-12
MACRS Indian Reservation Plus 168 (Method MR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-13
ACRS Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15
ACRS Table (Method AT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15
Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS (Methods SA and ST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-17
Straight-Line Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-20
Straight-Line (Method SL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-21
Straight-Line, Full-Month (Method SF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-21
Straight-Line, Full-Month Plus 168 (Method SB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-22
Straight-Line, Half-Year (Method SH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-23
Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year (Method SD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-24
Declining-Balance Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-25
Declining-Balance (Methods DB and DC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-26
Declining-Balance, Half-Year (Methods DH and DI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28
Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year (Methods DD and DE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-29
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits (Method YS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-30
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year (Method YH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-32
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year (Method YD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-33
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life (Method RV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-34
Own Calculation (Method OC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
No Depreciation (Method NO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
Custom Depreciation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
Custom Depreciation Method Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-37
Custom Depreciation Method Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-37
Custom Depreciation Method Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-37
Custom Depreciation Methods and Short Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-37
Appendix C. Custom Import Helper
Custom Import Helper File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Importing Depreciation-Critical Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Setting Asset Warning Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Contents-5
Contents
Importing Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Navigating the Custom Import Helper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
List of Importable Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Field Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-14
Appendix D. Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Navigating the Custom Export Helper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
List of Exportable Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
Appendix E. Sage Fixed Assets Links
Selecting a Favorite Sage Fixed Assets Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
Sage Fixed Assets Link Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
Step 1: Entering G/L Account Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
Step 2: Calculating Depreciation Before Running the Sage Fixed Assets Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4
Step 3: Running a Sage Fixed Assets Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5
ProSystem fx Tax Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7
Using the Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-8
Step 1: Setting Up the Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-9
Step 2: Assigning an Entity to Each Asset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-15
Step 3: Calculating Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-17
Step 4: Importing Depreciation into ProSystem fx Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-19
Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-24
Appendix F. How Do I ...?
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Force Depreciation Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Critical Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fix the Depreciation This Run Amount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import Assets into the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undo a Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F-1
F-5
F-5
F-7
F-8
F-9
F-9
Glossary
Index
Contents-6
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 1
Introduction
In this chapter:
Welcome to Sage Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Verifying Your Computer’s Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Key Steps in Implementing the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Understanding Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Understanding Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Understanding Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Welcome to Sage Fixed Assets
Welcome to the world of Sage Fixed Assets! Understanding fixed asset management takes
the right experience. For almost two decades, Sage Fixed Assets has remained the
industry’s most reliable, most respected name in fixed asset management. Today, Sage
Fixed Assets is hard at work helping more than 25,000 fixed asset managers nationwide. In
fact, we outsell every other package three to one. For fixed asset management done right,
there’s just one choice: Sage Fixed Assets. For information about the rest of the Sage Fixed
Assets line of fixed asset management solutions, contact your Sage Fixed Assets sales
representative, or visit our web site at www.SageFixedAssets.com.
Verifying Your Computer’s Equipment
For information on the minimum system requirements for operating the application,
please refer to the applicable quick start guide, which is available on the installation DVD.
The quick start guide is also available at www.SageFixedAssets.com/support.
Key Steps in Implementing the Application
There are numerous implementation plans you can develop in order to get the application
up and running and working efficiently with your existing fixed asset management
solution. Two benefits of the product are its extreme flexibility and its customization
features. The following is just one impl ementation plan example.

Install the Application
Use the installation instructions provided in the applicable quick start guide to install
the application on your computer.
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1-2
Introduction
Key Steps in Implementing the Application

Read the Introduction Chapter
This short chapter introduces you to the basic concepts necessary for you to
understand how the application works. Make your life easier, read this chapter. Don’t
skip this step.

Navigate through the Application
Familiarize yourself with the application’s interface and two views of your assets.
Learn how to accomplish some basic tasks. For more information, see Chapter 3,
“Navigating the Application Interface.”

Set Preferences
For full instructions on setting up preferences, see Chapter 4, “Setting Up the Product.”

Set Up a Company/Define Books
Create and set up a new company to store your asset data. When creating a new
company you can also set up the seven accounting books necessary for your individual
accounting needs, from the Internal and Tax books to the two user-defined books. For
full instructions on setting up a company and the seven depreciation books, see
Chapter 4, “Setting Up the Product.”

Customize Fields
The application has numerous fields you can use to describe your assets (most of which
are fully customizable). The majority of fields are pre-defined, using common fixed
asset terminology. It also contains seven user-defined fields, so you can tailor the
application to meet the specific needs of your company. Since there are so many
user-defined fields, you might not find it necessary to change any of the pre-defined
fields. You can also create lists of valid entries for each of these fields. These lists are
called SmartLists. For details on the customization process, see Chapter 4, “Setting Up
the Product.”

Enter Asset Data Information
If your asset data is not already contained in some electronic form, then you must enter
your asset data from scratch. If this is the case, be sure to take advantage of the
Template Manager, which allows you to create templates for easy data entry of similar
assets. To help you gather your asset information, you can print blank forms of the data
entry fields in Asset Detail. For details on entering asset information and using
templates, see Chapter 6, “Working with Assets.” If you currently use a spreadsheet to
track your assets, you can quickly import your data using Custom Import. For more
information on importing your data, see Appendix C, “Custom Import Helper.”

Create Groups
Use Group Manager to divide your assets into useful groups. Groups logically divide
and order your assets, and make reporting on assets much easier. For a full conceptual
discussion of groups, see “Understanding Groups,” page 1-4. For detailed instructions
on how to create groups, see Chapter 4, “Setting Up the Product.”

Perform Asset Maintenance
Perform basic asset maintenance, such as adding assets or disposing of assets. For
information about the disposing of assets, see Chapter 7, “Performing Advanced Asset
Functions.”

Perform Depreciation-Related Tasks and Budgetary Projections
Calculate depreciation for the current period, past periods, and future periods. You can
also reset depreciation, make changes to assets, and then recalculate depreciation. For
details on running depreciation-related tasks, see Chapter 8, “Depreciation.”
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Introduction
Understanding Databases

1
Run Reports
Run any or all of the reports. These reports provide information on every aspect of your
asset maintenance, including, of course, budgetary projections and depreciation. For
report information, see Chapter 9, “Standard Reports.”
Understanding Databases
The application stores your asset data in an internal software structure called a database. A
database holds data in a way that makes it extremely easy to search, sort, organize, and
retrieve. Additionally, you can create many databases to further organize your data.
Each company you create is stored in a database. You can store one or more companies in
one database, or you can create multiple databases for storing multiple companies. To
optimize application processing speed and convenience, determine which number of
databases is best for you. Storing all your companies in one database is convenient because
you do all your work in one place. However, distributing your companies among multiple
databases optimizes application processing speed.
You can create more than one database in each directory (or file folder) on your computer.
The database is a file with a BDB extension. You can give this file any name that conforms
to Windows file naming standards. You can assign each database a unique name that you
use to reference the database within the application. For example, you might create two
databases named MACHINES and OFFICE.
Understanding Companies
A company is a collection of assets that you define as you prefer—it is not necessarily a
legal entity. For example, you might want to define a company for the assets in each
department or in each location of your organization. You store companies in one or more
databases.
Why Use More than One Company?
Even though you can group assets within a company, there are still many reasons to create
separate companies for different groups of assets. Reasons for organizing your assets into
multiple companies include the following:

Multiple Legal Entities
The most obvious reason for creating multiple companies to track assets is if your
organization tracks or owns assets for separate legal entities. In this case, you would
want to create at least one company for each of the legal entities. You might also want
to create more than one company for a legal entity if it meets other criteria as listed
below.

Mergers or Acquisitions
If the legal entity that is your organization has merged with another organization or
has acquired one, you might want to maintain the assets for these entities in separate
companies within the application.

Different Fiscal Year Ends or Short Years
Fiscal year ends and short years must be the same within a single company. If this is
not true for the different reporting units within your organization, you must create
separate companies for each reporting unit. For example, if one organization with a
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Introduction
Understanding Groups
December year-end acquired another organization with a September year-end, you
might want to maintain the assets in two separate organizations.

Decentralized Corporate Structure
If the culture of your organization is decentralized, or if different organizational units
maintain autonomous jurisdiction over assets or accounting, or if they track and report
to a central authority separately, then you will want to create separate companies for
each of these organizational units.

Multi-State Organization
If your organization owns assets in multiple states that require unique calculations,
then you might need to enter these assets into different companies. Within the
application you have one default state tax book. You also have two user-defined books
that you can use for different state tax books. So, depending on how many states your
organization has assets in and how many user-defined books you have used for
purposes other than state tax books, you might need to create separate companies for
those assets or for additional State books.

Large Number of Assets
The application processing speed depends on how many assets you store in your
working database. Many functions in the application process all data in all companies
in the working database. Therefore, if you maintain many assets (more than about
thirty thousand), to gain optimal processing speed you should organize them into
multiple companies stored in multiple databases. For example, you might organize
your assets according to the reporting structure for different areas of your organization
based on accounting principles.

Strict Separation of Asset Classifications/Diversified Products or Markets
Even if your organization is centralized, and accounting is controlled by one umbrella
administrative unit, you might want to create separate companies for your assets if the
assets are strictly divided by classification. For instance, one arm of your organization
may be devoted to manufacturing and another to medical supplies.
When to Keep Assets in One Company?
Many of the situations outlined above are special situations. If your organization does not
fit into any of the above situations, then you probably want to store all your assets in one
company.
Use one company to store assets, if:
• Your organization is a single legal entity.
• Your organization has a centralized management and accounting structure.
• Your organization does not have diversified products or markets.
• All units in your organization have the same fiscal year end and short years.
Understanding Groups
A group is a logical—not physical—subset of assets within a company. Groups are viewed
in the Asset List. A group is a collection of assets grouped together for the purpose of
tracking them, working on them, or reporting on them collectively.
You create groups using the Group Manager option. By specifying one or more criteria, you
define which type(s) of assets to include in the group. For example, you might create a
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Introduction
Understanding Groups
1
group that includes only the assets of a specific location during a specific time period.
Defining a group is flexible; you can pinpoint your group with various types of criteria. You
can also hand-pick individual assets for a group, and change a group definition at any time.
You can define multiple groups per company, and include any asset in multiple groups. For
example, you might want to organize your assets into several groups because you have
different reporting requirements for each group. In addition, because a group is simply a
logical view of a company, it is always current—you never have to update a group created
with Group Manager. (Groups created by selecting assets are not updated automatically.)
It is important that you understand how assets are grouped within the same company and
why you would want to group your assets.
Using Groups
Creating a variety of distinct, logical groups gives you greater control of managing and
reporting on your assets. For example, you might create groups to more precisely
accomplish the following tasks:
• Calculate depreciation
• Run reports
• Browse your asset list
• Sort your assets
• Find a specific asset
• Activate or inactivate assets
• Dispose of assets
• Replace data
• Perform a 168 Allowance Switch
• Reset depreciation
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Introduction
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists
How the Application Updates Groups
The illustration below shows how the application processes your requests for a group.
How the Application Processes Requests for Groups
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists
Nearly everything you do in asset management is based on information about your assets.
In order to identify an asset you must know its description, classification, location, serial
number, purchase order number, or any of a myriad of bits of information available on an
asset. The application contains asset fields for each of these bits of information and many
more.
Nearly all of these asset fields are fully customizable. In addition, you can create SmartLists
of valid entries for the descriptive fields of assets. For instance, you can create a SmartList
for the Location field that lists the locations in your company. You might only have three
locations in your organization: Administration, Warehouse, and Machining. Why allow
users to add other locations? Or to add them at random? Field entries are a prominent part
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Introduction
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists
1
of reports. Allowing users to add their own location at random can cause you to end up
with a report that has this many variations of the same location:
• Machining
• machining
• MACHINING
• Mach
• Mchng
• MAC
• Machineing
• Masheening
There is beauty in consistency. In addition to the aesthetic problem posed by the above
entries, it would not be possible for you to perform accurate sorts or create valid groups
with these types of entries. To avoid this situation, you should create SmartLists from
which the user can select a valid entry when needed. For details on customizing your fields
and creating SmartLists, see Chapter 4, “Setting Up the Product.”
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Introduction
Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 2f
Getting Started
In this chapter:
Installing the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Starting the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Opening an Existing Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Setting Up Your Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
This chapter guides you through the initial tasks involved in getting the application up and
running.
Installing the Application
This chapter assumes you have already installed the program on your computer. Installing
the application is a simple task that takes only a few minutes. For complete instructions on
installing the application, please refer to the applicable quick start guide.
Starting the Application
The Lite Depreciation software icon appears in the Sage Fixed Assets program group by
default.
Note: You can also start the application by double-clicking the software icon on your
desktop.
To start the application
1.
Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar, and then select Programs (or All
Programs) from the Start menu.
2.
Select Sage Fixed Assets from the Programs submenu.
3.
Select the Lite Depreciation software icon.
The application opens and displays the main window.
Using Demonstration Data
The application contains demonstration data for a company called “Sample Company.”
This demonstration data makes it much easier for new users to learn the application.
Depending on whether you are a new user, or the first user of the product for your
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2-1
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Getting Started
Opening an Existing Company
company, Sample Company might open automatically after startup. If not, you can open
Sample Company as you would any other company.
Opening an Existing Company
You can have only one company open at a time.
To open an existing company
1.
Select File/Open Company from the menu bar.
If you currently have another company open, a message asks if you want to close the
currently open company.
2.
Click Yes to continue. The Open Company dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Open Company dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the Open
Company Dialog,” page 2-2. The application opens the company and displays the
Asset List.
Completing the Open Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Open Company dialog.
2-2

Companies
Use this field to select the company you want to open from the list of existing
companies. If the company you want to open is not displayed, you might be looking in
the wrong database. To change the list of companies, select a different database in the
Database field.

Database
Use this field to select the database that contains the company you want to open. Click
the down arrow to view a drop-down list of available databases. If you do not see the
database you want, click the Find Database button to locate and add the database to
the system.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Getting Started
Getting Help

2
Find Database Button
Click this button to locate and add a database to the system. The Find Databases dialog
appears. For more information, see “Completing the Find Databases Dialog,” page
5-20.
Getting Help
There are many ways to learn to use the application. Your options include:
• Using the online Help system
• Viewing the online user’s guide
• Viewing Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals
• Contacting Sage Fixed Assets
• Sage Live Connect
Using Online Help
Sometimes the quickest way to get help with the application is to use its extensive online
Help. All Windows-based online Help systems contain three main sections—Contents,
Index, and Search. The Contents section presents the information contained within the
online system in an easy-to-follow manner. The Index and Search features allow you to
quickly locate specific information.
To activate the online Help
1.
Select Help/Online Help from the menu bar. The online Help window appears.
2.
Do one of the following:
• Click the Contents tab to explore the Table of Contents.
• Click the Index tab to find a topic by entering an index key word.
• Click the Search tab to search for any word or phrase in the online Help.
• Click the Favorites tab to add the current topic to a list of favorite topics, so you
can quickly locate it at a later time.
• Click the Glossary tab to find the definition of an unfamiliar term.
Viewing Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals
Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals contains everything you need to know about
depreciation for both Tax and GAAP purposes, written in easy-to-understand language.
When you installed the application, you also installed Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation
Fundamentals, an electronic reference tool that answers all of your questions about
depreciation.
You must have Adobe Reader installed on your computer to view PDF file. We have
included the Adobe Reader software on the installation DVD in the \ACROBAT directory.
You can also download the Adobe Reader software from the Adobe web site
(www.adobe.com).
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Getting Started
Getting Help
Follow these steps to view the online Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals.
To view Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals
1.
Select Help/Depreciation Fundamentals from the menu bar. The application opens
Adobe Reader and displays Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals.
Contacting Sage Fixed Assets
Sage Fixed Assets operates a web site for our customers. You can quickly access various
pages on this web site from the Help menu.
To contact Sage Fixed Assets
1.
Select Help/Contact Us from the menu bar. The Contact Us dialog appears.
2.
Click on a link to receive customer support, find information about training
opportunities, view online demos of our products, purchase barcode labels or barcode
hardware, or to send us a product suggestion.
Sage Live Connect
The Sage Live Connect option on the Help menu allows you to connect your computer
directly to a Sage Fixed Assets Customer Support representative. The Customer Support
representative can then take control of your computer to more quickly diagnose your
computer’s problem. If the Customer Support representative decides that taking control of
your computer would be helpful, you will be asked to click on Sage Live Connect.
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Getting Started
Getting Help
2
To access Sage Live Connect
1.
At the request of a Customer Support representative, select Help/Sage Live Connect
from the menu bar. A dialog appears that provides further instructions.
Note: You must have access to the Internet to use the Sage Live Connect.
Viewing Your Customer Number
You must have your customer number when you call Customer Support with a question
about using the application.
To view your customer number
1.
Select Help/About Depreciation from the menu bar. A dialog appears containing
information about your application, including your customer number.
Note: If you did not enter a customer number when the application was installed, you can
visit www.SageFixedAssets.com/customernumber, or call Customer Service at
800-368-2405.
Updating Your Customer Number
After you purchase the application, you will be given a customer number. Once you receive
your customer number, you can enter it in a dialog so it will be readily available when you
need it.
To update your customer number
1.
Select Help/Update User License from the menu bar. The Update User License
Information dialog appears.
2.
Enter your name, the name of your company, and your customer number. For more
information, see “Completing the Update User License Information Dialog,” page 2-6.
3.
Click OK.
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Getting Started
Setting Up Your Printer
You can view your customer number at any time from the Help menu. For more
information, see “Viewing Your Customer Number,” page 2-5.
Completing the Update User License Information Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Update User License Information dialog.

User Name
Use this field to enter your name.

Company
Use this field to enter the name of your company.

Customer Number
Use this field to enter your customer number. Your customer number is located on the
package list that comes with your software. If you cannot find your customer number,
you can call Customer Service at 800-368-2405.
Setting Up Your Printer
The Print Setup option is a standard Windows option. It allows you to select a printer that
you want to use to print asset information, asset images, and reports, and change the
orientation of the printed page (portrait or landscape).
When you open the application the first time, the system registers your default printer from
your operating system. It will automatically use your default printer if you do not select a
different printer.
To set up your printer
1.
Select File/Print Setup from the menu bar. The Print Setup dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Print Setup dialog, and then click OK.
The selected orientation on this dialog is the default setting for the standard Report
Definition dialog. Once you change and save the setting on your Report Definition dialog,
it overrides the Print Setup option for that specific report.
Note: For details about completing the Print Setup dialog, see your Windows
documentation.
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Chapter 3
Navigating the Application Interface
In this chapter:
Elements of the Main Application Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Navigating the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Viewing Your Assets - Asset List, Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Asset List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Asset Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Entering Dates in Date Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26
Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Accessing the Windows Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
This chapter introduces you to the application and describes the application’s interface.
You’ll learn about the two views of your assets—the Asset List for looking at a group of
assets and Asset Detail for looking at a single asset. You’ll also learn how to accomplish
some basic tasks, such as finding and selecting assets, replacing asset data, entering dates
in date fields, and browsing the currently selected group of assets.
The main dialog contains all the elements of a standard Windows application, plus many
features that are specific to the application.
Elements of the Main Application Window
Following are the most important elements of the main application window in both the
Asset List and Asset Detail.

Menu Bar
The menu bar is a standard Windows interface tool used to access specific areas of an
application. The menu bar contains menu headings that list specific functions or
actions in the application. To initiate an action, click the menu heading that
corresponds to the desired action, or use keyboard commands to access the menu
heading. For more information, see “Keyboard Shortcuts,” page 3-27.

Navigation Pane
The navigation pane contains tasks and buttons that give you quick access to many
features in the application. The list of tasks changes, depending on what is currently
displayed in the working area. For more information, see “Using the Navigation
Pane,” page 3-2.

System Number/Asset ID
To find an asset quickly, enter its System Number or Asset ID in this field. You choose
whether to use System Number or Asset ID by selecting the Go option in the
Preferences dialog.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Navigating the Application

Go Button
After you enter the System Number or Asset ID, click the Go button. If you are viewing
the Asset List, the application finds and highlights the asset. If you are in Asset Detail,
the application finds the asset and displays it in Asset Detail view.

Asset List
In the Asset List, the application displays all assets in your database that are contained
in the currently selected group. A single horizontal row represents one asset. General
information fields, which contain information about the asset, appear at the top of each
vertical row. Use the horizontal scroll bar to view all general information field
information. For more information, see “Asset List,” page 3-10.

Asset Detail
In Asset Detail, the application displays detailed information about your assets. The
Asset tabs display the following pages of detailed information about your assets: Main,
Transactions, History, and Notes. For more information, see “Asset Detail,” page 3-19.

Asset Detail/Asset List Button
When you are in the Asset List, click this button to switch the view of your asset group
to a detailed view of the selected asset. When you are in Asset Detail, this button
changes to Asset List. Click this button to return to the Asset List.
Navigating the Application
It’s easy to navigate to the various areas of the application using the buttons at the bottom
of the navigation pane. Once you are in the appropriate work area, you can use either the
menu bar or the tasks on the navigation pane to perform the desired functions.
Using the Navigation Pane
You navigate the application using the navigation pane.
The list of tasks changes
depending on which working
area is currently displayed.
Click a button to display a
working area.
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Navigating the Application
3
To navigate to different areas of the application, click the buttons at the bottom of the
navigation pane.
• For example, click the Assets button to view the Asset List.
The Asset List displays the current group of assets in the working area of the
application. For more information, see “Assets Area,” page 3-4.
To view information about a single asset, double-click the asset, or click the Asset Detail
button at the bottom of the Asset List. The asset information appears in the Asset Detail
view.
To perform a task, such as adding an asset, disposing an asset, or calculating
depreciation, use the task list on the navigation pane.
The list of tasks changes depending on what is currently displayed in the working area.
• Click the Reports button to view the Reports working area.
In the Reports working area, you can run the standard reports, create batch reports, and
create a list of favorite reports. For more information, see “Reports Area,” page 3-5.
• Click the System Administration button to view the System Administration working
area.
In the System Administration working area, you can perform tasks that relate to the
entire system, such as managing your databases, backing up and restoring data, and
setting up security. For more information, see “System Administration Area,” page 3-6.
• Click the Assistance Center button to view the Assistance Center working area.
In the Assistance Center, you can find answers to frequently asked questions and links
for contacting customer support, sales, and training.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Navigating the Application
Assets Area
Some commands on the Assets task list may be enabled or disabled based on the security
settings and whether you select an asset from the Asset List.
For more information, see “Viewing Your Assets - Asset List, Asset Detail,” page 3-9.
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Navigating the Application
3
Reports Area
To access the Reports area, click the Reports button on the navigation pane. The application
displays the Reports area.
For more information, see “Running a Standard Report,” page 9-4.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Navigating the Application
System Administration Area
To access the System Administration area, click the System Administration button on the
navigation pane. The application displays the System Administration area.
The System Administration area provides quick access to many of the administrative
features of the application. System administration functions, such as managing databases,
companies, and history events, can be performed using this shortcut.
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Navigating the Application
3
Assistance Center Area
In the Assistance Center, you can find answers to frequently asked questions and links for
contacting customer support, sales, and training.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Navigating the Application
Using the Right Mouse Button
You can use the right mouse button to print the Asset List, navigate from Asset Detail to
the Asset List, save an asset as a template, and more.
In the Asset List, right-click anywhere on the list assets to display the following menu:
In Asset Detail, right-click anywhere on the Main tab of the current asset to display the
following menu:
Browsing Your Assets
The application uses scroll buttons so you can easily browse the assets in the currently
active group.
Asset List
In the Asset List, use the scroll buttons located on the right side of the screen as follows:
Use this button to display the top of the asset list.
Use this button to display the bottom of the asset list.
Use this button to move up through the assets one row at a time.
Use this button to move down through the assets one row at a time.
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Viewing Your Assets - Asset List, Asset Detail
3
Asset Detail
In Asset Detail, you can use the scroll buttons next to the Go button, as shown below.
The Go field scroll buttons move forward or backward as follows:
Use this button to move to the previous asset in the currently active group.
Use this button to move to the next asset in the currently active group.
Viewing Your Assets - Asset List, Asset Detail
In the main application dialog, there are two ways you can view your assets - the Asset List
and Asset Detail. The Asset List displays all assets in the currently selected group. Asset
Detail displays four tabbed pages of information about a single selected asset.
The application opens the company in the Asset List view. For information how to open an
existing company, see “Opening an Existing Company,” page 2-2.
To navigate to Asset Detail
1.
Do any of the following:
• Click the Asset Detail button at the bottom of the Assets working area.
• Select Asset/Asset Detail from the menu bar.
• Double-click on any asset in the Asset List.
• Select any asset in the Asset List, then press Enter.
To navigate to the Asset List
1.
Do any of the following:
• Click the Asset List button at the bottom of the Assets working area.
• Select Asset/Asset List from the menu bar.
• On the navigation pane, click the Assets button.
Note: If you don’t have any asset selected, the application displays Asset Detail of the first
asset listed in the Asset List view.
The diagrams on the following pages illustrate the most important elements of the main
dialog in both the Asset List, page 3-10, and Asset Detail, page 3-19. Following the
diagrams are brief explanations of most elements.
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Asset List
Asset List
The Asset List displays all assets of the currently selected group in your database. A single
horizontal row represents one asset. General information fields, which contain information
about the asset, appear at the top of each vertical row. Use the horizontal scroll bar to view
all general information field information.
Name of Currently
Open Company
Save
Selections
Find
Replace
Assets in
Group
Group
The following describes the elements of the Asset List.
3-10

Group
This field provides easy access to the complete list of available asset groups. An asset
group is a group of assets that you design for specific purposes such as running
reports, calculating depreciation, and performing depreciation projections. The Asset
List displays only the assets contained in the currently selected group.

Save Selections Icon
Create a group quickly by selecting assets. Select the assets in the Asset List that you
want to save as a group, and then click this icon. For more information, see
“Completing the Save Selections Dialog,” page 4-34.

Find Icon
Use this icon to find one or more assets in the current group based on search criteria
that you specify. For more information, see “Completing the Find Dialog,” page 3-25.

Replace Icon
Use this icon to replace data in one or more assets in the current group. For more
information, see “Completing the Replace on Selected Assets Dialog,” page 3-18.

Assets in Group
This field displays the number of assets in the current group.

Asset Detail Button
Click this button to go to Asset Detail view for a selected asset. For more information,
see “Asset Detail,” page 3-19.
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Asset List

Print Asset List Button
Click this button to send the list of assets in the current group to the printer. For more
information, see “Printing the Asset List,” page 6-31.

Export to Excel Button
Click this button to export the list of assets in the current group to a file that can be
opened in Microsoft Excel. For more information, see “Exporting the Asset List to
Microsoft Excel,” page 3-15.
Viewing Asset Groups
You can view all assets within a company by selecting the All FAS Assets group in the
Group field at the top of the Asset List.
The application creates four default groups when a company is created:
• All FAS Assets
• Active Assets
• Disposed Assets
• Inactive Assets
You can select one of these groups to see a subset of the assets within the company that
qualify for the group. For more information, see “Predefined Groups,” page 4-28.
In addition, you can create your own groups using Group Manager. For more information,
see “Creating Groups,” page 4-32.
To view the assets in the group, you can scroll through the assets by using the scroll bar to
the right of the spreadsheet, or use the Go field at the top to locate a specific asset within
the group. When you select a group of assets, the Assets in Group field at the top of the
view indicates how many assets qualify for the group.
Use the Group field in the Asset List to switch between groups.
To switch between groups
1.
In the Group field, click the down arrow to display the list of available groups.
2.
Select the group you want displayed from the list. The assets in the group appear in
the Asset List view.
Selecting Assets
The Asset List allows you to select one or more assets in the view to perform asset
functions, such as disposals or calculating depreciation using standard Windows controls.
For more information, see “Disposing Individual Assets,” page 7-2, and “Calculating
Depreciation for Your Assets,” page 8-4.
To select an asset, simply click anywhere within the row. To select multiple assets, you can
use the Ctrl and Shift keys.
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Asset List
If you want to edit the attributes displayed in the list or view the asset in greater detail, you
can switch to Asset Detail by double-clicking in a row or clicking the Asset Detail button.
For more information, see “Asset Detail,” page 3-19.
To select an individual asset from the Asset List
1.
Do any one of the following:
• Click anywhere in the row that contains the asset you want to select.
• Use the Go field to find and select the asset.
The application highlights the asset you select.
To select all assets in the current group from the Asset List
You navigate the asset grid in a similar way as an Excel spreadsheet.
1.
Do any one of the following:
• Select Edit/Select All from the menu bar.
• Click the Select All box in the upper-left corner of the Asset List.
Select All box
The application highlights all assets in the current group.
To unselect all assets in the current group from the Asset List
1.
Do any one of the following:
• Select Edit/Unselect All from the menu bar.
• Click the Select All box in the upper-left corner of the Asset List.
The application removes the highlight bar from all the assets in the current group.
To select contiguous assets
1.
Select the first asset by clicking anywhere in the row that contains the asset.
2.
Press and hold the Shift key on the keyboard.
3.
Select the last asset by clicking anywhere in the row that contains the asset.
The first and last assets and all of the assets in between are highlighted.
To select noncontiguous assets
3-12
1.
Select the first asset by clicking anywhere in the row that contains the asset.
2.
Press and hold the Ctrl key on the keyboard.
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Asset List
3.
Select the next asset by clicking anywhere in the row that contains the asset.
Each asset that you select is highlighted.
Customizing the Asset List View
You can customize the view of your assets in the Asset List by doing the following:
• Changing the order of the columns by moving them. See “Moving a Column in the
Asset List,” page 3-13.
• Sorting the assets temporarily by viewing any column in ascending or descending
order. See “Temporarily Changing the Asset Sort Order,” page 3-13.
• Freezing a column to keep it in view as you scroll through the columns. See “Freezing
a Column in the Asset List,” page 3-14.
• Changing the width of columns. See “Changing the Column Width,” page 3-14.
• Hiding fields by removing them from the Asset List view. See “Removing a Field,”
page 3-15.
For information about restoring your Asset List view, see “Restoring Your Asset List View,”
page 3-15.
Moving a Column in the Asset List
To move a column in the Asset List
1.
Click on the column header of the column that you want to move.
2.
Drag the column header to its new location. Two red arrows indicate the new location
of the column.
3.
Release the mouse button.
Note: The column remains in its new position, even if you close the company. The column
order is specific to each company; you can have a different column order in each company.
Temporarily Changing the Asset Sort Order
You can temporarily change the sort order of your assets in the Asset List.
The assets in the Asset List are displayed according to the Sort Criteria tab of the currently
active group (most often by System Number). For more information, see “Completing the
Sort Criteria Tab,” page 4-37. To temporarily change asset sort order, select another general
information field by which to sort the group. The general information field names are listed
at the top of each column in the Asset List.
To temporarily change asset sort order
1.
Do one of the following:
• Double-click the column header of the field by which you want to sort the assets.
The assets are sorted in ascending order by the selected field. Double-click the
column header again to sort the assets in descending order.
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Asset List
• Right-click the column header, and from the pop-up menu select Sort By. The
assets are sorted in ascending order by the selected field. Right-click the column
header and select Sort By again to sort the assets in descending order.
To return to the default sort order
1.
Select Window/Restore Group Sort from the menu bar. The Asset List displays the
original sort order of the current group, which could consist of more than one sort
level.
Tip: You can use this procedure to find out if any asset fields are blank. For example, to
quickly discover if any assets have blank entries in the G/L Expense Account field, sort
your assets by that field. Any assets with blank entries in the G/L Expense Account field
will appear at the top of the list.
Note: When you use this method to sort assets, the new sort order is only temporary.
When you close the company and then re-open it, or you select another group to display,
the assets will be sorted in their original order.
Freezing a Column in the Asset List
You can freeze a column in the Asset List so that it remains visible as you scroll to the right.
To freeze a column
1.
Right-click the column header of the column that you want to freeze.
2.
From the pop-up menu, select Freeze Column.
Note: The column remains frozen, even if you close the company. To unfreeze the column,
follow the steps below.
To unfreeze the column
1.
Right-click the column header of the column that you want to unfreeze.
2.
From the pop-up menu, select Unfreeze Column.
Tip: Be careful about scrolling to the right and freezing a column. You may freeze a
column and not be able to scroll to that column to see it. If this happens, you must
unfreeze the column. Right-click anywhere in the Asset List, and select Unfreeze Column
from the pop-up menu. To freeze the desired column, first move the column within the
visible range of columns and then freeze it.
Changing the Column Width
You can change the width of columns in the Asset List. The columns retain their new width
when you move between companies, as well as when you exit from the application and
start it again.
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Asset List
To change the column width
1.
Click and hold the vertical line separating the columns you want to change.
2.
Drag the line left or right to decrease or increase the width of the column, and then
release the line.
Note: The Asset List keeps the change made to the column width, even if you close the
company.
To restore the column width
1.
Select Window/Restore Default View from the menu bar. The columns return to their
default widths.
To size the column to the data
1.
Double-click the column divider to the right of the column header. The column
enlarges or contracts so that the column header and the longest piece of data in the
column are completely visible.
Removing a Field
You can remove a field from the Asset List by hiding it from view.
To remove a field from view
1.
Select Customize/Customize Fields from the menu bar.
2.
From the Asset Field list box, select the field that you want to remove from view.
3.
From the View field drop-down list, select Hide.
4.
Click OK.
Restoring Your Asset List View
If you have customized the Asset List, you can restore the default view of your assets.
To restore your asset view
1.
Select Window/Restore Default View from the menu bar. The default view of the
Asset List appears.
Exporting the Asset List to Microsoft Excel
The asset information in the Asset List view can be saved in a file that you can open in
Microsoft Excel. After you save the file, the system opens the file in Microsoft Excel.
To export the Asset List to Microsoft Excel
1.
If you are in Asset Detail, click the Asset List button.
2.
Select the assets that you want to save to a file.
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Asset List
Note: If no assets are selected, then the application saves all of the assets in the
currently displayed group to the file.
3.
Click the Export to Excel button located at the bottom of the main application
window. The application displays a dialog that allows you to select the folder where
you want to save the Microsoft Excel file.
4.
In the File Name field, enter a name for the Microsoft Excel file.
5.
Click the Save button. The system saves the file and then attempts to launch Microsoft
Excel and open the file.
Note: The version of Microsoft Excel installed on your computer determines the version(s)
available in the Save as Type drop-down list. If Microsoft Excel is not on your machine, an
error message appears, but the file is still saved. You can copy the file to another machine
that has Microsoft Excel to view the file.
Replacing Asset Data
You can replace data in any one of the general information fields for selected assets. The
Replace feature is only available from the Asset List, and it operates only on assets that
have been selected from the currently active group. That is, you must first select the assets
from the currently active group before using the Replace command. For information on
selecting assets, see “Selecting Assets,” page 3-11.
To replace asset data
3-16
1.
In the Asset List, select the assets in which you want to replace data. (To replace data
for all assets in a company, make sure the currently active group in the Asset List is
All FAS Assets.)
2.
Select Edit/Replace from the menu bar. The Replace on Selected Assets dialog
appears.
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Asset List
3.
3
Complete the Replace on Selected Assets dialog, then click the Replace button. A
message asks you to confirm your intention to replace the data. After you confirm
your intention, a message tells you how many replacements were made, and then the
Asset List appears. For more information, see “Completing the Replace on Selected
Assets Dialog,” page 3-18.
Note: The application reserves the word Null when you are using the Replace feature.
Therefore, you cannot enter this word in the Look For field or the Replace With field on
the Replace on Selected Assets dialog.
Replacing Data for All Assets
You can globally replace data in any one of the general information fields for selected assets.
The Replace feature is only available in the Asset List, and it operates only on assets that
have been selected from the currently active group. That is, you must first select the assets
from the currently active group before using the Replace command. For information on
selecting assets, see “Selecting Assets,” page 3-11.
To replace data for all assets
1.
Make sure the currently active group in the Asset List is All FAS Assets.
2.
Select Edit/Select All from the menu bar.
3.
Select Edit/Replace from the menu bar. The Replace on Selected Assets dialog
appears.
4.
Complete the Replace on Selected Assets dialog, and then click the Replace All button.
A message asks you to confirm your intention to replace the data. After you confirm
your intention, a message tells you how many replacements were made, and then the
Asset List appears.
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Asset List
Completing the Replace on Selected Assets Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Replace on Selected Assets dialog.
Tip: The application replaces data only in selected assets of the currently active group. You
must first select the assets in the currently active group before using the Replace
command. For information on selecting assets, see “Selecting Assets,” page 3-11.

Look In
Use this field to select the General Information field for which you want to replace
data.

Look For
Use this field to enter or select the specific data you want to replace in the selected field.
If the field you selected contains a SmartList, you can select the value from a
drop-down list.


All Values in Field
Select this check box if you do not want to enter data in the Look For field, and you
would rather have all data replaced in the specified field. If you select this check
box, the Look For field is no longer available.

Blank Values in Field
Select this check box if you want to replace fields that are blank. If you select this
check box, the Look For field is no longer available.
Replace With
Use this field to enter or select the specific data you want to use to replace the old data.
If the field you selected contains a SmartList, you can select the value from a
drop-down list.

Blank Values in Field
Select this check box to replace the old data with a blank field. If you select this
check box, the Replace With field is no longer available.
Note: You cannot enter the word Null in the Look For or Replace With fields because it
is reserved by the application.
3-18

Find Next Button
Click this button to display the next selected asset in the Asset List containing the old
data that you want to replace. The application scrolls so that you can view the field that
you selected in the Look In field, if necessary. You can move the Replace on Selected
Assets dialog to view this asset. If you decide you want to replace the data, click the
Replace button.

Replace Button
Click this button to replace the value entered in the Look For field with the value
entered in the Replace With field. This button is not available until you have clicked the
Find Next button. When you click the Replace button, the application replaces data for
one field at a time. Therefore, after you replace the data for one asset, you must click
the Find Next button again before you can click the Replace button for another asset.

Replace All Button
Click this button to replace the value entered in the Look For field with the value
entered in the Replace With field for all selected assets in the Asset List.
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Asset Detail
3
Note: It is possible that after you replace data, one or more assets may no longer qualify
for the group currently displayed in the Asset List. In that case, the asset will not appear in
the Asset List when you close the Replace on Selected Assets dialog.
Asset Detail
Asset Detail allows you to view and/or edit the information for each asset individually.
Asset Detail contains four asset pages. You can access the pages by clicking the
corresponding tabs. For more information, see “Using the Tabs in Asset Detail,” page 3-21.
Apply Template
Asset Tabs
General
Information
Fields
Depreciation
Books
Book
Information
Fields
The following describes the elements of Asset Detail.

Asset System Number and Description
The application displays the System Number and the contents of the Description field
at the top of Asset Detail.

Status
This field displays the status of the asset (Active, Inactive, or Disposed).

Go
Use this field to navigate to another asset while remaining in Asset Detail view. For
more information, see “Browsing Your Assets,” page 3-8.

Group
This field displays the most recently displayed group in the Asset List.

Asset Tabs
Asset tabs display additional information about your assets, such as disposals, history,
and more. For more information, see “Using the Tabs in Asset Detail,” page 3-21.
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Asset Detail

General Information Fields
The general information fields contain general business information about your assets.
These fields do not affect depreciation calculations. Whenever you add a new asset into
the application, you enter data into the general information fields. These fields can be
used to create asset groups. For more information, see “Completing the General
Information Fields,” page 6-3.

Apply Template
This field allows you to select from a list of available asset templates that you can apply
to an existing asset or use to create a new asset. An asset template is a set of standard
general-information-field and book-information-field entries that you create.

Book Information Fields
The book information fields display depreciation data specific to each book displayed
in the column headings. In Asset Detail, you can view all depreciation data for a single
asset. Use the scroll bars to the right to scroll through all available fields. For more
information, see “Completing the Book Information Fields,” page 6-5.

Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books
The seven depreciation books available in the application are displayed across each of
these column headings. Data in each column relates to the book listed at the top of the
column. For more information, see “Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books,” page A-2.

Asset List Button
Click this button to go to the Asset List and view the current group of assets.

Print Detail Button
Click this button to send the information for the current asset to the printer. For more
information, see “Completing the Print Asset Information Dialog,” page 6-30.

Save Asset Button
Click this button to save changes made to the current asset.

IRS Table Link
The IRS Table link provides an easy-to-access method for determining an asset’s
MACRS GDS or ADS life for the Tax book. Click the link to display the IRS ADR Class
Life Table, per Revenue Procedure 87-56, which we have reformatted and alphabetized
for ease of use. By clicking the See Also button, you can navigate to three different
tables:
• Commonly used assets.
• Assets used in manufacturing, alphabetized by end product. (For example, assets
used to manufacture photographic equipment are listed under “P” in this table.)
• Assets used in specialized businesses. (For example, assets used in recreational
services are listed under “R” in this table.)
By locating an asset in the appropriate table and entering both its MACRS GDS life and
ADS life, the application will default the correct lives into both the AMT and ACE
books as needed.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Asset Detail
3
Using the Tabs in Asset Detail
Asset tabs display detailed information about each asset, such as depreciation amounts,
disposal information, history events, and more.
The Main Tab of Asset Detail
The Main tab of Asset Detail contains two categories of fields:

General Information Fields
Fields on the main system window that contain general business information about
your assets; for example, G/L Asset Account and Purchase Order. This information
does not affect the depreciation calculations, but is useful for asset management. You
can customize these fields and also define and use 6 additional fields for your own
purposes. For more information, see “Completing the General Information Fields,”
page 6-3.

Book Information Fields
Data entry fields that accept or display depreciation data specific to each book
displayed in the column headings. All of these fields affect the depreciation
calculations. Examples include the Depreciation Method field and the Acquisition
Value field. For more information, see “Completing the Book Information Fields,” page
6-5.
Tip: You can move the gray divider between the General Information and Book
Information fields to display more or fewer fields in each section.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Asset Detail
The Transactions Tab of Asset Detail
The Transactions tab displays information about disposals for the selected asset. From this
tab, you can:
• Make changes to the disposal.
• Delete the disposal.
• View the disposal calculation for any disposal.

View Transaction Button
Click this button to edit or view information about a disposal.

Delete Last Transaction Button
Click this button to delete the disposal. For more information, see “Deleting Asset
Transactions,” page 7-15.

Disposal Worksheet
Click this button to view the Disposal Worksheet. For more information, see “Viewing
the Disposal Calculation,” page 7-13.
The Notes Tab of Asset Detail
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Navigating the Application Interface
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data
3
The Notes tab provides additional space for you to enter any notes or special information
about the asset. You can document certain changes made to the asset or the reasons for the
changes, or provide further detail on asset maintenance information.
To add a note to the asset
1.
Select the Notes tab.
2.
Enter the note in the upper section.
3.
Click the Add Note button. The note is saved in the lower section of the tab.
4.
Click the Save Asset button to save the note.
After a note has been added and saved, you cannot edit or delete it.
The History Tab of Asset Detail
The History tab provides a history of major milestones and actions performed on an asset.
The application automatically records and tracks specified actions, including the date and
time they occurred.
You can decide which events in an asset’s life you want to track. For more information, see
“Setting Up History Events,” page 5-6.
There are two different views you can use to view the History tab.

Summary Button
Click this button to see a quick look at asset history.

Detail Button
Click this button to view more in-depth historical information about individual events.
For a description of the historical actions that the application tracks and more information,
see “Asset History Events,” page 6-31.
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data
The application provides two tools to help you find specific assets. The two tools are the Go
field and the Find feature. The Find feature helps you find specific data in the general
information or book information fields of an asset.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data
• Go field
The Go field is available in both the Asset List and Asset Detail. It is useful when you
know the System Number or the user-entered Asset ID of an asset you want to display
in Asset Detail. (You use the Go Options field on the Preferences dialog to specify
which of the two types of numbers you want to use. For more information, see “Setting
Preferences,” page 4-1.
Here is an illustration of the Go field.
• Find feature
The Find feature is only available from the Asset List. It is useful when you do not
know the System Number or the Asset ID for an asset, but you do know other
information about the asset. You search for an asset or a group of assets based on data
in the general information or book information fields.
To find an asset using the Go field
Tip: You may want to select the All FAS Assets group in the Group field before you follow
the steps below.
1.
In the Go field, enter the System Number or the Asset ID of the asset you want to find,
and then click the Go button. (In the Go field, you must use the same number type
you specified on the Preferences dialog.)
The application highlights the asset if it is found in the currently active group.
2.
Press Enter to go to Asset Detail for the found asset.
The Asset Detail of the specified asset appears. Once in Asset Detail, you can use the
Go field scroll buttons to scroll through the assets in the currently active group. For
more information, see “Browsing Your Assets,” page 3-8.
To find an asset using the Find feature
When using the Find feature, do not worry about entering upper- or lowercase letters. This
feature is not case-sensitive.
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1.
Select Edit/Find from the menu bar. The Find dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Find dialog, and then click the Find All button. For more information,
see “Completing the Find Dialog,” page 3-25.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Finding Specific Assets or Specific Data
The application displays the assets that meet the Find criteria in a group called <Find
Results> in the Asset List view. If you go to Asset Detail, you must return to the Asset
List before you can continue searching.
Note: The application reserves the word Null when you are using the Find feature.
Therefore, you cannot enter this word in the Find What field on the Find dialog.
To find an asset using a wildcard character
The asterisk (*) is a wildcard character that can help you search for assets. The asterisk
represents any letter combination.
For example, to search for asset descriptions containing the letters D-E-S-K, follow these
steps:
1.
Go to the Asset List view.
2.
Select Edit/Find from the menu bar. The Find dialog appears.
3.
From the Look In drop-down list, select the Description field.
4.
From the Select an Operator drop-down list, select one of the following:
• contains (*abc*)
• ends with (*abc)
• begins with (abc*)
If you select contains (*abc*) in the Find What field, the application finds assets with
the letters D-E-S-K- anywhere in their descriptions.
If you select ends with (*abc) in the Find What field, the application finds asset
descriptions that end with the letters D-E-S-K.
If you select begins with (abc*) in the Find What field, the application finds every asset
description beginning with the letters D-E-S-K.
5.
In the Find What field, enter the letters D-E-S-K.
6.
Click the Find All button. The system displays the Find results in the Asset List.
Completing the Find Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Find dialog.

Look In
Use this field to select the field in which you want to look for specific data.


For Book
Use this field to specify the book that contains the field you selected above. This
field appears only if you select a book information field in the Look In drop-down
list box.
Select an Operator
Use this field to specify the operator you want to use for the expression you are
building to find the data. Operators are very much like mathematical symbols. For a
full discussion of operators, see “Understanding and Specifying Criteria,” page 4-29.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Entering Dates in Date Fields

Find What
Use this field to type the specific value you want to find in the selected field.
Note: You cannot enter the word Null in the Find What field because it is reserved by
the application.

And
Use this field when you select an operator that requires a range of data, such as the
between operator. The between operator looks for data between two values; for
example, all assets with a System Number between 4 and 7. In this case, you would
enter the 7 in this field. This field appears only if you select an operator that requires a
range of data.

Find All Button
Click this button to find all assets in the currently displayed group that contain the
specified data in the selected field. The application displays the assets in a group called
<Find Results> in the Asset List view.
Entering Dates in Date Fields
There are several ways you can enter the date in the date fields.
• Simply type the date.
• Use the built-in calendar.
The application contains an easy-to-use calendar that you can access in any date field.
To use the built-in calendar
1.
Move the cursor to any date field, then click the down arrow button that appears in
the field. The calendar appears.
2.
Select a date from the calendar. For more information, see “Selecting Dates in the
Calendar,” page 3-26.
The date you selected is entered in the date field.
Selecting Dates in the Calendar
To move the calendar to the next month, click the arrow in the upper-right corner of the
calendar. To move the calendar to the previous month, click the arrow in the upper-left
corner.
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Navigating the Application Interface
Keyboard Shortcuts
3
After you’ve displayed the appropriate year and month, click on the desired date.
You can also quickly change the month by clicking the month displayed in the center top
of the calendar, and selecting a different month from the drop-down list. To quickly change
the year, click the year displayed, and select the year by clicking the up or down arrows.
Keyboard Shortcuts
Keyboard commands are sometimes faster than using the mouse. The following table
shows keyboard commands specific to the application.
Key Combination
Feature
Working with Many Assets:
Ctrl+R
Refresh the selected group
Working with an Asset:
Ctrl+A
Create new asset
Ctrl+S
Save changes to an asset, or save a new asset
Ctrl+P
Print the detail of an asset
Moving between Fields in Asset Detail:
Tab
Move to next entry field or button
Shift+Tab
Move to previous entry field or button
Ctrl+Right Arrow
Skip to next depreciation book
Ctrl+Left Arrow
Skip to previous depreciation book
Editing a Field in Asset Detail:
Alt+Down Arrow
Open a drop-down list box, calendar, or other special function
Working with Depreciation Books in Asset Detail:
Ctrl+D
Force defaults
Ctrl+Q
Quick depreciation projection
Standard Windows key combinations:
Space
Toggle a check box
F1
Open the Help index
Ctrl+K
Launch the online calculator
Alt+A, Alt+B (etc.)
Execute the command that contains the underscored letter
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Navigating the Application Interface
Accessing the Windows Calculator
Key Combination
Feature
Cut/Copy/Paste:
Ctrl+X
Edit/Cut
Ctrl+C
Edit/Copy
Ctrl+V
Edit/Paste
Moving between Dialogs/Applications:
Alt+F4
Exit the application
Accessing the Windows Calculator
You can easily access the Windows calculator while using the application.
To access the Windows calculator
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1.
Select Window/Calculator from the menu bar. The Windows calculator appears.
2.
Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the calculator dialog to close the
calculator.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 4
Setting Up the Product
In this chapter:
Setting Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Creating a New Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Creating a New Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Predefined Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Customizing Asset Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
In Chapter 3 you learned about the most important elements of the application and about
how those elements work together to make the application work for you. In this chapter
you’ll learn the steps necessary to making each of those elements a reality. Specifically,
you’ll learn how to fine-tune the application by selecting preferences and creating
databases, companies, and groups. You’ll also learn how to customize your asset fields to
suit your needs and create valid field entries with the SmartList feature.
Setting Preferences
You can use the Preferences dialog to make several decisions about how your application
operates. You can increase your efficiency by changing the settings in the Preferences
dialog. For more information, see “Setting Preferences to Increase Efficiency,” page 4-3.
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4
Setting Up the Product
Setting Preferences
To set your preferences
1.
Select File/Preferences from the menu bar. The Preferences dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Preferences dialog. For more information, see “Completing the
Preferences Dialog,” page 4-3.
3.
Click OK to exit the Preferences dialog.
Setting the Default Folder for File Creation
You can specify a default folder for files created by the application. After you specify the
folder, it becomes the default folder for the following activities:
• exporting data to a file
• saving export field map files
• importing files
• saving import field map files
• backing up companies
• restoring backed-up companies
To specify the default folder for file creation
4-2
1.
Select File/Preferences from the menu bar. The Preferences dialog appears.
2.
Click the Browse button to select the default folder. After you select the folder, the
directory path to the folder appears in the Default Path for File Creation field.
3.
Click OK to close the Preferences dialog.
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Setting Up the Product
Setting Preferences
4
Setting Preferences to Increase Efficiency
You can use the Preferences dialog to make several decisions about how your application
operates. Here are a few suggestions for using this dialog to increase your efficiency.
• Select the Activate Company on Startup check box. The last company opened will
open automatically when you start the application.
• Clear the Group Refresh on Save option. This check box determines when the
application updates the assets shown in the Asset List. Suppose you edit an asset in
Asset Detail so that the asset no longer qualifies for the current group displayed in the
Asset List. (For example, the current group shows assets in Location A, and you
change the location of the asset to Location B.) If you select this check box, the
application refreshes the Asset List every time you save changes to an asset in Asset
Detail. You can save time by clearing this check box. You can then change as many
assets as you want in Asset Detail, without waiting for the application to refresh the
data shown in the Asset List. When you are ready to refresh the data, select
View/Refresh View from the menu bar, or simply return to the Asset List.
• Select the Automatic Book Defaults check box. When you finish entering asset
information in the Tax book, the application will enter default information in the other
open books.
Completing the Preferences Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Preferences dialog.

Application Option
 Activate Company on Startup
Select this check box if you want the last open company to open when you start the
application.

Refresh Option
 Group Refresh on Save
If you select this check box, the list of assets in the current group is automatically
refreshed when you save new assets or changes to existing assets. If the additions
or changes do not meet the criteria of the current group, you will no longer be able
to locate the assets using the previous and next (arrow) buttons in the Go field. If
you clear this check box, you can continue to use the Go field to find the assets until
a refresh occurs. You can manually refresh the current group by selecting
View/Refresh View from the menu bar.See “Updating Groups,” page 4-31.

Data Entry Options
 Automatic Book Defaults
Select this check box to enable the automatic defaulting feature. This feature
defaults information you’ve entered from the Tax book into the other open books.
This is an extremely useful feature when you are adding a new asset. It saves data
entry time.

Display Asset Warnings
Select this check box if you want warning messages displayed each time you enter
data that is inconsistent with depreciation concepts and rules. For more
information, see “Setting Asset Warning Preference,” page C-2.

Disable Report Definition Warnings
Click this check box if you want a warning message displayed when you select
another report without saving your changes in the Report Definition dialog. Clear
this check box if you do not want the warning message displayed.
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4
Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Database


Go Options
Use this field to specify which of the two available fields you want to use as a search
mechanism in the Go field. The Go field is a quick-find feature that allows you to enter
a System Number or an Asset ID number, which is then located and displayed.

System Number
Click this option button if you want to enter System Numbers in the Go field when
switching between assets.

Asset ID
Click this option button if you want to enter Asset ID numbers in the Go field when
switching between assets.
Default Path for File Creation
Use this field to specify the default folder for creating files in the application. The folder
that you select becomes the default folder for exporting data to a file, saving export
field map files, importing files, saving import field map files, and backing up and
restoring companies. See “Setting the Default Folder for File Creation,” page 4-2.


Browse Button
Click this button to select the default folder for file creation.
Favorite Link
Use this field to select the general ledger link that you use most often. The selected link
appears at the bottom of the Links menu, making it easier to access. See “Selecting a
Favorite Sage Fixed Assets Link,” page E-2.
Creating a New Database
The application already contains a default database where the demonstration data for
Sample Company is located. You can store your new company in the default database, but
you might also want to start creating databases with unique names to assist your database
management.
Before creating your first database, make sure you read “Understanding Databases,” page
1-3. A folder can contain two or more databases.
To create a new database
1.
Select File/Database List Manager from the menu bar.
If you currently have a company open, a message asks if you want to close the
currently open company.
2.
4-4
Click Yes to continue. The Database List Manager dialog appears. See “Completing
the Database List Manager Dialog,” page 5-19.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Database
3.
Click the New Database button. The New Database dialog appears.
4.
Complete the New Database dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the New
Database Dialog,” page 4-5.
4
You should now see your new database name displayed in the Database Name field on
the Database List Manager dialog.
5.
Click the Close button to exit the Database List Manager dialog.
Completing the New Database Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the New Database dialog. A folder can contain
two or more databases.

Database Name
Use this field to enter a name for the database you are creating. This is the name that
appears in the Database field of other dialogs in the application.

Database File Name
Use this field to enter the file name for the database you are creating. This is the name
of the file as it appears in the Windows Explorer software. You do not need to enter a
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4-5
4
Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
file extension because the application automatically adds a BDB extension to the file
name.

Database Location
This field displays the folder where you want to store the database. (Long file names
for folder names are supported by the application.)

Browse Button
Click this button to select the folder.
Note: Each database name in the application must be unique. You cannot enter a
database name that already exists in the Database List Manager.
Creating a New Company
There are many fields available to you when setting up a new company. Many of these
fields do not have to be completed immediately. Depending on your implementation plan,
you might want to set up a company quickly so you can begin data entry. If so, you can go
back later and complete the rest of the fields in the company setup.
The most important fields are the book information fields. These fields set up your
company so that the application can properly depreciate all assets in the company.
Note: If your company uses short fiscal years, make sure you complete the Short Years tab
before you calculate depreciation. For more information, see “The Short Years Tab,” page
4-14.
Before creating your first company, make sure you read “Understanding Companies,”
page 1-3.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
To create a new company
1.
Select File/New Company from the menu bar. The New Company dialog appears.
2.
Complete the New Company dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the New
Company Dialog,” page 4-8.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
The new company is opened showing the Asset List, so you can begin adding assets.
Completing the New Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the New Company or Edit Company dialog.
Company
Information
Setup
Information
Book
Information
Tabs
Database
Information
The dialog is divided into the following sections:
• Company Information at the top. See “The Company Information,” page 4-9.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
• Setup information. See “The Setup Information,” page 4-9.
• Tabs in the middle: Book Defaults, page 4-11, Short Years, page 4-14, Book Overrides,
page 4-15, Contact Information, page 4-19, and Notes, page 4-20.
• Database information at the bottom. See “The Database Information,” page 4-11.
The Company Information
Follow the guidelines below to complete the company information section of the New
Company or Edit Company dialog.

Name (Required Field)
Use this field to enter a unique name for the company you are creating (up to 32
characters). This name appears in the title bar of dialogs and reports. You can change
the company name, if desired.

Identification Number (EIN)
Use this field to enter the EIN for the company. Enter the EIN as a 9-digit number in
NN-NNNNNNN format. You must enter the first two digits, followed by a hyphen,
and then enter the remaining seven digits.
The Setup Information
Follow the guidelines below to complete the setup information section of the New
Company or Edit Company dialog.

Business Start Date (Required Field)
Use this field to specify the start date of your company. Enter the date in MM/YYYY
format. For more information, see “Entering Dates in Date Fields,” page 3-26. The date
entered in this field cannot be later than the placed-in-service date of the company’s
oldest asset. If you change the business start date after you enter assets, the application
compares the new Business Start Date with the placed-in-service date of each asset.
This may be a time-consuming process.
Note: If you have entered assets in a company, changing the Business Start Date
affects your short years, which in turn may affect depreciation calculations. You may
need to reset depreciation to the beginning date and recalculate depreciation for all
seven books. For information on Resetting Depreciation, see “Resetting Depreciation,”
page 8-6.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
If you change the Business Start Date, the application displays a warning message:
Click the Yes button to change the Business Start Date; otherwise, click the No button.

Starting System Number
Use this field to type the starting System Number. The application assigns a unique
System Number to each asset you enter into the application. The System Number
initially begins with 1. However, if you have more than one company, you might want
your assets’ System Numbers to remain unique. To ensure unique System Numbers,
start the System Numbers for additional companies at a much higher level.
For example, Company #1 might start at 1, Company #2 at 1,001, and Company #3 at
2,001. The highest available system number is 999,999. Remember that the application
allows you to enter up to 1,000 assets in each company.
Note: This field is only available until the first asset is entered in a new company. You
cannot change the starting System Number after you begin adding assets.

Round Tax Reports and Worksheets to Whole Dollars?
Select this check box if you want dollar amounts to print as whole dollars on tax reports
(other than the Form 4562). This field does not affect dollar amounts in calculations and
quick projections, because these amounts are never rounded.

Include Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Expense
Select this check box if you want to include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179
expense in depreciation expense for reporting purposes.
• If you select the check box, these two amounts are included when displaying the
following columns on reports: Prior Accum Depreciation, Depreciation This Run,
Current YTD, and Current Accum. Both the Section 179 expense and the Section
168 Allowance are claimed on the first day of the placed-in-service month.
• If you clear the check box, the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense are
not included in depreciation expense on reports, they are stated separately.
Whether you select the check box or not, the acquisition value is always reduced by the
Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense, if applicable, when calculating the
depreciable basis. Also, because the Section 168 Allowance and Sec. 179 expense can be
both basis reductions and included in expense, selecting the check box does not change
the amounts displayed in the Current YTD field and Current Accum field in Asset
Detail. The Current YTD field and the Current Accum field in Asset Detail always
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
display depreciation without inclusion of the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179
expense, which are displayed separately.
Changing the selection in this field will affect the depreciation expense amounts shown
on reports. However, you do not need to recalculate depreciation after changing the
selection in this field because it does not affect the depreciation calculations displayed
in Asset Detail.
The Database Information
Follow the guidelines below to complete the database information section of the New
Company or Edit Company dialog.

Database
Use this field to select the database in which you want to store the company you are
creating. You can select a database only when you first create a company.

New Database Button
Click this button if you want to create a new database to store the company you are
creating. The application displays the New Database dialog. This button is available
only when you first create a company. See “Completing the New Database Dialog,”
page 4-5.
The Book Defaults Tab
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Book Defaults tab of the New Company or
Edit Company dialog.
The application can keep as many as seven depreciation books for each company. In brief,
these books are:
Name
Description
Tax
For federal tax reporting
Internal
For internal depreciation calculations (GAAP)
State
For state tax reporting
AMT
For depreciation under the Alternative Minimum Tax rules
ACE
For Adjusted Current Earnings depreciation under Code Section 56(g)
Custom 1
For use as desired
Custom 2
For use as desired
The fields on the Book Defaults tab are arranged in columns and rows. One field is
duplicated across a row and corresponds to the book listed at the top of each column. The
information you enter on the Book Defaults tab affects the book information fields you
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
access when adding a new asset. For more information, see “Completing the Book
Information Fields,” page 6-5.

Open Book
Use this field to specify whether you want to use the book listed at the top of the
column.
You can open and close individual books at any time. Closing a book does not affect
data already entered, but you cannot access the data until you reopen the book. Also,
the application will not enter default information in closed books.
If a corporation is exempt from AMT (under the rules prescribed by the Taxpayer Relief
Act of 1997), it should close the AMT book, as well as the ACE book, for the first year
beginning after December 31, 1997.
Note: The FASB 109 Projection report and the Form 4626 AMT worksheet require at
least one financial statement book to be open before you can define and run the
reports. The financial statement book can be the Internal book or the user-defined
Custom 1 or Custom 2 books.

Book Title
This field displays the name of the book in the current column. You cannot edit the
book title for the Tax, Internal, State, AMT, and ACE books because the purpose of
these books is predefined. For the Custom 1 and Custom 2 books, you can change the
title to identify your use of the book (for example, a state name).

Fiscal Year End
This field displays the last month of the company’s original fiscal year. The end of the
fiscal year may be different in different books. The default fiscal year-end is December.
Note: If the end of the fiscal year has changed since the company’s first year, click the
Short Years tab and enter the change(s) there. Afterwards, the fiscal year-end field will
reflect the current fiscal year-end.
For information about this field when a short year has been entered, see “Short Years
Example,” page 4-15.
If the company’s first year of business was less than 12 months and you later need to
correct the original fiscal year-end date, you must first clear all the short years. The best
way to do this is to select the Short Years tab and click the Clear Short Years button. The
application clears the short years entered in Years 2 to 20 (if any). You can now return
to the Book Defaults tab and enter the correct year-end dates for the company’s first
year in the Fiscal Year End field. For information on clearing short years, see “Clearing
Short Years,” page 4-15. If you have already calculated depreciation, you must also
reset depreciation. See “Resetting Depreciation,” page 8-6.

Emulate Book
Use this field to specify whether you want a book to emulate another book’s default
information.
When you enter data into the Tax book, the application automatically applies data to
the other books based on GAAP principles or IRS rules and regulations that pertain to
the destination book. This procedure is referred to as setting the book defaults. You can
also force the application to update default data anytime you change asset information.
See “Applying Book Defaults,” page 6-22.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
This feature is only effective if both the emulated book and the destination book are
open. Book emulation is available for the Internal book, for Custom 1 and Custom 2
books, and for the ACE book (the ACE book can emulate only the AMT book and only
for post-1993 assets). To make the ACE book emulate the AMT book, see “Book
Emulation for the ACE Book,” page 4-20.
After defaulting the Tax book data into the other open books, you can override the
applied data if appropriate. Enter the override data directly in the field you want to
change.
When the application defaults Tax book data into other books, you can tell the
application you want one of those books to receive the same data as another book,
rather than receiving it directly from the Tax book. This is called book emulation. For
instance, you can set Custom 1 book to emulate the AMT book. When you default the
Tax book data, the application applies the default data to the AMT book, which is then
copied into the Custom 1 book.
Generally, once the defaults are applied, any changes you make to the emulated book
are not applied to the destination book. In the above example, this means that if you
make changes to the AMT book, the changes will not automatically be applied to the
Custom 1 book.
There is one exception: When you make changes to the Tax book and then use the
Apply Book Defaults feature, all data is changed as specified. In the above example, the
application would default data to the AMT book and then copy the AMT book defaults
to the Custom 1 book. When you apply the defaults, the application overwrites all data
previously entered. It also clears any depreciation that was calculated in all books
except the Tax book.
Note: This feature does not affect previously existing assets, except in the case as
specified in the above paragraph where you have used the Apply Book Defaults
feature after changing Tax book data (or when making the ACE book emulate the
AMT book). Therefore, you should specify your preferences in this field prior to
adding assets.

Default Method
Use this field to select a default depreciation method for the user books (Internal,
Custom 1, and Custom 2). The default method for the user books is the straight-line
method (method SL). This field is disabled if the Emulate Book field is set to anything
but None. For more information, see “Depreciation Method,” page 6-6.

Enable Begin Fields
Use this field to specify whether you want the application to allow users to enter
beginning depreciation amounts for assets. The default allows users to enter beginning
amounts in all books.
Note: After you have entered all assets previously maintained on another fixed asset
system, you may want to disallow entry of beginning amounts in order to protect the
data; these fields are not required for newly acquired assets.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
The Short Years Tab
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Short Years tab of the New Company dialog
or Edit Company dialog.
You need to use the Short Years tab only if you are entering a company’s past history, or if
you are editing a company setup and want to enter the dates of current or future short
years. An initial short year is completed automatically if you complete the Book Defaults
tab and indicate that the first year of business is less than 12 months.
You can enter up to five different short years for each book. If the first year of business was
a short year, its fiscal year-end date appears in the dialog and is disabled. All fields on this
tab are date fields. Enter dates in the MM/YYYY format, or use the calendar to select the
fiscal year-end. For more information on entering dates, see “Entering Dates in Date
Fields,” page 3-26.

Year 1
When setting up a company that has a first year of less than 12 months duration based
on the Business Start Date, this field is completed automatically based on the entries
you made in the Company Information fields. If the first year of business is not a short
year, this field is available for use in the future. See the explanation for Years 2-5, below.

Years 2-5
Use the fields in each row to enter the month and year of the new fiscal year-end for
each book listed at the top of the column.
The application assumes that a fiscal year ends with the last day of the month. It also
assumes the new fiscal year-end is in effect for subsequent years, unless you enter another
new fiscal year-end.
Note: Ideally, you should enter a short year before you calculate depreciation for the given
year. However, if you need to enter a short year after you’ve initially calculated
depreciation for the year, or if you need to change a short-year date you’ve entered
(including a short first year of business), you must clear all previously calculated
depreciation figures by resetting depreciation. See “Resetting Depreciation,” page 8-6. You
do not need to reset depreciation if you are adding a short-year date later than the date(s)
through which you have calculated current depreciation for all assets.
Example: Company A has a fiscal year-end of December 2010. They have calculated
depreciation through June when they realize they will have a short year ending in August
2010. Company A should reset depreciation on all active assets that were previously
calculated through June because the original calculations assumed a full 12-month fiscal
year.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
Short Years Example
Suppose that the Original Company was established in May 2002 and decided to use a
fiscal year-end of April. In 2005, the company adopted a new fiscal year-end of December.
In 2010, the Bigger Company bought the Original Company and required that it change its
fiscal year-end to September, to match its own. How would you enter this in the
application?
Note that the first year of business for the Original Company was not a short year. Enter a
Business Start Date of 5/2002. For the fiscal year-end, on the Book Defaults tab, you enter
April. The company had two subsequent short years, so you select the Short Years tab. In
the Year 1 field, you enter the first new fiscal year-end date, 12/2005. Then you enter the
second new fiscal year-end date of 09/2010 in the Year 2 field.
The application considers the fiscal year-end from 12/2005 through 2009 to be December,
and the fiscal year-end after 12/2009 to be September. The Fiscal Year End field on the Book
Defaults tab now shows September. The application automatically makes all adjustments
necessary to prorate depreciation for the short years when you update depreciation.
Clearing Short Years
You can click the Clear Short Years button to clear the short years entered in Years 2 to 5 on
the Short Years tab. A message asks for your confirmation before clearing the short years.
To clear the Year 1 field, you must select the Book Defaults tab and enter a month in the
Fiscal Year End field that is 12 months after the Business Start Date. For example, if the
Business Start Date is 01/2010, then enter December in the Fiscal Year End field. Because
the fiscal year-end is now 12 months after the date the business began, the application
clears the short years in the Year 1 field on the Short Years tab.
If you clear short years, you must also reset depreciation for all assets that have
system-calculated depreciation. For more information, see “Resetting Depreciation,” page
8-6.
The Book Overrides Tab
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Book Overrides tab of the New Company or
Edit Company dialog.
The Book Overrides tab displays some of the default settings used to calculate the
depreciation of your assets. You should review the Midquarter field annually to decide
whether the midquarter convention applies to the current year asset additions. You can
override any of the defaults on this tab by selecting another valid option.
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The book default values for the fields are as follows:
• The application uses the half-year convention unless you specify the midquarter
convention. See Midquarter below for a detailed explanation of the midquarter
convention and for an important note concerning this field.
• The application does not take a depreciation adjustment amount into the accumulated
depreciation calculations. The depreciation adjustment amount is the difference
between the user-entered beginning depreciation amounts and the amounts the
application calculates for the same period.
• The application reduces the asset’s basis in all books except the Internal book if you
take full Investment Tax Credit (ITC) for an asset.
You may want to change the default settings applied by the application.

Midquarter
Important: This field is extremely important to depreciation calculations for the
tax-related books. It controls which averaging convention is used. After you select the
midquarter convention and calculate depreciation, you cannot undo the depreciation
results unless you reset depreciation for the asset. However, this does not apply to
depreciation projections. To change the application of the midquarter convention after
calculating depreciation, first reset the application-calculated depreciation for the
asset. See “Resetting Depreciation,” page 8-6.
Under the Tax Reform Act of 1986, if during the last three months of the tax year you
place in service more than 40% of the aggregate basis of newly acquired qualifying
MACRS property (generally, personal property), you must treat all such newly
acquired MACRS property as though you placed in service in the middle of the quarter
in which you purchased it.
Note: If you need help determining whether you should apply the midquarter
convention, run the Midquarter Applicability report (accessible through the Reports
menu). If the report indicates that the company’s acquisitions of qualifying property
in the last three months of the tax year exceed 40 percent, and you have not calculated
depreciation on them yet, you must change this field to Midquarter and depreciate the
assets. If you have already calculated depreciation on any assets placed in service in
the current year, you must reset depreciation on them before recalculating
depreciation. You should review midquarter applicability on an annual basis
whenever you acquire new assets.
Note: For assets previously depreciated outside of a Sage Fixed Assets application,
when you enter a date in the Beginning Date field in Asset Detail, the application asks
you if you used the midquarter convention.

4-16
Adjustments
Use this field to specify how you want the application to adjust incorrect depreciation
calculation amounts that result from mixing past calculation amounts (calculated
outside of Sage Fixed Assets application) with current Sage Fixed Assets calculations.
You need only concern yourself with this field if you added assets to Sage Fixed Assets
for which another system previously calculated depreciation. Note that this option
only affects assets that were underdepreciated before they were added to the
application.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
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When you add previously depreciated assets to the application, you can enter
beginning depreciation amounts. These are the amounts previously calculated by
another accounting system.
The application then calculates depreciation for the same dates and arrives at its own
depreciation amount. The difference between the two amounts, if any, is called the
depreciation adjustment amount. The Depreciation Adjustment report lists all
depreciation adjustment amounts for all assets in the application.
After you know that you have depreciation adjustment amounts in the application,
you might want to reconcile them.
There are two kinds of depreciation adjustment amounts, only one of which you can
do anything about (i.e., underdepreciated assets):

Overdepreciated Assets
If you entered a Beginning Date and a Beginning Depreciation amount that is more
than the application calculates to be correct, the asset is considered
overdepreciated. The application continues to correctly calculate as much
depreciation as you would be entitled to for that asset for each subsequent year.
The application stops calculating depreciation when the asset is fully depreciated,
thereby actually taking less depreciation than you would otherwise be entitled to
in the last year of the asset’s life. This is because you took that depreciation earlier
in the asset’s life than you should have.

Underdepreciated Assets
If you entered a Beginning Date and a Beginning Depreciation amount that is less
than the application calculates to be correct, the asset is considered
underdepreciated. Again, the application continues to correctly calculate as much
depreciation as you would be entitled to for that asset for each subsequent year.
However, because it generally does not calculate depreciation beyond an asset’s
estimated life, the asset might remain on the books indefinitely with a net book
value remaining unless you set an adjustment convention. There are a number of
ways you can handle the adjustment, depending on which depreciation method
you are using.
You have three options for handling underdepreciated assets. Each of these options
contains at least one exception. The exceptions are explained below.
• None: Select this option to take no adjustment. The asset will never be fully
depreciated, leaving a residual value of the adjustment amount. (This is not
the case for the depreciation methods listed below. These methods handle the
None option differently, as explained.)
• Immediate: Select this option to take an immediate adjustment. After
entering the beginning depreciation amount, the application takes the
adjustment amount the next time you calculate depreciation. The adjustment
is included in the Depreciation This Run values. The adjustment is recorded
in the month following the beginning date. If you run depreciation within the
same fiscal year as the beginning date, it will be included in the Current Year
to Date values. If the next time you run depreciation you skip the fiscal year of
the beginning date, (for example, you calculate depreciation for a future
period), then the adjustment will display in the Prior Accum Depreciation
values. In reports, the Key Code column displays an “a” for adjustment.
Note: This is not the case for depreciation method RV, which handles this
adjustment type the same as it does for None and Postrecovery, as explained
below.
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• Postrecovery: Select this option to take a postrecovery period adjustment. The
application takes the adjustment amount in the first period in the next fiscal
year after the end of the asset’s life. The asset is then fully depreciated. On the
Depreciation Expense report for the postrecovery period, the Year-to-Date
columns reflect the adjustment amount, and the Key column displays an “a”
for adjustment. (This is not the case for the depreciation methods listed below.
These methods handle this adjustment type differently, as explained.)
If you are using the depreciation methods listed below, both the None and Post
Recovery adjustment types prorate the adjustment amount over the asset’s
remaining life. These methods do not make the adjustment as explained above,
because the calculations are based on the remaining net book value.
• MACRS (MF, MA, MI, MR, AD, and AA)
• Declining-balance (DB)
• Declining-balance half-year (DH)
• Declining-balance modified half-year (DD)
• Declining balance, no switch to SL (DC)
• Declining-balance, half-year, no switch to SL (DI)
• Declining-balance, modified half-year, no switch to SL (DE)
• Remaining value over remaining life (RV)
There is an exception to how the application applies a Post Recovery adjustment
for the MACRS and declining-balance depreciation methods listed above.
When an asset’s Beginning Date is during the fiscal year in which the asset’s life
ends, the application takes the Post Recovery adjustment in the first period of the
following fiscal year.
When an asset’s Beginning Date is after the fiscal year in which the asset’s life ends,
the application takes the Post Recovery adjustment in the period following the
Beginning Date.
Here are some examples:
An asset’s life ends on 6/30/10, at which point it should be fully depreciated. XYZ
Manufacturing, a calendar year company, has under-depreciated the asset in
another product and now enters it in the application.
Example A: XYZ Manufacturing enters a Beginning Date of 03/10 (that is, in the
last year of the asset’s life). The application takes the adjustment amount when it
calculates depreciation for 1/31/11, the first period in the following fiscal year.
Example B: XYZ Manufacturing enters a Beginning Date of 03/11 (that is, in the
fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the asset’s life ends). The application
takes the adjustment amount when it calculates depreciation for 4/30/11, the first
period following the Beginning Date.

4-18
Reduce by ITC
Use this field to select which of the two ITC options you want to apply: reduce or not
reduce the basis of assets qualifying for the Investment Tax Credit. The selection you
make here applies to all assets in the application, whether previously depreciated or
not.
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Setting Up the Product
Creating a New Company
4
For assets that were placed in service after 1982 and before 1986, companies taking an
Investment Tax Credit (ITC) had two choices:
• Take the full ITC but reduce the basis of the asset.
• Take a reduced ITC without adjusting the basis.
For assets that were placed in service after 1985, only the first option applies.
The default setting is to reduce the basis of all assets for which the full ITC was taken.
This reduction is taken for all books except the Internal book, to which the ITC does not
apply.
If you do not want the application to reduce the basis of appropriate assets in a book,
select No.
Depending on the book and the ITC option you choose for an asset, you may need to
override the system-calculated ITC percentage and ITC amount in Asset Detail to
conform to IRS regulations.
The Contact Information Tab
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Contact Information tab of the New Company
or Edit Company dialog.

Contact Name
Use this field to enter the name of a contact person for the company you are creating.

Address
Use this field to enter the address of the company you are creating.

City
Use this field to enter the city in which the company you are creating is located.

State
From the drop-down list, select the state or territory in which the company you are
creating is located.

Zip Code
Use this field to enter the zip code in which the company you are creating is located.

Country
Use this field to enter the country in which the company you are created is located.

Phone
Use this field to enter the phone number of the company you are creating.

Fax
Use this field to enter the fax number of the company you are creating.
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The Notes Tab
Use the Notes tab of the New Company or Edit Company dialog to enter any notes or
special information about the company.
Book Emulation for the ACE Book
The Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 changed the tax rules for ACE depreciation when
it eliminated the ACE Depreciation Adjustment for property placed in service after
December 31, 1993. Although all property with a placed-in-service date prior to 1994
continues to be depreciated under the pre-Tax Act ACE rules, post-1993 property is
handled differently.
In your company setup, if you have not specified a book emulation for the ACE book, then
the Depreciation Method field automatically defaults to “No” in the ACE book for these
assets. Therefore, in some reports, the application does not provide detail on these assets.
Additionally, ACE depreciation information for these assets is not available in Asset Detail.
All post-1993 assets display a zero in report columns referring to ACE Depreciation
Adjustment amounts.
You can force the application to display depreciation information in reports and in Asset
Detail by making the ACE book emulate the AMT book. If you choose to do so, the
application still displays a zero in report columns referring to ACE Depreciation
Adjustment amounts. The application does this in order to comply with the rule that
post-1993 assets cannot have an ACE Depreciation Adjustment amount.
No matter which method you select, the application calculates the ACE Depreciation
Adjustment by subtracting an asset’s ACE depreciation amount from its AMT depreciation
amount. The difference is in how the information is presented. Both methods provide the
same result, a zero ACE Depreciation Adjustment amount for post-1993 property.
Once you’ve set this option in the Emulate Book field, it affects only new assets added into
the application. However, when you are actually setting this option, you have the
opportunity to copy existing AMT book data into the ACE book for any
previously-entered, post-1993 property. This process can take a long time if you have a
great number of assets. You can return to this option later, if desired.
To display depreciation information for post-1993 assets in the ACE
book
4-20
1.
Select File/Edit Company from the menu bar if you are not already in the Edit
Company or New Company dialog. The Edit Company dialog appears.
2.
On the Book Defaults tab, change the Emulate Book field for the ACE book from None
to AMT: Post-1993. A message appears asking you to confirm your intention.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
3.
Click OK to continue. The application returns to the Edit Company dialog.
4.
Click OK to save your changes to the company. This message appears if you are
editing an already existing company:
5.
Click Yes or No based on the information below:
4
• Click Yes to override existing data (including depreciation and gain/loss
calculations) in the ACE book for any previously entered, post-1993 assets with
AMT information.
• Click No if you do not want to override existing data. This action does not void
the AMT book emulation in the ACE book for newly entered assets.
The application copies data into the ACE book, then returns to your previous view.
Predefined Groups
The ability to create groups is a very powerful feature for managing a company’s fixed
assets. By using a predefined group you can quickly and efficiently view information, run
reports, and project depreciation for a very select group of assets. After you identify the
assets to define as a group, you can also decide the order in which you want them to appear.
In addition, you can decide whether you want to subtotal the assets in a group during
reports.
The more groups you have, the more control you have over your assets. Groups provide
you with a way to permanently sort selected assets into logical formations. Groups can also
narrow-down the number of assets you have to browse in order to find a specific asset. The
application contains four predefined groups for you to use:
• All FAS Assets: Activity codes A, D, and I. For a description of each activity code, see
“Understanding Activity Codes,” page 7-1.
• Active Assets: Activity codes A and D. (Disposals are included in the Active Assets
group because they are considered to have current activity in the year of disposal.)
• Disposed Assets: Activity code D.
• Inactive Assets: Activity code I.
Understanding and Specifying Criteria
In the Group Manager, you write a criteria string to specify which assets to include in a
group. A criteria string—also known as an expression—is a statement or series of
statements that qualifies the characteristics of assets to include in a group. An expression
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Predefined Groups
can search for multiple criteria (a complex expression) or just one criterion (a simple
expression).
In addition, you can sort groups any way you want. For more information, see “Sorting
Groups,” page 4-27.
Simple Expressions
When you specify criteria for a group, only those assets that satisfy the expression criteria
are included in the group. For example, to define a group that includes only those assets
with the location code Admin, you would write the expression Location is Admin. The word
is is an operator, which is equivalent to the mathematical symbol for the EQUAL SIGN (=).
Conversely, the operator is not would exclude all assets with Location code Admin.
The table below lists each available operator and its equivalent mathematical symbol (if
any). In addition, the If and Then columns provide an example of results returned by each
operator. The example for the Is operator reads: “If the criteria for the selected field Is 5, then
the asset selected for the group will be 5.”
Mathematical
Symbol
Operator
If
(Given a Set of 10)
Then
contains (*abc*)
xyz
All occurrences of the specified string, xyz
does not contain
xyz
All occurrences not containing the string, xyz
begins with (abc*)
xyz
All occurrences beginning with the string, xyz
ends with (*abc)
xyz
All occurrences ending with the string, xyz
is

5
5
is not

5
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
is less than

5
1, 2, 3, 4

5
6, 7, 8, 9, 10
is greater than
is between
1
is not between 1
5, 8
5, 6, 7, 8
5, 8
1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10
Any
Include all with any data
is not blank

is blank

equals

5
5
does not equal

5
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
equals or is less than

5
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
equals or is greater than

5
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
1
Include only those with no data
The is between and is not between operators do not have an equivalent mathematical symbol. They
search for all values through the specified value range—including the first and last values.
Complex Expressions
A complex expression is one that searches for multiple criteria. The and operator or the or
operator connect these criteria (much the same way you would connect these types of
statements in a sentence).
The decision to use an and or an or in a sentence specifies the relationship between the two
variables. For example, look at these two sentences.
1.
4-22
For the company retreat, you must bring a flashlight and a lantern.
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Predefined Groups
2.
For the company retreat, you must bring a flashlight or a lantern.
These statements written in the same format as an expression specifying a group would
read:
We separated the individuals attending the company retreat into two groups. Group
One brought a flashlight and a lantern. Group Two brought a flashlight or a lantern.
This example illustrates how the use of the or statement tends to create a larger group.
The application applies the and and or statements automatically.
• An and operator connects multiple expressions specifying criteria for different fields.
• An or operator connects multiple expressions specifying criteria for the same field.
To illustrate this important point further, here is an example of each type.

An And Operator Connecting a Complex Expression
A series of statements connected by the and operator indicates that the criteria of all
statements must be satisfied. For example, to define a group that includes all assets
whose Class is not CE and whose Tax book Depreciation Method is MF, write this
expression:
Class is not CE
Tax book Depreciation Method is MF
Note that you do not have to enter the and operator; when you specify two different
fields, the application assumes the and operator.

An Or Operator Connecting a Complex Expression
A series of statements connected by the or operator indicates that the criteria of any one
of the statements must be satisfied. For example, to define a group that includes all
assets whose Tax book Depreciation Method is either MF or MT, write this expression:
Tax book Depreciation Method is MF
Tax book Depreciation Method is MT
Note that you do not have to enter the or operator; when you specify the same field
twice, the application assumes the or operator.
Note: Be careful when you specify criteria for the same field while using the is not
operator; you may obtain a surprising result. Suppose you create a group using the
following expression:
Class is not CE
Class is not FF
You may be surprised to discover that the group using this expression contains all
assets, including assets in the CE class and the FF class. Because you specified the
same field (Class), the application employs the or operator. An asset in the AA class is
not in the CE or FF class, so it satisfies the criteria. An asset in the CE class is not in the
FF class, so it satisfies the criteria. And of course, an asset in the FF class is not in the
CE class, so the group contains that asset as well. (Remember, when the application
employs the or operator, the asset is included in the group if one of the criteria is true.)
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups

An And Operator Connecting Multiple Criteria for a Single Field
If a single statement searches a single field for multiple criteria connected by the and
operator, all criteria must be satisfied. For example, to define a group that includes all
assets acquired in 2010, you would write the expression:
Acquisition Date is between 01/01/2010 and 12/31/2010
Note that in this case, you must enter the and operator.
You can write an expression combining all search criteria specified above, plus more if
needed. Here is an example of a more complex expression:
Acquisition Date is between 01/01/2010 and 12/31/2010
Class is not CE
Tax book Depreciation Method is MF
Tax book Depreciation Method is MT
Here is how it reads:
• Create a group where the Acquisition Date is between 01/01/2010 and 12/31/2010
AND
• where the Class is not equal to CE AND
• where the Tax book Depreciation Method is equal to MF OR
• where the Tax book Depreciation Method is equal to MT.
Creating Groups
You can create groups of assets based on any asset attributes specified in the general
information or book information fields, unless the field has been hidden from view. For
more information, see “Removing a Field,” page 3-15. Therefore, a group is a request to
search the current company for assets matching criteria you specify. To create groups you
should understand how to apply criteria to build expressions. See “Understanding and
Specifying Criteria,” page 4-21.
You can use Group Manager to create a new group, and to edit, rename, delete, or copy an
existing group.
Note: As a precaution, the application does not permit you to edit or delete the All FAS
Assets group.
Before creating your first group, make sure you read “Understanding Groups,” page 1-4.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
To create a group using Group Manager
1.
Select Customize/Group Manager from the menu bar. The Group Manager dialog
appears.
2.
In the Enter New Group Name field, type a name for the group you are creating, then
click the Add button. The Add Group - [Group Name] dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Field Criteria tab and Sort Criteria tab, then click OK. See “Completing
the Field Criteria Tab,” page 4-28 and “Completing the Sort Criteria Tab,” page 4-30.
The application returns to the Group Manager dialog.
4.
Click the Close button to close the Group Manager dialog.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
Completing the Group Manager Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Group Manager dialog. To access this dialog,
select Customize/Group Manager from the menu bar.

Enter New Group Name
Use this field to enter the name of the group you want to add. Choose a unique name
that describes the purpose of the group.

Existing Groups
This list box displays the names of all the groups in the current company. Use this list
box to select a group on which to perform one of the functions listed on the buttons to
the right of this list box (Edit, Rename, Delete, or Copy).

Add Button
Click this button to add the group name that you enter in the Enter New Group Name
field to the Existing Groups list box. When you add a new group name to the Existing
Groups list box, the Add Group - [Group Name] dialog appears, which allows you to
define the criteria for the new group. See “Completing the Add/Edit Group - [Group
Name] Dialog,” page 4-27.

Edit Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to edit the criteria for the selected
group. See “Completing the Add/Edit Group - [Group Name] Dialog,” page 4-27.

Rename Button
Click this button to rename the selected group. Select the group you want to rename in
the Existing Groups list box. Enter the new name in the Enter New Group Name field,
and then click the Rename button.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete the selected group. When you delete a group, that logical
organization of assets is deleted; the assets that belonged to the deleted group are not
deleted.

Copy Button
Click this button to copy the selected group. In the Existing Groups list box, select the
group you want to copy. On the Copy Group dialog, enter the name of the new group.
The group name is not case-sensitive. That is, “active” and “Active” are names for the
same group.
To create a group from selected assets
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1.
Select the assets in the Asset List that you want to form into a group.
2.
Select Asset/Save Selections from the menu bar. The Save Selections dialog appears.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
3.
Type a name for the group in the Enter New Group Name field, and then click OK.
The application saves the selected assets as a group. The application defines the
criteria of the group based on the System Numbers of the selected assets.
Completing the Save Selections Dialog
After you have selected assets in the Asset List, you can save the selected assets as a group.
Select Asset/Save Selections from the menu bar, and follow the guidelines below to
complete the Save Selections dialog.

Enter New Group Name
Type a name for the new asset group (25 alphanumeric characters maximum,
uppercase or lowercase).

All Available Groups
This field shows the names of the existing groups in the current company.
Sorting Groups
You can sort groups any way you want—by any field and any number of fields—using the
Sort Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group - [Group Name] dialog. For more information, see
“Completing the Sort Criteria Tab,” page 4-30. The default sort field is System Number. In
addition, you can specify whether to sort in ascending order (the default) or descending
order.
After you define your preferred sort order, you can set it permanently (for any group except
the All FAS Assets) or temporarily just for the current session. A temporary sort overrides
a permanent sort.
Completing the Add/Edit Group - [Group Name] Dialog
The Add/Edit Group - [Group Name] dialog contains two tabs:
• On the Field Criteria tab, you define the group. See “Completing the Field Criteria
Tab,” page 4-28.
• On the Sort Criteria tab, you define how the group is sorted. See “Completing the Sort
Criteria Tab,” page 4-30.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
If you intend to specify complex criteria to build a group, there is information critical to
both of these tabs in “Understanding and Specifying Criteria,” page 4-21.
Completing the Field Criteria Tab
You use the fields on the Field Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group dialog to specify the
criteria for building a group.
Think of the fields outlined above as being divided into three sections, like a mathematical
equation.
Variable X
plus, minus, equal to, etc...
Variable Y
Look In
Select an Operator
Find What
equals your group.
The three sections together form an expression that defines the group.
• The Look In field tells the application where to look for the data you want to use to
define the group.
• The Select an Operator field tells the application how to look at the data in the Find
What field.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups
• The Find What field tells the application what specifically to look for in the selected
field. The application then compares what it finds based on how it is looking at it as
specified in the Select an Operator field.
After you create an expression, you add that expression to the Include Assets that Meet the
Following Criteria field. You can create multiple expressions to define a group. Each added
expression further restricts the asset selection for the group. For example, suppose you
choose to select by date placed-in-service and then by location. The application selects
assets that match both criteria. However, if you add two expressions using the same field
but requesting different data, the application selects all assets that fall in either range (for
instance, location is New York or location is Chicago). For detailed information on criteria
expressions, see “Understanding and Specifying Criteria,” page 4-21.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Field Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group
dialog.

Look In
Use this field to specify the asset field you want to use to define your group. See
“Completing the Preferences Dialog,” page 4-3.)

For Book
Use this field to specify the book that contains the field you selected above. This field
appears only if you select a book information field in the Look In drop-down list.

Select an Operator
Use this field to specify the operator you want to use for the expression you are
building to define the group. Operators are very much like mathematical symbols. For
a full discussion of operators, see “Understanding and Specifying Criteria,” page 4-21.

Find What
Use this field to specify the data you want to find or not find in the field you selected
above. This is not a case-sensitive field. That is, if you enter Bakery, the application will
find assets that contain BAKERY in their location fields. Enter dates in MM/DD/YYYY
format. For operators that require a range, enter the first value in the range in this field
(for more information, see below).

And
Use this field when you select an operator that requires a range of data, such as the
between operator. The between operator looks for data between two values; for
example, all assets with a System Number between 4 and 7. In this case, you would
enter the 7 in this field. Enter dates in MM/DD/YYYY format. This field appears only
if you select an operator that requires a range of data.

Include Assets that Meet the Following Criteria
This field displays all the expressions you created for this group.

Add Button
Click this button to add an expression you have created into the Include Assets that
Meet the Following Criteria field.

Replace Button
Click this button to replace an expression selected in the Include Assets that Meet the
Following Criteria field with a newly created expression. Select the expression you
want to change in the Include Assets that Meet the Following Criteria field, make the
desired changes, and then click the Replace button.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete a selected expression from the Include Assets that Meet the
Following Criteria field.
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Setting Up the Product
Predefined Groups

Delete All Button
Click this button to clear the Include Assets that Meet the Following Criteria field of all
expressions.
Completing the Sort Criteria Tab
By default, assets are listed in the Asset List according to System Number. In reports, they
are also ordered by book. The Sort Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group dialog allows you
to change the order in which assets are listed in the Asset List and in reports. You can also
indicate whether you want subtotals to appear for each sort level in reports. There is
information critical to creating complex sort criteria in “Complex Expressions,” page 4-22.
Refer to it if you plan to build such a sort.
Note: You can override the sort criteria that you select on the Sort Criteria tab when you
run reports.
The application sorts fields first by number, then by uppercase letters, and finally by
lowercase letters. If you select descending order, this order is reversed.
The order in which you select fields to sort is important. The first field determines the
primary sort order. The next field determines the sort order within the primary group. The
third field determines the sort order within the secondary group. If you do not select a
secondary sort field, the assets are listed within the primary sort group in order by System
Number.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Sort Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group
dialog.

4-30
Sort By
Use this field to select the field you want to use as the primary sort.
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
4

Select an Order
Use this field to select whether you want the sort to list assets in ascending or
descending order.

Subtotal
Use this field to indicate the type of subtotaling system, if any, that you want to use in
reports for the selected field. Any type of subtotaling increases the size of your reports.

Add Button
Click this button to add the sort criteria to the Sort Assets by the Following Criteria
field.

Sort Assets by the Following Criteria
This field displays the sort criteria that you have created.

Replace Button
Click this button to replace a sort criterion with a newly created sort criterion. Select
the sort criterion you want to change in the Sort Assets by the Following Criteria field,
make the desired changes, and then click the Replace button.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete a selected sort criterion from the Sort Assets by the Following
Criteria field.

Delete All Button
Click this button to clear the Sort Assets by the Following Criteria field of all sort
criteria.
Updating Groups
When you make changes to asset information, you might make a change that affects an
asset in such a way that it no longer qualifies for the current group, or you might add an
asset that should be part of the current group. In order for the current group to reflect such
changes, a refresh group action must occur.
On the Preferences dialog, you can specify that you want to automatically update groups
when you save changes to an asset in Asset Detail. For more information, see “Setting
Preferences,” page 4-1. You can also update groups anytime you want. When you use the
manual refresh group option, the current group is refreshed when you perform the
procedure. This eliminates the need for you to wait every time the application refreshes the
group as specified in the Preference settings.
To update the current group
1.
Select View/Refresh View from the menu bar.
The application automatically updates the current group. Any assets you added are
displayed if they meet the criteria of the current group.
For information about editing, renaming, deleting, or copying groups, see “Completing the
Group Manager Dialog,” page 4-26.
Customizing Asset Fields
You can customize the assets’ general information fields to suit the individual needs of
your organization. When customizing these fields, keep in mind that there are five
alphanumeric Custom Fields you can customize and two Custom Date fields. Therefore,
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
you might not want to customize any of the pre-existing fields until you’ve exhausted the
Custom Fields. You follow the same procedure to customize either the pre-existing fields
or the Custom Fields.
You should not customize the four asset fields listed below so that their overall purpose is
changed:
• Asset ID
• The three G/L asset account fields: G/L Asset Account, G/L Accum Account, and
G/L Expense Account.
Before attempting to customize your fields for the first time, make sure you read
“Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists,” page 1-6.
Note: Do not change the name of a field to a name that is already in use by a Sage Fixed
Assets application. For a list of field names that should be avoided, see “Avoiding Field
Names Used by the Application,” page 4-35.
To customize asset fields
1.
Do one of the following:
• Select Customize/Customize Fields from the menu bar.
• Click the Customize a Field task on the navigation pane.
• In either Asset Detail or the Asset List, right-click on the field you want to
customize, and select Customize Fields from the popup menu.
The Customize Fields dialog appears.
2.
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Complete the Customize Fields dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the
Customize Fields Dialog,” page 4-33.
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
4
Completing the Customize Fields Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Customize Fields dialog.

Asset Field
Use this field to select the asset field you want to customize. All customizable asset
fields are listed here. The attributes of the selected field are displayed on the right.

Field Attributes


View
Use this field to specify the viewing or entry rights you want to allow users for the
selected field. Following are the available options:

Allow Entry
Select this option if you want to allow, but not require, users to enter data in
the field. Users can view the data.

Require Entry
Select this option if you want to require users who are creating an asset to enter
data in the field before saving the asset. Users can view the data.

View Only
Select this option if you want to allow users to view the default data, but not
enter data in the field.

Hide
Select this option if you want to hide the entire field in both the Asset List and
Asset Detail. This option is useful when you don’t want to use a particular
field. If you decide not to hide the field at a later time, select a different View
option and the field will be available to you.
Title
This field displays the name of the currently selected field. To edit the field, type
over the current name. After changing the name of a field, the original name is still
displayed in the list of available fields to the left. This option is most often used for
the user-defined fields.
Note: Do not change the name of a field to a name that is already in use by a Sage
Fixed Assets application. For a list of field names that should be avoided, see
“Avoiding Field Names Used by the Application,” page 4-35.

Entry Mask
Use this field to specify the type of character (such as number or alphanumeric) or
how many characters you want to allow users to type in the field. The default
number is listed on top of the field; as you change the number of characters, the
application tracks the number of characters you are typing. To change the number
of characters allowed, type or delete the Xs. For more information, see
“Completing the Entry Mask Field,” page 4-34.

Default
Use this field to type in a default entry for the field. The user can overwrite the
default.

Message
Use this field to enter a brief explanatory message to appear in the status bar when
a user enters the field. For example, if you rename Custom Field 1 to Branch, you
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
might want the prompt to read “Enter the branch office number where the asset is
located.”

Entry Order
Use this field to specify the order in which you want the fields to appear in Asset
Detail. When changing the entry order of a field, the field previously holding that
entry order swaps places with the new field.
Example: Suppose you change the field in the 7th position to the 4th position. The
field that was in the 4th position will now be in the 7th position.

Activate SmartList?
Select this check box to enable the SmartList Manager button.

SmartList Manager Button
Click this button to display the SmartList Manager dialog, which allows you to create
valid entries for asset fields. A list of valid entries for an asset is called a SmartList. See
“Creating Valid Field Entries with SmartLists,” page 4-37.

Restore Defaults Button
Click this button to restore the default settings for this dialog. Clicking this button
erases all modifications you’ve made to all the fields.
Completing the Entry Mask Field
An entry mask allows you to specify up to three characteristics about most general
information fields:
• Field length
• Special characters to format the text (optional)
• Restrictions on data types (optional)
The total number of characters entered, including special characters, will correspond to the
maximum number of characters allowed in the field. The information next to the field label
will track this information as you enter it.
You can specify special characters (such as decimal points, hyphens, and slashes) that will
appear in the field during and after data entry. These characters often help to segment the
data into meaningful data elements, such as those found in a general ledger account. When
entering data, the user cannot type over those characters. You can use all
non-alphanumeric characters except an exclamation point (!), an apostrophe ('), or a pound
sign (#).
You can also restrict the data entered to specific data types. The following table shows how
you specify the kinds of characters the user can enter:
Character
Meaning
X
Any ASCII character (not allowed in combination with special characters)
9
Any number 0-9
N
Any alphanumeric character
Examples of valid Entry Masks include all Xs (such as XXXXX) or any combination of 9, N,
and nonalphanumeric characters (such as NN-999-99).
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
4
Note: A decrease in entry mask size can cause you to lose existing data. Additionally, if
you change the field entry mask to include characters such as hyphens and slashes,
existing characters move to the right, past the fixed characters. If the addition of fixed
characters pushes existing characters beyond the length of the field and you save the
asset’s data, the characters beyond the field length are lost.
When you click OK to exit the Customize Fields dialog in either of the above situations,
the application prompts you with this message:
Click Yes to continue.
Avoiding Field Names Used by the Application
You can customize the names of fields so that you can tailor the application to meet the
specific needs of your organization. However, you should not rename a field to a name that
is already in use by the Sage Fixed Assets application.
Renaming a field to a field name used by the application creates duplicate fields. This
causes problems while using certain features in the application, such as creating a group or
changing the sort order when running a report.
Below is a list of field names that you should avoid because they are used by a Sage Fixed
Assets application. The left column displays the field name, and the right column displays
the field name as it appears on the standard reports.
Tip: If the name that you want to use is a Sage Fixed Assets field name, then you can use a
similar name instead. For example, if you want to change the name of a field to “Class,”
you might consider using “Classes” or “CLASS” instead.
The following field names should not be used when customizing a field.
Sage Fixed Assets Field Name
Report Headers
168 Allowance Amount
168 Allowance
168 Expense
168 Expense
168 Allowance %
168 Pct
179 Deduction
179 Deduction
179 Other Amount
Sec 179/Other Amt
179 Other Code
CS
179 Qualified?
SQ
1st Year Business Use %
n/a
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
Sage Fixed Assets Field Name
Report Headers
Acquired by
n/a
Acquisition Date
Acq Date
Acquisition Value
Acquired Value
Activity Code
AC
ADS Life
ADS Life
Asset ID
Asset ID
Beginning Accum
Beginning Accum
Beginning YTD
Beginning YTD
Beginning Date
Begin Date
Business Use 100%
FB
Cash Proceeds
Cash Proceeds
Class
Cl
Creation Code
CC
Current 179 Recapture
Section 179 Recapture
Current Accum
Current Accum
Current Business Use %
Bus Use %
Current Through Date
Thru Date
Current YTD
Current YTD
Custom Date 1
Custom Date 1
Custom Date 2
Custom Date 2
Custom Field 1
Custom Field 1
Custom Field 2
Custom Field 2
Custom Field 3
Custom Field 3
Custom Field 4
Custom Field 4
Custom Field 5
Custom Field 5
Declining Balance %
DB Pct
Deferred Code
GL
Deferred Date
Deferral Date
Depreciable Basis
Depreciable Basis
Depreciation Method
Depr Meth
Description
Description
Disposal Date
Disposal Date
Disposal Method
DM
Entity
Entity
Estimated Life
Est Life
Exclude on Depr Report?
ED
Expense of Sale
Expense of Sale
G/L Accum Account
G/L Accum Account
G/L Asset Account
G/L Asset Account
G/L Expense Account
G/L Expense Account
Gain/Loss
Realized Gain (Loss)
ITC Amount
ITC Amount
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
Sage Fixed Assets Field Name
Report Headers
ITC Basis Reduction
n/a
ITC Option
IO
ITC %
ITC %
ITC Recapture
ITC Recap
Key Code
Key Code
Location
Location
Midquarter Convention
n/a
Net Book Value
Net Book Value
Non Cash Proceeds
Non-Cash Proceeds
Owner
Owner
Period Close Accum
Prd Close Accum
Period Close Date
Prd Close Date
Period Close YTD
Prd Close YTD
Placed-in-Service Date
In Svc Date
Property Type
PT
Purchase Order
Purchase Order
Salvage Value
Salvage Value
Serial Number
Serial Number
System Number
Sys No
Vendor
Vendor
Zone Type
ZT
4
Creating Valid Field Entries with SmartLists
You can create valid entries for your assets’ general information fields. A list of valid entries
for an asset is called a SmartList. After you’ve created a SmartList for a field, a user can
simply select an option from the available list, rather than having to manually enter the
data in the field. In addition to saving data entry time, SmartLists also ensure consistency.
Creating a SmartList does not necessarily eliminate a user’s ability to add an entry to a field
that is not currently on the SmartList. You control the ability or inability to perform such an
action in the SmartList Manager dialog.
Another useful feature in the SmartList Manager dialog is the Fill button. The Fill button
adds every previously entered unique value in a selected field to a SmartList. Although this
is an extremely powerful feature, it is not appropriate for all situations.
Before creating your first SmartList, make sure you read “Understanding Asset Fields and
SmartLists,” page 1-6.
To create asset SmartLists
1.
Select Customize/Customize Fields from the menu bar. The Customize Fields dialog
appears.
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
2.
From the list, select the field for which you want to create a SmartList, and then select
the Activate SmartList check box. See “Completing the Customize Fields Dialog,”
page 4-33.
3.
Click the SmartList Manager button. The SmartList Manager dialog appears.
4.
Complete the SmartList Manager dialog to build the list of valid entries for the
selected field, and then click the Close button. The application returns to the
Customize Fields dialog. See “Completing the SmartList Manager Dialog,” page 4-38.
5.
Click OK to exit the Customize Fields dialog.
Completing the SmartList Manager Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the SmartList Manager dialog.

Enter New Name and Description
Use this field to type the valid entry you want your users to have the option of selecting
from the SmartList when they create or edit an asset. The entry mask in the Customize
Fields dialog dictates the maximum number of characters.
You can also use this field to provide users with additional details about the SmartList
entry. For example, if the name is HW, then a description of computer hardware would
greatly aid your users. By using this field in conjunction with the Display Description
field under List Attributes (see below), you can specify whether you want to display
descriptions in a SmartList. If you don’t want to display descriptions, skip this field.

SmartList List Box
This list box displays the names and descriptions of all SmartList entries that you have
added to the list.

List Attributes
Use this field to select the attributes to apply to your SmartList:

4-38
Display Description.
Select this check box if you want to display the description beside the valid entry.
This is extremely useful for fields where you are using codes instead of full names.
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Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields

4

Auto Drop List
Select this check box if you want the application to automatically open the
drop-down list box whenever the cursor is in the field.

Quick Lookup
Select this check box if you want to enable the quick lookup feature. The quick
lookup feature allows users to enter only the first three characters of an entry in the
drop-down list box, and then the application quickly finds the first entry in the list
box that matches the characters.
Entry Options
Use this field to specify how you want the application to react to users making entries
that are not currently in the SmartList.

Restrict Entry to List
Click this option button if you want to require users to enter data in a field by using
an entry from the SmartList. Selecting this option disables the Auto Add Entry to
List options.

Auto Add Entry to List
Click this option button if you want to allow users to make entries in the selected
field that are not on the SmartList. From the drop-down list, select how you want
the application to react to the user’s entries
• No Auto Add
Select this option if you want to allow users to make entries in the selected
field that are not on the SmartList, but you don’t want the application to add
those entries to the SmartList.
• Confirm Auto Add
Select this option if you want to allow users to make entries in the selected
field that are not on the SmartList, but you want the application to prompt the
user for confirmation before adding the entry into the SmartList.
• Auto Add Always
Select this option if you want to allow users to make entries in the selected
field that are not on the SmartList, and you also want the application to
automatically add the entry into the SmartList.

Add Button
Click this button to add an entry to the SmartList. To add another entry, click in the
Enter New Name and Description field, enter the new SmartList entry and description
(if desired), and then click the Add button. The application adds the entry to the
SmartList list box.

Replace Button
Click this button to replace the selected SmartList entry with another entry you have
created. To replace a SmartList entry, select the entry, type a new entry in the Enter New
Name and Description field, then click this button. If the SmartList entry you are
replacing has already been used for an asset, the Replace Field List Entry dialog
appears informing you of the number of existing assets in the current company that
will be affected by the change. You then have three update options available:

Keep the Original Entry
Click this option button to keep the original entry in the field for existing assets,
but still replace the entry in the SmartList.
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4-39
4
Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields



Blank the Original Entry
Click this option button to remove the original entry from the field for existing
assets and leave it blank.

Globally Replace the Original Entry
Click this option button to replace the original entry in the field with the new entry
for all existing assets.
Delete Button
Click this button to delete the selected SmartList entry. To delete a SmartList entry,
select the entry, then click this button. If the SmartList entry you are deleting has
already been used for an asset, the Delete Field List Entry dialog appears informing
you of the number of existing assets in the current company that will be affected by the
change. You then have two update options available:

Keep the Original Entry
Click this option button to keep the original entry in the field for existing assets,
but still delete the entry from the SmartList.

Blank the Original Entry
Click this option button to remove the original entry from the field for existing
assets and leave it blank.
Fill Button
Click this button to create a SmartList from all previously existing unique data in this
field.
Note: A warning appears during the Fill process if over 1,000 unique entries are
detected. This warning indicates that system performance may be affected by such a
large volume of data in a single field.

Delete All Button
Click this button to delete all SmartList entries from the list. If the SmartList entries you
are deleting have already been used for an asset, the Delete All Field List Entries dialog
appears informing you of the number of existing assets in the current company that
will be affected by the change. You then have two update options available (see Delete
Button above).

Print Button
Click this button to send the SmartList report to the default printer. The report shows
a field’s SmartList entries. For more information, see “Printing a SmartList Report,”
page 4-40.
Printing a SmartList Report
A SmartList is a customized drop-down list box of available entries for a field. You can
print a SmartList report that shows the entries for any field for which you have created a
SmartList.
To print a SmartList report
4-40
1.
Select Customize/Fields from the menu bar. The Customize Fields dialog appears.
2.
Select the field for which you want to print the SmartList report. See “Completing the
Customize Fields Dialog,” page 4-33.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
4
3.
Select the Activate SmartList check box.
4.
Click the SmartList Manager button. The SmartList Manager dialog appears. For more
information, see “Completing the SmartList Manager Dialog,” page 4-38.
5.
Click the Print button. A standard Print dialog appears.
6.
Complete the standard Print dialog to send the SmartList report to the printer.
SmartList Report Sections
The SmartList report contains three sections:

Field Customizations
This section of the report displays the contents of the following fields on the Customize
Fields dialog for the selected field:
• Title field
• View field
• Entry Mask field
• Default field

SmartList Manager
This section of the report displays the following information for the selected field:
• List of available SmartList entries
• Description of each available SmartList entry
• Total number of available SmartList entries

List Options
This section of the report displays the following information about the fields on the
SmartList Manager dialog for the selected field:
• Which of the List Attributes have been selected
• Which one of the Auto Add Options has been selected
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4
Setting Up the Product
Customizing Asset Fields
Sample SmartList Report
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4-42
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 5
Working with Companies
In this chapter:
Editing a Company Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Deleting Companies and Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Using Company Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Managing Your Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
In Chapter 4 you learned how to create a new company. In this chapter, you’ll learn to
perform maintenance on your companies by using the company utility options.
Editing a Company Setup
A company setup defines critical depreciation-related elements of a company, such as short
years and depreciation methods. Without a proper company setup, the application cannot
properly calculate depreciation on your assets. After you’ve defined a company setup, you
can edit that setup.
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5-1
5
Working with Companies
Editing a Company Setup
To edit a company setup
1.
Make sure the company you want to edit is open.
2.
Select File/Edit Company from the menu bar. The Edit Company dialog appears.
You can now make changes to the company setup. The Edit Company dialog is the
same as the New Company dialog. For full details on the fields on this dialog, see
“Completing the New Company Dialog,” page 4-13.
The following field is unique to the Edit Company dialog:

Total Number of Assets
This field indicates the total number of assets that the company contains. You can enter
up to 1,000 assets per company.
Tip: Making changes to the company setup after assets have been added and depreciated
will cause existing depreciation amounts to change. You will probably need to recalculate
depreciation.
Changing Company Settings
It is possible that changing company settings in the Edit Company dialog might require
you to recalculate depreciation. You must recalculate depreciation if you have existing
assets for which you have already calculated depreciation and then you do one of the
following:
• Enter a short year that exists during the life of any asset.
• Change a short year date that you have previously entered (including a short first
year of business).
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Working with Companies
Deleting Companies and Databases
5
• Change the adjustment convention on assets.
In any of these cases, you must clear all system-calculated depreciation by resetting
depreciation to the Beginning Date or the Period Close Date, and then recalculating
depreciation to the current through date.
Deleting Companies and Databases
You should delete a company only if you’ve moved all data into another company or into
another location for a specific purpose. After you delete a company, the data contained
within that company cannot be restored except from company data that you have backed
up.
We recommend that you first back up a company before you delete it, especially if you
think you may want to view the data at a later date. For more information, see “Backing Up
Your Companies,” page 5-9. After you have backed up the company, you can easily restore
the company at a later date, even if you have deleted it. For more information, see
“Restoring a Backed-Up Company,” page 5-11.
You can delete only one company at a time. You cannot have any companies open when
deleting a company.
To delete a database, you must first delete each of the companies within the database.
Before you begin the steps outlined below, you must close any currently open company.
To delete a company
1.
Select File/Delete Company from the menu bar. The Delete Company dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Delete Company dialog, and then click the Delete button. A message
confirms the deletion of the company.
3.
Click Yes to delete the company.
4.
Click the Close button to close the Delete Company dialog.
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5-3
5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
To delete a database
1.
Delete all companies within the database you want to delete.
2.
Select the database you want to delete in the Database field of the Delete Company
dialog, and then click the Delete button. A message confirms the deletion of the
database.
3.
Click Yes to delete the database.
4.
Click the Close button to close the Delete Company dialog.
Note: You may want to use Windows Explorer to delete the physical files associated with
the database (that is, the .BDB, .ID, and .LOG files).
Completing the Delete Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Delete Company dialog.

Companies
Use this field to select the company you want to delete from the list of existing
companies. If the you want to delete is not displayed, you might be looking in the
wrong database. To change the list of companies, select a different database in the
Database field.

Database
Use this field to select the database where the company you want to delete is located.
If you do not see the database you want, select Database List Manager from the File
menu to locate and add the database to the system.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete the selected company.
Note: After you delete a company, the data contained within that company cannot be
restored except from a backup.
Using Company Utilities
The company utilities enable you to manage the asset data in your companies. You can use
the utilities to copy companies, back up and restore your asset data, and more.
Copying a Company
You might want to copy a company in order to create a new company using the same data.
When you copy a company in its entirety, an exact copy of the original company is created,
including its assets. The System Numbers remain intact.
Before you begin the steps outlined below, you must close any currently open company.
5-4
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Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
5
To copy a company
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Copy Company from the menu bar. The Copy
Company dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Copy Company dialog, and then click the Copy button to copy the
company. See “Completing the Copy Company Dialog,” page 5-5. If you’re copying
the company into the same database, or into a database containing a company with
the same name, the Rename Company dialog appears.
3.
Enter a name for the new company. If you want to overwrite a company with the same
name in the selected database, click the Overwrite button; otherwise, click the Rename
button. See “Completing the Rename Company Dialog,” page 5-6. The Overwrite
button is not available if you are copying the company into the same database. The
application begins the copy process, and then returns to the Copy Company dialog.
Click the Close button to close the Copy Company dialog.
Completing the Copy Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Copy Company dialog.

From
Use these fields to describe the original company you are copying.
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5-5
5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities


Companies
Use this field to select the company you want to copy from the list of existing
companies. If the name of the company you want to copy is not displayed, you
might be looking in the wrong database. To change the list of companies, select a
different database in the Database field.

Database
Use this field to select the database containing the company you want to copy. If
you do not see the database you want, you can select Database List Manager from
the File menu. See “Managing Your Databases,” page 5-16.

Delete Original Company After Copy
Select this check box if you want to delete the original company after the copy is
created. When you click the Copy button, a message asks you to confirm the
deletion.
To
Use this field to describe the company to create during the copying process.

Databases
Use this field to select the database in which you want to store the new company
created by the copying process.
Tip: We recommend copying a company to a new database. Copying a company to
the database in which it currently resides may cause performance problems.

Copy Button
Click this button to copy the selected company.

New Database Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to create a new database to store
the company you are copying. For more information, see “Completing the New
Database Dialog,” page 4-6.
Completing the Rename Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Rename Company dialog.

New Company Name
Use this field to enter a new name for the company that you are copying. To rename
the company, click the Rename button.

Overwrite Button
Click this button to overwrite the existing company with the same name as the one you
are copying.

Rename Button
Click this button to change the name of the company that you are copying. You must
enter a new name in the New Company Name field to enable this button.
Setting Up History Events
You can decide which events in an asset’s life you want the application to track. When you
use the Setup History feature, the application tracks only the events that are important to
you.
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Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
5
To set up history events
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/History/Setup History from the menu bar. The Setup
History dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Setup History dialog, and then click OK.
Completing the Setup History Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Setup History dialog.

History Events
This column displays the events in an asset’s life that you can track.

On
Use this column to indicate whether you want to track an event in the asset’s life. If a
check mark appears in this column, then the application will track the event. Click once
in this column if you want to track the event. Click on a check mark to remove it if you
do not want to track the event.

Purge Schedule
 Never Delete History
Click this option button if you do not want the application to delete asset history
events.

Delete History After X Days
Click this option button if you want the application to delete asset history events
after a specified number of days. Enter the desired number of days in the text box.

Confirmation Required
Select this check box if you want the application to display a confirmation
message before the asset history is deleted.
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5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities

Restore Defaults Button
Click this button to revert to the default settings for this dialog.
Purging Asset History
When you purge the asset history from a company, you lose the record of events that
pertain to each asset. For more information, see “Asset History Events,” page 6-31. Before
you decide to do this, you may want to back up your company so that you can recover the
asset history information at a later date. For information on backing up your company, see
“Backing Up Your Companies,” page 5-9.
You can purge asset history in one of two ways:
• Purge asset history manually using the Purge History dialog. See below for details.
• Purge asset history automatically after a specified number of days using the History
Setup feature. For more information, see “Setting Up History Events,” page 5-6.
When you purge history manually using the Purge History dialog, you can either delete all
history events, or you can delete history events prior to a date that you specify.
You can delete the asset history from a single company, or you can delete the asset history
from all of the companies in the selected database.
To purge asset history
5-8
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/History/Purge History from the menu bar. The Purge
History dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Purge History dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the Purge
History Dialog,” page 5-9. The application displays a confirmation message.
3.
Click the Yes button to close the confirmation message. The application either deletes
all history entries, or it deletes the history events prior to the date that you specified
on the Purge History dialog.
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Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
5
Completing the Purge History Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Purge History dialog.

Database
Use the list of databases in this field to select the database that contains the company
(or companies) from which you want to purge asset history. You can purge asset history
from one database at a time.

Company
Use the list of companies in this field to select the company (or companies) from which
you want to purge asset history. You can purge asset history from all of the companies
in the selected database, or from a single company in the selected database.

Purge Options
 Delete All History Events
Click this option button to delete all of the asset history events from the selected
company (or companies).

Delete All History Events Prior To the Specified Date
Click this option button to delete all of the asset history events prior to the date you
specify in the date field.

Purge Date
Use this field to specify the purge date. The application will delete all asset history
events occurring before this date.
Backing Up Your Companies
It is extremely important for you to make backup copies of the data in your companies in
case you lose data due to computer-related problems. Making backups allows you to get
up and running quickly after such an otherwise disastrous episode. You can easily make
backup copies of your company data. If the need ever arises, you can restore the backed-up
data by using the Restore Company function. For more information, see “Restoring a
Backed-Up Company,” page 5-11.
You might also want to back up your data before deleting groups of assets, performing a
global field change, resetting depreciation, or deleting a company, in case you make an
error or later discover you need the original data.
Before you begin the steps outlined below, you must close any currently open company.
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5-9
5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
To make a backup of your company data
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Backup Company from the menu bar. The Backup
Company dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Backup Company dialog, and then click the Next button. The
application displays a dialog that allows you to name and save the backup file.
3.
Enter a file name and select a location for the backup file, and then click the Backup
button. The application saves the backup file and returns to the Backup Company
dialog. See “Completing the Backup Company Dialog,” page 5-11.
Note: If the name that you enter for the backup file already exists, the application asks
if you want to overwrite the file. Click Yes to overwrite the existing backup file;
otherwise, click No and enter a different file name. If you click Yes to overwrite the file
and then cancel the backup process, the application deletes the backup file and you
cannot recover it.
4.
5-10
Click the Cancel button to close the Backup Company dialog.
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Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
5
The backed-up company (or companies) are stored in a file with a BBK extension. Because
the data is compressed, you must use the Restore option to restore it. For more information,
see “Restoring a Backed-Up Company,” page 5-11.
Completing the Backup Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Backup Company dialog.

Companies
Use this field to select the company (or companies) you want to back up.
Note: To select more than one company in the Companies field, hold down the Ctrl
key when you select the companies. The application highlights each company as you
select it. To select several companies that appear consecutively in the list, hold down
the Shift key, and then select the first and last companies. The application highlights
the first and last companies and all of the companies in between them.

Database
Use this field to select the database that contains the company (or companies) you want
to back up.

Select All Button
Click this button to select all of the companies displayed in the Companies field for the
backup.

Next Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to name and save the backup file.
Restoring a Backed-Up Company
If you ever lose data due to a computer-related problem, or if you want to restore data to a
previous state, you will need to restore the companies you have backed up.
During the restore process, you can choose whether to delete the Depreciate history events
from the backed-up database that you are restoring. Deleting unwanted Depreciate history
events can decrease the size of the database, speed up the restore process, and improve on
on-going application performance.
You must close any open company prior to initiating a restore. You can restore the company
to the same database as the original company or to another database.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
5-11
5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
To restore a backed-up company
5-12
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Restore Company from the menu bar. The Restore Select Companies dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Restore - Select Companies dialog, and then click Next when finished.
See “Completing the Restore - Select Companies Dialog,” page 5-14. The Restore Choose Destination dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Restore - Choose Destination dialog, and then click the Next button. See
“Completing the Restore - Choose Destination Dialog,” page 5-14. The Restore - Purge
History dialog appears.
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5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
4.
Complete the Restore - Purge History dialog, and then click the Restore button. See
“Completing the Restore - Purge History Dialog,” page 5-15. The restore process
begins. A series of status messages appears as it decompresses and restores the data.
Note: If you are restoring a backed-up company with the same name as a company
already existing in the selected database, the Restore - Rename Company dialog
appears.
• To rename the company that you are restoring, type a new name in the New
Company Name field, and then click the Rename button.
• To replace the existing company that has the same name as the company you are
restoring, click the Overwrite button.
Caution: If you begin to overwrite an existing company and then you cancel the restore
process, the application deletes the company from the database. You cannot recover it.
• If you are restoring more than one company and you want to replace all of the
existing companies that have the same names as the companies you are restoring,
click the Overwrite All button.
After the application completes the restore process, it returns to the Restore - Purge
History dialog.
5.
Click the Cancel button when the restore is complete to close the Restore - Purge
History dialog.
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5-13
5
Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
Completing the Restore - Select Companies Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Restore - Select Companies dialog.

File Name
Use this field to enter the selected backup file, which holds the company (or
companies) that you want to restore.


Browse Button
Click this button to locate the folder containing the backed-up file.
Companies Found in Backup File
This field displays the name of the company (or companies) contained in the
backed-up file. You can choose to restore one or more of the companies found in the
backup file.
Tip: To select more than one company in this field, hold down the Ctrl key when you
select the companies. The application highlights each company as you select it. To
select several companies that appear consecutively in the list, hold down the Shift key,
and then select the first and last companies. The application highlights the first and
last companies and all of the companies in between them.


Select All Button
Click this button to select all of the companies displayed in the Companies Found
in Backup File field.
Next Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to select the database to which you
want to restore the company or companies. See “Completing the Restore - Choose
Destination Dialog,” page 5-14.
Completing the Restore - Choose Destination Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Restore - Choose Destination dialog.

Database
Use this field to select the database where you want the company (or companies)
restored.
Tip: If you are renaming the company during the restore process, we recommend
restoring the company to a new database. Restoring a company to the database in
which it currently resides and renaming it may cause performance problems. You can
overwrite an existing company without causing any problems.

Existing Companies
This field lists the companies already residing in the selected database.
Note: If you begin to overwrite an existing company and then you cancel the restore
process, the application deletes the company from the database. You cannot recover it.

5-14
Next Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to delete history events from the
company or companies that you are restoring. See “Completing the Restore - Purge
History Dialog,” page 5-15.
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Working with Companies
Using Company Utilities
5
Completing the Restore - Purge History Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Restore - Purge History dialog.

Smart Purge
Click this option button if you want to delete the depreciation events from the database
that you are restoring. If you click this button, you have two options:

Purge All Depreciation Events
Click this option button if you want to delete all of the depreciation events from the
database that you are restoring.

Purge Depreciation Events Prior To
Click this option button if you want to delete only the depreciation events prior to
the date that you enter in the date field.

Do Not Purge
Click this option button if you do not want to delete any history events from the
database that you are restoring.

Restore Button
Click this button to begin restoring the company or companies you selected on the
Restore - Select Companies dialog to the selected database. If you are restoring a
backed-up company with the same name as a company already existing in the selected
database, a dialog appears and allows you to overwrite the existing company or
rename the company that you are restoring. See “Completing the Restore - Rename
Company Dialog,” page 5-15.
Completing the Restore - Rename Company Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Restore - Rename Company dialog.

New Company Name
Use this field to enter a new name for the company that you are restoring. To rename
the company, click the Rename button.

Overwrite Button
Click this button to overwrite the existing company with the same name as the one you
are restoring.

Overwrite All Button
Click this button if you are restoring more than one company and you want to
overwrite all of the existing companies in the database.

Rename Button
Click this button to change the name of the company that you are restoring. You must
enter a new name in the New Company Name field to enable this button.
Importing Data
The Custom Import Helper guides you through the process of importing asset data from
other sources into your Sage Fixed Assets application. When importing data, you can add
the assets into a new or existing company. When using the Custom Import Helper, you can
import asset data to update existing assets, or as new assets (that is, the application assigns
new system numbers to the imported assets). The new assets you import can be either
active or fully disposed. You can import inactive assets if you also import the Activity Code
field. For detailed instructions, see Appendix C, “Custom Import Helper.”
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Working with Companies
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Note: If you are upgrading your version of Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation or
moving data between installed versions of the application, use a simple backup and
restore procedure instead of Custom Import.
No matter which type of data you are importing, you can import data only by company,
and you can only import one company at a time.
Exporting Data
Sage Fixed Assets now offers two ways to export asset data to Microsoft Excel:
• As in previous Sage Fixed Assets versions, you can use the Custom Export Helper to
export asset data to a .CSV file, which can be opened in Microsoft Excel. For detailed
instructions on using the Export Helper, see Appendix D, “Custom Export Helper.”
• You can now export the current group of assets in the Asset List to Microsoft Excel.
For more information, see “Exporting the Asset List to Microsoft Excel,” page 3-15.
Managing Your Databases
You can use the Database List Manager to help you manage your databases. In addition to
helping you create and rename databases, the Database List Manager also helps you find
databases. After using the application for some time, you, or other users, might have
created databases in locations that you might not remember. The Database List Manager is
extremely useful when you need to connect to a database that another user created in an
unknown location.
After the Database List Manager locates a database, you can add the database to a list of
databases that you have created. The application remembers where the database is located.
You can access the Database List Manager from the File menu, or from any dialog with a
Database button. To create a new database using Database List Manager, click the New
Database button and complete the New Database dialog. For more information, see
“Creating a New Database,” page 4-4.
Using Windows Explorer to Manage Your Databases
You can use Windows Explorer to move and copy your database file. The database file
name can have any name that complies with Windows standards, as long as it has a BDB
file extension. A single folder can contain two or more database files.
If you use Windows Explorer to move your database file, make sure that you also move the
file with the .ID extension. For example, if you move the MYDATA.BDB file to a new folder,
make sure you also move MYDATA.ID to the same folder.
After you move a database using Windows Explorer, you must locate the database using
the Database List Manager to let the system know the new location.
To locate a database using the Database List Manager
1.
Select File/Database List Manager from the menu bar.
If a company is open, a message asks if you want to close the open company.
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5
2.
Click Yes to continue. The Database List Manager dialog appears. See “Completing
the Database List Manager Dialog,” page 5-19.
3.
Click the Find button. The Find Databases dialog appears. See “Completing the Find
Databases Dialog,” page 5-20.
4.
Select the drive(s) that you want to search.
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5.
To specify a folder to search, click the Browse button. The Browse for Folder dialog
appears.
6.
Select the folder that you want to search, and then click OK. For more information, see
“Completing the Browse for Folder Dialog,” page 5-21. The application returns to the
Find Databases dialog.
7.
Click the Search button. The application searches the selected drive(s) for databases.
8.
Select a database in the list box, and then click the Add button to add the database to
your list. The application adds the database to the list.
Note: The Rename Database dialog appears if you attempt to add a database that
already exists in the list. You can change the name of the database, the name of the
database file, and/or the location of the database.
9.
Repeat step 8 for additional databases you want to add to your list.
10. Click the Close button on the Find Databases dialog.
11. Click the Close button on the Database List Manager dialog.
To rename a database
You can use the Database List Manager to change the database name. You cannot change
the database file name.
5-18
1.
Select File/Database List Manager from the menu bar. The Database List Manager
dialog appears.
2.
Select the database you want to rename from the list.
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3.
Click the Rename button. The Rename Database dialog appears.
4.
Complete the Rename Database dialog, and click OK to return to the Database List
Manager dialog. See “Completing the Rename Database Dialog,” page 5-21.
5.
Click the Close button on the Database List Manager dialog.
To remove a database from the list
Removing a database removes the database from the list; however, it does not delete the
database. To delete a database, see “Deleting Companies and Databases,” page 5-3.
1.
Select File/Database List Manager from the menu bar. The Database List Manager
dialog appears.
2.
Select the database you want to remove from the list.
3.
Click the Remove button. A message asks you to confirm your intention to remove the
database.
4.
Click Yes to remove the database. The application removes the database from the list
and displays a message confirming the removal.
5.
Click OK to exit the confirmation message.
6.
Click the Close button on the Database List Manager dialog.
Completing the Database List Manager Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Database List Manager dialog.

Database Name
This field displays the names of all databases in the system. To perform a function on
a database, select it, and then click the appropriate button to the right.

Database Path
This field displays the directory path and file name of the database as it appears in the
Windows Explorer program.

New Database Button
Click this button to create a new database. The application displays a dialog that allows
you to select the location and name of the new database. For more information, see
“Creating a New Database,” page 4-4.
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
Find Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to search for an existing database.
For more information, see “Completing the Find Databases Dialog,” page 5-20.

Configure Button
Click this button to view a series of dialogs that allow you to specify the protocols and
start-up parameters for your databases.

Rename Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to rename the selected database.
For more information, see “Completing the Rename Database Dialog,” page 5-21.

Remove Button
Click this button to remove the selected database from the list. This does not delete the
database but makes it unavailable for use in the application.

Open Company Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to open an existing company in the
selected database.
Completing the Find Databases Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Find Databases dialog.

5-20
Options
Use this field to specify the drive(s) that you want to search for the databases.

Specified
Click this option button to search only in the path specified in the Find Path In
field.

All Drives
Click this option button to search all drives on your computer (both local and
network drives).

All Local Drives
Click this option button to search only the local drives on your computer’s hard
disk.

All Network Drives
Click this option button to search only the computer network drives.

Find Path In
Use this field to enter the path to the directory where a database is located (if you know
it). If not, use the Browse and Search buttons.

Browse Button
Click the Browse button to display a dialog that allows you to select the folder that you
want to search for the database(s). After you select the folder, the path to the selected
folder appears in the Find Path In field. Click the Specified option button, and then
click the Search button. The application searches for the database in the selected folder
and in all folders underneath the selected folder.

Search Button
Click this button to search for the database.

Path
This field displays all databases found during a search. Use this field to individually
select databases to add to your list by clicking the Add button.
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5

Name
This field displays the database name. This is the name that appears in the Database
field of other dialogs.

Add Button
Click this button to add the selected database to the list of databases in the Database
List Manager.
Completing the Browse for Folder Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Browse for Folder dialog.

Locate Path
Use this field to select the folder containing the database you are looking for.

Folder
This field displays the selected folder.

Make New Folder Button
Click this button to create a subfolder underneath the selected folder. After you create
the new folder, you can rename it by right-clicking the folder and selecting Rename
from the popup menu.
Completing the Rename Database Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Rename Database dialog.

Database Name
Use this field to enter a new name for the database. The database name is the name that
appears in the Database field of other dialogs in the application.

Database File Name
Use this field to enter a new physical file name for the database. This is the name that
appears in Windows Explorer program.

Database Location
This field displays the folder containing the database file that you want to rename.
Click the Browse button to select the folder.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 6
Working with Assets
In this chapter:
Entering New Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Editing Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
Replicating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
Applying Book Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Asset Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Printing Asset Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-29
Asset History Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-32
This chapter describes the procedures for all the different methods of creating assets, and
explains the tabs in Asset Detail. Before advancing further into this chapter, make sure
you’ve read “Understanding Asset Fields and SmartLists,” page 1-6. Creating SmartLists
before adding assets will be a great help.
In addition to the import options, there are three additional methods available for adding
assets into the application.
1.
First is the standard method of entering data in each of the asset fields individually.
For more information, see “Entering Assets in Asset Detail,” page 6-2.
2.
In the second method, you replicate an asset that closely matches the asset you are
adding. For more information, see “Replicating Assets,” page 6-21.
3.
In the third method, you apply an asset template that you have created to a new asset.
For more information, see “Applying Asset Templates,” page 6-26.
The second and third methods drastically reduce your data-entry time, because you only
have to complete a few asset fields (the rest are completed automatically).
Entering New Assets
Note: You can enter up to 1,000 assets per company. You cannot enter new assets in a
company after 1,000 assets have been created. To see how many assets are currently in a
company, select the All FAS Assets group in the Asset List. The application displays the
number of assets in the Assets in Group field at the top of the Asset List.
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Working with Assets
Entering New Assets
Entering Assets in Asset Detail
Entering assets is a three-phase process:
• Enter the general asset information.
• Enter the book-specific information. (You should start with the Tax book so you can
make the most use of the application’s defaults to save you valuable data entry time
in the other books.)
• Enter any notes, if applicable.
To add individual assets into a company
1.
Do any of the following:
• Select Asset/Add from the menu bar.
• Click the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
A blank set of asset tabs appears in Asset Detail.
6-2
2.
Complete the general information fields on the Main tab. For more information, see
“Completing the General Information Fields,” page 6-3.
3.
Complete the book information fields on the Main tab. For more information, see
“Completing the Book Information Fields,” page 6-4.
4.
Complete the Notes tab if you want to store additional information for this asset not
covered by any of the other tabs. For additional information, see “The Notes Tab of
Asset Detail,” page 3-22.
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Entering New Assets
5.
6
Save the asset by doing any one of the following:
• Click the Save Asset button.
• Press Ctrl+S.
• Select Asset/Save from the menu bar.
The application assigns a System Number to the asset and displays the System Number
and description underneath the title bar of Asset Detail. The asset is now saved.
Completing the General Information Fields
Follow the guidelines below to complete the general information fields.
These guidelines are based upon all available fields in the general information field set. If
you have customized your application, it is possible that some of these fields do not display
or that other fields display instead. A brief descriptive message appears in the status bar as
you enter each field.
After you complete the fields that are in full view, use the scroll bar to the right of the
general information fields to make the rest of the fields available.

Asset ID
Use this field to enter the number that your company has assigned to identify this asset.
This number can be any number you’ve been using in the past to track this asset, up to
25 alphanumeric characters. You can assign the same asset ID to more than one asset.

Description
Use this field to enter a description of the asset. This description prints on all reports
that include the description field. However, on many reports the Description field is
truncated to ten characters. Therefore, when creating a description, you might want to
make the first ten characters the most descriptive.

Location
Use this field to enter any alphanumeric code or description to identify this asset’s
location. For example, a location code could be a room number, a building name, or the
name of a city.

G/L Asset Account
Use this field to enter a General Ledger Asset Account number as defined by your
accounting department. You can enter up to 100 alphanumeric characters. This field is
important to the Annual Activity report and the File Listing report.

G/L Accumulated Account
Use this field to enter a General Ledger Accumulated Account number as defined by
your accounting department. You can enter up to 100 alphanumeric characters. This
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Working with Assets
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field is important when posting fixed asset information to your corporate accounting
system. It is also important to the General Ledger Posting report.

Class
Use this field to enter any one- or two-character code, which you define, to classify this
asset. Common class codes are FF for Furniture and Fixtures, and ME for Machinery
and Equipment.

G/L Expense Account
Use this field to enter a General Ledger Expense Account number as defined by your
accounting department. You can enter up to 100 alphanumeric characters. This field is
important when posting fixed asset information to your corporate accounting system.
It is also important to the General Ledger Posting report.

Purchase Order
Use this field to enter the purchase order number for the asset, up to 25 alphanumeric
characters.

Vendor
Use this field to enter the name of the vendor of the asset, up to 25 alphanumeric
characters.

Serial Number
Use this field to enter the manufacturer’s serial number for the asset, up to 25
alphanumeric characters.

Owner
Use this field to enter the name of the person most responsible for the asset, up to 25
alphanumeric characters.

Custom Fields 1 Through 5
Use these additional five alphanumeric fields for entering information that is not
appropriate for the other fields. The application treats entries in these fields as text.
These fields may have been customized with new names.

Custom Date 1 and 2
Use these two date fields for entering information that is not appropriate for the other
fields. These fields may have been customized with new names.
Completing the Book Information Fields
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Entering New Assets
6
Follow the guidelines below to complete the book information fields on the Main tab in
Asset Detail.
The book information fields are extremely important since they determine your
depreciation calculations. You must complete most of the fields according to rules imposed
under GAAP or by the IRS. Although the application displays a warning message when it
detects entries inconsistent with these rules, it does allow you to override the warning and
make your own entries (it assumes you know what you’re doing). However, if you are
unsure about what you’re doing, we recommend you heed the warning messages and
rethink your entry. If you need a brush-up on depreciation rules and regulations, or if you
need to simply look up a depreciation concept, refer to Appendix A, “Depreciation and
Fixed Asset Concepts.”
The book information fields on the Main tab are organized in rows and columns. Each field
contains depreciation data specific to the book heading up the column.
The application enters default information in the other open books based on the Tax book
entries. For this reason, you might want to complete the Tax book first. Then you may only
need to make slight changes to each additional book. If you need to set default values in
other books after the initial setting, you must use the Apply Book Defaults feature on the
Asset menu. See “Applying Book Defaults,” page 6-22.
Following are the book information fields:

Acquisition Date
Use this field to enter the date on which you actually acquired the asset (as opposed to
the date you placed the asset in service). The application uses this date in the Quarterly
Acquisition report, in the Annual Activity report, and in the Fixed Asset Summary
report. If you choose not to enter a date, the application defaults to the
Placed-in-Service Date from the reported book as the Acquisition Date for these three
reports.

Acquired By
Use this field to indicate how the asset was acquired.

Purchase
Click this option button if you acquired the asset by purchasing it.

Exchange or Conversion
Click this option button if the asset was received in a like-kind exchange or an
involuntary conversion. Clicking this option tells the application that the asset
should not appear on any reports that are run prior to the date the asset was
received in an exchange. For information about like-kind exchanges and
involuntary conversions, see “Like-Kind Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions
After 1/2/2000,” page 7-8.

Property Type
Use this field to select the correct Property Type of the asset. This is a required field. The
application uses this field to determine valid depreciation methods, as well as other
important depreciation factors. For an explanation of Property Type, see “Types of
Property,” page A-5.

Placed-in-Service Date
Use this field to enter the date you placed the asset in service. Enter the date in
MM/DD/YYYY format. Click the down arrow to select the date from a calendar. For
more information, see “Entering Dates in Date Fields,” page 3-26. The application uses
this field to determine when to begin depreciating an asset. This field is mandatory and
extremely important for depreciation calculations. You must enter the
Placed-in-Service Date in order for the rest of the fields to become active.
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Entering New Assets

Acquisition Value
Use this field to enter the acquired dollar value of the asset including freight and
installation charges, up to nine digits to the left of the decimal point. You can use a
negative number when you have a credit or rebate on an asset that reduces its value
below zero. To enter a negative number, use the minus sign on the keyboard. The
application displays -$200 using parentheses; that is, ($200).
Note: The acquisition value is used in determining the asset’s depreciable basis. The
formula for determining the depreciable basis depends on the depreciation method.
In general, the depreciable basis is the acquisition value, multiplied by the
business-use percentage if applicable, minus any salvage value, Section 179 expense
or bonus depreciation, Section 168 Allowance, and Investment Tax Credit reduction
amount.

Depreciation Method
Use this field to select a depreciation method code. A depreciation method code is a
combination of the depreciation method and averaging convention. After you
complete the Property Type and Placed-in-Service Date fields, the application provides
a default depreciation method, estimated life, and ADS life.
In the drop-down list, the application displays valid depreciation methods based on
date placed in service and property type. Custom depreciation methods appear in the
list, or you can enter the custom code in lower case letters.
The following chart displays the available standard depreciation methods.
6-6
Code
Depreciation Method
MA
MACRS formula plus 168 Allowance
AA
ADS straight-line MACRS plus 168 Allowance
MR
MACRS Indian Reservation plus 168 Allowance
SB
Straight-line, full-month plus 168 Allowance
MF
MACRS formula
MT
MACRS table
AD
ADS straight-line MACRS
MI
MACRS Indian Reservation
AT
ACRS table
SA
Straight-line, alternate ACRS formula
ST
Straight-line, alternate ACRS table
SD
Straight-line, modified half-year
SL
Straight-line
SF
Straight-line, full month
SH
Straight-line, half-year
DB
Declining-balance, switch to SL when optimal
DD
Declining-balance, modified half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DC
Declining-balance, no switch to SL
DH
Declining-balance, half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DE
Declining-balance, modified half-year, no switch to SL
DI
Declining-balance, half-year, no switch to SL
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Code
6
Depreciation Method
YH
Sum-of-the-years’-digits, half-year
YD
Sum-of-the-years’-digits, modified half-year
YS
Sum-of-the-years’-digits
RV
Remaining value over remaining life
OC
Own depreciation calculation
NO
Do not depreciate
For a detailed explanation of depreciation methods, see Appendix B, “Depreciation
Methods.”

Estimated Life
Use this field to enter the asset’s estimated life in the format YY/MM. The application
uses this field to determine the time period over which the asset will recover its
depreciable basis. For some methods you can select the estimated life from a list of
valid entries. Generally, you cannot enter an estimated life of less than 1 year for an
asset. Exceptions are:
• If the asset’s depreciation method is MACRS formula (MF or MA), 150%
declining-balance, and the property type is real or personal property other than
an automobile, the estimated life can be 6 months.
• If the asset’s depreciation method is straight-line (SL), ADS straight-line MACRS
(AD or AA), remaining value over remaining life (RV), or your own depreciation
calculation (OC), the estimated life can be 1 to 11 months. Method OC lets you
manually enter depreciation amounts; the application will not calculate
depreciation for the asset.
Note: To help you determine the correct estimated life for an asset for the Tax book,
you can use the IRS Table link located in Asset Detail. Here you will find the
easy-to-use version of the IRS ADR Class Life Table.

ADS Life
Use this field to enter the asset’s ADS life. The ADS life is assigned to an asset type
under the MACRS Alternative Depreciation System. For most assets, the ADS life is the
midpoint of the Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) in which the asset belongs.
The application uses this field as the asset’s default estimated life in the user books
(Internal, Custom 1, and Custom 2) and in the AMT and ACE books (where
applicable).
Note: If you elect depreciation method AD or AA (MACRS straight-line) for regular
tax purposes, enter the asset’s ADS life in both the Estimated Life field and the ADS
Life field in the Tax book. The application uses the entry in the Estimated Life field for
calculating depreciation in the Tax book, and the entry in the ADS Life field for setting
defaults in other books where appropriate.
If you choose not to enter an ADS life, the application automatically assigns and
displays a default life based on Tax book entries. Because there are exceptions to the
general rules the application uses, entering a known ADS life for a specific asset is more
accurate than letting the application determine it.
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The following chart outlines some frequently used ADS lives (as outlined in Rev. Proc
87-56):
Asset
ADS Life
(Years)
Automobiles
5
Copiers
6
Information systems; including computers
5
Land improvements
20
Office equipment and furniture
10
Real property
40
Trucks, heavy general purpose
6
Trucks, light general purpose
5
Typewriters and adding machines
6
Note: Although the application will default an ADS life based on the Estimated Life
field, it is best to look up the ADS Life field yourself. For ease of use, we have
reformatted the IRS ADR Class Life Table. It is accessed by following the IRS Table
link in Asset Detail.

Business Use %
Use this field to specify the percentage of business use the asset receives, versus the
percentage of personal use it receives (if applicable). Enter only the percentage of
business use.
If you enter any number except 100 in the Business Use % field, the application
displays the Business Use dialog. This dialog allows you to enter different business use
percentage rates for each fiscal year of the asset’s life. The effective date for each change
in business use percentage must be the beginning date of a fiscal year. See “Completing
the Business Use Dialog,” page 6-16.

179 Deduction
Use this field to enter either a Section 179 amount or a pre-1981 bonus amount (if one
of these options applies). You decide which of these two options applies based on the
asset’s service date and several other factors. If neither option applies, accept the
default of zero. If a previous entry disqualifies the application of either of these options,
this field is disabled.
This field displays the total Section 179 and Bonus amount calculated in the
§179/Bonus Details dialog. To access this dialog, click in the Section 179 field, and then
click the down-arrow to the right of the field or enter an amount in the 179 Deduction
field, and then press Enter. See “Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page
6-17.

Section 179
Note: This section describes the Section 179 deduction that is claimed on the Form
4562 at the end of the tax year. For information on taking a deduction under Other
Section 179 Deductions, see “Section 179 Deductions,” page 6-11.
This option is only used for assets using an ACRS or MACRS depreciation method
(methods MF, MA, MT, MI, MR, AD, AA, AT, SF, SB, SA, ST, or custom method). A
6-8
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6
Section 179 deduction allows you to treat the cost of a qualifying asset as an
expense, rather than as a capital investment to be depreciated in the future.
Enter the amount of the asset’s cost (if any) that you wish to deduct. If you have
already expensed the maximum amount for the year (see below) or if you are not
taking the deduction, enter zero as the dollar amount.
The following guidelines apply only to property that qualifies under Section 179.
For property placed in service in 1982 through 1986, the total maximum allowable
amount you can expense is $5,000 per year for all assets combined. For property
placed in service after 1986 through taxable years beginning before January 1, 1993,
the total maximum amount that you can expense is $10,000 per year. For property
placed in service in taxable years beginning after December 31, 1992, the table
below displays the total maximum amount you can expense:
Tax Year Beginning In
Maximum Section 179
1993 through 1996
$17,500
1997
$18,000
1998
$18,500
1999
$19,000
2000
$20,000
2001 - 2002
$24,000
2003
$100,000
2004
$102,000
2005
$105,000
2006
$108,000
2007
$125,000
2008
$250,000
2009
$250,000
2010 *
$500,000
2011 *
$500,000
2012
$139,000
2013 and thereafter
$25,000
* Recently passed legislation for fiscal years beginning in 2010 and 2011 allows an election
to be made that would include up to $250,000.00 of real property in the definition of
qualified Section 179 property eligible for immediate expensing. Specifically the real
property must be qualified leasehold improvement property, qualified restaurant
property, or qualified retail improvement property. The deduction on real property is
subject to the same Section 179 phase-out rules for personal property and does not apply
to nonresidential real or residential rental property. Remember if you elect to claim a
Section 179 deduction on real property, then you must identify all qualifying property
using the Qualified §179 Property check box on the §179/Bonus Details dialog in Asset
Detail, in order to properly calculate the phase-out limits.
Sport Utility Vehicles
The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 limits the Section 179 expense on a Sport
Utility Vehicle (SUV) weighing between 6,000 and 14,000 pounds to $25,000. The
$25,000 limit applies to SUVs placed in service after 10/22/04. To enter an asset as
an SUV, use property type Q, listed property.
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The maximum amount of Section 179 that you can take in one year is also limited
by the threshold amount (see below).
Note: There are increased limits for:
 New York Liberty Zone property; see “Section 179 Limits for New York Liberty
Zone Property,” page 8-35.
 Enterprise Zone property; see “Section 179 Limits for Enterprise Zone Property,”
page 8-39.
 Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone property; see “Section 179 Limits for Qualified
Gulf Opportunity Zone Property,” page 8-41.
 Qualified Recovery Assistance property (Kansas Disaster Zone property); see
“Section 179 Limits for Kansas Disaster Zone Property,” page 8-44.
 Qualified Disaster Assistance property (Qualified Disaster Zone property); see
“Section 179 Limits for Qualified Disaster Zone Property,” page 8-46.
Threshold Amounts
If the total acquired value of qualifying property placed in service during the year
exceeds the threshold amount for that year, the amount of Section 179 expense that
you can take decreases one dollar for each dollar exceeding the threshold amount.
For example, if the total acquired value of property placed in service in a taxable
year beginning in 2010 exceeds $2,500,000 ($2,000,000 threshold + $500,000 dollar
limit for 2010), you cannot take any Section 179 expense deduction.
Recently passed legislation for fiscal years beginning in 2010 and 2011 allows an
election to be made that would include up to $250,000.00 of real property in the
definition of qualified Section 179 property eligible for immediate expensing.
Remember if you elect to claim a Section 179 deduction on real property, then you
must identify all qualifying property using the Qualified §179 Property check box
on the §179/Bonus Details dialog in Asset Detail, in order to properly calculate the
phase-out limits.
The table below displays the threshold amounts for each taxable year.
Taxable Year
Threshold Amount
1986 - 2002
$200,000
2003
$400,000
2004
$410,000
2005
$420,000
2006
$430,000
2007
$500,000
2008
$800,000
2009
$800,000
2010 *
$2,000,000
2011 *
$2,000,000
2012
$560,000
2013 and thereafter
$200,000
* The threshold amount increase for 2010 and 2011 is due to the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, as
signed into law on September 27, 2010.
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6
Note: The application does not warn you during data entry of an individual asset if
the total acquired value of qualifying property placed in service during the year
exceeds the Section 179 limit. However, you can use the Audit Advisor to determine if
you have exceeded the Section 179 limit for all assets placed in service in the year.
You cannot depreciate the amount expensed under the Section 179 deduction. For
example, suppose you are entering an asset that was fully depreciated under an
earlier solution. If the asset’s acquired value is $10,000 and $6,000 was taken as a
Section 179 expense, you would enter $10,000 as Acquisition Value, $6,000 as the
Section 179 expense, and $4,000 as beginning accumulated depreciation. If you are
entering a newly acquired asset, enter the Section 179 expense amount and the
application will calculate the correct depreciation on any remaining depreciable
basis.
You also cannot take any Investment Tax Credit (ITC) on the part of an asset’s cost
that is expensed under Section 179. The application automatically takes any
Section 179 expense into account when it calculates ITC for the asset.
The application will not let you enter more than the maximum Section 179 expense
for one asset. To view Section 179 amounts for each asset and totals for the fiscal
year, run the Tax Expense report.

Section 179 Deductions
The Jobs Creation Act of 2004 provided a new deduction under Section 179B. The
Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 added additional deductions under Sections
179C and 179D. The Small Business Act of 2007 created a new deduction under
Section 179E. To take a deduction under Section 179B, 179C, 179D, or 179E, you
must select the desired code in the §179/Bonus Details dialog.
To access this dialog, click in the 179 Deduction field in Asset Detail, and then click
the down arrow. The §179/Bonus Details dialog appears. For information on
completing this dialog, see “Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page
6-17.
For a brief description of the deductions available under Section 179B, 179C, 179D,
and 179E, see “§179/Other Codes,” page 6-19.

Bonus Depreciation
This option is only used for assets using a depreciation method other than an
ACRS or MACRS method. In addition, the asset must be personal property, it must
have an estimated life of at least 6 years, and it must use a straight-line,
declining-balance, sum-of-the-years’ digits, own calculation, or custom calculation
depreciation method.
For qualifying assets, you may be entitled to a 20% first-year depreciation bonus
on up to $10,000 of eligible property placed in service during a taxable year prior
to 1981.
The application calculates the bonus amount based on the preliminary depreciable
basis of the asset without subtracting the salvage value. (The preliminary
depreciable basis here is the acquisition value times the business-use percentage.)
If you take the bonus, the application subtracts it from the preliminary depreciable
basis before making any further calculations. On reports, however, the bonus
amount is included in accumulated depreciation, rather than being shown as
subtracted from the depreciable basis.
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The application will not let you enter more than $2,000 or 20% of the depreciable
basis, whichever is less, as the bonus amount for any one asset. It does not keep
track of your total bonus taken as you enter asset information. You must limit the
first-year bonus depreciation taken according to IRS rules.

168 Allowance %
Use this field to select either a 30%, 50%, or 100% allowance under IRS Section 168.
The 2010 Tax Relief Act allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service
after September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011, (or December 31, 2012 for
assets with longer production lives).
The 168 Allowance will still be available for qualified property placed in service in a
special disaster zone through 2012 for personal property and through 2013 for real
property, and for cellulosic biofuel plant property through 2012. Beginning in 2006, the
168 Allowance can also be taken for reuse and recycling property. Currently, there is no
expiration of the 168 Allowance for reuse and recycling property.
This field is available only if you select a “Plus 168” depreciation method (that is,
depreciation method MA, MR, AA, or SB.)
After you select a “Plus 168” depreciation method, either 30, 50, or 100 appears in the
168 Allowance % field. The default selection is 50 for property placed in service after
May 5, 2003. The calculated amount of the allowance is also displayed in the 168
Allowance Amount field. For more information, see “168 Allowance Amount,” page
6-15.

Salvage Value
Use this field to enter the estimated salvage value of the asset. Salvage value is an
estimate of an asset’s worth at the end of its useful life. Several depreciation methods
use the salvage value in determining depreciation amounts. In such cases, the salvage
value is generally subtracted from the acquisition value when calculating the
depreciable basis.

Investment Tax Credit
Use this field to enter the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) amount applied to the asset (if
applicable). ITC allows a credit for a percentage of an asset’s cost basis, based on the
estimated life of the asset and when you placed it in service. To enter an amount, click
in the Investment Tax Credit field, and then click the arrow. The Investment Tax Credit
dialog appears (see “Completing the Investment Tax Credit Dialog,” page 6-19). In the
ITC Credit field, the application only displays ITC options that are valid for this asset
based on property type, service date, and depreciation method. Select one of the valid
ITC options for this asset. The following chart outlines all possible choices:
Code
1
6-12
ITC Option
Heat/Power System
2
Small Wind Energy
3
Geothermal Heat Pump
4
Advanced Energy Project
A
New Property, Full Credit
B
New Property, Reduced Credit
C
Used Property, Full Credit
D
Used Property, Reduced Credit
E
30-year Rehabilitation Property
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Code
6
ITC Option
F
40-year Rehabilitation Property
G
Certified Historic Structures
H
Pre-1936 Buildings
R
Reforestation Property
S
Solar Energy Property
T
Other Energy Property
U
Fuel Cell Property
V
Microturbine Property
W
Advanced Coal Project
X
No Investment Tax Credit
Y
Gasification Project
For assets acquired after 1985, you usually cannot take ITC and you should select X as
the ITC option. If you choose an ITC option other than X, the application automatically
determines the ITC percentage based on the option chosen, the year the asset was
placed in service, its property type, its estimated life, and its depreciable basis. The
percentage field displays the system-determined percentage. You can override the
percentage or amount of ITC taken, which can be useful if the asset is allowed more
than one type of credit (such as an energy credit and a regular credit).
To accept the system’s percentage, click OK. To override the default, enter a different
percentage in XX.XX format.
After you enter the percentage and click OK, the application calculates the amount of
the ITC as the asset’s depreciable basis multiplied by the ITC percentage. If the asset’s
depreciable basis is not the same as its at-risk basis, you may need to adjust the
calculated amount.
To override the calculated amount, click the arrow again, enter the new amount, and
click OK. The application adjusts the ITC percentage automatically.

Beginning Depreciation Fields
There are three fields that handle beginning depreciation: Beginning Date, Beginning
Year-to-Date, and Beginning Accumulated.
The application automatically enters information in the beginning depreciation fields
under several different circumstances:
• You have manually entered data in the beginning depreciation fields. You will do
this if you have calculated depreciation on an asset before you purchased the Sage
Fixed Assets application. Previously, you may have used other software or
computed depreciation using a spreadsheet.
• You have imported assets from another source (such as a spreadsheet program)
into the Sage Fixed Assets application. When you use the Import Helper to import
assets from another source, the system places the depreciation associated with the
imported assets in the beginning depreciation fields only if you enter the
depreciation amounts in the appropriate fields before you import the assets.
• You have changed an entry in an asset that is critical to calculating depreciation
and have chosen to save the depreciation already calculated to date by the Sage
Fixed Assets application. When you indicate that this is what you want to do, the
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application takes the current depreciation and copies it into the beginning
depreciation fields.
You are required to enter data in these fields only if you are entering an asset on which
depreciation was calculated in another system. These fields are not required for newly
acquired assets or for assets that have never been depreciated.
Entering beginning depreciation amounts is your way of telling the application to
accept your prior depreciation balances and to calculate depreciation from that point
forward.
Example: Suppose your company owns an asset with an acquired value of $1,000 and
a life of 10 years, and you are depreciating it using the straight-line method. The
company’s fiscal year-end is June. You placed the asset in service on July 1, 1998, and
you are adding it to the application on June 30, 2007, after you have taken 9 years of
depreciation. You would enter a beginning current YTD depreciation of $100,
beginning accumulated depreciation of $900, and a beginning date of 06/07, for June
2007. Note that the beginning accumulated depreciation amount includes the $100
depreciation for the current fiscal year.
Note: When applicable, the Beginning Year-to-Date and Beginning Accumulated
fields should include bonus depreciation but not Section 179 expense or the 168
Allowance. You enter Section 179 expense in the 179 Deduction field. The application
calculates the 168 Allowance and displays the amount in the 168 Allowance Amount
field. The Section 179 expense and the 168 Allowance are displayed separately in
Asset Detail because special rules and limitations apply to these values.

Beginning Date
Use this field to enter the date through which you have calculated the amounts for
beginning YTD depreciation and beginning accumulated depreciation. Enter the
date in MM/YYYY format.
The application calculates depreciation for this asset starting from the next month
and adds the beginning amounts to the amounts it calculates for future periods.
The simplest approach is to enter the end of the last fiscal year as the beginning
date and let the application begin calculating depreciation for the new fiscal year.
This field is only required if you are entering depreciation for an asset on which
you calculated depreciation on another system; it is not required for newly
acquired assets.
Do not confuse the Beginning Date with the date on which you are entering assets
in the application for the first time. For example, if an asset was placed in service
on 8/1/06, was depreciated through 12/2006, and entered in the application on
5/3/07, the Beginning Date field should be 12/2006. The application starts
depreciating the asset on 1/1/07. If you were to mistakenly enter 5/2007 in the
Beginning Date field, you would have zero depreciation in the Beginning
Year-to-Date field (because the asset was not yet depreciated in 2007), and the
accumulated depreciation through 12/2006 would be entered in the Beginning
Accumulated field. What would happen is that the application would start
calculating depreciation on 6/1/07 and five months of depreciation (1/1/07
through 5/31/07) would be missing!

6-14
Beginning YTD
Use this field to enter the amount of depreciation, if any, already taken on this asset
for the fiscal year in which you are switching the asset’s depreciation to Sage Fixed
Assets. This amount is the amount of depreciation taken from the beginning of that
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6
fiscal year through the date you will enter as the beginning date for Sage Fixed
Assets depreciation. If the beginning date is any date other than the end of a fiscal
year, you must enter an amount in this field to get correct results for the current
fiscal year. If you do not enter an amount in this field, the application assumes that
you did not take any depreciation in the current fiscal year.


Beginning Accum
Use this field to enter the total of all depreciation calculated on the asset since you
placed it in service, including the amount entered as the beginning YTD
depreciation.
168 Allowance Amount
This field displays the 168 Allowance deduction. This amount is calculated only when
you select one of the following “Plus 168” depreciation methods: MACRS formula plus
168 Allowance (MA), MACRS Indian Reservation plus 168 Allowance (MR), ADS
straight-line MACRS plus 168 Allowance (AA), or straight-line, full-month plus 168
Allowance (SB).
In addition, you must select either a 30%, 50%, or 100% allowance deduction in the 168
Allowance % field. For more information, see “168 Allowance %,” page 6-12.
The 30% Allowance is available for:
• Personal property placed in service after September 10, 2001 and before January 1,
2007.
• Real property after September 10, 2001 and before January 1, 2010.
After May 5, 2003, you can elect a 50% Allowance.
The 2010 Tax Relief Act allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service
after September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011, (or December 31, 2012 for
assets with longer production lives).
The 168 Allowance will still be available for qualified property placed in service in a
special disaster zone through 2012 for personal property and through 2013 for real
property, and for cellulosic biofuel plant property through 2012. Beginning in 2006, the
168 Allowance can also be taken for reuse and recycling property. Currently, there is no
expiration of the 168 Allowance for reuse and recycling property.

Current YTD
This field displays the asset’s depreciation amount for the period starting with the first
day of the current fiscal year through the Current Through Date (the last date on which
you calculated depreciation for the asset in the current year). The application
automatically updates this field every time you calculate depreciation for the asset. The
Current Year-to-Date amount never includes the 168 Allowance or Section 179 expense
deduction because these amounts are displayed separately in Asset Detail.

Current Accum
This field displays the asset’s depreciation from the asset’s placed-in-service date
through the Current Through Date (the last date on which you calculated
depreciation), including any current year-to-date depreciation. The application
automatically updates this field every time you calculate depreciation for the asset. The
Current Accumulated amount never includes the 168 Allowance or Section 179 expense
deduction because these amounts are displayed separately in Asset Detail.
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Working with Assets
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
Current Through Date
This field displays the date through which depreciation was last calculated. The
application automatically updates this field every time you calculate depreciation for
the asset.

Net Book Value
This field displays the current net book value for the asset through the Current
Through Date. The application automatically updates the net book value when current
depreciation is updated.

Period Close Date
This field displays the date through which depreciation was last saved for a period
close. Each time you run a period close, the application automatically updates this field
with the results of your last depreciation calculation.

Period Close YTD
This field displays the current year-to-date depreciation amount through the most
recent period close date. Each time you run a period close, the application
automatically updates this field with the results of your last depreciation calculation.

Period Close Accum
This field displays the asset’s depreciation from the date of the asset’s placed-in-service
date through the most recent period close date, including any period year-to-date
depreciation. Each time you run a period close, the application automatically updates
this field.
Completing the Business Use Dialog
Enter business-use percentages in chronological order. Start with the earliest use of the
asset at less than 100% for business. The effective date for each change in the business-use
percentage must be the beginning of a fiscal year. If the percentage changed later in the
year, enter the business-use percentage averaged over the fiscal year.
By entering a single business-use statement, you are specifying a percentage of business
use beginning in one year and continuing until you add another percentage.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Business Use dialog.
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
100% Business Use?l
Select this check box if the asset was used entirely for business purposes. You must
clear this check box to enter a new fiscal year beginning date and business use
percentage.

Enter a New Fiscal Year Begin and Business Use Percentage
Use the first field to enter the fiscal-year beginning date for the year the asset was used
for less than 100% business purposes. You can click the down arrow to select the date
from the pop-up calendar.
Use the second field to enter the percentage of the year that the asset was used for
business purposes. Enter the percentage in whole numbers. For example, if the asset
was used for business purposes 70 percent of the time, enter 70 in this field.

Add Button
Click this button to add the fiscal year beginning date and business use percentage to
the list box.

Clear Button
Click this button to remove the selected business use percentage and beginning date
from the list box.

Clear All Button
Click this button to remove all of the business use percentages and beginning dates
from the list box.

Count
This field displays the number of business use percentages and beginning dates in the
list box.
Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the §179/Bonus Details dialog.

Regular §179
 Qualified §179 Property
Check this box if the asset is qualified §179 property. If the box is checked, then the
Zone Type and §179 Amount fields are enabled, and the Pre-ACRS Bonus field is
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Working with Assets
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disabled. If the box is unchecked, then the Zone Type and §179 Amount fields are
disabled, and the Pre-ACRS Bonus field is enabled.

Classification
Use this field to specify the type of real property that is eligible for a Section 179
expense deduction. Select one of these options:
• Qualified leasehold improvement
• Qualified restaurant property
• Qualified retail improvement
The total cost of each asset and total Section 179 elected for each class of real
property appears on the attachment, along with the election, when you run the
Form 4562 - Depreciation and Amortization report.
Note: If the property is personal property, this field is unavailable and the application
displays “Tangible personal and other property” in this field.


Zone Type
Availability
G - Gulf Opportunity Zone
8/28/2005 - 12/31/2008
K - Kansas Disaster Zone
5/5/2007 - 12/31/2008
E - Enterprise Zone
1/1/2007 - 12/31/2011
D - Qualified Disaster Zone
1/1/2008 - 12/31/2012
X - No Zone Applies
Always available

§179 Amount
Enter the amount of Section 179 expense for this asset. This amount is subject to a
dollar limit and a phase-out restriction. The amount entered in this field flows to
Part I of the Form 4562.

Pre-ACRS Bonus
Enter the amount of bonus depreciation for this asset. The asset must be personal
property placed in service during a taxable year prior to 1981. It must have an
estimated life of at least 6 years, and it must use a straight-line, declining balance,
sum-of-the-years’ digits, or own calculation.
Other §179 Deductions
 §179/Other Code
Select a code to identify the §179/Other basis reduction amount. For a description
of each code, see “§179/Other Codes,” page 6-19.

6-18
Zone Type
There are currently five zone types. The availability of these zone types is based on
the placed-in-service date of the asset. The table below lists the zone types and
their availability:
§179/Other Amount
Enter the amount of §179/Other basis reduction. This amount is not subject to the
Section 179 dollar limit and phase-out restriction, and it is not included in Part I of
the Form 4562.
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
Total §179/Bonus
This field displays the total of the §179 Amount, Pre-ACRS Bonus, and §179/Other
Amount fields. When you click OK, this amount appears in the 179 Deduction field in
Asset Detail.
§179/Other Codes
Use the following codes to specify the type of §179/Other Amount entered in the
§179/Bonus Details dialog.
Code
Description
B
EPA Sulfur Control Requirements: Available for property placed in service after
12/31/2002; property types P, Q, R, or S; and depreciation methods MF, MT, MI, AD,
MA, AA, MR, RV, OC, and custom methods.
C
Qualified Refineries: Available for property placed in service after 8/8/2005 and
before 1/1/2014; property types P, Q, R, or S; and depreciation methods MF, MT, MI
(not available after 12/31/2009), AD, MA, AA, MR (not available after 12/31/2009), RV,
OC, and custom methods.
D
Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings: Available for property placed in service after
12/31/2005 and before 1/1/2014; property types P, Q, R, or S; and depreciation
methods MF, MT, MI (not available after 12/31/2009), AD, MA, AA, MR (not available
after 12/31/2009), RV, OC, and custom methods.
E
Advanced Mine Safety Equipment: Available for property placed in service after
12/20/2006 and before 1/1/2010; property types P or Q; and depreciation methods MF,
MT, MI, AD, MA, AA, MR, RV, OC, and custom methods.
O
Other Asset Basis Reductions: Available for all placed-in-service dates; property types
P, A, T, Q, R, or S; and all depreciation methods.
N
Not Applicable: If you select this code, the §179/Other Amount field is unavailable.
Completing the Investment Tax Credit Dialog
When you click the down arrow on the Investment Tax Credit field, the Investment Tax
Credit dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Investment Tax Credit dialog.
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Working with Assets
Editing Asset Data

Options
 ITC Credit
Select the ITC Credit option you want to take on the current asset. For a description
of each option, see ITC Credit Options, page 6-12.

ITC Credit Percentage
Enter the ITC Credit percentage you want to apply. The application displays a
default percentage based on the selected ITC Credit option. You can enter a
percentage of up to 30% of the asset’s depreciable basis.
Note: A higher ITC Credit percentage is available for certain types of property located
in the Gulf Opportunity Zone. For more information, see “Qualified Gulf
Opportunity Zone Property,” page 8-40.


ITC Credit Amount
The application computes the ITC Credit Amount by multiplying the asset’s
depreciable basis by the ITC Credit percentage. You can change this amount;
however, the amount cannot exceed the asset’s depreciable basis.
Basis Reduction Amount
 Amount
This field displays the amount by which the depreciable basis will be reduced for
the current asset.
Editing Asset Data
Once you’ve entered asset data, you can edit the data anytime by entering Asset Detail and
making changes directly in asset fields. However, when you make changes to any fields
used in calculations, you’ll have to perform additional tasks in order to update the data.
Follow the guidelines below when editing asset data.

Editing General Information Fields
The general information fields do not affect depreciation. You can change the data in
general information fields at any time.

Editing Book Information Fields
When you change an entry in the book-specific fields after you have calculated
depreciation or entered beginning depreciation for the asset, the application assumes
that the current depreciation figures are no longer correct. A message appears asking
you if you want to accept the change and reset the current depreciation amount. If you
answer No, the change will not take effect. If you answer Yes, a second message
appears asking when you want to apply the change to the depreciation-critical field.
After you have reset depreciation and made your changes, execute the Depreciate
command from the Depreciation menu to get current depreciation figures.

Editing Tax Book Fields
If you change information in the Tax book, you can force the application to determine
new default values for the other books. For example, if you change the Tax book
depreciation method from MT to AD, the AMT book depreciation method should
change from MF to AD. However, if you already changed information in the other books
to values you want, you may not want to overwrite your data with the new default
values.
For this reason, before you leave the asset after making changes in the Tax book, you
must decide whether you want the new defaults to overwrite the existing data in the
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other books. If so, select Force Defaults on the Asset Menu. A message appears asking
you to confirm your intent to overwrite information in all open books.

Editing Disposal Date
In order to edit a disposal date, you’ll first have to delete the transactions. See
“Resetting Depreciation,” page 8-6.

Editing Inactive Assets
You cannot edit inactive assets. To edit an inactive asset, you must first reactivate it. See
“Inactivating and Reactivating Assets,” page 7-14.
Replicating Assets
If you are adding multiple assets that are similar in nature, you can add the first one, save
it, and then replicate it as needed. The application can create as many as 99 assets out of a
single entry. After you’ve replicated an asset, you can change each asset individually to
modify specific fields as needed. This feature is particularly useful for adding grouped
assets from the same invoice.
Note: If you replicate an asset that has Section 179 expense or bonus depreciation, you
may receive a warning message stating that the total amount for all replicated assets will
exceed allowable limits. If you choose to continue, remember to reduce the Section 179 or
bonus depreciation amounts for the replicated assets, as needed.
To replicate an asset
1.
In Asset Detail, display the asset you want to replicate.
2.
Do any one of the following:
• Select Asset/Replicate from the menu bar.
• Click the Replicate an Asset task on the navigation pane.
The Replicate Asset dialog appears.
3.
Enter the number of times you want to replicate the asset, and then click OK. The
application displays a message confirming the replication and informing you of the
Starting System Number.
4.
Click OK to close the confirmation message.
5.
Enter assets individually to edit asset information (if applicable).
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Working with Assets
Applying Book Defaults
Applying Book Defaults
You can apply the defaults from the Tax book into the other books and from the Internal
book into the Custom 1 and Custom 2 books by using the Apply Book Defaults feature. You
will want to use the Apply Book Defaults function if you change an entry in the Tax book
that you want to affect the other books.
To apply book defaults
1.
Display the asset in Asset Detail.
2.
Select Asset/Apply Book Defaults from the menu bar.
The application displays a confirmation message.
3.
Select Yes to re-apply the defaults.
Note: If you want to apply defaults only in certain books, you can close books in the Edit
Company dialog. The Apply Book Defaults feature will reset defaults only in the open
books.
Copying Book Information
You can use the Copy Book feature to copy the depreciation information from a book, such
as the Tax book, to another book. You may want to use this feature if you have been using
the application for some time but you only now decided to open one of the books.
For example, you may have decided to not use the State book when you first started using
the application because your state followed all federal depreciation rules, so you closed the
book on the Book Defaults tab of the Edit Company dialog. Suppose your state now
decides not to comply with newly issued federal tax laws. If your state does not fully
conform to the federal tax laws, you may need to open the State book and depreciate your
assets following the rules for your state. You can use the Copy Book feature to quickly
populate the fields in the State book with the correct placed-in-service date and cost
information. Then you can modify the assets to conform to your state rules.
You select the Copy Book feature from the Asset List. The application copies information
for all of the assets in the open company.
To copy book information
1.
6-22
In the Asset List, select Asset/Copy Book from the menu bar. The Copy Book dialog
appears.
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Working with Assets
Applying Book Defaults
2.
6
Complete the Copy Book dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the Copy Book
Dialog,” page 6-23.
If the Source Book and the Destination Book have different short year information, a
message gives you two options.
3.
Select whether you want to copy both the short year information and the depreciation
information, or just the depreciation information, and then click OK.
For information on copying books with different short year information, see “Copying
Short Year Information,” page 6-23.
Completing the Copy Book Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Copy Book dialog.

Source Book
Select the book from which you want to copy depreciation information. You can select
a book only if it is currently open.

Destination Book
Select the book to which you want to copy depreciation information. The Destination
book must be open.

Overwrite Existing Data
Select this check box if you want to overwrite existing data in the Destination Book
with the depreciation information from the Source Book. If the box is left unchecked,
the application skips assets with existing book data in the Destination Book when
completing the copy function.
Copying Short Year Information
When you change the short year information for an asset, you must reset and recalculate
its depreciation. The short year information may change for assets when you copy
depreciation information from one book to another, and the Source Book and the
Destination Book have different short year information.
If the Source Book and the Destination Book have different short year information, you
have two options:
• Copy both calendar information and depreciation information
You can copy the short year information from the Source Book into the Destination
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6
Working with Assets
Asset Templates
Book. This overwrites the short year information in the Destination Book, and
replaces it with the short year information in the Source Book.
• Copy depreciation information only
You can keep the short year information in the Destination Book.
If you select the first option, you would not need to reset and recalculate depreciation
unless you cleared the Overwrite Existing Data check box in the Copy Book dialog.
If you select the second option, we recommend that you reset depreciation to the beginning
date and recalculate depreciation for all of the assets in the Destination Book.
Asset Templates
The Asset Templates feature lets you create predefined assets, which can then be copied
into individual assets. You should create an asset specifically made to be saved as a
template. This is because you probably do not want to complete certain fields, such as the
Asset ID field. If you completed this field for the template, you would have to change it
every time you applied the template to an asset.
Asset templates provide more flexibility than the Replicate function.
With an asset template, you can:
• Assign it a recognizable name for quick and easy recall.
• Enter data in all fields or only in a few fields.
• Use the template to create a new asset.
• Use the template over an existing asset. If you use a template over an existing asset,
the template information will overwrite any existing information that was entered for
the asset before you used the template. If, however, the asset has information in a field
that is blank in the template, such preexisting information will not be overwritten.
You can view an existing template once you create it. Then you can edit the template and
save it under a new name or its current name. For more information, see “Editing an
Existing Template,” page 6-25.
To rename, copy. or delete an asset template, select Customize/Template Manager from the
menu bar, and then complete the Template Manager dialog. For more information, see
“Completing the Template Manager Dialog,” page 6-28.
Creating a Template
You can create an asset for the purpose of saving it as a template.
To create a template
1.
Enter a new asset that you want to save as a template. For more information, see
“Entering New Assets,” page 6-1. (You can also use an existing asset to create a
template.)
2.
Do one of the following after you have completed all asset fields you want to include
in the template:
• Select Asset/Save as Template from the menu bar.
• Click the Save as a Template on the navigation pane.
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Working with Assets
Asset Templates
6
The Save as Template dialog appears.
3.
Enter a name for the template you are creating, and then click OK. For more
information, see “Completing the Save as Template Dialog,” page 6-26. The
application returns to the asset tabs and remains in the new asset mode.
Note: In addition to creating an asset template, you can save your current entries as a new
asset at the same time. To save the current entries as a new asset, click the Save Asset
button. If you do not want to save the current entries as a new asset, click the Asset List
button. A message appears asking if you want to create this asset. Click the No button.
The application does not save the template settings as a new asset.
Editing an Existing Template
To edit an existing template
1.
Do one of the following:
• Select Asset/Add from the menu bar.
• Click the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
A blank asset form in Asset Detail view appears.
2.
From the Apply Template drop-down list, select the template that you want to edit. A
confirmation message asks if you want to continue.
3.
Click Yes. The application displays the information in the template.
4.
Make the desired changes to the template.
5.
Do one of the following:
• Select Asset/Save as Template from the menu bar.
• Click the Save as Template task on the navigation pane.
The Save as Template dialog appears.
6.
Complete the Save as Template dialog, and click OK.
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Working with Assets
Asset Templates
Completing the Save as Template Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Save as Template dialog.

Enter New Template Name
Enter a name for the new template; up to 25 alphanumeric characters, uppercase or
lowercase.

Option
 Include Notes
Select this check box if you want the template to include the notes entered on the
Notes tab.

Existing Templates
This field displays the names of existing templates.
Applying Asset Templates
You can easily apply a template to an asset.
Note: When you apply a template to an existing asset, any information in the template
will override existing asset information. You cannot apply a template to an asset with
existing calculated depreciation amounts.
To apply an asset template
1.
In Asset Detail, display the asset to which you want to apply the template. To apply
the template to a new asset, select Asset/Add from the menu bar.
2.
Click the arrow button in the Apply Template field. The system displays a list of all
available templates.
Apply Template
Field
3.
Select a template.
The system asks you to confirm your intention, and then applies the template to the
asset. All completed fields in the template will be entered in the corresponding fields
in the asset.
4.
Click the Save Asset button.
Note: You can cancel the application of an asset template before saving the asset. To do so,
click the Asset List button and do not save the asset when the system prompts you.
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Working with Assets
Asset Templates
Renaming a Template
Follow the steps below to rename an existing template.
To rename a template
1.
Select Customize/Template Manager from the menu bar. The Template Manager
dialog appears.
2.
In the Existing Templates field, select the template that you want to rename.
3.
In the Enter New Template Name field, type the new name for the template. For more
information, see “Completing the Template Manager Dialog,” page 6-28.
4.
Click the Rename button. The application changes the name of the template in the
Existing Templates field.
5.
Click the Close button.
Copying a Template
Follow the steps below to copy an existing template and give it a new name.
To copy a template
1.
Select Customize/Template Manager from the menu bar. The Template Manager
dialog appears.
2.
In the Existing Templates field, select the template that you want to copy. For more
information, see “Completing the Template Manager Dialog,” page 6-28.
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Working with Assets
Asset Templates
3.
Click the Copy button. The Copy Template dialog appears.
4.
In the Copy To field, type the new name for the template.
5.
Click OK. The application returns to the Template Manager dialog and the new
template appears in the Existing Templates field.
6.
Click the Close button.
Deleting a Template
Follow the steps below to delete an existing template.
To delete a template
1.
Select Customize/Template Manager from the menu bar. The Template Manager
dialog appears.
2.
In the Existing Templates field, select the template that you want to delete.
3.
Click the Delete button. A message confirms that you want to delete the template.
4.
Click the Yes button. The application removes the template from the Existing
Templates field. For more information, see “Completing the Template Manager
Dialog,” page 6-28.
5.
Click the Close button.
Completing the Template Manager Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Template Manager dialog.
6-28

Enter New Template Name
Use this field to rename a template. First, select the template you want to rename in the
Existing Templates field. Then, type a new name in this field and click the Rename
button.

Existing Templates
This field displays the names of existing templates.

Rename Button
Click this button to rename an existing template. First, select the template that you
want to rename in the Existing Templates field. Then enter the new name in the Enter
New Template Name field, and click the Rename button.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete an existing template. First, select the template that you want
to delete in the Existing Templates field. Then click the Delete button.
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Working with Assets
Printing Asset Information

6
Copy Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to copy an existing template and
give it a new name.
Printing Asset Information
You can print a copy of each of the Asset tabs you see in Asset Detail. When you print them,
you can include asset information, or you can print blank tabs for data collection. When
you print the asset tabs, you can either select assets or an entire group.
Tip: When you print disposal information, the application prints information on the Asset
Disposal dialog. Before printing the Disposal information, we recommend that you first
create an appropriate group with Group Manager. Create a group consisting only of
disposed assets. Then, select that group when you print the Disposal information. For
more information, see “Creating Groups,” page 4-32.
When you print asset tabs, they are sent to the printer as a graphic. Make sure your
computer hardware can handle the request.
To enable the print function, you must select at least one asset.
To print copies of asset tabs
1.
Select an asset or assets in the Asset List, or display an asset in Asset Detail. (To print
one set of blank tabs, display a new asset in Asset Detail, or select the Print Blank
Forms for Main and Disposal Only option on the Print Asset Information dialog.)
2.
Do any one of the following:
• Select File/Print Asset Detail from the menu bar.
• Click the Print Detail button at the bottom of Asset Detail.
The Print Asset Information dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Print Asset Information dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the
Print Asset Information Dialog,” page 6-30.
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Working with Assets
Printing Asset Information
You may notice that asset information does not print for some of the assets you have
selected in the Asset List.
The application prints asset information tabs only when the information exists. You may
have selected the Disposal check box. If you selected some assets in the Asset List that have
not been disposed, the application does not print disposal tab for those assets. (In previous
versions of Sage Fixed Assets, the application would print blank disposal tab for these
assets.)
Completing the Print Asset Information Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Print Asset Information dialog.

Group
Use this field to select which assets’ tabs you want to print. If you are printing blank
tabs for data collection, it is only necessary to print one set of asset tabs. To do so, select
<Detailed Asset No. X>.

Print Options
Use this field to specify the tabs you want to print.

Print Blank Forms for Main and Disposal Only
Click this option button to print blank tabs for data collection.

Print Asset Information
Click this option button to specify the information that you want to print. If you
select the Disposal check box, the application prints the information on the Asset
Disposal dialog.


Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button to either select all of the check boxes or to clear all of the check
boxes.
Copies
Use this field to enter the number of copies of each tab you want to print.
Printing the Asset List
You can print the list of assets currently displayed in the Asset List. You can add a header
and footer to the printed pages, and you can include grid lines and column labels.
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Working with Assets
Printing Asset Information
6
To print the Asset List
1.
In the Asset List view, click the Print Asset List button. The Print Options dialog
appears.
2.
Complete the Print Options dialog, and then click the Print button.
Completing the Print Options Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Print Options dialog.

Header
Enter text that will appear at the top of the printed Asset List.

Footer
Enter text that will appear at the bottom of the printed Asset List.

Grid Lines
Select this check box to include horizontal grid lines between each asset and vertical
grid lines between each column on the printed Asset List.

Column Labels
Select this check box to include field names at the top of each column on the printed
Asset List.

Preview Button
Click this button to view a preview of the printed Asset List before you send it to the
printer.

Print Button
Click this button to display a standard Print dialog that allows you to send the Asset
List to a printer.
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Working with Assets
Asset History Events
Asset History Events
The History tab of Asset Detail provides a history of major milestones and actions
performed on an asset. The application automatically records and tracks specified actions,
including the date and time they occurred, and displays a viewable history.
You can decide which events in an asset’s life you want to track. For more information, see
“Setting Up History Events,” page 5-6.
The following chart explains the historical actions that the application tracks:
Action
Description
Activated Asset
Asset was activated
Adjustment Calculated
Depreciation adjustment amount calculated
Asset Data Backed Up
Company data was backed up
Changed General Information Data in a general information field was changed
Changed Book Information
Information in the [specified] field was changed from [prior
value] to [new value]
168 Allowance Switched
168 Allowance Switch - [100%, 50%, 30%, or No] Allowance taken
- Depreciation method changed from [prior method] to [new
method]
Cleared Period Close
Period close fields were cleared
Copied Asset Information
Asset data was copied to another company
Asset data was copied from another company
Copied Book Information
Asset data was copied into the [specified] book
Depreciation Calculated
Depreciation was calculated through MM/DD/YYYY
Disposed Asset
Asset disposed, gain/loss was calculated as of MM/DD/YYYY
Imported Asset Information
Asset was created by a custom import
Imported Update(s)
Asset general information was updated by a custom import
Inactivated Asset
Asset was inactivated
Asset Created
Asset was created
Period Closed
Period Close was set as of MM/YYYY
Reset to Begin Date
Depreciation was reset to Beginning date
Reset to Period Close
Depreciation was reset to Period Close date
Reset to Placed in Service
Date
Depreciation was reset to Placed-in-Service date
Restored Asset Data
Backed-up asset data was restored
There are two different views you can use to view the History tab: Summary view and
Detail view.
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Working with Assets
Asset History Events
6
Summary View
The Summary view is the default view. It provides a quick look at asset history.
Detail View
The second view is the Detail view. Access Detail view by clicking the Detail button. Detail
view provides more in-depth historical information about individual events.
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Working with Assets
Asset History Events
The Detail view shows the condition of an asset before and after it was changed. For
example, if you change an asset’s Property Type from Personal, General to Automobile,
both the old and new Property Types are displayed in the Description column.
When you click the Detail button, you can see the previous and current condition of an
asset if you have changed the following fields:
Fields on the Main tab:
Property Type
Placed-in-Service Date
Acquisition Value
Depreciation Method
Estimated Life
ADS Life
Business Use %
179 Deduction
168 Allowance %
Beginning Date
Beginning YTD
Beginning Accum
Fields on the Asset Disposal dialog:
Disposal Date
Cash Proceeds
Non-Cash Proceeds
Expenses of Sale
Besides using the Detail and Summary buttons, you can double-click on an event to switch
between Detail and Summary views.
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Chapter 7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
In this chapter:
Understanding Asset Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Understanding Activity Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Disposing Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Inactivating and Reactivating Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Deleting Asset Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
Deleting Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15
This chapter outlines the steps necessary to perform basic asset management tasks. These
tasks include disposing assets (individually or in bulk); inactivating, reactivating, and
deleting assets.
Understanding Asset Identification
Assets are identified by their System Number. The application assigns a unique System
Number to each asset in a company. You also have the ability to track assets based on your
own identification scheme by entering pre-existing or internal numbers into the Asset ID
field.
Understanding Activity Codes
Activity Code is an important field, it indicates the activity status of an asset. Activity
Codes are automatically assigned during asset activity.
The activity status of an asset affects your ability to perform certain functions on the asset.
It also affects how the asset appears in reports. For instance, after you have disposed of an
asset, the Activity Code of that asset changes from Active to Disposed. Once disposed, you
cannot perform any asset functions on the asset. The asset appears on most reports
indefinitely. Two exceptions to this rule are the Depreciation Expense report and the
Adjusted Current Earnings report, where a disposed asset appears on the report only until
the end of the year in which it was disposed. On reports in which it does appear, the
application flags the asset as disposed by placing a “D” in the Key column of the report.
Every activity status has a distinct code. Here is a chart outlining the activity statuses, their
corresponding codes, their definitions, and the effects the statuses have on an asset’s activity.
Activity
Code
Type
Definition
A
Active
Active Asset
D
Disposed
Disposed Asset
I
Inactive
Inactive Asset
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7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Disposing Assets
When you sell, exchange, abandon, retire, or in some other way dispose of an asset, you
must inform the application of the transaction so it can calculate the gain or loss and halt
depreciation on the asset. The application automatically calculates depreciation through
the disposal date, so you don’t have to update current depreciation before disposing of the
asset.
The application indicates that an asset is disposed in many ways. In reports, it displays the
code for a disposal in the Key Code column. The code for a disposal is “d.” To signify
disposed assets, the application also displays the word “Disposed” in the Status field of the
asset when in Asset Detail. In the Asset List, it displays the word “Disposed” in the Status
column of the asset.
You can perform individual disposals or bulk disposals. For more information, see
“Disposing Individual Assets,” page 7-2 or “Performing Bulk Disposals,” page 7-6.
Note: When you reset depreciation on an asset that was entirely disposed, the disposal is
canceled.
Disposing Individual Assets
You can perform disposals on individual assets by selecting Dispose from the Asset menu.
To perform a disposal of an individual asset
1.
Do one of the following:
• In the Asset List, select the asset you want to dispose.
• Display the asset you want to dispose in Asset Detail.
2.
Do one of the following:
• Select Asset/Dispose from the menu bar.
• Click the Dispose an Asset task on the navigation pane.
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Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
7
The Asset Disposal dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Asset Disposal dialog. See “Completing the Asset Disposal Dialog,”
page 7-3.
4.
Click the Calculate button. The application calculates depreciation for the disposed
asset and displays the new figures in the appropriate fields.
5.
Click OK to save the disposal information and close the Asset Disposal dialog.
A message confirms the disposal and asks if you want to view the disposal information
on the Transactions tab.
6.
Click Yes to view the disposal information on the Transactions tab; otherwise, click
No.
Completing the Asset Disposal Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Asset Disposal dialog.
To view this dialog, select Asset/Dispose from the menu bar. To view disposal information,
select the Transactions tab of the disposed asset.

Disposal Date (Required Field)
Use this field to enter the date of the asset disposal in MM/DD/YYYY format. The
application uses this date and the appropriate averaging convention to calculate gain
or loss on the disposal. If you enter a date prior to the asset’s Current Through Date,
the application recalculates depreciation as of the disposal date. The disposal date must
be on or after the Beginning Date and after the Period Close Date, if any.
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7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Note: If the asset uses a “Plus 168” depreciation method, the disposal date cannot
occur in the same year that you placed the asset in service. This is to comply with IRS
regulations on claiming the Section 168 Allowance. If the disposal date is in the
placed-in-service year, you must first change the depreciation method in all books so
that the asset does not take the 168 Allowance. Then you can enter the disposal
information.

Disposal Method
Use this field to select the disposal method. The disposal method you select determines
how the application treats the default gain or loss treatment of the disposed asset. For
a full description of each disposal method, see the online Help or “Disposal Methods,”
page A-29.

Cash Proceeds
Use this field to enter the dollar amount of all cash received plus the value of any debts
or other liabilities assumed by the buyer. If the disposal is a like-kind exchange, also
include the value of any property received that is not like-kind.

Non-cash Proceeds
Use this field to enter the dollar value of any non-cash items received. If the disposal is
a like-kind exchange, include the value of any like-kind property received.

Expenses of Sale
Use this field to enter the dollar amount of direct expenses incurred in selling or
otherwise disposing of the asset. The application adds this amount to the asset’s basis
when calculating the gain or loss reported on Form 4797—Sales of Property worksheet,
which is accessible through the Reports menu.

Calculate Button
Click this button to calculate the gain or loss on the disposal.
Asset Information
The application uses these fields to display relevant information about the asset.
Disposal Calculations
The application uses these fields to display the gain/loss calculations.

Gain/Loss
This field displays the realized gain or loss on the disposal after the calculation is
complete. The disposal method determines the realized gain or loss. You can override
the amount by entering your own figure. Precede a negative number with a negative
sign; do not enclose a loss amount in parentheses.

Recognize?
Use this field to specify the appropriate recognition choice. If you want the application
to recognize a gain or loss (that is, report on it in the tax and company books), select
Yes.
You can also specify Defer to defer the recognition until a later date. Defer causes the
application to enable the Deferred Date field below the Recognize field. Based on the
disposal method you choose, the application automatically sets the Recognize field to
the default. For default settings, see “Gain or Loss Recognition Defaults,” page A-32.
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Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets

7
Deferred Date
The application enables this field only if you specified Defer in the Recognize field.
Enter the month and year for which you want the gain or loss to be recognized. The
asset will appear on the Form 4797 in the year entered.
Note: The Deferred Date must be later than the Disposal Date.

Section 179 Recapture
This field displays the Section 179 recapture amount as required by tax law. If an asset
has taken Section 179 expense and the Section 179 recapture rules apply, you can enter
another amount to override the calculated amount. The amount in this field is carried
to the Form 4797—Sales of Property worksheet, accessible through the Reports menu.

ITC Recapture
The application uses this field to determine the amount of ITC to add back to the asset’s
basis when calculating gain/loss as required by tax law (if you took ITC on the asset
and disposed of the asset before the end of its recovery life). To see the amount of ITC
recapture tax, see the Form 4255—ITC Recapture worksheet, which is accessible
through the Reports menu.

Worksheet Button
Click this button at the bottom of the Asset Disposal dialog to view a detailed
calculation of the gain or loss amount.
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7-5
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Sample Disposal Worksheet
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Performing Bulk Disposals
A bulk disposal occurs when you sell multiple assets for one selling price. When this
occurs, the cash proceeds, non-cash proceeds, and selling expenses must be prorated for
the individual assets. Prorating is based on the percentage of the acquisition value of each
asset selected over the total acquisition value of all the assets selected.
To dispose in bulk, you can select assets from the Asset List, or you can create a group for
the assets that you want to dispose. If you create a group of assets to dispose, display that
group in the Asset List, and select all assets.
To perform a bulk disposal
1.
In the Asset List, select the assets that you want to include in the bulk sale.
2.
Do any one of the following:
• Select Asset/Bulk Disposal from the menu bar.
• Click the Bulk Dispose Assets task on the navigation pane.
7-6
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
7
The Bulk Disposal dialog appears.
Note: The Bulk Disposal menu item is not activated unless you select at least two or
more assets.
3.
Complete the Bulk Disposal dialog. “Completing the Bulk Disposal Dialog,” page 7-7.
4.
Click OK. The application displays the Bulk Disposal report in the report viewer.
Completing the Bulk Disposal Dialog
Follow the guidelines provided below to complete the Bulk Disposal dialog.

Disposal Date
Type the date of the asset disposal in MM/DD/YYYY format. The application uses this
date when calculating gain or loss on the disposal. It applies the appropriate averaging
convention.

Disposal Method
Use this field to select the disposal method. The disposal method you select determines
the default gain or loss treatment of the disposed assets. For a full description of each
disposal method, see “Disposal Methods,” page A-29. The application applies the
selected disposal method to all of the assets you have selected for the bulk disposal.
However, you can edit the Disposal Method field after you have completed the bulk
disposal.
Note: When you perform a bulk disposal, the following disposal methods are
unavailable: Like-Kind Exchange and Involuntary Conversion.

Cash Proceeds
Enter the dollar amount of all cash received plus the value of any debts or other
liabilities assumed by the buyer.

Non-Cash Proceeds
Enter the dollar value of any non-cash items received.

Expenses of Sales
Enter the dollar amount of direct expenses incurred in selling or otherwise disposing
of the assets. The application adds this amount to the bases of the assets when
calculating the gain or loss reported on the Form 4797—Sales of Property worksheet.
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7-7
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Like-Kind Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions After 1/2/2000
A like-kind exchange is a type of disposal that occurs when two parties exchange assets
that are similar in nature. The exchange can include the receipt of money or other dissimilar
property.
In 2000, the IRS issued new guidelines concerning property received in a like-kind
exchange or an involuntary conversion. If you exchange a MACRS asset for a similar asset,
for depreciation purposes the newly acquired asset “steps into the shoes” of the asset that
you give up. If cash or its equivalent (“boot”) is paid at the time of the exchange, the newly
acquired asset is depreciated as if it were two separate assets:
• Asset #1: This asset is a continuation of the asset given up in the exchange. It has the
same placed-in-service date, acquisition value, averaging convention, and recovery
period as the original asset.
• Asset #2: This asset is treated as a new asset received in the exchange. It has an
acquisition value that is equal to the basis in the new asset less the adjusted basis in
the original asset. (Generally, this is the amount of any boot paid.) The new asset’s
placed-in-service date is the date on which the exchange occurred. This asset should
be assigned an appropriate depreciation method and a new recovery period starting
with its new placed-in-service date.
If no boot is paid at the time of the exchange, the newly acquired asset is depreciated as a
single asset, with the same attributes as Asset #1 above.
These new IRS guidelines allow you to depreciate the newly acquired property faster than
under the old rules (as long as the original asset had not been fully depreciated).
Note: The new IRS rules are mandatory for all qualifying exchanges after 1/2/2000.
Therefore, if you are using either of the user-defined books (Custom 1 and 2) and you are
using a MACRS method (MF, MT, or AD), the application assumes that the book is a Tax
book and will treat the disposal according to the new rules.
Example:
In January 2007, XYZ Manufacturing traded a copier they had purchased in 2003, along
with $5,500 in cash, for a similar copier with a Fair Market Value (FMV) of $8,000. The
original copier had a FMV of $2,500 at the time of the exchange. The information regarding
the exchanged copiers is as follows:
Old Copier
Cost:
$8,000
Accumulated Depreciation:
Net Book Value:
5,696
$2,304
XYZ Manufacturing, Inc. calculates the basis of the new copier received in the exchange as
follows:
New Copier
Net Book Value of original copier
plus
Cash paid
Basis of newly acquired copier
7-8
$2,304
5,500
$7,804
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
7
Under the new IRS guidelines, for depreciation purposes the corporation has two copiers
on its books:
• Copier #1 has a placed-in-service date of 2003, an acquired value of $8,000,
accumulated depreciation of $5,696, and a recovery period of 5 years. It continues to
be depreciated as if it were the original copier.
• Copier #2 has a placed-in-service date of January 2007, an acquired value of $5,500
($7,804 minus $2,304), and a recovery period of 5 years. It is depreciated as a newly
acquired asset.
Entering a Like-Kind Exchange or an Involuntary Conversion
Entering a like-kind exchange or involuntary conversion in the application is a two-step
process:
1.
Dispose of the asset given up in the exchange.
2.
Enter the asset(s) received in the exchange.
Note: If you are exchanging a vehicle that qualifies for the luxury car limits, see “Luxury
Cars and Like-Kind Exchanges,” page 7-12.
To enter a like-kind exchange or an involuntary conversion after
1/2/2000
Step 1: Dispose of the original asset
1.
Make sure you have depreciated the asset to be disposed through the month-end prior
to the exchange.
2.
Print the asset information for the Main tab, and note the amount of Current
Year-to-Date and Current Accumulated Depreciation taken on the asset prior to the
exchange for each book used for tax purposes. These books include the Tax, ACE,
AMT, and State books, and possibly Custom 1 and Custom 2 books. This is important
information that you will need when entering the new asset(s) received in the
exchange.
3.
Select the asset that you are disposing, and go to Asset Detail for that asset.
4.
Select the Dispose an Asset task on the navigation pane. The Asset Disposal dialog
appears.
5.
In the Disposal Method field, select Like-Kind Exchange: Post-1/2/2000 (or
Involuntary Conversion: Post-1/2/2000) if you want to apply the new IRS guidelines.
6.
Complete the Asset Disposal dialog.
7.
Click the Calculate button, and then click OK to close the Asset Disposal dialog.
Step 2: Enter the newly acquired asset
This next step may consist of two parts if you are required to depreciate the newly acquired
asset as if it were two assets.
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7-9
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Step 2(a)
In Step 2(a), you enter the portion of the newly acquired asset that is treated as a
continuation of the asset given up in the exchange. You should perform Step 2(a) whether
or not boot was paid.
1.
Select the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
2.
In the Description field, enter a description of the newly acquired asset.
3.
In the Acquired By field, click the Exchange or Conversion option button to indicate
the asset was acquired in an exchange.
Note: Clicking the Exchange or Conversion option button tells the application that
this asset should not appear on any reports that are run prior to the date the asset was
received in the exchange.
4.
In the books used for tax purposes (for example, the Tax, AMT, and State books), enter
the same Property Type, Placed-in-Service Date, Acquisition Value, Depreciation
Method, and Estimated Life as for the original asset (that is, the asset given up in the
exchange). (For more about entering information in the ACE book, see “ACE Book,”
page 7-11.)
Note: If this asset is personal property, be sure that the MACRS averaging convention
is correctly set in the Edit Company dialog before you depreciate the asset for the first
time. The averaging convention should be the same as the one used by the original
asset.
5.
In the Beginning Date field, enter the month-end prior to when the exchange
occurred. For example, if the exchange occurred on October 15, 2007, enter September
30, 2007 (assuming a monthly accounting cycle).
6.
In the Beginning Year-To-Date field, enter the amount of depreciation already claimed
on the original asset in the year of the exchange. This is the information calculated
above in Step 1 (Dispose of the original asset) when you disposed of the original asset.
The Beginning Year-to-Date depreciation is the amount of depreciation taken from the
first day of the disposal year through the Beginning Date entered in step 5.
7.
In the Beginning Accumulated field, enter the amount of depreciation that was taken
on the original asset plus the amount entered in the Beginning Year-to-Date field
above. For example, if the exchange occurred on October 15, 2007, enter the
depreciation taken from the original asset’s placed-in-service date through
September 30, 2007.
8.
If boot was paid, in the Internal book (and any other financial book), enter $0 in the
Acquisition Value field and NO in the Depreciation Method field. (If boot was paid,
this asset exists only for tax purposes, not for financial purposes.)
If boot was not paid, follow the instructions for steps 3 and 6 under 2(b) below for
entering information in the Internal book. You do not need to create a second asset.
9.
7-10
Click the Save Asset button to save the information.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
ACE Book
If you have accepted our default of NONE in the Emulate Book field for the ACE book on
the Book Defaults tab of the New Company (or Edit Company) dialog, you must make the
following changes in the ACE book when entering the newly acquired asset.
Note: If you have already changed the Emulate Book field for the ACE book to “AMT:
Post-1993,” you should apply the instructions given above for the books used for tax
purposes to the ACE book and ignore the instructions below.
When entering the portion of the newly acquired asset that is treated as a continuation of
the asset given up in the exchange, you must do the following in the ACE book:
1.
Select the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
2.
Change the Depreciation Method from NO to OC (Own Calculation).
3.
In the Beginning Date field, enter the month-end prior to when the exchange
occurred. (This is the same date as entered in the Tax book.)
4.
In the Beginning Year-To-Date and the Beginning Accumulated fields, accept the
default entry of zero.
Step 2(b)
In Step 2(b), you enter the portion of the newly acquired asset that is treated as a new asset.
This step is necessary only if boot is paid, or if you are entering the newly acquired asset in
the Internal book for GAAP purposes (see step 8 above).
1.
Select the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
2.
In the Description field, enter a description of the newly acquired asset.
Note: In order to link this asset to the first asset, use the Description field and/or the
Asset ID fields. This is important because the two assets actually represent one
physical asset. If this asset is disposed in the future, you must locate and dispose both
assets.
3.
In the Placed-in-Service Date field, enter the date on which the exchange occurred.
4.
In the Tax book, enter an appropriate depreciation method and recovery period based
on the new placed-in-service date.
5.
In the Tax book, enter an Acquisition Value equal to the basis in the newly acquired
asset less the adjusted basis in the original asset. This amount is generally the same as
the cash paid for the new asset. If only like-kind property was exchanged (that is, no
additional payment was made), enter an Acquisition Value of $0 and NO in the
Depreciation Method field.
Note: Do not enter anything in the Beginning Depreciation fields (Beginning Date,
Beginning Year-to-Date, and Beginning Accumulated).
6.
In the Internal book, enter an Acquisition Value equal to the basis calculated for
financial purposes, and enter an appropriate depreciation method and recovery period.
7.
Click the Save Asset button to save the information.
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7-11
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
Luxury Cars and Like-Kind Exchanges
If you are entering a luxury car that was received in a like-kind exchange or involuntary
conversion, you should consider entering it as one asset, rather than two assets, with a
placed-in-service date of the exchange, in order to ensure that the application correctly
applies the luxury auto limits. The Acquisition Value of this asset should be the full basis
in the newly acquired asset. Using this approach, you should not select Yes in the Exchange
field, and there is no need to enter any data in the Beginning Depreciation fields. The IRS
has not yet issued regulations on this issue.
Editing Disposal Information
You can change disposal information after you perform a disposal of an asset.
To edit disposal information
7-12
1.
Go to Asset Detail for the disposed asset.
2.
Click the Transactions tab.
3.
Click the View Transaction button. The Asset Disposal dialog appears. For more
information, see “Completing the Asset Disposal Dialog,” page 7-3.
4.
Edit any of the fields, and then click OK. The application displays a message asking
you to confirm your changes.
5.
Click the Yes button to confirm the changes to the disposal information.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Disposing Assets
7
Note: You cannot edit disposal information after you disposed the asset during a
Like-Kind Exchange or an involuntary conversion. For more information, see “Like-Kind
Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions After 1/2/2000,” page 7-8.
To change the disposal information in this situation, you must select Delete Last
Transaction from the Asset menu and re-enter the disposal data. For more information, see
“Deleting Asset Transactions,” page 7-15.
Viewing the Disposal Calculation
You can view a detailed worksheet of the calculations used to determine the gain or loss for
an individual asset.
To view the disposal calculation
1.
Display the Asset Detail view for the disposed asset.
2.
Select the Transactions tab. For more information, see “The Transactions Tab of Asset
Detail,” page 3-22.
3.
Click the Disposal Worksheet button. The Disposal Worksheet appears in the report
viewer.
The system initially displays the worksheet for the Tax book. However, you can view the
worksheet for each of the seven books by clicking the page scroll buttons at the top of the
report.
You can also print the worksheet by clicking the Print Report button on the report viewer.
For more information about viewing and printing the worksheet, see “Viewing a Report,”
page 9-19.
Viewing Current-Year Disposals
You can specify a range of disposal dates when you run the Disposal report. For example,
you can run the report for assets disposed in the current year.
To view only current-year disposals
1.
Select Reports/Standard Reports/Disposal from the menu bar. The Report Definition
dialog appears.
Notice the Run for Assets Disposed field, which contains two fields for entering dates.
2.
In the From field, enter the beginning date of the current fiscal year.
3.
In the To field, enter the ending date of the current fiscal year.
4.
Complete the remaining fields on the Report Definition dialog, and then click the Run
Report button.
The application either displays the Disposal report in the report viewer or sends the
Disposal report to the default printer, or both. The Disposal report now includes only those
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
7-13
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Inactivating and Reactivating Assets
assets disposed during the current fiscal year. Notice that the range of dates that you
entered appears beneath the title of the report.
Deleting Asset Disposals
If you reset depreciation on an asset, the disposal is cancelled. To delete disposal
information, you can also delete the entire asset. For more information, see “Deleting
Assets,” page 7-15. Deleting the asset deletes the core System Number. However, we do not
generally recommend deleting assets.
Inactivating and Reactivating Assets
Reactivating and inactivating assets is an important element of the asset maintenance
activities.
Inactivating Assets
Temporarily prevent assets from appearing on reports or being depreciated.
Reactivating Assets
Remove the inactive status from assets, allowing them to appear on reports and be
depreciated.
Inactivating Assets
We recommend that you inactivate assets instead of deleting them. If you delete an asset,
you lose all of its history information. If you inactivate an asset, you retain that asset’s
history and accomplish most other goals you would attain by deleting an asset.
You should inactivate (rather than delete) an asset that has been disposed of if you believe
that you may need the asset’s data again for an audit or other purposes.
Inactivating an asset affects the asset in these ways:
• The application removes the asset from all reports except the File Listing report.
• The application does not calculate additional depreciation on the asset.
• The application disables the asset’s tabs. You are allowed to view but not edit the
inactive asset’s descriptive fields.
• In the Asset List, the Status column indicates the asset’s inactive status.
• In Asset Detail, the Status field indicates the asset’s inactive status.
Be sure you complete all necessary processing on an asset before you inactivate it.
To inactivate assets
You can inactivate an asset individually or inactivate a selection of assets. Or you can use
the Select All button in the upper-left corner of the Asset List and inactivate the entire
group of assets.
7-14
1.
Select the asset or assets you want to inactivate.
2.
Select Asset/Inactivate from the menu bar. A message appears asking you to confirm
your intention to inactivate the selected assets.
3.
Click Yes.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Deleting Asset Transactions
Reactivating Assets
After you inactivate an asset, you can no longer perform asset functions on it or edit it. To
change an inactive asset, you must first reactivate the asset. You also reactivate an asset to
make it appear on reports again. The next time depreciation is calculated after an asset is
reactivated, the application calculates depreciation through the inactive period.
To reactivate assets
You can reactivate an asset individually or you can reactivate a selection of assets. Or you
can use the Select All button in the upper-left corner on the Asset List and reactivate the
entire group of assets.
1.
Select the asset or assets you want to reactivate.
2.
Select Asset/Reactivate from the menu bar. A message appears asking you to confirm
your intention to reactivate the selected assets.
3.
Click Yes.
Deleting Asset Transactions
You can use the Delete Last Transaction command to delete disposal transactions. Deleting
the last transaction returns an asset to its original condition prior to the disposal. You can
select this command only in Asset Detail view of an individual System Number.
In addition to this method of deleting transactions, you can also delete disposals by
resetting depreciation. For more information, see “Resetting Depreciation,” page 8-6.
To delete the last transaction performed on an asset
1.
In Asset Detail, display the asset that contains the transaction you want to delete.
2.
Select the Transactions tab. See “The Transactions Tab of Asset Detail,” page 3-22.
3.
Click the Delete Last Transaction button. A message confirms that you want to
continue.
4.
Click the Yes button. The application automatically deletes the last transaction for this
asset.
Deleting Assets
Generally, you don’t want to delete an asset. If you delete an asset, you lose all of its history
information. If you inactivate the asset instead, you retain that asset’s history and
accomplish most other goals you would attain by deleting an asset. Delete an asset only if
you think you will never again need a single piece of information from that asset (say, for
instance, for a tax audit).
The application does not reuse deleted asset numbers unless it is the last asset number
issued.
Note: Deleted assets cannot be undeleted.
If you still want to delete an asset, follow the procedures outlined below.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
7-15
7
Performing Advanced Asset Functions
Deleting Assets
To delete a single asset
1.
In Asset Detail, display the asset you want to delete.
2.
Select Asset/Delete Asset from the menu bar. A confirmation message appears.
3.
Click Yes to delete the asset. A message asks if you want to print the Asset Detail
report for the deleted asset.
4.
Click Yes to print the report. A standard Print dialog appears.
5.
Complete the Print dialog to send the Asset Detail report to the printer.
To delete multiple assets
7-16
1.
In the Asset List, select the assets you want to delete. For more information, see
“Selecting Assets,” page 3-11.
2.
Select Asset/Delete Asset from the menu bar. A confirmation message appears.
3.
Click Yes to delete the assets. A message asks if you want to print the Asset Detail
report for the deleted assets.
4.
Click Yes to print the report. A standard Print dialog appears.
5.
Complete the Print dialog to send the Asset Detail report to the printer.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 8
Depreciation
In this chapter:
Understanding Depreciation Calculation Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Resetting Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Running a Budgetary Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Running a Quick Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Changing Critical Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
Conducting a Period Close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
Electing the 168 Allowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
New York Liberty Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-33
Section 179 Limits for Enterprise Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-39
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-40
Qualified Recovery Assistance Property (Kansas Disaster Zone) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-43
Qualified Disaster Assistance Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-45
Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-47
Calculating depreciation is one of the most important aspects of working with fixed assets.
You can calculate and update current depreciation, project future depreciation amounts, or
recalculate depreciation for an earlier period.
The Depreciation menu is where you go to calculate current depreciation for all assets or
for a group of assets. You can depreciate monthly, quarterly, or annually. You can also reset
depreciation back to an earlier date. Using this menu, you can choose to project
depreciation amounts for future years for a group of assets or for an entire company. After
you calculate current depreciation, you can store the results separately by running a period
close, so that you can later return to them if necessary.
This chapter covers these topics plus the steps necessary to create custom depreciation
methods. For additional detailed information about the elements of depreciation,
depreciation defaults, and disposal methods, you may also want to refer to Appendix A,
“Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts.” The depreciation methods are described in
depth in Appendix B, “Depreciation Methods.”
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
8-1
8
Depreciation
Understanding Depreciation Calculation Concepts
Understanding Depreciation Calculation Concepts
Following are several hints regarding the proper methods for calculating depreciation
effectively.
Depreciation Calculation Dates
The application calculates depreciation from one of the four following dates:
• Placed-in-service date
• Beginning date
• Period close date
The placed-in-service date is self-explanatory. The beginning date is the date through which
depreciation was already calculated for the asset at the time you entered it in the
application. The period close date is the date on which depreciation was last saved in the
database. The current through date is the date through which depreciation was last
calculated by the application.
The application uses whichever of those four dates immediately precedes the new date you
enter for calculations (the depreciation calculation date), as illustrated below.
Monthly Depreciation Run for Next Period
Depr. this run
8/2009
Placed in
Service date
10/2010
Beginning
date
12/2010
Period Close
date
01/2011
02/2011
Through
date
03/2011
Depr. Calc.
date
———————>
In the above example, the user is calculating forward from 2/2011 to 3/2011. Thus,
depreciation this run is for the 1-month period between the two dates.
Depreciation Run for Earlier Period
Depr. this run
8/2009
Placed in
Service date
10/2010
Beginning
date
12/2010
Period Close
date
01/2011
02/2011
Depr. Calc.
Through
date
date
<———————
03/2011
In this example, the user is calculating depreciation for a period prior to the current
Through Date of 2/2011. The application looks for a starting point for the calculations and
determines that the latest date in time is the Period Close on 12/2010. Thus, depreciation
this run is for the 1-month period from 12/2010 to 1/2011. If no period close data existed,
the application’s starting point for calculations would have been the Beginning Date of
10/2010 and depreciation this run would have been for the 3-month period between
10/2010 and 1/2011.
Note that in either case the depreciation calculation date becomes the new through date for
the asset or assets being depreciated.
8-2
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Understanding Depreciation Calculation Concepts
8
Obtaining Monthly Depreciation Figures
Because the depreciation this run amount is dependent on the frequency of your
depreciation calculations, you should calculate depreciation for each month in succession
in order to obtain accurate monthly depreciation figures. For example, suppose today is
April 2, 2010. You last calculated depreciation for all assets and all books through February
2010. This means that current year-to-date and accumulated depreciation for all assets has
been calculated through February 2010, and the current through date in Asset Detail is
February 2010.
To calculate depreciation for March, you would type 03/10 as the date through which you
want to calculate depreciation and select an output option. If you run a Depreciation
Expense report at the time you calculate depreciation, the column that shows depreciation
for this run will give you the March figures; that is, depreciation is calculated from the
current through date (February) through the depreciation calculation date (March). After
you calculate depreciation, the new through date in Asset Detail for your assets will be
March 2010, and each asset’s current depreciation figures will include the March numbers.
Note: If you need only to update the assets in the application and don’t need to generate a
report, make sure you clear all Send To check boxes.
Calculating Depreciation for Earlier Periods
If you calculate depreciation for an earlier period, you will reset current depreciation for
the selected assets to the figures for the earlier period. Note that if you include a disposed
asset in a report with a run date earlier than the disposal date, the gain/loss figures on the
Disposal report will be incorrect for that asset. In any case, you can return to the current
period amounts by executing the Depreciate command again, through the disposal date,
after you finish calculating depreciation for the earlier period.
Midquarter Convention
One way to determine whether the midquarter convention applies is to run the Midquarter
Applicability report before you execute the Depreciate command. If the report states that
more than 40% of the aggregate basis of newly acquired qualifying MACRS property
(generally, personal property) was placed in service in the last three months of the tax year,
you need to select Edit Company from the File menu, change the Book Override to
Midquarter, and depreciate the assets. For details regarding the midquarter convention
settings, see “Midquarter,” page 4-20.
Changes to the Book Overrides’ settings have no effect on future depreciation calculations
for the assets that have already been depreciated. The only exception is if you reset an
asset’s depreciation to the placed-in-service date and clear the MACRS convention setting
in the Reset Depreciation dialog.
The midquarter convention is optional for the 2001 tax year if September 11, 2001 occurs in
the third or fourth quarter of your fiscal year. Pursuant to IRS Notice 2001-70 and 2001-74,
you can elect to use the half-year convention, even if more than 40% of the aggregate
depreciable basis of newly acquired qualifying MACRS property was placed in service in
the last three months of the tax year.
To make the half-year convention election when you would otherwise be required to use
the midquarter convention, write “Election Pursuant to Notice 2001-70” across the top of
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Depreciation
Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets
Form 4562, Depreciation and Amortization. You can tell the application to write this text
on the form when you complete the Form 4562 Report Definition dialog.
Multiple Books
Because you can select which books to include for depreciation calculations, a given asset
may have current depreciation calculated through different dates in different books.
Similarly, because you can select which assets to depreciate, different assets belonging to
the same company may have current depreciation calculated through different dates. If
you want all assets in all books to have depreciation calculated through the same date,
select all books on the Depreciate dialog and use the All FAS Assets group when calculating
depreciation. This does not affect any disposed assets.
Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets
The Depreciate feature calculates depreciation beginning from the last date you ran
depreciation to an end date that you specify. Anytime you calculate depreciation you can
run a Depreciation Expense report as well. The Depreciation Expense report provides
essential asset data, plus figures for previous depreciation, depreciation calculated by this
depreciation run, and current depreciation. The application generates a separate
Depreciation Expense report for each book you select.
The application also calculates depreciation up to the transaction date when you dispose
an asset. An asset’s depreciation figures reflect whichever of these actions—depreciate or
dispose—you performed most recently.
You should calculate depreciation monthly for any book that is posted monthly.
To depreciate your assets
1.
Do one of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the menu bar.
• Click the Calculate Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
The Depreciate dialog appears.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets
2.
8
Complete the Depreciate dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the Depreciate
Dialog,” page 8-5. The application calculates depreciation for the selected group of
assets, then either displays the results in a report viewer or sends them to a printer.
You can also depreciate only selected assets or an individual assets.
To depreciate only selected assets
1.
In the Asset List, select the assets you want to depreciate.
2.
Do one of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the menu bar.
• Click the Calculate Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
The Depreciate dialog appears. The application automatically selects <Selected
Assets> in the Group field.
3.
Complete the Depreciate dialog, then OK. The application calculates depreciation for
the selected assets, then either displays the results in a report viewer or sends them to
a printer.
To depreciate only a single asset
1.
Select the asset for which you want to calculate depreciation, and then go to Asset
Detail.
2.
Do one of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the menu bar.
• Click the Calculate Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
The Depreciate dialog appears. The application automatically selects <Detailed Asset
No. XX> in the Group field, where XX is the System Number of the selected asset.
3.
Complete the Depreciate dialog, then click OK. The application calculates
depreciation for the selected asset, then either displays the results in a report viewer
or sends them to a printer.
Completing the Depreciate Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Depreciate dialog.

Group
Use this field to select a group for which you want to calculate depreciation. To create
a new group, you select Group Manager from the Customize menu.

Books
Use this field to select the books for which you want to calculate depreciation. You
must select at least one book.


Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
Date
 Calculate Depreciation Through the Following Date
Use this field to enter the date (in the MM/YYYY format) through which you want
to calculate depreciation. All assets placed in service through the last day of the
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Depreciation
Resetting Depreciation
month you enter are included. The date can be for any period, including an earlier
period. If you enter a date for an earlier period, however, the current depreciation
figures for all assets included in the calculation are reset to the depreciation
amounts for that earlier period.
Note: Certain date validations occur during the depreciate process. Refer to
“Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets,” page 8-4, for an explanation of
depreciation calculation dates.


View Reporting Period Button
Click this button to view a dialog that allows you to select the reporting period for
each book. For more information, see “Completing the Current Reporting Period
Dialog,” page 9-9.
Run Options
 Force Recalculation
Select this check box to recalculate depreciation on assets for which you have
already calculated depreciation through this date. You should select this check box
if you have changed the company’s fiscal year-end or the adjustment convention
in the Edit Company dialog since your last calculated depreciation. Otherwise, you
can save processing time by clearing this check box.

Update Current Reporting Period
Select this check box to change the current reporting period to the date entered in
the Date field. For more information, see “Setting the Current Reporting Period,”
page 9-8.

Send To
You can send a report to two possible destinations: a display window or a printer.
Select the appropriate check box. If you do not want to generate a report, clear both
check boxes. When no boxes are selected, depreciation is calculated for the selected
assets and depreciation amounts are updated in Asset Detail.
Resetting Depreciation
Resetting depreciation on an asset allows you to roll back depreciation information to an
archived date. Depreciation can be reset to either the placed-in-service date or the
beginning date. You can reset depreciation for a single asset or a group of assets. Only those
assets that are selected either in the Asset List or Asset Detail will be reset.
Note: Resetting depreciation on a disposed asset cancels the disposal.
To reset depreciation
1.
Select the asset or assets on which you want to reset depreciation.
2.
Do any of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Reset Depreciation from the menu bar.
• Click the Reset Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
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Depreciation
Resetting Depreciation
8
The Reset Depreciation dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Reset Depreciation dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the
Reset Depreciation Dialog,” page 8-7.
The application resets depreciation for the selected assets.
Completing the Reset Depreciation Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Reset Depreciation dialog.

Select a Book
Use the check boxes in this field to specify the books for which you want to reset
depreciation.


Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
Reset Date
Use this field to specify the date to which you want to reset depreciation.

Placed-in-Service Date
Click this option button to reset depreciation to the asset’s Placed-in-Service Date.
Selecting this option resets all depreciation figures to zero (the amount of
depreciation on the date the asset was placed in service). The amounts in the
Period Close fields, if any, will be deleted. Select this option if critical depreciation
values, such as the acquisition value or depreciation method, were entered
incorrectly. In this case, you need to reenter the beginning amounts and other
values after resetting depreciation and before executing the Depreciate command.

Beginning Date
Click this option button to reset the current depreciation fields to the beginning
date of the asset (if applicable). Selecting this option resets depreciation figures to
the amounts entered in the asset’s beginning depreciation fields. The amounts in
the Period Close fields, if any, will be deleted. This is the default. Select this option
when the beginning values are correct but the current or period close depreciation
figures are not. After you reset to the beginning depreciation amounts, you can
change asset data as needed and recalculate depreciation by executing the
Depreciate command.
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8
Depreciation
Running a Budgetary Projection
Note: If there is no date in the Beginning Date field, the application automatically
resets the asset’s depreciation to the Placed-in-Service Date.

Period Close Date
Click this option button if you want to reset depreciation back to the last period
close date. Selecting this option resets the current depreciation figures to the
amounts entered when the last period close was performed.
Note: If there is no date in the Period Close Date field, the application automatically
resets the asset’s depreciation to the Beginning Date (if one exists). If there is no date
in the Beginning Date field, the application resets the asset’s depreciation to the
Placed-in-Service Date.

Clear Convention?
Select this check box if you want to change the averaging convention on qualifying
MACRS property when you reset depreciation. Qualifying MACRS property is
generally property types P, Q, A, and T, as well as those property type R assets that do
not use the midmonth convention. You must also change the averaging convention in
the Edit Company dialog (on the Book Overrides tab) before you recalculate
depreciation. You can clear the convention only when you select the Beginning Date or
the Placed-in-Service Date options; you cannot clear the convention when you select
the Period Close Date.
Note: If you want to reset depreciation on an asset that is qualifying MACRS property
(or on a group of assets that includes qualifying MACRS property), and you want to
recalculate depreciation using a different averaging convention (that is, use the
half-year convention instead of the midquarter convention, or vice versa), follow
these steps: First, select the Clear MACRS Convention check box. Next, change the
averaging convention in the Edit Company dialog (on the Book Overrides tab).
Finally, recalculate depreciation.
Running a Budgetary Projection
For each fiscal year, it’s easy to view the projected depreciation expense for one asset or for
a group of assets.You can view the projected depreciation expense in two ways:
• Run a monthly projection, which shows the projected depreciation expense for each
month in a single year.
• Run an annual projection, which shows the projected depreciation expense for
multiple years.
The application displays the projection in the form of the Monthly Projection report and the
Annual Projection report. These reports display the projection as a grand total of all assets
selected for inclusion in the report. They do not display projections for individual assets,
unless you run the report for only one asset.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Running a Budgetary Projection
8
To run a monthly projection
1.
Select Depreciation/Monthly Projection from the menu bar. The Report Definition
dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Report Definition dialog, and then click the Run Report button. The
application runs the projection and sends the results to the specified location. For
more information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7.
Note: When you click the Other Date option button, and change the report date to
another year, you get a monthly projection for that year.
3.
If you sent the report to the display window, view the Monthly Projection report.
Print the report by clicking the Print icon, if desired, and then click the Close button to
exit from the report viewer.
4.
Click the Close button to exit from the Report Definition dialog.
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Depreciation
Running a Quick Projection
To run an annual projection
1.
Select Depreciation/Annual Projection from the menu bar. The Report Definition
dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Report Definition dialog, then click the Run Report button. The
application runs the projection and sends the results to the specified location. For
more information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7.
3.
If you sent the report to the display window, view the Annual Projection report. Print
the report by clicking the Print icon, if desired, and then click the Close button to exit
from the report viewer.
4.
Click the Close button to exit from the Report Definition dialog.
Running a Quick Projection
You can easily view an asset’s projected depreciation expense for the life of the asset.
To run a quick projection on an asset
1.
Do one of the following:
• In Asset Detail, display the asset you want to project.
• In the Asset List, select the asset you want to project.
2.
Do one of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Quick Projection from the menu bar.
• Click the Run a Quick Projection task on the navigation pane.
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Depreciation
Running a Quick Projection
8
The Quick Projection dialog appears.
3.
Select the book on which you want to run a projection, and then click OK. The
application generates and displays the Quick Projection report.
Quick Projection Report
The Quick Projection report shows an asset’s projected depreciation expense for the life of
the asset.
Report Columns
The following guidelines provide detail on the columns appearing on the report.

As Of
This column displays the fiscal year-end for each year in the asset’s life.

Beginning Depreciation
Beginning Depreciation includes all depreciation expense from the asset’s
placed-in-service date through the end of the fiscal year before the one for which
depreciation is projected.

Depreciation This Run
Because this projection is run annually, the Depreciation This Run column will always
be the same as the Current Year to Date Depreciation.

Current YTD Depreciation
Current Year to Date Depreciation includes all depreciation expense from the
beginning to the end of the fiscal year for which depreciation is projected.

Current Accum Depreciation
Current Accumulated Depreciation includes all depreciation expense from the asset’s
placed-in-service date up to the end of the year for which depreciation is projected.
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8
Depreciation
Changing Critical Depreciation Fields
Note: The following columns on the report include the 168 Allowance and Section 179
expense, when applicable to the depreciation method, if you selected Yes in the Include
Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Expense field in the Edit Company dialog:
• Beginning Depreciation
• Depreciation This Run
• Current YTD Depreciation
• Current Accum Depreciation
The header of the report indicates whether you selected Yes or No in the Edit Company
dialog.
Sample Quick Projection Report
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Changing Critical Depreciation Fields
Tip: Before changing a critical depreciation field, we recommend that you print the Main
tab of the asset you are changing to insure you have the original asset information or
perform a backup of the company prior to making the change, in case you do not get the
desired outcome.
The information entered in several fields is used to calculate depreciation. The following
fields are the depreciation-critical fields:
• Property Type
• Placed-in-Service Date
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Changing Critical Depreciation Fields
8
• Acquisition Value
• Depreciation Method
• Estimated Life
• Salvage Value
• Section 168 Allowance % (if applicable to method)
• Section 179
• Business-Use Percentage
When you change a value in a depreciation-critical field after you have calculated
depreciation for the asset, you must indicate when to apply the change. The new
information could be applied at several different points in the life of the asset. A message
box will prompt you to select the date after you make the change to the depreciation-critical
field.
To change a critical depreciation field
1.
Go to Asset Detail for the asset whose depreciation-critical information you want to
change.
2.
Change the information in one of the depreciation-critical fields. When you tab out of
the field, a message warns you that you are making a change to a depreciation-critical
field and asks if you want to continue.
3.
Click the Yes button to continue. The Critical Depreciation Change dialog appears.
4.
Click one of the four option buttons, and then click OK. The information in the
Beginning Depreciation, Current Depreciation, and Period Close fields is updated.
5.
Click the Save Asset button.
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8
Depreciation
Changing Critical Depreciation Fields
Note: If you select anything except Placed-in-Service Date in step 4, and the depreciation
method is currently SL, SF, or SH and the changes make the asset under-depreciated as
related to the new values, the asset may not fully depreciate over the life of the asset. In
this case, we recommend changing the Depreciation Method to RV. The Depreciation
Adjustment report can assist you in identifying under-depreciated assets.
Completing the Critical Depreciation Change Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Critical Depreciation Change dialog.

Placed-in-Service Date
Click this option button to apply the change as of the Placed-in-Service date. Any
depreciation in the Current Depreciation, Period Close, and Beginning Depreciation
fields is reset to zero. The next time you calculate depreciation, the newly entered
information is applied as of the Placed-in-Service date as though the asset had been
originally entered with the new information.
Note: This option is not recommended for older assets. Choosing this option will
remove prior-year calculations.
8-14

Beginning Date
Click this option button to apply the change as of the Beginning date. The values in the
beginning fields are retained and depreciation will be recalculated going forward
using the newly entered information. Zeros are entered in the Period Close fields if the
Period Close date is after the Beginning date. The information in the Period Close fields
is retained if the Period Close date equals the Beginning date. The next time you
calculate depreciation, the newly entered information will be applied as of the
Beginning date. This option is not available if you are changing the Placed-in-Service
date to a date after the Beginning date or there is no Beginning information.

Period Close Date
Click this option button to apply the change as of the Period Close date. The period
close values calculated using the existing depreciation-critical field values are retained.
The next time you calculate depreciation, the newly entered information is applied as
of the Period Close date. The Period Close data becomes the Beginning data and
overwrites the information in the Beginning fields. This option is not available if you
are changing the Placed-in-Service date to a date after the Period Close date or there is
no Beginning data.

Current Through Date
Click this option button to apply the change as of the Current Through date. The
Current Through date values calculated using the existing depreciation-critical field
values are retained. Period Close amounts before the Current Through date will be
reset to zero. The next time you calculate depreciation beyond the Current Through
date, the newly entered information will be applied. The Current Through data
becomes the Beginning data and overwrites the information in the Beginning fields.
This option is not available if you are changing the Placed-in-Service date to a date after
the Current Through date.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Conducting a Period Close
8
Changing the Beginning Depreciation Fields
When you make a change to any of the Beginning Depreciation fields (Beginning Date,
Beginning Year-to-Date Depreciation, or Beginning Accumulated Depreciation), the
following changes to the asset are made:
• The newly entered Beginning Depreciation information is copied into the Current
Depreciation fields (Current Through Date, Current Year-to-Date Depreciation, and
Current Accumulated Depreciation).
• The information in the Period Close fields (Period Close Date, Period Close
Year-to-Date Depreciation, and Period Close Accumulated Depreciation) is set to zero.
• The depreciation adjustment, if any, is recalculated and can be viewed on the
Depreciation Adjustment report.
Conducting a Period Close
The Period Close feature allows you to store and protect current depreciation values for all
assets. This feature provides a security blanket against future calculation problems, such as
changes made to assets that lead to incorrect calculations. If needed, you can then later reset
depreciation to the period close date, a time when you last tied out to your general ledger.
The tasks involved in conducting a period close are exactly the same as those for running
a Depreciation Expense report. The only difference is how you access the feature. Plus, the
results of conducting the period close are stored in the Period Close fields. This allows you
to later reset depreciation to a period close date if necessary.
Note: When you conduct a period close, depreciation is not calculated; the application is
only storing figures.
You can view period close calculation amounts for an asset in Asset Detail. The last three
book information fields display those figures:
• Period Close Date
• Period Close Year-to-Date
• Period Close Accumulated
Hints for Conducting a Period Close
• Before you conduct a Period Close, calculate depreciation on the assets you want to
include in the process. To calculate depreciation, select the Depreciate command on
the Depreciation menu. The date that you enter on the Set Period Close dialog must
be the same as the date through which you have calculated depreciation. If
depreciation on an asset has not been calculated through the date in this field, it will
not appear on the Period Close report.
• We recommend that you select the All FAS Assets group when you conduct a period
close.
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Depreciation
Conducting a Period Close
Note: The date of the Period Close must be on or after the Beginning Date for each asset
for which you are conducting the Period Close. You cannot conduct a Period Close prior
to an asset’s Beginning Date.
To conduct a period close
1.
Select Depreciation/Period Close/Set Period Close from the menu bar. The Set Period
Close dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Set Period Close dialog, and then click OK. See “Completing the Set
Period Close Dialog,” page 8-16. The most recent depreciation calculations for the
selected group of assets are saved, and then the results are either displayed on your
computer screen or sent to a printer.
If you opted to display the results, click the Close button to exit the Report Viewer.
Completing the Set Period Close Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Set Period Close dialog.

Group
Use this field to select the group on which you want to conduct a period close. To create
a new group, you can select the Group Manager from the Customize menu

Books
Use this field to select the books for which you want to conduct a period close. You
must select at least one book.


8-16
Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
Close the Period for Assets Calculated Through
Use this field to enter the date (in the format MM/YYYY) through which you want the
application to save previously calculated depreciation amounts. The application
includes all assets for which depreciation has been calculated through the last day of
the month you entered. The date may be for any period, including an earlier period. If
you enter a date for an earlier period, however, be sure you have calculated
depreciation through that date for the assets you want to include in the report. The
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation
Conducting a Period Close
8
assets’ current through date must be the same as the date you enter in this field. This
ensures that the selected assets appear on the report.


View Reporting Period Button
Click this button to view a dialog that allows you to select the reporting period for
each book. For more information, see “Completing the Current Reporting Period
Dialog,” page 9-9.
Send To
Use this field to specify where you want to send the report: a display window or
printer. Click the appropriate check box. If you do not want to generate a report, clear
both check boxes. The application saves previously calculated depreciation amounts
for the selected assets and updates them in Asset Detail.
Saving Calculations with a Period Close
The Period Close feature saves the most recent depreciation calculations and displays them
in the three Period Close fields. When you conduct a period close, the application copies
the amounts in the three depreciation-related fields to the three Period Close fields.
The table below shows the three fields that contain your depreciation calculations and the
corresponding Period Close fields.
Depreciation Fields
Period Close Fields
Current Year-to-Date
Period Close Year-to-Date
Current Accum
Period Close Accum
Current Through Date
Period Close Date
Example:
You calculate depreciation on an asset with the following attributes:
Property Type:
D
Placed-in-Service Date:
03/01/2003
Acquisition Value:
$10,000
Depreciation Method:
SL
Estimated Life:
7 years
You calculate depreciation for this asset on 12/31/2007. The application displays the
following in the three depreciation-related fields:
Current Year-to-Date:
$1,428.57
Current Accum:
$6,904.76
Current Through Date:
12/2007
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Depreciation
Conducting a Period Close
Then you conduct a Period Close for a group of assets that includes this asset. After you
conduct the Period Close, the application displays the following in the three Period Close
fields:
Period Close Year-to-Date: $1,428.57
Period Close Accum:
$6,904.76
Period Close Date:
12/2007
Relying on the Period Close Calculations
The Period Close feature allows you to store current depreciation values for all assets. This
feature locks in your calculations to ensure that your historical balances will always tie out
as of the Period Close date.
For example, if you make changes to the asset attributes, such as estimated life or
depreciation method, you can make the change effective as of the Period Close date. This
means your beginning balance is secured and the change will affect only the ongoing
calculations.
The Period Close amounts are used as a “starting point” when you calculate depreciation.
The Period Close amounts serve as the foundation on which future depreciation is
calculated.
Example:
You enter an asset in January of 2007, and you calculate depreciation on the asset each
month. In December 2007, you conduct a Period Close for a group of assets that includes
this asset. The information in the current depreciation fields for December 2007 is now
saved in your Period Close depreciation fields.
You continue to calculate depreciation monthly through March 2008. Then you realize that
an error was made on the asset during the original data entry, and you need to change the
estimated life from seven years to five years.
After you make the depreciation-critical change, the depreciation is recalculated, starting
with the December 2007 values, which are locked in and stored in the Period Close fields.
An adjustment is also calculated as of December 2007 for the change in estimated life.
Therefore, you are able to make the depreciation-critical change and claim an adjustment
in the current year, without restating your historical values.
Period Close and Beginning Depreciation Fields
Both the Period Close fields and the Beginning Depreciation fields protect your
depreciation calculations. The application does not allow you to calculate depreciation
prior to the Beginning Date or the Period Close Date. (To do so, you must first reset
depreciation back to the Placed-in-Service date.)
Please note the following rules for the Period Close and Beginning Depreciation fields:
• You cannot conduct a Period Close before the date in the Beginning Date field. (This
is because you cannot calculate depreciation prior to the date in the Beginning Date
field.)
• You can conduct a Period Close on the same date as the date in the Beginning Date
field. If you do so, then all three sets of depreciation fields (the Beginning
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Depreciation
Conducting a Period Close
8
Depreciation fields, the Period Close fields, and the Current Depreciation fields) will
contain the same information.
• When you conduct a Period Close after the Beginning Date, the application copies the
depreciation amounts from the Current Depreciation fields into the Period Close
fields. The information in the Beginning Depreciation fields remains the same. The
application does not recalculate an adjustment.
• The application calculates adjustments to depreciation based on the information in
the Beginning Depreciation fields. You can run a Depreciation Adjustment report to
view the difference between depreciation calculated by the application and the
amounts entered in the Beginning Depreciation fields.
Clearing the Period Close Fields
You can remove information from the period close fields for a single asset or for a group of
assets, allowing you to easily rerun depreciation reports for periods prior to a period close.
When you use the Clear Period Close feature, the application removes the period close date
and enters zeros in the period close depreciation fields.
The application does not remove period close information from an asset whose status is
Inactive.
Note: Removing period close data does not immediately change the current depreciation
data. However, if you made changes to asset attributes after the Period Close date, then
depreciation calculations may be affected the next time depreciation is calculated prior to
the current through date.
To clear the period close fields
1.
Select Depreciation/Period Close/Clear Period Close from the menu bar. The Clear
Period Close dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Clear Period Close dialog. See “Completing the Clear Period Close
Dialog,” page 8-20.
3.
Click OK. Zeros are entered in the period close fields if the asset’s Period Close Date is
on or after the date entered in the Clear Period Close dialog.
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Depreciation
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods
Completing the Clear Period Close Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Clear Period Close dialog.

Step 1: Select a Group
Use this field to select the group of assets for which you want to set the period close
fields to zero.

Step 2: Select Books
Use this field to select the book(s) for which you want to set the period close fields to
zero.


Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
Step 3: Enter Period Close Date
Clear Period Close Information On or After
Use this field to enter the date for which you want to set the period close fields to zero.
When you click OK, the application enters zeros in the period close fields if the asset’s
Period Close Date is on or after the date you entered.
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods
If your company uses nonstandard depreciation methods, you can create custom
depreciation methods. Custom methods can be used to depreciate assets for up to 60 years
with a specified percentage for each year. The default for the averaging convention in the
year of disposition is full month, but you can select a different averaging convention. You
can create over 1200 different custom depreciation methods.
Note: The averaging convention for the placed-in-service year must be calculated as part
of the first year percentage.
To create a custom depreciation method
1.
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Select Customize/Depreciation Methods from the menu bar. The Custom
Depreciation Methods dialog appears.
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Depreciation
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods
2.
8
Enter a two-character code and a brief description of the method, and then click the
Add button. For further instructions on this dialog, see “Completing the Custom
Depreciation Methods Dialog,” page 8-21.
The Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] dialog appears.
3.
Complete the Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] dialog, and then click OK. See
“Completing the Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] Dialog,” page 8-22. The
application returns to the Custom Depreciation Methods dialog.
4.
Click the Close button on the Custom Depreciation Methods dialog. The application
automatically adds your custom method to the SmartList of available depreciation
methods.
Completing the Custom Depreciation Methods Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Depreciation Methods dialog.

Enter New Name and Description
Use this field to type a two-character code to identify this depreciation method. The
code can include any number or lowercase letter, except for the codes reserved by the
application (see note below). If you enter uppercase letters, the application changes
them to lowercase. Uppercase letters are reserved for the application’s standard
depreciation methods.
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Depreciation
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods
Note: The following two-character codes are reserved by the application. Therefore,
you cannot enter the following codes in the Enter New Name and Description field:
aa
de
ma
oc
sh
ad
dh
mf
rv
sl
at
di
mi
sa
st
db
dl
mr
sb
yd
dc
dm
mt
sd
yh
dd
dy
no
sf
ys

Custom Methods List Box
This list box displays the two-character codes and descriptions of all the custom
methods in your application. Use this list box to select a custom method on which you
want to perform one of the functions listed on the buttons to the right of this list box
(Edit, Delete, Copy, Replace).

Add Button
Click this button to define the custom method you specify in the Enter New Name and
Description field. The application automatically adds your custom method to the
SmartList of available depreciation methods.

Edit Button
Click this button to edit a custom method you select from the Custom Methods list box.
See “Completing the Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] Dialog,” page 8-22. If you
edit a custom method used by an existing asset, you must use the depreciate function
to redepreciate the asset and apply the new percentages.

Delete Button
Click this button to delete the custom method you select from the Custom Methods list
box. If you delete a custom method used by an existing asset, the asset’s depreciation
method will change to RV.

Copy Button
To copy a custom method, select the method from the Custom Methods list box, click
this button, and complete the Copy Custom Method dialog. See “Completing the Copy
Custom Method Dialog,” page 8-24.

Replace Button
To replace a custom method, select the method from the Custom Methods list box, click
this button, and complete the Replace Custom Method dialog. See “Completing the
Replace Custom Method Dialog,” page 8-24.
Completing the Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Depreciation Method Setup - [Name] dialog.

Disposal Method Convention
Use this field to select a disposal year averaging convention. The default disposal year
convention is full month. The following disposal year conventions are available:
• Full month
• Midmonth
• Half-year, ACRS
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Depreciation
Creating Custom Depreciation Methods
8
• Half-year, MACRS and pre-ACRS
• Modified half-year
Note: The application uses the selected averaging convention only in the disposal
year. The averaging convention for the placed-in-service year must be calculated as
part of the first year percentage.
Averaging conventions are discussed at length in Appendix A, “Depreciation and
Fixed Asset Concepts.”

Percent (%)
For each year, enter the percentage of depreciation to be taken in that year. Year 1 is the
year you placed the asset in service, and you can enter percentages for up to 60 years.
Enter the percentage as a whole number or a whole number with a decimal; for
example, enter 10% as 10, and enter 14.5% as 14.5.
Note: For the placed-in-service year, the asset always receives a full year’s
depreciation, no matter when the asset is placed in service. For example, suppose you
enter 20% in the Percent Field for Year 1. Even if you place the asset in service on the
last day of the year, the application would multiply the asset’s depreciable basis by
20% for the first year. If you want the asset to receive only partial depreciation for the
first year, you must enter a smaller percentage.
You should not enter a percentage greater than 100.000.

Total Percentage
This field shows the total percentage of depreciation for all years entered thus far. This
amount cannot exceed 100.000.

Remaining Percentage
This field shows the difference between the total percentage and 100.000 (100%
depreciation).
For most depreciation methods, when you finish entering annual percentages the total
percentage should be 100.000 and the remaining percentage should be zero. You can,
however, create a depreciation method that does not fully depreciate assets.
When the application calculates depreciation, it applies the percentage entered for each
year to the depreciable basis of the asset and evenly distributes the depreciation
amount over the 12-month period.
When you have entered the percentages, click OK to save your data and return to the
Custom Depreciation Methods dialog. The new custom depreciation method appears
in the list box.
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Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
Completing the Copy Custom Method Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Copy Custom Method dialog.

Copy From
This field displays the method you are copying.

Copy To
Use this field to type the name of the method to which you are copying the selected
method. You must enter a new custom method name. You cannot use the Copy Custom
Method to override an existing method.
Completing the Replace Custom Method Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Replace Custom Method dialog.

Replace From
This field displays the method you want to replace with the method you type in the
Replace To field.

Replace To
Use this field to type the name of the method that you want to replace the method
displayed in the Replace From field. You can enter either a new or existing method in
this field.
Electing the 168 Allowance
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 (JCWAA) includes a provision
allowing an additional depreciation deduction for qualifying MACRS property in the first
year you place an asset in service. The JCWAA was revised by the Jobs and Growth Tax
Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003 (JGTRRA) and again in the Economic Stimulus Act of
2008. The new rules are covered under IRS Code Section 168.
The 2010 Tax Relief Act allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service after
September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011, (or December 31, 2012 for assets with
longer production lives).
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Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
8
The 168 Allowance will still be available for qualified property placed in service in a special
disaster zone through 2012 for personal property and through 2013 for real property, and
for cellulosic biofuel plant property through 2012. Beginning in 2006, the 168 Allowance
can also be taken for reuse and recycling property. Currently, there is no expiration of the
168 Allowance for reuse and recycling property.
There are special 168 Allowance rules for property located in the New York Liberty Zone
and the Gulf Opportunity Zone. For more information, see “New York Liberty Zone
Property,” page 8-33 and “Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property,” page 8-40.
The additional allowance is 50% of the asset’s depreciable basis for property placed in
service after May 5, 2003. The 50% allowance is a provision of the Jobs and Growth Tax
Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003.
Originally, the additional allowance was 30% of the asset’s depreciable basis for property
acquired after September 10, 2001 and placed in service before January 1, 2005 (or January
1, 2006 for certain property with longer production periods).
The Section 168 Allowance is an election made each year it is applicable. In Sage Fixed
Assets, the election is made by choosing a depreciation method especially designed to
calculate and claim the allowance. Therefore, you make the election when you save the
asset using a “Plus 168” depreciation method.
To elect the 168 Allowance
1.
2.
In Asset Detail, select one of the following “Plus 168” depreciation methods:
Depreciation
Method
Description
MA200
MACRS Formula 200 + 168
MA150
MACRS Formula 150 + 168
MA100
MACRS Formula 100 + 168
MR200
MACRS Indian Reservation 200 + 168
MR150
MACRS Indian Reservation 150 + 168
MR100
MACRS Indian Reservation 100 + 168
AA
ADS Straight-line MACRS + 168
SB
Straight-line Full-month + 168
After selecting the method, select 30, 50, or 100% in the 168 Allowance % field. The
application displays the calculated amount of the allowance in the 168 Allowance
Amount field.
The additional allowance applies to qualifying assets, but you can elect out of the
allowance for each class of assets (that is, 3-year, 5-year, 7-year, etc.) on a year-to-year
basis.
Note: You can select a 30%, 50%, or 100% allowance, depending on when the property
was placed in service. You select the desired percentage in the 168 Allowance % field.
3.
Click the Save Asset button to save the asset.
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8
Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
Note: You can also select the 168 Allowance for a group of assets by performing a 168
Allowance Switch. For more information, see “Performing a 168 Allowance Switch,” page
8-28.
Assets That Qualify for the 168 Allowance
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 (JCWAA) allows you to take an
additional 30% depreciation allowance in the year you place an asset in service. In 2003, the
allowance was increased to 50% for assets placed in service after May 5, 2003.
To qualify for the 168 Allowance under JCWAA, an asset must be one of the following:
• MACRS property with a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Section 167(f)(1)(B) computer software
• Qualified leasehold improvements
• Water utility property, which has a 25-year recovery period
• Other property that is also qualified New York Liberty Zone property
In addition, qualifying property must meet certain other rules. It must be acquired after
September 10, 2001 and placed in service before January 1, 2005 with no binding written
contract for the acquisition in effect before September 11, 2001, or it must be acquired
pursuant to a binding written contract that was entered into after September 10, 2001 and
before January 1, 2005.
The asset must be placed in service before January 1, 2005, except for certain other property.
Such property must be placed in service before January 1, 2006.
The original use of the property must commence with the taxpayer. Used property does not
qualify; however, there are exceptions for New York Liberty Zone property.
Additional rules apply to property which the taxpayer self-constructed or sold and leased
back. These are covered in IRS Code Section 168(k)(2)(D).
Note: There are special 168 Allowance rules for property located in the New York Liberty
Zone and the Gulf Opportunity Zone. For more information, see “New York Liberty Zone
Property,” page 8-33 and “Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property,” page 8-40.
In 2006 the Tax Relief and Reconciliation Act introduced a 168 Allowance of 50% that is
available for qualified cellulosic biomass ethanol plant property.
Any of the following attributes disqualify the asset:
• The property is listed property that is used 50% or less for business purposes.
• The property is required to be depreciated under the Alternative Depreciation System
(ADS).
• The property is New York Liberty Zone qualified leasehold improvement property.
Such property is eligible for a 5-year life however.
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8
Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
Changing the Depreciation Method of a Single Asset
You can change an existing asset’s depreciation method so that it receives the 168
Allowance, assuming the asset qualifies for the additional allowance. For information on
which assets qualify for the additional allowance, see “Assets That Qualify for the 168
Allowance Switch,” page 8-30.
Note: You can also change the depreciation methods for a group of assets, so that they
either take the additional depreciation allowance or elect out of the additional
depreciation. For more information, see “Performing a 168 Allowance Switch,” page 8-28.
The table below shows which depreciation method you would select to receive the 168
Allowance. For example, if a qualifying asset currently uses depreciation method MF200,
you would change its depreciation method to MA200. The depreciation methods in the left
column do not take the 168 Allowance. The depreciation methods in the right column do
take the 168 Allowance.
Depr. Methods with No 168 Allowance
Depr. Methods with 168 Allowance
MF200
MACRS formula 200
MA200
MACRS formula 200 + 168
MF150
MACRS formula 150
MA150
MACRS formula 150 + 168
MF100
MACRS formula 100
MA100
MACRS formula 100 + 168
MI200
MACRS Indian Reserv. 200
MR200
MACRS Indian Reserv. 200 + 168
MI150
MACRS Indian Reserv. 150
MR150
MACRS Indian Reserv. 150 + 168
MI100
MACRS Indian Reserv. 100
MR100
MACRS Indian Reserv. 100 + 168
AD
ADS Straight-line MACRS
AA
ADS Straight-line MACRS + 168
SF
Straight-line full month
SB
Straight-line full month + 168
Note: If you change an asset’s depreciation method after you have calculated depreciation
on it, the application displays two warning messages. It is important to respond to these
messages correctly.
To change an asset’s depreciation method
1.
Select the asset whose depreciation method you want to change, and then go to Asset
Detail.
2.
Change the depreciation method for all federal tax books and any applicable state
books. Check with each state’s Department of Revenue to determine whether they
have adopted the 168 Allowance before switching to one of the “Plus 168”
depreciation methods.
Note: Do not change any information in the Internal book.
The application displays a message warning you that changing the depreciation
method affects the current depreciation amount and asking if you want to continue.
3.
Click the Yes button. The application displays a message asking when you want to
apply the change to the depreciation-critical field.
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Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
4.
Click the Placed-in-Service Date option, and then click OK. The application clears all
of the previously calculated depreciation amounts. This enables the application to
correctly calculate the additional 168 Allowance.
5.
Select 30, 50, or 100 in the 168 Allowance % field if you have selected a “Plus 168”
depreciation method.
6.
Click the Save Asset button to save the asset.
Performing a 168 Allowance Switch
You can select a group of assets and change the depreciation method for the group so that
the group will take the additional 30%, 50%, or 100% allowance. You can also change the
group’s depreciation methods so that the group does not take the additional allowance at
all.
The application changes the depreciation method for only those assets that qualify for the
switch. For more information, see “Assets That Qualify for the 168 Allowance Switch,”
page 8-30.
Before you use this feature, you should spend some time planning and creating your asset
groups. Remember that you elect the 168 Allowance for entire classes of assets (3-year
property, 5-year property, etc.). Your asset group could include multiple classes of property,
as long as you include all of the qualifying assets for each class in the group. Also, make
sure that groups for which you are applying the “Plus 168” depreciation methods consist
of assets that are eligible for the additional depreciation.
You may also want to reset depreciation on your assets to the placed-in-service date before
you use this feature, especially if your assets contain beginning depreciation amounts. If
you want to retain the information in the beginning depreciation fields, then reset
depreciation to the Beginning Date instead. For more information, see “Resetting
Depreciation,” page 8-6.
The application switches depreciation methods as outlined in the table in “Changing the
Depreciation Method of a Single Asset,” page 8-27. For example, suppose Asset A currently
uses depreciation method MF200. You create a group of assets called “7-year MACRS
Property” that includes Asset A. If you perform a 168 Allowance Switch on this group of
assets, then Asset A will use depreciation method MA200.
The application changes depreciation methods as indicated in the table on page 8-27. The
application does not change the depreciation method of an asset that has a custom
depreciation method.
Note: If you switch an asset that uses a MACRS table depreciation method, the
application applies a MACRS formula Plus 168 depreciation method. For example, the
application switches an asset with an MT200 depreciation method to MA200. However,
you cannot switch an asset back to a MACRS table method. For example, the application
switches an asset with an MA200 depreciation method to MF200, even if that asset once
used depreciation method MT200. To change the depreciation method back to MT200, you
must edit the Depreciation Method field in Asset Detail. For more information, see
“Changing the Depreciation Method of a Single Asset,” page 8-27.
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Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
8
To perform the 168 Allowance Switch
1.
Create a group consisting of one or more classes of assets for which you want to
change depreciation methods.
2.
Select Depreciate/168 Allowance Switch from the menu bar. The 168 Allowance
Switch dialog appears.
3.
Complete the 168 Allowance Switch dialog, and then click OK. For more information,
see “Completing the 168 Allowance Switch Dialog,” page 8-29.
The application changes the depreciation methods for the selected group of assets that
qualify for the change. The application also applies the 30%, 50%, or 100% allowance
percentage if you elect to take the 168 Allowance. The application calculates depreciation
through the Current Through Date using the new depreciation methods. The application
also recalculates any gain or loss on disposed assets.
Completing the 168 Allowance Switch Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the 168 Allowance Switch dialog.

Step 1: Select a Group
Use this field to select the group of assets for which you want to make one of the
following selections:
• Change the depreciation methods so that the assets take the 168 Allowance.
• Change the depreciation methods so that the assets do not take the 168
Allowance.

Step 2: Select a Book
Select the check box for each book for which you want to make the election.
Note: If you select one federal tax book, you should select all federal tax books.

Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
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8
Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance

Step 3: Enter a Fiscal Year End
 Assets Placed in Service Fiscal Year End
Use this text box to enter the fiscal year-end for which you want to make the
election. The application changes the depreciation methods only for valid assets
that have been placed in service during the fiscal year that you enter.

Step 4: Select a Method
Select one of the following elections:

Take the 168 - 100% Allowance
Click this option button if you want the selected group of assets to take the
additional 100% depreciation allowance. The 100% allowance is available for
assets placed in service after September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011 (or
December 31, 2012 for assets with longer production lives).

Take the 168 - 50% Allowance
Click this option button if you want the selected group of assets to take the
additional 50% depreciation allowance.

Take the 168 - 30% Allowance
Click this option button if you want the selected group of assets to take the
additional 30% depreciation allowance.

Do Not Take the 168 Allowance
Click this option button if you want the selected group of assets to not take the 168
Allowance.
Assets That Qualify for the 168 Allowance Switch
The 168 Allowance Switch feature changes an asset’s depreciation method to (or from) the
“Plus 168” depreciation methods. The application makes the change only for assets that
meet the following criteria:
• Activity code is A (active) or D (disposed).
• Placed-in-service date is 09/11/01 to 12/31/09. (Restrictions based on property type
and placed-in-service date apply.)
• Depreciation method is a MACRS method, SF (straight-line, full-month), or SB
(straight-line, full-month plus 168 Allowance).
• Property type is P, A, T, Q, R, S, C, E, or F.
• Business use is 51% or greater.
For example, the application will change an active asset placed in service on 01/01/02 with
the MF200 depreciation method to MA200 or vice versa.
The 2010 Tax Relief Act allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service after
September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011, (or December 31, 2012 for assets with
longer production lives).
The 168 Allowance will still be available for qualified property placed in service in a special
disaster zone through 2012 for personal property and through 2013 for real property, and
for cellulosic biofuel plant property through 2012. Beginning in 2006, the 168 Allowance
can also be taken for reuse and recycling property. Currently, there is no expiration of the
168 Allowance for reuse and recycling property.
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8
Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
Note: The 168 Allowance generally applies to real property only if the asset is a leasehold
improvement. If you want an asset with a property type of R, S, C, E, or F to take the 168
Allowance, make sure it is a qualifying leasehold improvement. The application cannot
make this determination for you.
Electing Out of the 168 Allowance
The 168 Allowance is taken by all qualifying assets, unless you elect out of the allowance.
You can elect out of the allowance for each class of assets (that is, 3-year property, 5-year
property, 7-year property, etc.) on a year-to-year basis.
To elect out of the allowance
1.
Select one of the depreciation methods that does not include the additional allowance,
such as MACRS formula (MF) or MACRS table (MT).
2.
When you file the Form 4562, you must attach a statement indicating the class of
property for which you are electing not to claim the additional depreciation
allowance.
Including Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Depreciation
Expense
The Section 168 Allowance and the Section 179 expense are basis deductions before
MACRS depreciation is calculated. They are separately stated items in Asset Detail and on
reports by default. However, you can choose whether to combine the Section 168
Allowance and Section 179 expense, when applicable, with MACRS depreciation expense
on reports.
You indicate your selection in the Edit Company dialog. If you decide to include these
amounts in depreciation expense on reports, the application includes the Section 168
Allowance and Section 179 expense in the following columns:
• Prior Accumulated Depreciation
• Depreciation This Run
• Current Year to Date
• Current Accumulated Depreciation
Generally, the entire Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense are claimed in the
placed-in-service month. After the placed-in-service year, the amounts become part of the
Prior Accumulated Depreciation. Neither the Section 168 Allowance nor the Section 179
expense is prorated for a short year or affected by the asset’s averaging convention.
Although you can include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense in
depreciation amounts for reporting, the application does not include them when
displaying the Current Year-to-Date field and Current Accumulation field in Asset Detail.
Both the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense are separately stated in Asset
Detail because special rules and limitations apply to these values. To view a breakdown of
all the components of Tax Expense, including the Section 179 expense and Section 168
Allowance, you can run the Tax Expense Report from the Reports menu.
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Depreciation
Electing the 168 Allowance
The asset’s acquisition value is always reduced by the Section 168 Allowance and Section
179 expense, if applicable, when calculating and displaying the asset’s depreciable basis.
Thus, if you choose to include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in expense, then
the total accumulated depreciation at the end of the asset’s life will be greater than the
depreciable basis by the amount of the Section 168 Allowance and the Section 179 expense.
The decision whether to include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in depreciation
expense applies to all of the assets in a company.
To include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in depreciation
expense
1.
Select File/Edit Company from the menu bar. The Edit Company dialog appears.
2.
Select the Include Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Expense check box.
A message warns that changing the entry in this field will change the depreciation
values on reports.
3.
Click the Yes button to continue.
4.
Click OK to close the Edit Company dialog.
Example:
You acquire office equipment that costs $10,000 and has an estimated life of 5 years. You
place it in service on January 1, 2002 and claim $2,000 of Section 179 expense. A Section 168
Allowance of $2,400 (30% of $8,000) is calculated when you use depreciation method
MA200.
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Depreciation
New York Liberty Zone Property
8
If you do not include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense in depreciation
expense, the application calculates the following amounts when you run the Depreciation
Expense report for December 31, 2002 (assuming you calculate depreciation monthly):
Report Column
Amount
Calculation
Depreciable Basis
$5,600.00
$10,000 – 2,000 – (8,000 x .30)
Prior Accum Depreciation
$
0.00
Depreciation This Run
$
93.33
Current YTD
$1,120.00
Current Accum
$1,120.00
$1,120/12 (1 month of depreciation)
($5,600/5 years x 200%) x ½ (half-year convention)
If you include the Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense in depreciation expense,
the application calculates the following amounts when you run the Depreciation Expense
report for December 31, 2002 (assuming you calculate depreciation monthly):
Report Column
Amount
Calculation
Depreciable Basis
$5,600.00
$10,000 – 2,000 – (8,000 x .30)
Prior Accum Depreciation
$
0.00
Depreciation This Run
$
93.33
Current YTD
$5,520.00
($1,120 (regular depr.) + $2,000 (Sec. 179) + $2,400 (Sec.
168 Allowance)
Current Accum
$5,520.00
$1,120 + $2,000 +$2,400
$1,120/12 (1 month of depreciation)
At the end of the asset’s life, the Current Accumulated Depreciation will be $10,000, but the
asset’s Depreciable Basis is only $5,600. The difference of $4,400 is equal to the $2,000 of
Section 179 expense and $2,400 of the Section 168 Allowance.
New York Liberty Zone Property
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 created additional tax incentives for
taxpayers located in a New York Liberty Zone. In general, the provisions of the JCWAA that
apply to the New York Liberty Zone allow the taxpayers additional time to claim incentives
and also include:
• Expansion of the 168 Allowance to additional types of property
• Decrease in depreciable life for leasehold improvements
• Increase in the Section 179 deduction
• The 30% allowance is available for New York Liberty Zone property placed in service
after September 10, 2001 and before January 1, 2007. It is available for residential
rental property and non-residential real property placed in service before January 1,
2010.
Note: The 168 Allowance is deductible for both regular tax and AMT purposes.
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Depreciation
New York Liberty Zone Property
Qualifying NY Liberty Zone property is one of the following:
• MACRS property with a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Water utility property, with a 25-year recovery period
• Section 167(f)(1)(B) computer software
• Residential rental and non-residential real property, to the extent that it rehabilitates
real property damaged, or replaces real property destroyed or condemned, as a result
of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack.
NY Liberty Zone property must also meet the following tests:
• Property must be acquired after September 10, 2001.
• If property is acquired after September 10, 2001 and before January 1, 2005, it must be
“used” property. If acquired after January 1, 2005, it can be either new or used property.
• Property must be placed into service before January 1, 2007 (January 1, 2010 for
residential rental and non-residential real property).
• Substantially all property must be in use in the NY Liberty Zone, and used in the
active conduct of a trade or business in the NY Liberty Zone.
• The original use of the property in the NY Liberty Zone must have begun after
September 10, 2001. Used property qualifies if it has not previously been used within
the NY Liberty Zone.
The following property does not qualify as NY Liberty Zone property:
• Property to which Section 168 Allowance applies (that is, property that qualifies for
the additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation allowance)
• Listed property that is used 50% or less for business purposes
• Property that is required to be depreciated under the Alternative Depreciation System
(ADS)
• Qualified NY Liberty Zone Leasehold Improvement property
New York Liberty Zone Definition
The New York Liberty Zone is the area located on or south of Canal Street, East Broadway
(east of its intersection with Canal Street), or Grand Street (east of its intersection with East
Broadway) in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York, New York.
Entering New York Liberty Zone Property
You enter New York Liberty Zone property in the application the same way you enter any
other asset. There is no special field that designates an asset as New York Liberty Zone
property.
You can identify the asset as New York Liberty Zone property in the Description field or in
one of the Custom Fields if desired.
The following rules apply to New York Liberty Zone property:
Personal Property
You can select a “Plus 168” depreciation method if the placed-in-service date is after
September 10, 2001 and before January 1, 2007. (If the placed-in-service date is after
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Depreciation
New York Liberty Zone Property
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December 31, 2004, the application reminds you that a “Plus 168” depreciation method is
allowed only for New York Liberty Zone property or certain property having longer
production periods.)
Note: The 30% allowance is available for New York Liberty Zone property placed in
service after September 10, 2001 and before January 1, 2007. It is available for residential
rental property and non-residential real property placed in service before January 1, 2010.
The availability of the 30% 168 Allowance for residential rental and non-residential real
property in the New York Liberty Zone was set to expire on 12/31/2009; however, it is
expected that these provisions will be extended. Please check with your tax advisor for
updated information.
Non-Residential Real and Residential Rental Property
The “Plus 168” depreciation methods are also available for non-residential real property
and residential rental property in the Liberty Zone if it “rehabilitates real property
damaged, or replaces real property destroyed or condemned, as a result of the September
11, 2001 terrorist attack” and is placed in service by December 31, 2009. You can select a
“Plus 168” depreciation method when the placed-in-service date is after September 10,
2001 and before January 1, 2010 and the property type is R, S, C, E, or F.
Leasehold Improvements
You can enter qualified leasehold improvements with a 5-year estimated life (GDS life) and
a 9-year ADS life. Select a real property type (R, S, C, E, or F) and the MF100 depreciation
method to enter a leasehold improvement. (New York Liberty Zone leasehold improvements
do not qualify for the 168 Allowance.) The application reminds you that a 5-year estimated
life is available only for leasehold property located in the New York Liberty Zone.
Section 179 Limits for New York Liberty Zone Property
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 changed both the dollar limit and the
investment limit for Section 179 property located in the New York Liberty Zone.
Dollar Limit
The yearly Section 179 limits increase for New York Liberty Zone property. The new
limitations treat New York Liberty Zone property in a similar manner to Enterprise Zone
property, which has had increased limits since 1993. For more information, see “Section 179
Limits for Enterprise Zone Property,” page 8-39.
The table below shows the standard Section 179 limits, as well as the increased limits for
New York Liberty Zone (NYLZ) property.
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
Increased Limit for NYLZ Property
2000
20,000
20,000 + 35,000 = 55,000 *
2001
24,000
24,000 + 35,000 = 59,000 *
2002
24,000
24,000 + 35,000 = 59,000
2003
100,000
100,000 + 35,000 = 135,000
2004
102,000
102,000 + 35,000 = 137,000
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Depreciation
New York Liberty Zone Property
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
Increased Limit for NYLZ Property
2005
105,000
105,000 + 35,000 = 140,000
2006
108,000
108,000 + 35,000 = 143,000 **
2007 and thereafter
--
Not applicable ***
* The increased limit applies only to property placed in service after September 10, 2001 for taxable
years beginning in this year.
** Qualified property must be placed in service by December 31, 2006. NOTE: The December 31,
2006 end date is valid for calendar and fiscal year filers.
***The increased limit for New York Liberty Zone property is not available for property placed in
service after 2006. The normal Section 179 limits apply. For more information, see the table on
page 6-9.
The increase in the Section 179 limit is the lesser of $35,000 or the cost of the Section 179
property located in the New York Liberty Zone. The IRS publication “Supplement to
Publication 946” provides the following two examples:
Example 1:
In 2002, you place in service a fixed asset located in the New York Liberty Zone with an
acquired value of $25,000. The cost is less than $35,000; therefore, the limit on the Section
179 deduction increases to $49,000 ($24,000 + $25,000).
Example 2:
In 2002, you place in service a fixed asset located in the New York Liberty Zone with an
acquired value of $75,000. The cost is greater than $35,000; therefore, the limit on the
Section 179 deduction increases to $59,000 ($24,000 + $35,000).
Investment Limit
Special rules also exist for New York Liberty Zone property when calculating the
investment limit.
For property NOT in the New York Liberty Zone, the allowable amount deducted under
Section 179 is reduced by one dollar for every dollar of investment over the threshold
amount for property qualifying for Section 179 and placed in service in the same taxable
year. For information about the threshold amounts for each taxable year, see “Threshold
Amounts,” page 6-10.
For example, a business places in service qualifying property costing $222,000 in 2002 when
the maximum dollar limit is $24,000. Assuming the property is not located in the New York
Liberty Zone, only $2,000 of Section 179 expense deduction is allowed for that year due to
the investment limit ($24,000 - $22,000).
For New York Liberty Zone property, as well as Enterprise Zone property, you consider
only 50% of the cost of the property placed in service in the tax year. The IRS “Supplement
to Publication 946” provides the following example:
In 2002, you place in service fixed assets with combined acquired values of $460,000 within
the New York Liberty Zone. The maximum dollar limit increases to $59,000 ($35,000 +
$24,000). Fifty percent of the cost of the property ($230,000) is $30,000 over $200,000;
therefore, the investment limit is reduced to $29,000 ($59,000 - $30,000).
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Depreciation
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Overriding Section 179 Limits on the Form 4562
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 changed the dollar limit for Section
179 property located in the New York Liberty Zone. The investment limit was changed by
the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003. You must enter the increased
limits when you print the Form 4562 - Depreciation and Amortization.
To enter the new limits for Liberty Zone on the Form 4562
1.
Select Reports/Tax Reports/4562 - Depreciation and Amortization from the menu bar.
The Form 4562 - Depreciation and Amortization dialog appears.
2.
Select a group of assets in the Group field.
3.
Enter the beginning date of the fiscal year for which you are running the report.
4.
Click the Additional Information button. The Form 4562 Additional Information
dialog appears.
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Depreciation
New York Liberty Zone Property
5.
In the Override: §179 Maximum Amount field, enter the increased dollar limit for the
year. The application prints the entered amount on Part I, Line 1 of the Form 4562.
6.
In the Override: Total Cost of §179 Property field, enter the total cost of qualifying
Section 179 property placed in service in the tax year. The application prints the
entered amount on Part I, Line 2 of the Form 4562.
Note: In general, if you enter an amount in the Override: §179 Maximum Amount
field, you should also enter an amount in the Override: Total Cost of §179 Property
field.
7.
In the Override: Threshold Cost of §179 Property field, enter the total cost of property
allowed before the Section 179 phaseout begins. The application prints the amount on
Part I, Line 3 of the Form 4562.
8.
Complete the remaining fields on the Form 4562 Additional Information dialog, and
then click OK. The application returns to the Form 4562 - Depreciation and
Amortization dialog.
9.
Complete the Form 4562 - Depreciation and Amortization dialog, and then click the
Run Report button. The application displays the Form 4562 - Depreciation and
Amortization report in the report viewer.
Completing the Form 4562 Additional Information Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Form 4562 Additional Information dialog.
Part I

Override: §179 Maximum Amount
Use this field to enter the increased dollar limit for property in the New York Liberty
Zone or Enterprise Zone. The application prints the entered amount on Part I, Line 1 of
the Form 4562.
Note: Do not use this override field for assets located in the Gulf Opportunity Zone.
Instead, use the 179 Deduction field in Asset Detail to indicate the assets are located in
the Gulf Opportunity Zone.

Override: Total Cost of §179 Property
Enter the total cost of qualifying Section 179 property placed in service in the tax year.
The application prints the entered amount on Part I, Line 2 of the Form 4562.
Note: In general, if you enter an amount in one of the two override fields above, you
should enter an amount in both override fields.
8-38

Override: Threshold Cost of §179 Property
When the state threshold amount differs from the federal threshold amount, enter the
total cost of property allowed before the Section 179 phaseout begins. The application
prints the entered amount on Part I, Line 3 of the Form 4562.

§179 Deduction Limited by Taxable Income
Click this check box if the company’s Section 179 expense deduction is limited by
taxable income under Code Section 179(b)(3).
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Depreciation
Section 179 Limits for Enterprise Zone Property
8

Aggregate Net Income Before §179 Deduction
Use this field to enter the company’s taxable income before subtracting any Section 179
expense.

Carryforward of Disallowed §179 From Prior Years
Use this field to enter the amount of Section 179 expense, if any, elected to be expensed
in previous years but not allowed as a deduction due to the taxable income limitation.
Part II

§168(f)(1) Amount - Units of Production
Use this field to enter the depreciation deduction for property the company has elected
to depreciate by the units-of-production method or other method as allowed under
Code Section 168(f)(1).

Other Depreciation
Use this field to enter the current year depreciation for assets that you do not amortize,
expense, or depreciate under MACRS and that are not maintained in the application.
Part IV

§263A Amount - Capitalized Inventory Cost
Use this field to enter the increase in basis from costs that you are required to capitalize
under the uniform capitalization rules of Code Section 263A. For more information, see
IRS Regulation 1.263A-1.
Section 179 Limits for Enterprise Zone Property
Since 1993, the amount of allowable Section 179 expense deduction has been increased for
qualifying property by an “enterprise zone business” (as defined in IRS Code Sec. 137B).
Dollar Limit
The table below shows the standard Section 179 limits, as well as the increased limits for
Enterprise Zone property.
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
Increased Limit for Enterprise
Zones
1993 - 1996
17,500
17,500 + 20,000 = 37,500
1997
18,000
18,000 + 20,000 = 38,000
1998
18,500
18,500 + 20,000 = 38,500
1999
19,000
19,000 + 20,000 = 39,000
2000
20,000
20,000 + 20,000 = 40,000
2001
24,000
24,000 + 20,000 = 44,000
2002
24,000
24,000 + 35,000 = 59,000
2003
100,000
100,000 + 35,000 = 135,000
2004
102,000
102,000 + 35,000 = 137,000
2005
105,000
105,000 + 35,000 = 140,000
2006
108,000
108,000 + 35,000 = 143,000
2007
125,000
125,000 + 35,000 = 160,000
2008
250,000
250,000 + 35,000 = 285,000
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Depreciation
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
2009
250,000
250,000 + 35,000 = 285,000
2010
500,000
500,000 + 35,000 = 535,000
2011
500,000
500,000 + 35,000 = 535,000
2012
125,000
N/A
25,000
N/A
2013 and thereafter
Increased Limit for Enterprise
Zones
Investment Limit
For property NOT qualifying as Enterprise Zone property, the allowable amount deducted
under Section 179 is reduced by one dollar for every dollar of investment over the
threshold amount for property qualifying for Section 179 and placed in service in the same
taxable year. For information about the threshold amounts for each taxable year, see
“Threshold Amounts,” page 6-10.
For property that DOES qualify as Enterprise Zone property, you consider only 50% of the
cost of the property placed in service in the tax year.
Example:
You place $900,000 of Section 179 property that is qualified zone property in service during
2006. Because the property is qualified zone property, only $450,000 (50% of $900,000) is
used to calculate the investment limit. Because $450,000 is $20,000 more than the
beginning-of-phase-out amount for tax years beginning in 2006 of $430,000, the amount
allowed to be expensed for 2006 is $123,000 ($108,000 + $35,000 [additional section 179
expense deduction allowed for Enterprise Zone property] - $20,000).
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property
In order for property to be qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone (GO Zone) property, it must
meet all of the following requirements:
1.
The property must be MACRS property that meets one of the following criteria:
• Has a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Is computer software not covered under Section 197
• Is water utility property
• Is qualified leasehold improvement property
• Is nonresidential real property or residential rental property.
8-40
2.
Substantially all of the use of such property must be in the Gulf Opportunity Zone
and in the active conduct of a trade or business by the taxpayer in such Zone.
3.
The original use of the property in the Gulf Opportunity Zone must commence with
the taxpayer on or after August 28, 2005.
4.
The property must be acquired by purchase on or after August 28, 2005, and placed in
service on or before March 31, 2011. For qualifying nonresidential real property and
residential rental property, the property must be placed in service on or before
December 31, 2010.
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Depreciation
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property
8
Note: Recent legislation extends the deadline for nonresidential real property and
residential rental property to December 31, 2010 if the property is located in a county or
parish within the GO Zone where more than 60% of the housing units were destroyed by
any hurricanes during 2005.
Gulf Opportunity Zone Definition
The Gulf Opportunity Zone refers to the areas of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and
Mississippi that were damaged by hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in 2005.
Section 179 Limits for Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property
The Gulf Opportunity Zone Act of 2005 provides for increased Section 179 limits for assets
placed in service in the Gulf Opportunity Zone.
Dollar Limit
The table below shows the standard Section 179 limits, as well as the increased limits for
GO Zone property.
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
2005
105,000
105,000 + (cost of GO Zone property, limited to $100,000) *
2006
108,000
108,000 + (cost of GO Zone property, limited to $100,000)
2007
125,000
125,000 + (cost of GO Zone property, limited to $100,000)
2008
250,000
250,000 + (cost of GO Zone property, limited to $100,000) **
Increased Limit for GO Zone Property
* Qualified property must be placed in service on or after August 28, 2005.
** Qualified property must be placed in service by December 31, 2008.
To claim the higher Section 179 dollar limit
1.
Click in the 179 Deduction field in Asset Detail.
2.
Select the down arrow to the right of the 179 Deduction field. The §179/Bonus Details
dialog appears. See “Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page 6-18.
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Depreciation
Qualified Gulf Opportunity Zone Property
3.
Select the Qualified §179 Property check box.
4.
Click the down arrow to the right of the Zone Type field, and select G - Gulf
Opportunity Zone from the drop-down list.
5.
Enter the desired amount of Section 179 expense for the asset in the §179 Amount field.
6.
Click OK to close the dialog.
Threshold Amount
When you have property located in the Gulf Opportunity Zone, the Section 179 threshold
amount is increased by the lesser of:
• $600,000 or
• the cost of the qualified Section 179 Gulf Opportunity Zone property placed in service
during the taxable year.
For information about the threshold amounts for each taxable year, see “Threshold
Amounts,” page 6-10.
The application calculates the threshold amount for you when you indicate which assets
are located in the Gulf Opportunity Zone. You do this by selecting the Qualified §179
Property check box, and then selecting G - Gulf Opportunity Zone from the drop-down list
in the §179/Bonus Details dialog for each asset located in the GO Zone. See “Completing
the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page 6-18.
Here are two examples:
Example 1:
In a tax year beginning in 2006, you place in service qualified section 179 GO Zone property
with a cost of $800,000. You may take an expense deduction of $208,000 for the tax year
($108,000 regular maximum deduction plus $100,000, which is the lesser of $100,000 or the
cost of qualified section 179 GO Zone property placed in service during the tax year). The
$208,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The remaining $592,000 of cost is subject to
depreciation.
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Depreciation
Qualified Recovery Assistance Property (Kansas Disaster Zone)
8
Example 2:
In a tax year beginning in 2006, you place in service qualified section 179 GO Zone property
with a cost of $1,100,000. You may take an expense deduction of $138,000 for 2006:
$108,000
Regular maximum deduction for 2006
+
$100,000
Lesser of $100,000 or the cost of qualified section 179 GO Zone property placed
in service during 2006
-
$ 70,000
The amount by which $1,100,000 exceeds $1,030,000 ($430,000
beginning-of-phaseout amount for 2006 + $600,000)
The $138,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The remaining $962,000 of cost is subject
to depreciation.
Qualified Recovery Assistance Property (Kansas Disaster
Zone)
The Heartland, Habitat, Harvest, and Horticulture Act of 2008 - Title XV of the Food,
Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (The 2008 Farm Act) replaces the term qualified Gulf
Opportunity Zone property with the term qualified Recovery Assistance property (Kansas
Disaster Zone property).
In order for property to be qualified Recovery Assistance property, it must meet all of the
following requirements:
1.
The property must be MACRS property that meets one of the following criteria:
• Has a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Is computer software not covered under Section 197
• Is water utility property
• Is qualified leasehold improvement property
• Is nonresidential real property or residential rental property.
2.
Substantially all of the use of such property must be in the Kansas disaster zone and
in the active conduct of a trade or business by the taxpayer in such zone.
3.
The original use of the property in the Kansas disaster zone must begin with the
taxpayer after May 4, 2007.
4.
The property must be acquired by purchase after May 4, 2007, and placed in service
on or before December 31, 2008. For qualifying nonresidential real property and
residential rental property, the property must be placed in service on or before
December 31, 2009.
Kansas Disaster Zone Definition
The Kansas Disaster Zone refers to the following 24 counties located in Kansas that were
damaged by severe storms and tornados beginning on May 4, 2007: Barton, Clay, Cloud,
Comanche, Dickinson, Edwards, Ellsworth, Kiowa, Leavenworth, Lyon, McPherson,
Osage, Osborne, Ottawa, Phillips, Pottawatomie, Pratt, Reno, Rice, Riley, Saline, Shawnee,
Smith, and Stafford.
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Depreciation
Qualified Recovery Assistance Property (Kansas Disaster Zone)
Section 179 Limits for Kansas Disaster Zone Property
The 2008 Farm Act provides for increased Section 179 limits for assets located in the Kansas
Disaster Zone.
Dollar Limit
The table below shows the standard Section 179 limits, as well as the increased limits for
Kansas Disaster Zone (KD Zone) property.
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
2007
125,000
125,000 + (cost of KD Zone property, limited to $100,000) *
2008
250,000
250,000 + (cost of KD Zone property, limited to $100,000) **
Increased Limit for KD Zone Property
* Qualified property must be placed in service after May 4, 2007.
** Qualified property must be placed in service by December 31, 2008.
To claim the higher Section 179 dollar limit
1.
Click in the 179 Deduction field in Asset Detail.
2.
Click on the down arrow to the right of the 179 Deduction field. The §179/Bonus
Details dialog appears. See “Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page 6-18.
3.
Select the Qualified §179 Property check box.
4.
Click on the down arrow to the right of the Zone Type field, and select code K Kansas Disaster Zone in the drop-down list.
5.
Enter the desired amount of Section 179 expense for the asset in the §179 Amount
field.
6.
Click OK to close the dialog.
Threshold Amount
When you have property located in the Kansas Disaster Zone, the Section 179 threshold
amount is increased by the lesser of:
• $600,000, or
• The cost of the qualified Section 179 Kansas Disaster Zone property placed in service
during the tax year.
The system calculates the threshold amount for you when you indicate which assets are
located in the Kansas Disaster Zone. You do this by selecting the Qualified §179 Property
check box and selecting code K - Kansas Disaster Zone from the drop-down list in the
§179/Bonus Details dialog for each asset located in the Kansas Disaster Zone.
Here are two examples:
Example 1:
In the tax year beginning in 2008, you place in service qualified section 179 Kansas Disaster
Zone property with a cost of $1,200,000. You may take an expense deduction of $350,000 for
the tax year ($250,000 regular maximum deduction plus $100,000, which is the lesser of
$100,000 or the cost of qualified section 179 Kansas Disaster Zone property placed in
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Depreciation
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8
service during the tax year). The $350,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The
remaining $850,000 of cost is subject to depreciation.
Example 2:
In the tax year beginning in 2008, you place in service qualified section 179 Kansas Disaster
Zone property with a cost of $1,450,000. You may take an expense deduction of $300,000 for
2008:
$250,000
Regular maximum deduction for 2008
+
$100,000
Lesser of $100,000 or the cost of qualified section 179 Kansas Disaster Zone
property placed in service during 2008
-
$ 50,000
The amount by which $1,450,000 exceeds $1,400,000 ($800,000
beginning-of-phaseout amount for 2008 + $600,000)
The $300,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The remaining $1,150,000 of cost is
subject to depreciation.
Qualified Disaster Assistance Property
In order for property to be qualified Disaster Assistance property, it must meet all of the
following requirements:
1.
The property must be MACRS property that meets one of the following criteria:
• Has a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Is computer software not covered under Section 197
• Is water utility property
• Is qualified leasehold improvement property
• Is nonresidential real property or residential rental property.
2.
Substantially all of the use of such property must be in a disaster area with respect to a
federally declared disaster occurring between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009,
and in the active conduct of a trade or business by the taxpayer in such area.
3.
The property must rehabilitate property damaged, or replace property destroyed or
condemned, as a result of the federally declared disaster.
4.
The original use of the property in the disaster area must begin with the taxpayer on
or after the applicable disaster date.
5.
The property must be acquired by purchase on or after the applicable disaster date,
and placed in service by the end of the third calendar year following the applicable
disaster date. For qualifying nonresidential real property and residential rental
property, the property must be placed in service by the end of the fourth calendar year
following the applicable disaster date.
Qualified Disaster Zone Definition
The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 defines qualified disaster zone as any
disaster area, in which the property is located, determined by the President to warrant
federal assistance under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance
Act.
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Depreciation
Qualified Disaster Assistance Property
Note: The term qualified disaster zone only applies to disasters declared after December
31, 2007 and occurring before January 1, 2010.
Section 179 Limits for Qualified Disaster Zone Property
The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 provides for increased Section 179
limits for assets located in the Qualified Disaster Zone.
Dollar Limit
The table below shows the standard Section 179 limits, as well as the increased limits for
Qualified Disaster Zone (QDZ) property.
Year
Sec. 179
Base Limit
Increased Limit for QDZ Property
2008
250,000
250,000 + (cost of QDZ property, limited to $100,000) = $350,000
2009
250,000
250,000 + (cost of QDZ property, limited to $100,000) = $350,000
2010
500,000
500,000 + (cost of QDZ property, limited to $100,000) = $600,000
2011
500,000
500,000 + (cost of QDZ property, limited to $100,000) = $600,000
2012
139,000
139,000 + (cost of QDZ property, limited to $100,000) = $239,000
To claim the higher Section 179 dollar limit
1.
Click in the 179 Deduction field in Asset Detail.
2.
Click on the down arrow to the right of the 179 Deduction field. The §179/Bonus
Details dialog appears. See “Completing the §179/Bonus Details Dialog,” page 6-18.
3.
Select the Qualified §179 Property check box.
4.
Click on the down arrow to the right of the Zone Type field, and select code
D-Qualified Disaster Zone in the drop-down list.
5.
Enter the desired amount of Section 179 expense for the asset in the §179 Amount
field.
6.
Click OK to close the dialog.
Threshold Amount
When you have property located in the Qualified Disaster Zone, the Section 179 threshold
amount is increased by the lesser of:
• $600,000, or
• The cost of the qualified Section 179 Disaster Zone property placed in service during
the year.
The system calculates the threshold amount for you when you indicate which assets are
located in the Qualified Disaster Zone. You do this by selecting the Qualified §179 Property
check box, and selecting Code D - Qualified Disaster Zone from the drop-down list in the
§179/Bonus Details dialog box for each asset located in the Qualified Disaster Zone.
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8
Here are two examples:
Example 1:
In the tax year beginning in 2008, you place in service qualified section 179 Disaster Zone
property with a cost of $1,200,000. You may take an expense deduction of $350,000 for the
tax year ($250,000 regular maximum deduction plus $100,000, which is the lesser of
$100,000 or the cost of qualified section 179 Disaster Zone property placed in service during
the tax year). The $350,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The remaining $850,000 of
cost is subject to depreciation.
Example 2:
In the tax year beginning in 2008, you place in service qualified section 179 Disaster Zone
property with a cost of $1,450,000. You may take an expense deduction of $300,000 for 2008:
$250,000
Regular maximum deduction for 2008
+
$100,000
Lesser of $100,000 or the cost of qualified section 179 Disaster Zone property
placed in service during 2008
-
$ 50,000
The amount by which $1,450,000 exceeds $1,400,000 ($800,000
beginning-of-phaseout amount for 2008 + $600,000)
The $300,000 of cost is not subject to depreciation. The remaining $1,150,000 of cost is
subject to depreciation.
Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance
Sometimes the IRS issues regulations that affect assets that you have already entered in the
application. These regulations may require that you change some of the asset information
so that your assets comply with the regulations.
For example, in 2003 the IRS issued a regulation that prohibits an asset using a “Plus 168”
depreciation method from being disposed in its placed-in-service year. The 168 Allowance
is available for assets placed in service after September 10, 2001. If you disposed an asset
using a “Plus 168” depreciation method in its placed-in-service year, you may need to
change its depreciation method.
You can use the Audit Advisor feature to locate assets that may not be in compliance with
IRS regulations. For information about the types of potential problems that the Audit
Advisor looks for, see “Audit Advisor Validations,” page 8-49.
Note: The Audit Advisor helps you locate assets that may not be in compliance with IRS
regulations. Running the Audit Advisor does not change any of your asset data. It is up to
you to decide whether to change the information for your assets.
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To review assets for tax compliance
1.
Select Depreciation/Audit Advisor from the menu bar. The Audit Advisor dialog
appears.
2.
Complete the Audit Advisor dialog, and then click the Run Review button. The
application reviews the assets in the selected book for the selected fiscal year, and it
displays the results on your computer screen.
The application also creates groups of assets that may not comply with IRS regulations
so that you can review the assets more easily. The report indicates the names of the
groups that the application creates.
Completing the Audit Advisor Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Audit Advisor dialog.

Step 1: Select a Book
Use this field to select the book containing the assets that you want the Audit Advisor
to check for compliance with tax regulations. You can select only one book at a time.

Step 2: Enter a Fiscal Year End
Use this field to enter a fiscal year end-date. The Audit Advisor will review only the
assets that were placed in service in the selected fiscal year. You can enter the date in
either MM/YY or MM/DD/YYYY format.
Note: The date that you enter must be in 2001 or later.

Run Review Button
Click this button to begin the review process. The application reviews the assets in the
selected book for the selected fiscal year, and it displays the results on your computer
screen.
The application also creates groups of assets that may not comply with IRS regulations so
that you can review the assets more easily. The report indicates the names of the groups
that the application creates.
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For information about the types of potential problems that the Audit Advisor looks for, see
“Audit Advisor Validations,” page 8-49.
Audit Advisor Validations
The Audit Advisor reviews your assets to help you determine if they comply with the
following IRS regulations:
• Disposals with 168 Allowance in the Placed-in-Service Year
You cannot dispose an asset using a “Plus 168” depreciation method in its
placed-in-service year. For more information, see “Disposals with 168 Allowance in
the Placed-in-Service Year,” page 8-50.
• MACRS Methods
Generally, all assets placed in service after 12/31/1986 must use a MACRS (Modified
Accelerated Cost Recovery System) depreciation method. For more information, see
“MACRS Methods,” page 8-51.
• Light Trucks and Vans
IRS regulations allow depreciation limits for light trucks and vans that are greater
than the limits on luxury automobiles. For more information, see “Light Trucks and
Vans,” page 8-51.
• Section 179 Dollar Limit
IRS regulations limit the total amount of Section 179 that you can take on assets placed
in service in a taxable year. For more information, see “Section 179 Dollar Limit,” page
8-52.
• Section 179 Disposals in the Placed-in-Service Year
IRS regulations prohibit you from claiming a Section 179 deduction on an asset that
was disposed in its placed-in-service year. For more information, see “Section 179
Disposals in the Placed-in-Service Year,” page 8-53.
• Section 179 Sport Utility Vehicle Dollar Limit
The Section 179 expense deduction is limited to $25,000 for Sport Utility Vehicles
placed in service after October 22, 2004. For more information, see “Section 179 Sport
Utility Vehicle Dollar Limit,” page 8-53.
• Leasehold Improvement and Qualified Restaurant Property
Leasehold improvements and qualified restaurant property placed in service after
October 22, 2004 and before January 1, 2012 must be depreciated using a 15-year
estimated life (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property). For more information, see
“Leasehold Improvement and Qualified Restaurant Property,” page 8-54.
• MACRS Depreciation Election
Certain MACRS depreciation elections must be made on a class-by-class basis. For
more information, see “MACRS Depreciation Election,” page 8-55.
• Assets with Beginning Information
Entering data in the beginning information fields overrides the application’s
depreciation calculations. For more information, see “Assets with Beginning
Information,” page 8-55.
• Qualified Retail Improvement Property
Qualified retail improvement property placed in service after December 31, 2008 and
before January 1, 2012 must be depreciated using a 15-year estimated life (or 9 years
for Indian Reservation property). For more information, see “Qualified Retail
Improvement Property,” page 8-56.
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• Assets with Less Than 100% Business Use
Assets with less than 100% business use are not entitled to a full year’s depreciation
deduction. The business-use percentage may change over time and should be
reviewed on an annual basis. For more information, see “Assets with Less Than 100%
Business Use,” page 8-57.
• Section 179 Qualified Real Property
For tax years beginning in 2010 or 2011, you can elect to expense under Section 179 up
to $250,000 of qualified real property purchases. For more information, see “Section
179 Qualified Real Property,” page 8-57.
• Increased 168 Allowance % Allowed
A 168 Allowance of 100%, instead of 50%, should generally be taken for assets placed
in service from 9/9/2010 through 12/31/2011 (or 12/31/2012 for assets with longer
production lives). For more information, see “Increased 168 Allowance % Allowed,”
page 8-58.
• Section 179 Qualified Real Property - Income Limit
The Section 179 expense deduction on qualifying real property is limited to business
income. You can carry over a 2010 deduction to 2011 that was disallowed due to the
business income limitation. For more information, see “Section 179 Qualified Real
Property - Income Limit,” page 8-58.
Disposals with 168 Allowance in the Placed-in-Service Year
The Audit Advisor finds assets using a “Plus 168” depreciation method that were disposed
in the year that they were placed in service.
Issue
An Asset that uses a “Plus 168” depreciation method cannot be disposed in its
placed-in-service year.
Resolution
Use the 168 Allowance Switch feature to change the depreciation methods for such assets
so they do not take the 168 Allowance.
1.
Select Depreciation/168 Allowance Switch from the menu bar. The 168 Allowance
Switch dialog appears.
2.
Select the group that the Audit Advisor created consisting of assets using a “Plus 168”
depreciation method that were disposed in their placed-in-service year.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “168 Disp,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2003 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-168 Disp-Tax-12/03.
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3.
Select the same book and fiscal year end that you selected in the Audit Advisor
dialog.
4.
Select the Do Not Take the 168 Allowance option.
5.
Click the Execute button. The application changes the depreciation methods for the
selected group of assets and recalculates the gain/loss for these assets.
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Depreciation
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MACRS Methods
The Audit Advisor finds assets using a non-MACRS depreciation method that were placed
in service in a year for which MACRS depreciation methods are required.
Issue
Generally, all assets placed in service after 12/31/1986 must use a MACRS (Modified
Accelerated Cost Recovery System) depreciation method. When you run the Audit
Advisor, the application determines if you have assets using non-MACRS depreciation
methods that were placed in service in a year for which MACRS depreciation methods are
required.
Resolution
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Audit Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “MACRS Meth,” followed
by the book name, followed by the fiscal year end. For example, if you selected the Tax
book and a fiscal year ending in December, 2003 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the
group would be called AA-MACRS Meth-Tax-12/03.
2.
Review the depreciation method for each of the assets in the group.
If you determine that an asset is incorrectly using a non-MACRS depreciation method,
then you need to change the depreciation method to a MACRS method (that is, MA,
MR, AA, SB, MF, MT, AD, or MI).
Also, note that if you decide to change depreciation methods, you may be required to
file a Form 3115 - Application for Change in Accounting Method.
Light Trucks and Vans
The Audit Advisor finds assets using property type A (for Automobiles). You might want
to see if these assets qualify for the higher depreciation limitations allowed for light trucks
and vans.
Issue
The IRS issued regulations allowing increased depreciation limitations for light trucks and
vans. These regulations apply to vehicles placed in service on or after January 1, 2003. You
may have entered assets in the application using property type A for autos, which qualify
for the higher depreciation limits.
Resolution
1.
Change the property type from property type A to property type T for any vehicle
currently designated as an auto that would qualify for the light trucks and vans
category.
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Section 179 Dollar Limit
The Audit Advisor determines if the Section 179 expense taken in a taxable year exceeds
the dollar limit for that year.
Issue
You are allowed to claim a Section 179 deduction each year subject to certain dollar limits.
The dollar limits are determined each year based on published IRS figures adjusted for
increased expensing for assets placed in service in certain zones and after applying a
phase-out calculation. In addition, the limits are applied across all assets placed in service
for the fiscal year. The published IRS dollar limit (without applying phase-out rules) for the
fiscal year is calculated taking into consideration any assets located in a special zone.
For tax years beginning in 2010 and 2011, up to $250,000 of the total Section 179 deduction
can be claimed on qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant property, and
qualified retail improvements.
Resolution 1
(If Section 179 dollar limit has been exceeded, but Section 179 limit for real property
has not been exceeded)
You have exceeded the maximum Section 179 deduction allowed for the fiscal year. The
application calculates the Section 179 dollar limit for the current company after applying
the phase-out rules. The application has created a group of all assets claiming a Section 179
deduction that were placed in service during the fiscal year. You should review the list of
assets and reduce the total Section 179 claimed by the indicated amount. To complete this
analysis, run the Tax Expense report for the selected year using the group created by the
application. Once the Section 179 claimed has been reduced to the appropriate limit you
must recalculate depreciation for the fiscal year end.
Note that the Section 179 validation above does not apply to companies in a consolidated
group. Separate limits and rules apply for companies in this situation. Check with your tax
advisor for more information.
Resolution 2
(If Section 179 limit for real property has been exceeded, but Section 179 dollar limit
has not been exceeded)
You have exceeded the maximum Section 179 deduction allowed for real property. The
application calculates the Section 179 dollar limit for the current company after applying
the phase-out rules. In addition, the portion of Section 179 attributable to real property
exceeds the limit of $250,000.
The application has created a group of all assets claiming a Section 179 deduction that were
placed in service during the fiscal year. You must also reduce the amount of Section 179
claimed on real property by the indicated amount. You may be eligible to increase the
deduction on personal property by the same amount. To complete this analysis, run the Tax
Expense Report for the selected year using the group created by the application. Once the
Section 179 claimed has been reduced to the appropriate limit you must recalculate
depreciation for the fiscal year end.
Note that the Section 179 validation above does not apply to companies in a consolidated
group. Separate limits and rules apply for companies in this situation. Check with your tax
advisor for more information.
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Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance
If you have exceeded the Section 179 dollar limitation on all assets placed in service in the
fiscal year, you must reduce the Section 179 deduction for one or more assets and
recalculate depreciation.
1.
Run the Tax Expense report for the group of assets created by the Audit Advisor.
The group is named AA-179 Limit-XXX-MM/YY, where XXX stands for the book
name, and MM/YY stands for the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax
book and a fiscal year ending in December, 2007 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the
group would be called AA-179 Limit-Tax-12/07.
The Tax Expense report shows the Section 179 deduction for each asset placed in
service in the fiscal year and the total Section 179 deduction for all assets.
2.
Reduce the Section 179 deduction for one or more assets in the group so that the total
Section 179 deduction does not exceed the limit for the fiscal year.
3.
Reduce the amount of Section 179 claimed on real property, if necessary.
4.
Recalculate depreciation for the group of assets for the fiscal year-end.
Section 179 Disposals in the Placed-in-Service Year
The Audit Advisor finds assets taking a Section 179 deduction that were disposed in the
placed-in-service year.
Issue
You are allowed to claim a Section 179 deduction on assets placed in service during the
year. However, if you dispose of the asset during the year it was placed in service, then you
cannot claim a Section 179 deduction.
Resolution
You must delete the disposal transaction, remove the Section 179 deduction claimed, and
then reenter the disposal information.
1.
Run the Disposal report for the group of assets created by the Audit Advisor.
The group is named AA-179 Disp-XXX-MM/YY, where XXX is the selected book and
MM/YY is the fiscal year entered. For example, if you selected the Tax book and a fiscal
year ending in December 2007 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group would be
called AA-179 Disp-Tax-12/07.
2.
For whole disposals, you can delete the disposal information by selecting the assets in
the Asset List and selecting the Reset Depreciation command from the Depreciation
menu. Reset depreciation to the assets’ Beginning Dates. The application
automatically removes the disposal information.
3.
For each asset in the group, change the Section 179 deduction to zero for all books.
4.
Reenter the disposal information for each asset.
Section 179 Sport Utility Vehicle Dollar Limit
The Audit Advisor finds assets claiming a Section 179 expense deduction of more than
$25,000. You should examine these assets to determine if any of them are Sport Utility
Vehicles.
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Issue
Effective October 22, 2004, the IRS issued regulations regarding the amount of Section 179
expense that can be claimed on Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) that are over 6,000 and less
than 14,000 pounds. The amount of Section 179 expense for these vehicles is limited to
$25,000 for each SUV placed in service.
Resolution
You may have claimed more than $25,000 of Section 179 expense for a Sport Utility Vehicle
for the fiscal year. A group of assets claiming a Section 179 deduction in excess of $25,000
is created.
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets created by the application.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “179 SUV,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2007 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-179 SUV-Tax-12/07.
2.
Review each asset to determine if any of the assets are SUVs.
3.
For any SUV, you must reduce the Section 179 expense to $25,000 or less in Asset
Detail.
4.
Recalculate depreciation for the fiscal year.
Leasehold Improvement and Qualified Restaurant Property
The Audit Advisor finds assets that are real property (property types R, S, C, E, or F) and
have an estimated life of 39 years. You should examine these assets and determine if any of
them are leasehold improvements or qualified restaurant property. For more information,
see “Leasehold Improvement Property,” page A-10.
Issue
Leasehold improvements and qualified restaurant property placed in service after
October 22, 2004 and before January 1, 2012 must be depreciated using an estimated life of
15 years (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property), a straight-line depreciation method,
and either the half-year or midquarter averaging convention.
Resolution
You may have entered an estimated life of 39 years instead of 15 years for leasehold
property or qualified restaurant property (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property). A
group of assets is created that are real property and have an estimated life of 39 years (or
22 years for Indian Reservation property).
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets created by the Audit Advisor.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “Leasehold,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2009 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-Leasehold-Tax-12/09.
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2.
Review each asset to determine if any of the assets are leasehold improvements.
3.
For each leasehold improvement or qualified restaurant property, change the
estimated life to 15 years (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property) in Asset Detail.
4.
Recalculate depreciation for the fiscal year.
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Depreciation
Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance
MACRS Depreciation Election
The Audit Advisor finds assets for which you have made one or more of the following
MACRS depreciation elections:
• Alternative Depreciation System (ADS): Assets use depreciation method AD or AA.
• 150% declining-balance depreciation method over the General Depreciation
System (GDS) recovery period: Assets use depreciation method MF150, MT150,
MI150, MA150, or MR150.
• Straight-line depreciation method over the GDS recovery period: Assets use
depreciation method MF100, MT100, MI100, MA100, or MR100.
Review your assets to determine if each MACRS election was made for an entire class of
assets.
Issue
The application uses the IRS default depreciation methods during data entry for the
tax-related books. However, you can make an alternate election on a class-by-class basis to
use the Alternative Depreciation System (ADS), 150% declining-balance method, or the
straight-line method over the General Depreciation System (GDS) recovery period. Note,
however, this rule does not apply to residential rental and nonresidential real property, for
which the election is made on a property-by-property basis.
Resolution
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Audit Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “MACRS Elec,” followed by
the book name, followed by the fiscal year end. For example, if you select the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2007 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-MACRS Elec-Tax 12/07.
2.
Review the depreciation method and estimated life for each asset in the group.
3.
Make sure that each MACRS election was made for an entire class of assets. If an
election was not made for an entire class of assets, then the non-conforming assets
must be updated.
Assets with Beginning Information
The Audit Advisor finds assets containing data in the beginning information fields.
Issue
Entering data in the beginning information fields overrides the application’s depreciation
calculations. If you are using your own calculation for depreciation (depreciation method
OC), assets will include beginning information.
Resolution
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Audit Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “Beg Info,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2007 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-Beg Info-Tax 12/07.
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2.
Examine each asset to make sure that the data in the beginning information fields is
correct.
3.
If the data in the beginning information fields is incorrect, you can reset depreciation
for the asset.
Note: Use extreme caution when resetting depreciation to ensure you achieve the desired
results.
Qualified Retail Improvement Property
The Audit Advisor finds assets that are real property (property types R, S, C, E, or F), have
an estimated life of 39 (or 22) years, and were placed in service after December 31, 2008 and
before January 1, 2012. You should examine these assets and determine if any of them are
qualified retail improvements.
Issue
The IRS has issued regulations shortening the recovery period for qualified retail
improvement property placed in service after December 31, 2008 and before January 1,
2012. The new estimated life is 15 years (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property).
Qualified retail improvements use a straight-line depreciation method and the half-year
averaging convention, unless the midquarter averaging convention applies.
Resolution
Prior to the enactment date of January 1, 2009, qualified retail improvements were
depreciated using a straight-line method over a 39-year period (or 22 years for Indian
Reservation property). You may have entered an estimated life of 39 years (or 22 years)
instead of 15 years (or 9 years) for qualified retail improvement property.
The system has created a group of assets that are real property and have an estimated life
of 39 (or 22) years. Please review this group of assets to determine if any of the assets are
qualified retail improvements. If any qualified retail improvements are found, you must
reduce the estimated life to 15 years (or 9 years for Indian Reservation property). Also, note
that a Section 168 Allowance cannot be claimed on qualified retail improvement property.
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets created by the Audit Advisor.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “Retail Prop,” followed by
the book name, followed by the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax
book and a fiscal year ending in December, 2009 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the
group would be called AA-Retail Prop-Tax-12/09.
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2.
Review each asset to determine if any of the assets are qualified retail improvements.
3.
For each qualified retail improvement, change the estimated life to 15 years (or 9 years
for Indian Reservation property) in Asset Detail.
4.
Recalculate depreciation for the fiscal year.
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Assets with Less Than 100% Business Use
The Audit Advisor finds assets in the selected fiscal year that have ever been used for less
than 100% business use.
Issue
Assets with less than 100% business use are not entitled to a full year’s depreciation
deduction. The business-use percentage may change over time and therefore should be
reviewed and updated on an annual basis. The system detects if one or more assets in the
selected fiscal year have ever been used for less than 100% business use.
Resolution
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Audit Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “Bus Use,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December 2010 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-Bus Use-Tax-12/10.
2.
Examine each asset to make sure that the Business Use Percentage field has been
appropriately updated for the selected fiscal year.
3.
If the percentage in the Business Use Percentage field is incorrect, you must enter the
correct business use, which is a depreciation-critical change.
4.
After you have updated the Business Use Percentage fields, recalculate depreciation
for the affected assets for the created group.
Section 179 Qualified Real Property
The Audit Advisor finds assets that are real property and that may be qualified for the
Section 179 deduction.
Issue
Recently passed legislation for fiscal years beginning in 2010 and 2011 allows an election to
be made that would include up to $250,000 of real property in the definition of qualified
Section 179 property eligible for immediate expensing. Specifically the real property must
be qualified leasehold improvement property, qualified restaurant property, or qualified
retail improvement property. The deduction on real property is subject to the same Section
179 phase-out rules for personal property and does not apply to nonresidential real or
residential rental property.
Resolution
You may have entered a real property that may qualify for a Section 179 deduction. Before
claiming a Section 179 deduction on real property, be sure to check the Section 179 Dollar
Limit Review to determine how much, if any, additional Section 179 deduction you can
claim. Remember if you elect to claim a Section 179 deduction on real property, then you
must identify all qualifying property using the Qualified §179 Property check box, found
on the §179/Bonus Details screen in Asset Detail, in order to properly calculate the
phase-out limits.
The application has created a group of real property assets. Please review this group of
assets to determine if any of the assets are qualified leasehold improvement property,
qualified restaurant property or qualified retail improvement property.
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1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Asset Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “179 Qual?,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2010 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-179 Qual?-Tax-12/10.
2.
Review each asset to determine if any of the assets are qualified leasehold
improvement property, qualified restaurant property, or qualified retail improvement
property.
3.
Identify each qualified Section 179 property by selecting the Qualified §179 Property
check box on the §179/Bonus Details dialog in Asset Detail.
4.
Recalculate depreciation for the group of assets for the fiscal year-end.
Increased 168 Allowance % Allowed
The Audit Advisor finds assets that are qualified for a 168 Allowance percentage of 100%.
Issue
Recently passed legislation allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service
from 9/9/2010 through 12/31/2011 (or 12/31/2012 for assets with longer production
lives). You have claimed a 168 Allowance on assets within this date range using a 50% rate.
A 168 Allowance percent of 50% is applicable during this time period only for qualifying
assets placed in service in the Gulf Opportunity Zones (Go Zone) or in a Qualified Disaster
Zone.
Resolution
If you would like to claim a Section 168 Allowance using the 100% rate rather than 50%,
you can use the 168 Allowance Switch on the Depreciate menu to update your assets.
The system has created a group of assets using the 50% rate. Please review this group of
assets to determine which, if any, of the assets should be switched to 100%.
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Audit Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “168 50Pct,” followed by the
book name, followed by the fiscal year-end. For example, if you selected the Tax book
and a fiscal year ending in December, 2010 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group
would be called AA-168 50Pct-Tax-12/10.
2.
Review the assets in the group to determine which, if any, of the assets should be
switched to 100%.
3.
Select Depreciate/168 Allowance Switch to change the deduction from 50% to 100%
for these assets.
Section 179 Qualified Real Property - Income Limit
The Audit Advisor finds assets that are real property placed in service in fiscal years
beginning in 2010 and 2011 and on which a Section 179 deduction was taken.
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Depreciation
Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance
8
Issue
In tax years beginning in 2010 and 2011, you can elect to deduct up to $250,000 Section 179
expense on qualifying real property each year. Specifically the real property must be
qualified leasehold improvement property, qualified restaurant property, or qualified retail
improvement property. The deduction on real property is subject to the same Section 179
phase-out rules as for personal property and does not apply to nonresidential real or
residential rental property.
The Section 179 deduction on qualifying real property is limited to business income. You
can carry over a 2010 deduction to 2011 that was disallowed due to the business income
limitation; however, you cannot carry over disallowed amounts to tax years beginning
after 12/31/11. If your 2010 carryover cannot be deducted in 2011 due to the business
income limitation, then the 2010 carried-over amount must be treated as property placed
in service on the first day of the 2011 tax year for purposes of computing depreciation.
Note that the Section 179 validation above does not apply to companies in a consolidated
group. Separate limits and rules apply for companies in this situation. Check with your tax
advisor for more information.
Resolution
The system has created a group of real property assets claiming a Section 179 deduction
that were placed in service in fiscal years beginning in 2010 and 2011.
If your Section 179 deduction was not limited by business income, then no further action is
needed.
If your Section 179 deduction is limited by business income and you have not finalized
your tax return for 2010 and/or 2011, we suggest that you reduce the Section 179 claimed
on real property for the applicable year to an amount that will not be limited by business
income. You must recalculate depreciation for the fiscal year end after you reduce the
Section 179 amount.
If you have a carryover from 2010 that cannot be deducted in 2011 due to the business
income limitation, you can treat the carried-over amount as property placed in service on
the first day of the 2011 tax year by creating a new tax-only asset. Create a new asset using
the same life as the original property and enter the disallowed amount as the acquisition
value for the tax books that are affected. Enter $0.00 acquisition value for non-tax books.
We suggest that you use a custom field to link the new asset to the original asset for tracking
purposes. If the original asset is disposed or transferred, the new asset must be disposed or
transferred on the same date.
The system has created a group of real property assets placed in service in 2010 or 2011 for
which Section 179 expense was taken.
1.
In the Asset List, display the group of assets that the Asset Advisor created.
The group is named AA (for Audit Advisor), followed by “179 RealProp,” followed by
the book name. For example, if you selected the Tax book and a fiscal year ending in
December, 2011 in the Audit Advisor dialog, then the group would be called AA-179
RealProp-Tax.
2.
If your Section 179 deduction was limited by business income, determine whether
you should reduce the amount of the Section 179 deduction claimed on these assets or
add a new tax-only asset (or assets) on the first day of the tax year beginning in 2011
for the disallowed amount.
3.
If you reduce the Section 179 deduction, recalculate depreciation.
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Reviewing Assets for Tax Compliance
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Chapter 9
Standard Reports
In this chapter:
List of Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Running a Standard Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Formatting a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Adding a Report to the Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Viewing a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
Exporting a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
The application contains numerous standard reports to help you manage your assets and
keep track of their depreciation, both for tax purposes and for your internal books. You
decide which assets and which books to include in each report, and how the assets should
be sorted and subtotaled. You can print a report or display it on the computer screen.
This chapter explains how to run the reports, how to format the reports, and how to
interpret each report.
List of Reports
Following is a list of each report and a brief description of each.
You run the following reports by selecting Standard Reports from the Reports menu:

Depreciation Expense Report
The Depreciation Expense report displays depreciation-related information for assets
on which depreciation has been calculated. The report includes assets containing
depreciation calculations through the date you enter for the report. Along with
essential asset data, the report shows figures for previous depreciation, depreciation
that was calculated for the last depreciation run, and current depreciation.

Tax Expense Report
The Tax Expense report displays the components of the current year’s depreciation
expense for tax purposes. For each asset, the report displays the current year’s Section
179 expense deduction, Section 168 Expense, and the current year-to-date depreciation.
In the Total Tax Year-to-Date Expense column, the report displays the total of these
three amounts.

Depreciation Summary Report
The Depreciation Summary report provides a concise list of the selected assets’
depreciation-related information, including their acquired values and any Section 179
amounts.

Period Close Summary Report
The Period Close Summary report displays the period close dates for the assets on the
report. It also shows the last date that depreciation was calculated (the Current
Through Date).
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9
9-2
Standard Reports
List of Reports

Depreciation Adjustment Report
The Depreciation Adjustment report shows the difference between the beginning
depreciation amounts you enter and the depreciation amounts the application
calculated for the same period. The report includes only those selected assets that have
adjustment amounts.

Disposal Report
The Disposal report lists the assets in the selected group that have been disposed and
shows the amounts of realized, recognized, and deferred gain or loss on each asset.

Annual Activity Report
The Annual Activity report shows the asset account balance activity for Acquisition
Value over a requested fiscal year. It presents the asset account balance as of the
beginning of the fiscal year, the cost of any acquisitions and disposals during the year,
and the account’s balance at the end of the fiscal year.

Asset Basis Report
The Asset Basis report shows how the application calculated the depreciable basis used
in the asset’s last depreciation run.

File Listing Report
For each selected asset and book, the File Listing report presents a summary of
commonly used information, such as the asset’s description, depreciation method, and
acquisition value. It also includes an activity code that differentiates between active,
inactive, and disposed assets.

Fixed Asset Summary Report
The Fixed Asset Summary report presents account balance activity for Acquisition
Value and Depreciation over the requested fiscal year for each asset or, if elected, for
each subtotal by category. It is designed to help you tie into the asset and accumulated
depreciation amounts on the balance sheet.

General Ledger Posting Report
The General Ledger Posting report prints a journal entry you can use to post the
Depreciation This Run figures stored from the most recent depreciation calculation to
a general ledger.

Net Book Value Report
The Net Book Value report shows the current net book value of each selected asset and
how that value is calculated. It also calculates the percentage of total depreciation taken
to date for each asset.

Quarterly Acquisition Report
You can run the Quarterly Acquisition report to determine the total of all assets
acquired in each quarter of a fiscal year.

Property Tax - Summary Report
The Property Tax - Summary report summarizes the acquisition value of active assets
for a selected date. The report sorts assets first by a defined property tax category, and
then by each acquisition year.

Property Tax - Detail Report
The Property Tax - Detail report shows detailed asset information for a selected date.
The report sorts assets first by a defined property tax category, and then by each
acquisition year.
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Standard Reports
List of Reports
9
You run the following reports by selecting Tax Reports from the Reports menu:

Adjusted Current Earnings Report
The Adjusted Current Earnings report displays ACE depreciation that has been
calculated for the selected assets. It also shows each asset’s remaining basis and
remaining life as of the close of the last tax year beginning before 1990.

Alternative Minimum Tax Report
The Alternative Minimum Tax report shows the depreciation differences between the
Tax and the AMT books. It also shows the Tax Preferences and Adjustments that arise
from those differences.

FASB 109 Projection Report
For each selected asset, the FASB 109 Projection report identifies the temporary
differences between the various books’ depreciation amounts and projects the reversal
of those differences.

Midquarter Applicability Report
The Midquarter Applicability report determines whether you should use the
midquarter convention. You should run this report at the end of each tax year and, if
midquarter applies, recalculate depreciation for all qualifying assets using the
midquarter convention.

Form 3468: Investment Tax Credit Worksheet
This report is a worksheet that gathers the Investment Tax Credit information needed
to file IRS Form 3468.

Form 4255: Investment Tax Credit Recapture Worksheet
This report is a worksheet that gathers the Investment Tax Credit recapture
information needed to file IRS Form 4255.

Form 4562: Depreciation and Amortization
This option prints an IRS Form 4562 that reports depreciation and amortization
expense in a format acceptable for filing with the IRS.

Form 4626: Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax Worksheet
This report is a worksheet that gathers the Alternative Minimum Tax information
needed to complete IRS Form 4626.


Form 4626: Adjusted Current Earnings Supplement
This report is a worksheet that helps you complete the IRS Form 4626 ACE
Worksheet.
Form 4797: Sales of Property Worksheet
This report is a worksheet that gathers the asset disposal information needed to file IRS
Form 4797.
The following commands also appear on the Reports menu:

Current Reporting Period
Select this command to set the date for which you want to run reports. For more
information, see “Setting the Current Reporting Period,” page 9-8.

Favorites Section
The application lists the reports you mark as your Favorites in the Report Definition
dialog. For more information, see “Adding a Report to the Favorites,” page 9-17.
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9
Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
You run the following reports by selecting them from the Depreciation menu:

Annual Projection Report
The Annual Projection report projects the total annual depreciation expense for
selected assets for up to 99 years.

Monthly Projection Report
The Monthly Projection report displays projected depreciation amounts for each
month (or period) in a fiscal year for the selected group of assets.

Quick Projection Report
The Quick Projection report displays an asset’s projected depreciation expense for the
life of the asset.
Running a Standard Report
There are two methods for running a standard report.
• Click the Reports button on the navigation pane, and then select the report you want
to run from the Reports list box on the Reports tab. Click the Run/Edit Report button,
and then complete the fields on the Report Definition dialog. For more information,
see “Completing the Reports Tab,” page 9-6.
• Use the menu bar to select the report you want to run. You then complete the fields on
the Report Definition dialog. For more information, see “Completing the Report
Definition Dialog,” page 9-7.
Tip: The first method has several advantages. You can view relevant information about
the report you select to run, as well as a preview of the report. You can also select favorite
reports. Favorite reports appear on the bottom of the Reports menu, where they are easier
to run in the future.
When completing the Report Definition dialog, you must decide where you want to send
the report. The available options are to a report viewer on your computer (Window) or to
the default printer. If you want to view the report before it prints, select the Window check
box. From the report viewer, you can then send the report to the default printer or export
it to several different file formats.
Note: Before you run a report that includes depreciation figures, be sure you have
calculated depreciation through the desired depreciation date for the assets you want to
include in the report. To calculate depreciation, execute the Depreciate command from the
Depreciation menu; otherwise your depreciation figures will not be current.
To run a standard report
9-4
1.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The application displays a
submenu containing all of the standard reports.
2.
Select the report you want to run from the submenu. The Report Definition dialog
appears.
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Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
3.
9
Complete the Report Definition dialog, then click the Run Report button. For more
information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7. The
application runs the report and sends it to the selected location. If you select the
Window check box, the report appears on your computer. For more information, see
“Viewing a Report,” page 9-19.
Note: To run the Monthly Projection report, the Annual Projection report, or the Quick
Projection report, select the report from the Depreciation menu. For more information, see
“Running a Budgetary Projection,” page 8-8.
You can also run a report on only selected assets or on an individual asset.
To run a report for only selected assets
1.
In the Asset List, select the assets for which you want to run the report.
2.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The application displays a
submenu containing all of the standard reports.
3.
Select the report you want to run from the submenu. The Report Definition dialog
appears. The application automatically selects <Selected Assets> in the Group field.
4.
Complete the Report Definition dialog, then click the Run Report button. For more
information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7. The
application runs the report and sends it to the selected location. If you select the
Window check box, the report appears on your computer. For more information, see
“Viewing a Report,” page 9-19.
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9
Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
To run a report for only a single asset
1.
Select the asset for which you want to run the report, and then go to Asset Detail.
2.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The application displays a
submenu containing all of the standard reports.
3.
Select the report you want to run from the submenu. The Report Definition dialog
appears. The application automatically selects <Detailed Asset No. XX> in the Group
field, where XX is the System Number of the selected asset.
4.
Complete the Report Definition dialog, then click the Run Report button. For more
information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7. The
application runs the report and sends it to the selected location. If you select the
Window check box, the report appears on your computer. For more information, see
“Viewing a Report,” page 9-19.
Completing the Reports Tab
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Reports tab.

Report Category
Use this field to narrow the list of reports that appear in the reports list box.

Reports List Box
Use this field to select the report that you want to run. When you select a report, the
application displays relevant information about that report to the right of the list box.
An asterisk (*) appears after the report name if the report has been added to the list of
favorites.
Tip: To add a report to the list of favorites, right-click on the report name, and then
select Add to Favorites from the popup menu. The report appears at the bottom of the
Reports menu, making it easier to run in the future. You cannot add the Tax reports to
the list of favorite reports.
9-6
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Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
9

Run/Edit Report Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to run the report, as well as edit
the definition of the report.

Report Columns
This field displays an image of the selected report so that you can preview the columns
on the report before you run it.
Completing the Report Definition Dialog
There are three tabs on the Report Definition dialog:
• Setup Report tab (for information, see “Completing the Setup Report Tab of the
Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-10)
• Format Report tab (for information, see “Completing the Format Report Tab of the
Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-14)
• View Report Layout tab (for information, see “Completing the View Report Layout
Tab of the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-16)
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Report Definition dialog.

Report Name
Use this field to select the report that you want to run. The Report Name field allows
you to run multiple reports without having to go back to the Reports menu.

Description
This field displays a brief description of the selected report.

Add Report to Favorites
Select this check box to add the selected report to the Favorites section on the bottom
of the Reports menu.

Run Report Button
Click this button to run the selected report.

Save Button
Click this button to save the report definition under the current name. The report
definition includes all of the fields on the Setup Report and Format Report tabs. If you
do not save your changes to the report definition, all of the fields on these tabs revert
to the default settings for the selected report.
Verifying the Run Date for Each Book
When you run a report, you enter the date for which you want to run the report. You may
want to run the report for the end of the month or for the end of the year.
However, suppose your company has different year-ends in the tax books and the Internal
book. In that case, you can use the Verify Run Date button on the Setup Report tab of the
Report Definition dialog to select a separate report run date for each book.
To verify the run date of the report for each book
1.
On the Setup Report tab of the Report Definition dialog, click the Other Date option
button.
2.
In the text box underneath the Other Date field, enter the date for which you want to
run the report.
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9
Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
Tip: You can also click the down arrow to display a calendar that allows you to select
the date.
3.
Click the Verify Run Date button. The Verify Run Date dialog appears.
4.
Select the dates that you want to use to run the report for each depreciation book, and
then click OK.
Completing the Verify Run Date Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Verify Run Date dialog.

Book
This field displays the name of each open depreciation book.

Cycle
This field displays the type of accounting cycle used by each depreciation book.

Run Date
Use this field to select the run date that you want to use for each depreciation book. For
most reports, you must select a date that is the last date in a month. (For some reports,
this date must be the beginning date of a fiscal year.) Enter dates in MM/DD/YYYY
format. For information on entering dates in date fields, see “Entering Dates in Date
Fields,” page 3-26.
Setting the Current Reporting Period
You can set the date for which you want to run reports in one place. The date that you select
is called the “current reporting period.” After you select the current reporting period for a
company, the date becomes the default date when you run reports.
You can change the date when you run reports to a date other than the current reporting
period, if needed. And you can change the current reporting period at any time.
You can set the current reporting period for each open book.
9-8
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Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
9
To set the current reporting period
1.
Select Reports/Current Reporting Period from the menu bar. The Current Reporting
Period dialog appears.
Tip: You can also access the Current Reporting Period dialog by clicking the Set
Current Report Period button on the Setup Report tab of the Report Definition dialog.
For more information, see “Completing the Setup Report Tab of the Report Definition
Dialog,” page 9-10.
2.
Complete the Current Reporting Period dialog, and then click OK.
The application uses the date that you select for each book when you run a report.
Note: You can also set the current reporting period when you calculate depreciation by
selecting the Update Current Reporting Period check box on the Depreciate dialog. See
“Completing the Depreciate Dialog,” page 8-5.
Completing the Current Reporting Period Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Current Reporting Period dialog.

Book
This field displays the name of the book for which you can set the current reporting
period.

Reporting Period
Use this field to select the period-end date for the current reporting period for each
book. The date must be the end of a period. If you enter a date that is not the end of a
period, the application automatically enters the end date for the period that contains
the date you entered.
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Standard Reports
Running a Standard Report
Completing the Setup Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Setup Report tab of the Report Definition
dialog.

Group
Use this field to select the group for which you want to run the report. You can select
the Selected Assets option to run the report on only the assets you select in the Asset
List. If you go to Asset Detail for an asset before you select the report from the Reports
menu, you can run a report on that single asset. The group you select also determines
the sort order of the report and whether the application uses subtotals. See
“Completing the Sort Criteria Tab,” page 4-37.
The application displays a description of the selected group’s criteria and sort order
underneath the field. You can override the sort order of the selected group with a new
sort order on the Format Report tab. The application displays a message when you
have overridden the group’s sort order on the Format Report tab.

Books
Use this field to select the book or books you want to include in the report. For most
reports, you must select at least one book to include in the report.


Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
Date
Use this field to run the report for either the current reporting period or for a date that
you select.

Current Reporting Period
Click this option button to run the report for the current reporting period. You can
set the current reporting period for each book. For more information, see “Setting
the Current Reporting Period,” page 9-8.
If you select only one book, the application displays the current reporting period
for that book. If you select more than one book with different current reporting
periods, you can view the current reporting periods by clicking the Verify Run
Date button.

9-10
Other Date
Click this option button if you want to run the report for a date other than the
current reporting period. Enter the date for which you want to run the report in
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Running a Standard Report
9
MM/DD/YYYY format. Click the down arrow to use the calendar to select the
date. For most reports, this date must be the end of a period.


Verify Run Date Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to view which period-end the
date you entered falls within, for each selected book. This button is unavailable if
you have not selected a book in the Books field. For information about using this
feature, see “Verifying the Run Date for Each Book,” page 9-7.

Current Report Period Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to set the end date of the
current reporting period.
Configuration
The options in this field allow you to specify what you want included in the report. The
available options vary depending on which report you are running.

Extended Asset Description
Select this check box if you want the report to include the full asset description
rather than the abbreviated version usually used for reports. The asset’s full
description prints on a line above the asset’s other information. Selecting this check
box doubles the size of your report.

Column Wrapping
Select this check box if you want text fields that exceed the column width to print
on the next line(s), so that all of the data in the field is displayed on the report.

Asset Count
Select this check box if you want the application to display the number of assets on
subtotal and total lines.

Subtotal Options
Use this field to determine how you want subtotals to display on the report.
• Detail, Subtotals, and Totals
Click this option button if you want the report to display details about every
asset included in the report in addition to subtotals and the grand total.
• Subtotals and Totals
Click this option button if you want the report to display only subtotals and
the grand total. Even if you choose to display subtotals and totals only, you
can drill down to view the details when you send the report to Window.

Send To
Use this field to specify where you want the application to send the report.

Window
Select this check box if you want to display the report on your computer screen in
the report viewer. You must first select a default printer to display the report in the
report viewer. After you display the report in the report viewer, you can print the
report or export it to several different file formats.

Printer
Select this check box if you want to send the report to the default printer.
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Standard Reports
Formatting a Report
Formatting a Report
You can make the following changes to the format of a report:
• Set the current reporting period. See “Setting the Current Reporting Period,” page 9-8.
• Set the orientation (portrait or landscape). See “Setting the Orientation of a Report,”
page 9-12.
• Set the currency rounding option. See “Setting the Currency Rounding Option on a
Report,” page 9-12.
• Change the sort order that was specified in Group Manager. See “Changing the Sort
Order on a Report,” page 9-13.
• Set the page break options. See “Setting the Page Break Options,” page 9-14.
Setting the Orientation of a Report
You can set the orientation of a report; that is, you can change the orientation from portrait
to landscape or from landscape to portrait.
To set the orientation of a report
1.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The system displays a submenu
containing all of the standard reports.
2.
From the submenu, select the report for which you want to set the orientation. The
Report Definition dialog appears.
3.
Make sure the report for which you want to set the orientation is selected in the
Report Name field.
4.
Click the Format Report tab. The Format Report information appears. For more
information, see “Completing the Format Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog,”
page 9-14.
5.
Select the desired orientation in the Report Orientation field. Select Portrait for a
vertical orientation, and select Landscape for a horizontal orientation.
6.
Do one of the following:
• Click the Run Report button to run the report immediately.
• Click the Save button to run the report at a later time, and then click the Close
button to close the Report Definition dialog.
Setting the Currency Rounding Option on a Report
You can set the currency rounding option for dollar amounts on reports. For example, you
can have the application round dollar amounts to the nearest dollar, the nearest thousand,
or the nearest million.
To set the currency rounding option on a report
1.
9-12
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The system displays a submenu
containing all of the standard reports.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
9
Standard Reports
Formatting a Report
2.
From the submenu, select the report for which you want to set the orientation. The
system displays the Report Definition dialog.
3.
Make sure the report for which you want to set the currency rounding option is
selected in the Report Name field.
4.
Click the Format Report tab. The Format Report information appears. For more
information, see “Completing the Format Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog,”
page 9-14.
5.
Select the desired currency rounding option from the Currency Rounding field. The
application displays an example of how the rounding option affects currency fields
underneath the field.
6.
Do one of the following:
• Click the Run Report button to run the report immediately.
• Click the Save button to run the report at a later time, and then click the Close
button to close the Report Definition dialog.
Changing the Sort Order on a Report
The order in which assets are sorted on a report is originally determined by the sort order
of the group you select when you run the report. This sort order is defined on the Sort
Criteria tab in Group Manager. For more information, see “Completing the Sort Criteria
Tab,” page 4-37. You can change this sort order in the Report Definition dialog when you
run a report.
To change the sort order on a report
1.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The system displays a submenu
containing all of the standard reports.
2.
From the submenu, select the report for which you want to set the orientation. The
Report Definition dialog appears.
3.
Make sure the report for which you want to change the sort order is selected in the
Report Name field.
4.
Click the Format Report tab. The Format Report information appears. For more
information, see “Completing the Format Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog,”
page 9-14.
5.
Complete the Sort Options fields on the Format Report tab of the Report Definition
dialog.
6.
Do one of the following:
• Click the Run Report button to run the report immediately.
• Click the Save button to run the report at a later time, and then click the Close
button to close the Report Definition dialog.
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9
Standard Reports
Formatting a Report
Setting the Page Break Options
You can determine where the page breaks are on a standard report.
To set the page breaks
1.
Select Reports/Standard Reports from the menu bar. The system displays a submenu
containing all of the standard reports.
2.
From the submenu, select the report for which you want to set the page break option.
The Report Definition dialog appears.
3.
Make sure the report for which you want to set the page break option is selected in the
Report Name field.
4.
Click the Format Report tab. The Format Report information appears. For more
information, see “Completing the Format Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog,”
page 9-14.
5.
Click the Override Sort Specified in Group option button. The fields that determine
the three sorting levels become available.
6.
Select the field that you want to use for the primary sort level. The Page Break check
box becomes available for the first sort level.
7.
Select the Page Break check box if you want the report to print a new page every time
the value for the primary sort level changes.
8.
Select a field for the second and third level sort levels, if desired.
9.
Select the Page Break check box if you want the report to print a new page every time
the value for the second and third sort level changes.
10. Do one of the following:
• Click the Run Report button to run the report immediately.
• Click the Save button to run the report at a later time, and then click the Close
button to close the Report Definition dialog.
Completing the Format Report Tab of the Report Definition Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Format Report tab of the Report Definition
dialog.
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Standard Reports
Formatting a Report



9
Report Orientation
Use this field to select the orientation of the report on the page.

Portrait
Click this option button if you want the report to have a vertical orientation.

Landscape
Click this option button if you want the report to have a horizontal orientation.
Currency Rounding
Use this field to specify how you want the application to round dollar amounts on the
report.

Do Not Round
Select this option if you want the application to display both dollars and cents.

Whole Dollars
Select this option if you want the application to round dollar amounts to the
nearest dollar.

Thousands
Select this option if you want the application to round dollar amounts to the
nearest thousand.

Millions
Select this option if you want the application to round dollar amounts to the
nearest million.

Data
This field displays an example of a dollar amount before the rounding option is
applied to it.

Display
This field displays the dollar amount shown in the Data field after the rounding
option has been applied.
Sort Options
Use these fields to specify how you want the application to sort the information on the
report.

Use Sort Specified in Group
Click this option button if you want the application to sort the information as
specified for the selected group on the Sort Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group
dialog. The application displays the group’s criteria and sort order underneath the
Group field on the Setup Report tab.

Override Sort Specified in Group
Click this option button if you want to override the sorting information specified
for the selected group on the Sort Criteria tab of the Add/Edit Group dialog.
The following fields are available only if you click the Override Sort Specified in Group
option button.

Field
Select up to three fields on which you want the application to sort the report.

Order
Use these fields to select the order in which you want the application to display the
data. Select Ascending to display the assets from A to Z or from 0 to 9. Select
Descending to display the data from Z to A or from 9 to 0.
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9
Standard Reports
Formatting a Report

Subtotals
Use these fields to specify how you want the application to display subtotals on the
report.
• None
Select this option if you do not want the application to display subtotals on
the report for the corresponding field.
• Subtotals
Select this option if you want the application to display subtotals on the
report for the corresponding field.
• Year Subtotals
Select this option if you want the application to display subtotals for each
year. This option is available only for date fields.
• Month and Year Subtotals
Select this option if you want the application to display subtotals for each
year and for each month within each year. This option is available only for
date fields.
Note: You can select subtotal options for up to three sort levels. The Month and Year
Subtotals option counts as two sort levels. Therefore, if you select Month and Year
Subtotals for either the first or second field, the application ignores the subtotal
selection for the third field. In addition, the Month and Year Subtotals sort option is
not available for the third field because selecting it would exceed the limit of three sort
levels.

Page Break
Select this check box if you want the application to start a new page when the sort
value changes. For example, if you select the Page Break check box for the Location
field, then the application starts a new page every time the location changes.
Completing the View Report Layout Tab of the Report Definition
Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to review the View Report Layout tab of the Report Definition
dialog.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Standard Reports
Adding a Report to the Favorites
9
The View Report Layout tab displays a sample report for the report that you select in the
Report Name field.

Header
This field displays the header section of the selected report.

Columns
This text box displays sample data for the selected report.

Footer
This field displays the footer section of the selected report.
Adding a Report to the Favorites
You can create a list of the reports that you run most often. This will make it easier and
quicker to select the report you need. The list of reports will appear in the list of Favorites
on the Favorites tab, as well as in the Favorites section on the Reports menu.
Favorites
section
Note: This feature is not available for the Tax reports.
To add a report to the Favorites tab
1.
Click the Reports button on the navigation pane.
2.
Select the Reports tab.
3.
In the list of reports, right-click the report you want to add to Favorites.
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9
Standard Reports
Adding a Report to the Favorites
Note: You can select either a standard report or a report that you have already
customized.
4.
From the pop-up menu, select Add to Favorites.
5.
The report appears in the list of Favorites on the Favorites tab, as well as the bottom of
the Reports menu.
Tip: You can also add a report to the Favorites section of the Reports menu by selecting
the Add Report to Favorites check box on the Report Definition dialog. For more
information, see “Completing the Report Definition Dialog,” page 9-7.
Completing the Favorites Tab
The Favorites tab displays the reports that you have added as favorites to the Reports
menu. When you select a favorite report from the list, the application displays the report
settings to the right of the list.
Note: You cannot add the Tax reports to the list of favorite reports.
9-18

Run/Edit Report Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to run the report, as well as edit
the definition of the report.

Report Columns
This field displays an image of the selected report so that you can preview the columns
on the report before you run it.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Standard Reports
Viewing a Report
9
Viewing a Report
When you select the Window check box in the Send To field on the Report Definition
dialog, the report appears on your computer. Every reports appears in a standard report
viewer that contains many features that make it easy for you to view, manipulate, and print
the report.
The Report Viewer
Here is the Depreciation Expense report displayed in the standard report viewer with each
of the elements of the report viewer displayed.
Export Report
Zoom Size
Go To Page Number
Print
Page Scroll Buttons
Group Tree Button
Stop
Loading
Search
Group Tree
The standard report viewer elements are as follows:

Report
This field displays the name of the report on your computer screen.

Book
Use this field to select the book for which you want to view a report. The application
creates a separate report for each book selected on the Report Definition dialog.

Print All Reports Button
Click this button to send the reports for all books to the printer. You can use this button
to print reports before you drill down for details. After you drill down, you must use
the Print button (see below).
Note: Selecting the Print All Reports button prints only one report when you run a
report for only one book (for example, running the report for only the Internal book).
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9
Standard Reports
Viewing a Report

Export Report Button
Click this button to display the Export dialog, which allows you to export the report to
an external file or email. You can export the report in many different file formats,
including Adobe Acrobat (PDF), comma-separated values (CSV), Microsoft Excel
(XLS), Microsoft Word for Windows (DOC), HTML, and XML.

Print Report Button
Click this button to send the report to the default printer. You can use this button to
print reports after you drill down for details.

Toggle Group Tree Button
Click this button to either display or hide the group tree. The group tree displays the
sort levels of the report. The application displays the group tree only if you have
selected to subtotal the sort criteria for the group of assets on which you are reporting.
You can use the group tree to navigate the report. Simply select a sort level from the
group tree to move the preview to the selected sort level. If you have not selected to
subtotal the sort criteria for the group of assets on which you are reporting, the
application displays a blank navigation area when you click the Toggle Group Tree
button. For more information, see “Using the Group Tree,” page 9-22.

Page Scroll Buttons
Click these buttons to scroll through the pages of the report. You can scroll to the next,
previous, first, and last pages of the report.

Go To Page Number X/Y
This field displays the current page number. You can enter a page number and press
Enter to go to that page of the report. To view the total number of pages in the report,
you must first use the page scroll buttons to move to the last page of the report.

Stop Loading Button
Click this button to interrupt the loading of the report in the report viewer. You can
view the portion of the report that was loaded before the button was clicked.

Search Text Button
Click this button to display the Search dialog, which allows you to search for text on
the report.

Zoom Size
Select a zoom size from the drop-down list box.
Interpreting Common Report Data
The guidelines provided below pertain to features common to most reports.

9-20
Header of Report
The header, or top section, of reports displays the following information about the
report:

Book
This field in the report header section displays the name of the book for which the
report was run. The application creates a separate report for each book that you
select in the Report Definition dialog.

Fiscal Year-End Month
This field in the report header section displays the month in which the fiscal year
ends for the selected book.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Standard Reports
Viewing a Report

9
Body of Report
The following information is displayed in the body of most reports.

Key Code Column
Many reports have a Key Code column. This column lists one or more lowercase
letters that are keys to understanding how depreciation was calculated for the asset
listed. The keys codes are:
a
A depreciation adjustment amount (to adjust for taking too little beginning depreciation)
is included in total accumulated depreciation. For information about depreciation
adjustments, see the online Help or “The Book Overrides Tab,” page 4-20. To obtain the
adjustment amount for this asset, you can run a Depreciation Adjustment report.
b
The asset has had a business-use percentage of less than 100%. The business-use
percentage reduces the asset’s depreciable basis.
d
The asset has been disposed.
f
The asset has switched from the MACRS table depreciation calculation to the MACRS
formula depreciation calculation because of a short tax year.
l
The asset’s depreciation has been limited by the cap on annual recovery allowances for
luxury automobiles.
m
The midquarter convention was applied to the asset’s depreciation.
r
The asset’s acquisition value was reduced to arrive at the depreciable basis. Salvage
value, Section 179 expense or bonus depreciation, ITC, 168 Allowance, and business-use
percentage may have reduced the acquisition value.
s
The asset switched from a declining-balance depreciation method to a straight-line
depreciation method when straight-line depreciation resulted in more depreciation than
declining balance.
v
The asset has switched to a remaining value over remaining life depreciation
calculation due to ACE rules.

Report Assumptions
The last page of most reports displays important information about the data included
on the report.

Report Name
This field displays the name of the report.

Source Report
If you have customized a standard report, this field displays the standard report
on which the customized report is based. The application always displays
<Standard Report> in this field because the customize report feature is not
available in Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation.

Calculation Assumptions
The calculation assumptions section shows:
• Whether the company had any short years during the report period.
• The depreciation adjustment convention used when an asset’s depreciation is
less than the amount the application calculates for the beginning period (no
adjustment, immediate adjustment, or postrecovery adjustment).
• Whether the setting for the Include Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in
Expense field was on or off for the company.
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9
Standard Reports
Viewing a Report

Key Codes
The key section lists all of the available key codes that can appear in the Key Code
column, along with a brief explanation of each code.

Group/Sorting Criteria
This section shows the group name, group definition, and sort criteria. You can
override the sort order specified in the group by completing the Sort Order fields
on the Format Report tab of the Report Definition dialog.
Using the Group Tree
The group tree in the report viewer displays the sort levels of a report. You can use the
group tree to view the sort levels and to quickly move from one section of the report to
another.
To view the group tree, click the Group Tree button on the report viewer.
Note: The application displays the group tree only if you have selected to subtotal the sort
criteria for the group of assets on which you are reporting. You can select whether to subtotal
the sort criteria when you define the group in the Group Manager. For more information
about creating groups, see “Creating Groups,” page 4-32. You can also select to subtotal the
sort criteria on the Format Report tab of the Report Definition dialog. If you have not
selected to subtotal the sort criteria for the group of assets on which you are reporting, the
application displays a blank navigation area when you click the Group Tree button.
The image below shows the group tree for a report that is sorted first by the Location field,
and then by the Department field.
Group Tree
You can expand the entries for the primary sort field (Location) to display the entries for
the secondary sort field (Department). In the image above, the Store #1 location is
expanded to show the four departments for that location. Click the plus sign (+) to expand
a sort field, and click the minus sign (-) to contract a sort field.
You can also quickly move to a section of the report by clicking a sort level on the group
tree. For example, when you click on Store #2 in the group tree, the application displays the
information about Store #2 in the report viewer.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Standard Reports
Viewing a Report
9
Drilling Down for More Details
You can create a report that initially displays only subtotals and totals. You can then “drill
down” to view the assets that make up those subtotals or totals.
For example, you might create a report for a group of assets that are sorted and subtotaled
by location. When you run the report, you select the Subtotals and Totals option on the
Setup Report tab of the Report Definition dialog. The application displays the subtotals for
each location in the company. You can “drill down” to see the details for each asset in a
particular location.
To drill down for more details
1.
Run a report, and select the Subtotals and Totals option and the Window check box in
the Send To field. The application displays only the subtotals and totals for each sort
level.
2.
Move the cursor over a sort level until the cursor becomes a magnifying glass.
3.
Double-click on the sort level. The application displays the assets that make up that
sort level in a separate page. Double-click to toggle between subtotals and the detail
page, or click the appropriate tab.
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9
Standard Reports
Exporting a Report
Note: To print a copy of the detail page, click the Print icon (not the Print All Reports
button) while viewing the detail page.
Exporting a Report
When you run a report, you can export the report in a variety of formats. These formats
include:
• Adobe Acrobat (.PDF) for easy report distribution
• eXtensible Markup Language (.XML) for easy analysis of your data in other financial
packages
• Microsoft Excel (.XLS) format, that retains more of the original report columns and
layout for convenient use in a spreadsheet.
To export a report
1.
Make sure you select the Window check box in the Send To field on the Report
Definition dialog.
2.
Click the Run Report button. The application displays the report in the report viewer.
3.
Click the Export Report button on the report viewer. The Export dialog appears.
4.
Select the desired format (for example, Adobe Acrobat or Microsoft Excel).
5.
Select the desired destination (for example, an application or a disk file).
6.
Click OK.
If you choose to send the report to a disk file, the application displays the Choose Export
File dialog, which allows you to select a folder in which to save the file. If you choose to
send the report to an application, the application opens the appropriate program and
displays the report.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Appendix A
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
In this appendix:
Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Depreciation: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Elements of Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Depreciation Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-23
Asset Disposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-28
Tax laws and accounting standards that apply to depreciation are complex and
ever-changing. Whether you are a business executive, an administrator, or an accountant,
depreciation can be a confusing and worrisome aspect of fixed asset management.
The application is designed to reduce the burden of these tax laws and accounting
standards by performing the many complicated calculations that are required. It also
disallows entries that are clearly invalid under the law. To produce the optimal
depreciation results for your company, however, you must understand several things:
• The concepts involved in the depreciation of fixed assets.
• The assumptions and decisions the application makes when calculating depreciation
and setting defaults for the depreciation books, whenever choices are available under
the law.
• The different depreciation methods available to you and their effects on your books.
This appendix provides detailed information about depreciation concepts and methods. It
can help you make the right decisions about your entries in the depreciation books.
Because depreciation and the IRS regulations that govern depreciation for tax purposes are
very complex and frequently require professional judgment, this discussion is no
substitute for the advice of an accountant or tax advisor.
Although the application takes much of the work out of depreciation by applying the
correct depreciation rules and calculations to each asset, its calculations can only be as
correct as the information you enter. For example, while the application can keep a user
from entering a depreciation method that is invalid for the asset’s property type and date
placed in service, the application cannot determine whether the property type is correct for
the asset or whether the user has chosen the most appropriate of the valid depreciation
methods. The person who sets guidelines for entering asset information and who sets up
the books should have a thorough understanding of depreciation and the way the
application calculates it. The person who enters asset data (if different) may find it helpful
to have a basic understanding of depreciation—as accountants understand it and as the IRS
requires it.
This appendix discusses the basics of depreciation, how the application determines default
values for the elements of depreciation, and the application’s disposal methods.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
A-1
A
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books
Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books
There are five predefined depreciation books and two user-defined books. There is also an
area where you can enter general information about an asset—data that does not affect
depreciation. To learn more about the general information fields, see “Completing the
General Information Fields,” page 6-3. To learn about the book-specific information fields,
see “Completing the Book Information Fields,” page 6-5.
This section of the appendix describes the seven Sage Fixed Assets depreciation books.
The Tax Book
The Tax book is for asset depreciation information as it will be reported to the IRS on the
company’s federal income tax return for regular tax purposes. The application uses the
entries in this book to set appropriate defaults for the other open books. For example, if you
enter a personal property asset’s depreciation method in the Tax book as MF200 (MACRS
Formula), the application will set the asset’s depreciation method in the AMT book to
MF150. The specific defaults for all depreciation books are explained in “Depreciation
Defaults,” page A-23. Note that if you close the Tax book, the State, AMT, and ACE books
will not have any default information.
The application limits entries in the Tax book to choices that are valid under the
depreciation sections of the Internal Revenue Code, principally Sections 167 and 168.
The Internal Book
The Internal book is for asset depreciation as needed for the company’s internal
accounting. The application default information, based on the Tax book, conforms to
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The application uses data from this
book in certain reports, such as the FASB 109 Projection report. The Internal book fiscal year
does not need to be the same as the Tax book fiscal year.
Guidelines for internal book depreciation, as outlined by GAAP, tend to be far less
restrictive than for tax depreciation. GAAP requires only that depreciation be a systematic
and rational measure of asset wear and tear and that any selected depreciation method be
applied consistently. Some rules are, however, quite specific, and you should refer to the
GAAP guidelines for detailed information.
The State Book
The State book is for asset depreciation information as it will be reported on the company’s
state income tax return. The application uses the data from the Tax book as the default
information for this book. You must know the tax laws for your state; the application does
not enforce specific state tax requirements. Generally, the State book fiscal year should be
the same as the Tax book fiscal year.
When you run a FASB 109 Projection report, you can get an additional report for the State
book.
The AMT Book
The rules for computing the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) differ from those used in
computing depreciation for the regular federal tax. As part of the Tax Reform Act of 1986,
A-2
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Sage Fixed Assets Depreciation Books
A
Congress passed legislation designed to ensure that both individual taxpayers and
corporations pay at least a certain minimum tax, known as the Alternative Minimum Tax
or AMT. The application applies those rules to determine the default information for this
book based on the Tax book entries. Generally, you should not change the default entries,
as they already comply with AMT rules. The AMT book fiscal year should be the same as
the Tax book fiscal year.
Note: If a corporation is exempt from AMT (under the rules prescribed by the Taxpayer
Relief Act of 1997), it should close the AMT book, as well as the ACE book, for the first
year beginning after December 31, 1997. The exemption from AMT may only be
temporary (that is, if the corporation grows sufficiently, it may have to start calculating
AMT again).
The Alternative Minimum Tax report shows Tax Preferences for ACRS real property and
Adjustments for MACRS assets as required under the AMT.
The ACE Book
For years after 1989, the Alternative Minimum Tax rules require a special income
calculation under Code Section 56(g) to arrive at Adjusted Current Earnings (ACE). A
major component of ACE is an adjustment for accelerated depreciation on recovery
property placed in service prior to January 1, 1994. ACE depreciation, for which the ACE
book is intended, is Alternative Minimum Tax depreciation with the following
modifications, which the application applies for the ACE book defaults:
• There is no ACE Depreciation Adjustment for assets placed in service after 1993.
Therefore, there is no adjustment made to the Alternative Minimum Tax depreciation.
• You must use ADS straight-line MACRS depreciation (method AD) to depreciate all
MACRS assets placed in service in 1990 through 1993. For these assets, the application
defaults the estimated life from the ADS life for use as the recovery period.
• For MACRS assets placed in service before 1990 and ACRS assets, the application
determines the asset’s remaining depreciable basis (using the AMT book for MACRS
property and the Tax book for ACRS property) as of the end of the last tax year that
began before 1990. After that date, the asset’s depreciation method changes to a
remaining value over remaining ADS life calculation; however, the ACE book still
shows the original depreciation method.
• For all other assets, depreciation under ACE is the same as allowed for regular tax
purposes.
Because the application establishes the ACE book defaults, under these rules, from entries
in the Tax book, you should not override the defaults unless you are thoroughly familiar
with Code Section 56(g) and fully understand the impact of your changes.
Note: If a corporation is exempt from AMT (under the rules prescribed by the Taxpayer
Relief Act of 1997), it should close the ACE book, as well as the AMT book, for the first
year beginning after December 31, 1997. Although the exemption from AMT may only be
temporary (that is, if the corporation grows sufficiently, it may have to start calculating
AMT again), the exemption from ACE calculation is permanent.
The ACE book fiscal year should be the same as the Tax book fiscal year.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
A-3
A
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation: An Overview
The Custom 1 and Custom 2 Books
The Custom 1 and Custom 2 books are for the company to use as it wishes. The application
sets the default values just as it does for the Internal book, but it does not use the
information in these books for any report calculations (other than those required to run
Custom 1 or Custom 2 reports). You may choose either of these books to use as the
applicable financial statement for the FASB 109 Projection report.
Depreciation: An Overview
Depreciation is an allowance for the decline in an asset’s value. It has two aspects, an
accounting aspect and a practical aspect. Both aspects have tax and financial implications.
In accounting terms, depreciation is the process of allocating the cost of tangible property
against income over a period of time, rather than deducting the cost as a cash expense in
the year of acquisition. Generally, at the end of an asset’s life, the sum of the amounts set
aside for depreciation each accounting period will equal original cost less salvage value
(the value of an asset at the end of its life). The method used to calculate an asset’s
depreciation is important because depreciation affects net profit. Higher depreciation
deductions reduce net profit while lower depreciation deductions increase net profit.
In practical terms, depreciation suggests a gradual decline in an asset’s market value
because of use and wear and tear. Federal and state tax laws recognize that businesses need
to account for this aspect of depreciation. As a result, IRS and state tax authorities allow
businesses to write off or expense a certain amount each year for the actual use of an asset.
This amount is treated as an expense even though the company may not have purchased
the asset in the current period.
Good accounting and financial management practices require that a company take both the
cost expiration and the declining market value of an asset into account. The cost expiration
of a company’s assets must be recognized if the cost of doing business is to be realistic.
Also, the decline in the market value of those assets must be considered if the company’s
net worth is to be realistic.
The application is concerned solely with fixed assets, which the IRS defines as property or
equipment with an estimated life in excess of 1 year. Note that the application does support
assets with a life as short as 6 months for the following depreciation methods:
• MF150% and MA150% (MACRS Formula)
• AD and AA (MACRS Alternative Depreciation System)
To be depreciated, a fixed asset must:
• Be used in business or held for the production of income.
• Have an estimated life greater than 1 year.
• Be subject to wear, decay, or expiration.
• Be fully installed and ready for use.
Elements of Depreciation
To calculate depreciation on a fixed asset, you must know five things:
• The type of property.
• The date the asset was placed in service.
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• The asset’s depreciable basis.
• The asset’s estimated useful life.
• The depreciation method.
The rest of this section explains each of the first four elements of depreciation. The available
depreciation methods are discussed in Appendix B, “Depreciation Methods.”
Types of Property
An asset’s property type often dictates the depreciation method to be used in the
depreciation calculation. Businesses use two general types of property: personal property
and real property. Under the Internal Revenue Code, personal property includes all
depreciable property other than real estate (real property). Real property includes
buildings and their structural components.
Note: Accountants often refer to a property by its depreciation method, such as a
declining-balance property or an ACRS asset. Assets depreciated under ACRS and
MACRS methods are called recovery properties because depreciation is taken over
statutory estimated lives called recovery periods. You designate qualifying property as
Indian Reservation property by selecting depreciation method MI, rather than by selecting
a specific property type.
Within the two broad property type categories—personal and real—the Internal Revenue
Code makes further distinctions for depreciation purposes. The application identifies
property by the following types:

General Personal Property (Type P)
This type includes all personal property other than listed personal property and
automobiles.

Automobile (Type A)
IRS rules place a cap on annual recovery allowances (including any deductions under
Code Section 179) for vehicles that qualify as luxury vehicles under IRS Section 280F
placed in service after June 18, 1984. The following table summarizes the limitations on
recovery allowances and investment tax credits for luxury vehicles, which the
application enforces for assets using ACRS and MACRS methods (methods AT, SA, ST,
MF, MT, MA, MR, AA, SB, MI, and AD). You should not use this property type for
assets placed in service before June 19, 1984.
Luxury Automobile Limitations
Car Placed in Service
After
Before
Maximum Recovery ($)
Asset
Life
Yr. 1
Yr. 2
Yr. 3
Yr. 4
Add’l
Years
Max.
ITC
6/18/84
1/1/85
3 years
4,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
1,000
12/31/84
4/3/85
3 years
4,100
6,200
6,200
6,200
6,200
1,000
4/2/85
1/1/87
3 years
3,200
4,800
4,800
4,800
4,800
675
12/31/86
1/1/89
5 years
2,560
4,100
2,450
1,475
1,475
0
12/31/88
1/1/91
5 years
2,660
4,200
2,550
1,475
1,475
0
12/31/90
1/1/92
5 years
2,660
4,300
2,550
1,475
1,575
0
12/31/91
1/1/93
5 years
2,760
4,400
2,650
1,575
1,575
0
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
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Luxury Automobile Limitations
Car Placed in Service
After
Before
Maximum Recovery ($)
Asset
Life
Yr. 1
Yr. 2
Yr. 3
Yr. 4
Add’l
Years
Max.
ITC
12/31/92
1/1/94
5 years
2,860
4,600
2,750
1,675
1,675
0
12/31/93
1/1/95
5 years
2,960
4,700
2,850
1,675
1,675
0
12/31/94
1/1/97
5 years
3,060
4,900
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/96
1/1/98
5 years
3,160
5,000
3,050
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/97
1/1/99
5 years
3,160
5,000
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/98
1/1/00
5 years
3,060
5,000
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/99
5/6/03
5 years
7,660 1
4,900
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
5/5/03
1/1/04
5 years
10,710 1
4,900
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/03
1/1/05
5 years
10,610 2
4,800
2,850
1,675
1,675
0
12/31/04
1/1/06
5 years
2,960
4,700
2,850
1,675
1,675
0
12/31/05
1/1/07
5 years
2,960
4,800
2,850
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/06
1/1/08
5 years
3,060
4,900
2,850
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/07
1/1/10
5 years
10,960
2
4,800
2,850
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/09
1/1/12
5 years
11,060 1
4,900
2,950
1,775
1,775
0
12/31/11
1/1/13
5 years
11,160 3
5,100
3,050
1,875
1,875
0
1 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the automobile, the depreciation limitation is $3,060 for
the first year.
2 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the automobile, the depreciation limitation is $2,960 for
the first year.
3 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the automobile, the depreciation limitation is $3,160 for
the first year.
Note: The depreciation limits are higher for light trucks and vans. For more
information, see “Light Trucks and Vans (Type T),” page A-7.
The amounts in the preceding table are based on a 12-month tax year and 100%
business use of the property. For business use less than 100% or a tax year of less than
12 months, the application automatically reduces the ceiling amounts according to IRS
regulations.
Automobile Limits and 168 Allowance in a Short Year
Code Section 280F requires that the luxury auto limit be prorated in a short year;
however, you are not required to prorate the 168 Allowance during a short year. Thus
when determining the limit on depreciation for automobiles, light trucks, or vans, the
application uses the following formula:
{(Annual Limit x Short Year Fraction) + $7,650 *} x Business Use
* Prior to May 6, 2003, this amount is $4,600.
The change in short year calculations is automatic and will occur the next time
depreciation is run for any vehicle claiming the 168 Allowance in a short year.
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Automobile Example:
In July 2002, a company purchased a $20,000 passenger car with a 5-year recovery
period and uses it exclusively for business.
The MACRS depreciation would be:
Maximum
Allowable
Depreciation ($)
Year
Depreciation
Before Luxury
Auto Limits ($)
2002
4,000.00
3,060.00 *
2003
6,400.00
4,900.00
2004
3,840.00
2,950.00
2005
2,304.00
1,775.00
2006
2,304.00
1,775.00
2007
1,152.00
1,775.00
2008
0.00
1,775.00
2009
0.00
1,775.00
2010
0.00
215.00
Total
20,000.00
20,000.00
* If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the passenger car, the depreciation limitation is
$3,060 for the first year. If the vehicle qualified for the 30% bonus depreciation, the first year
limit would have been $7,660.
Even though the car has a recovery period of 5 years, deductions can continue to be
taken after the recovery period if the vehicle is still used for business and the
deductions do not exceed the maximum yearly amount.

Light Trucks and Vans (Type T)
IRS rules place a cap on annual recovery allowances (including any deductions under
Code Section 179) for vehicles that qualify as light trucks or vans placed in service after
January 1, 2003. Use property type T if the vehicle’s gross weight is less than 6,000
pounds. If the vehicle’s gross weight is 6,000 pounds or more, use property type P or Q.
The following table summarizes the limitations on recovery allowances for light trucks
and vans. The application enforces these limitations for assets using MACRS
depreciation methods (methods MF, MT, MA, MR, AA, SB, MI, and AD). You cannot
use this property type for assets placed in service before January 1, 2003.
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Light Trucks and Vans Limitations
Vehicle Placed in Service
After
Before
Maximum Recovery
Asset Life
Yr. 1
Yr. 2
Yr. 3
Yr. 4
Add’l
Years
12/31/02
5/6/03
5 years
7,960 1
5,400
3,250
1,975
1,975
5/5/03
1/1/04
5 years
11,010 1
5,400
3,250
1,975
1,975
12/31/03
1/1/05
5 years
10,910 2
5,300
3,150
1,875
1,875
12/31/04
1/1/07
5 years
3,260
5,200
3,150
1,875
1,875
12/31/06
1/1/08
5 years
3,260
5,200
3,050
1,875
1,875
12/31/07
1/1/09
5 years
11,160
3
5,100
3,050
1,875
1,875
12/31/08
1/1/10
5 years
11,060 4
4,900
2,950
1,775
1,775
12/31/09
1/1/11
5 years
11,160 3
5,100
3,050
1,875
1,875
12/31/10
1/1/12
5 years
11,260 2
5,200
3,150
1,875
1,875
12/31/11
1/1/13
5 years
11,360 1
5,300
3,150
1,875
1,875
1 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the truck or van, the depreciation limitation is $3,360 for
the first year.
2 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the truck or van, the depreciation limitation is $3,260 for
the first year.
3 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the truck or van, the depreciation limitation is $3,160 for
the first year.
4 If you elect out of the 168 Allowance for the truck or van, the depreciation limitation is $3,060 for
the first year.
Note: Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) and other vehicles, except ambulances, hearses, or
vehicles used for transporting persons or property for hire should be entered using
property type Q. For more information, see “Sport Utility Vehicles,” page A-9.

Light Trucks and Vans Excluded from Limitations
Light trucks and vans may be excluded from the depreciation limitations if they
qualify as nonpersonal use vehicles. If the vehicle does qualify for the exclusion,
use property type P when you enter the asset in the application.
To qualify as a nonpersonal use vehicle, the truck or van must meet the following
requirements:
• The vehicle was specially modified so it is not likely to be used more than
minimally for personal purposes.
• The vehicle was placed in service on or after July 7, 2003.
IRS Reg. § 1.274-5T(k)(7) provides the following example of a vehicle that was
modified so that it would not be used for personal purposes:
“A van that has only a front bench for seating, in which permanent shelving that
fills most of the cargo area has been installed, that constantly carried merchandise
or equipment, and that has been specially painted with advertising or the
company’s name.”
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Vehicles that are exempt from the depreciation limitations also include those listed
under (k)(2) of the same regulation. This list includes cranes, school buses, forklifts,
and ambulances.

Listed Personal Property (Type Q)
Code Section 280F lists certain kinds of property for which ACRS and MACRS
deductions may be limited. Listed personal properties include passenger cars or other
forms of transportation that can be used for personal as well as business purposes, such
as airplanes, trucks, and boats; amusement equipment such as pinball machines;
cellular phones; and certain computers. For a complete list, see Code Section 280F.

Sport Utility Vehicles
Vehicles weighing less than 6,000 pounds are subject to the luxury automobile
limits on depreciation. Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) weighing between 6,000 and
14,000 pounds were not subject to these limitations. Since 2003, a business could
deduct up to $100,000 in the placed-in-service year for the cost of an SUV under
Section 179 because these vehicles were not subject to the automobile limits.
However, the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 limits the Section 179 expense
that can be taken in a single year on an SUV to $25,000. The $25,000 limit applies to
SUVs placed in service after 10/22/04.
To enter an asset as an SUV, use property type Q, listed property.

General Real Property (Type R)
This type includes all real property that is not listed or required to be reported
separately for tax purposes.

Listed Real Property (Type S)
Code Section 280F lists real property as well as personal property for which ACRS and
MACRS deductions may be limited. Listed real properties include entertainment,
recreational, and amusement properties, such as sports stadium boxes, beach houses,
and hunting lodges. For a complete list, see Code Section 280F.

Other Real Properties (Types C, E, and F)
Because you must report different real property types separately for several federal tax
forms (most notably Form 4797), the application has separate property types for
conservation property (type C); oil, gas, and energy property (type E); and farm
property (type F).

Low-Income Housing (Type H)
Special ACRS allowances are available for low-income housing placed in service after
1980 and before 1987. These periods allow for costs to be recovered at twice the
straight-line rate. Property allowed to be recovered under this method includes
housing projects insured under the National Housing Act.
Between 1980 and 1987, low-income housing was given a special full month’s
depreciation during the months of acquisition and disposal. Low-income housing was
also assigned a 15-year recovery period with 200% declining-balance depreciation.
After 1986, low-income housing uses the same midmonth convention as other
residential property, with a half-month’s depreciation given during months of
acquisition and disposal. For this reason, there is no special treatment for low-income
housing placed in service after 1986 and it should therefore be treated as general real
property (type R).
The short tax year rule does not apply to low-income housing in the year of acquisition
or disposition. The deduction is based on the number of months in which the property
was in service during the short tax year, as is the case with other real property.
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
Amortizable Property (Type Z)
The tax law requires taxpayers to recover certain specified capital expenditures
through a process known as amortization. Amortization uses straight-line depreciation
over certain specified periods of time. You can select only straight-line depreciation
methods (methods SD, SL, SF, SH, and RV, plus OC, NO, and custom methods) for
amortizable assets. Only certain expenditures may be amortized.
Many intangible assets that cannot be depreciated can be amortized. Among them are
business startup costs, organizational expenses of corporations and partnerships, and
covenants not to compete. Some tangible assets, including pollution control facilities,
pre-1982 child-care facilities, and the rehabilitation of certified historic structures, can
also be amortized. You should assign such assets to property type Z.

Vintage Account Property (Type V)
From 1971 through 1980, Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) depreciation allowed the
use of accounts having multiple assets. These accounts are called vintage accounts.
Vintage accounts require the use of either the half-year or modified half-year
convention; the application limits the valid depreciation methods accordingly.
Property type V also requires special handling of salvage value, whereby salvage value
does not reduce the depreciable basis yet the asset cannot be depreciated below the
salvage value. The application treats type V assets this way automatically.
Enter a vintage account as a single asset and select property type V.
Leasehold Improvement Property
Leasehold improvements are permanent betterments made to leased property, which is
owned by someone else and which will usually revert to the owner at the end of the lease
period. For example, a tenant may build shelves or install fixtures on the walls of a rented
store. Although for income tax purposes leasehold improvements are depreciated, for
financial reporting they are amortized.
Previously, leasehold improvements were required to be depreciated using the same
depreciation method, life, and averaging convention as the underlying property to which
they were attached. Generally, this meant most leaseholds were depreciated using
straight-line depreciation with a midmonth averaging convention over 39 years.
Currently, leasehold improvement property placed in service from 10/23/2004 12/31/2011 is required to depreciate using the straight-line depreciation method over a
15-year life (9-year life for Indian Reservation property), and apply either a half-year or
midquarter averaging convention.
Date Placed in Service
Along with the type of property, the date on which you place an asset in service can
determine the depreciation method required. As the Internal Revenue Code changes, so do
the depreciation methods that are valid for assets newly placed in service. You can use only
those depreciation methods that are valid for an asset given the property type and the date
placed in service.
The date an asset is placed in service affects depreciation in two other ways: the averaging
convention that you use (see page A-11), and whether you placed the asset in service
during a short tax year. (see page A-13).
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Averaging Conventions
To avoid the complications of depreciating each asset from the specific date on which
you placed it in service, the IRS and GAAP support guidelines that assume you place
assets in service or disposed of at designated dates throughout the year. These
guidelines are called averaging conventions. By assuming an average placed-in-service
date, the amount of total depreciation allowed for all assets approximates the total
depreciation that would be calculated based on the actual days in service.
Under GAAP and IRS rules, different depreciation methods use specific averaging
conventions. To learn which averaging convention the application uses for each
depreciation method, see Appendix B, “Depreciation Methods.”
There are five averaging conventions, as described below.

Half-Year Convention
Under the half-year convention, an asset is treated as though it were placed in
service or disposed of on July 1 (or on the first day of the 7th month of a fiscal year).
One-half of a full year’s depreciation is allowed for the asset in its first year placed
in service, regardless of when it was actually placed in service during that year.
If you dispose of an asset in its final year, the amount of depreciation depends on
when it is disposed. If the asset is disposed of before July 1 (or before the first day
of the 7th month of the fiscal year), it receives one half of the depreciation it would
have received if it had not been disposed. The asset will not be fully depreciated.
If the asset is disposed of on or after July 1 (on or after the first day of the 7th month
of the fiscal year), it receives the full amount of depreciation for its final year.
Under earlier legislation, personal property placed in service before 1987 and
depreciated under the ACRS tables used the half-year convention in the year of
acquisition. Such personal property was entitled to no depreciation in the year it
was disposed of. The MACRS rules of the 1986 Tax Reform Act keep the half-year
averaging in the year of acquisition, but they also allow for a half-year of
depreciation in the year of disposition.
Note: The half-year convention can be used for all MACRS property except residential
rental and nonresidential real property. It is used for MACRS 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 15-, 20-,
and 25-year property (unless the midquarter convention applies).

Modified Half-Year Convention
Under this convention, assets placed in service during the first half of the year are
considered to have been placed in service on the first day of the year. Therefore,
they receive a full year’s depreciation in the acquisition year. Assets placed in
service during the second half of the year are considered to have been placed in
service on the first day of the following year. Therefore, they receive no
depreciation in the acquisition year but receive a full year’s depreciation in the
subsequent year.
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Applying the modified half-year convention in the disposal year is slightly more
complicated because the disposal-year allowance depends on the acquisition year
allowance. The following table summarizes the relationships:
If Asset Was Placed in
Service in the:
And Disposed of in the:
Amount of Depreciation Allowed in
the Disposal Year
1st half of year
1st half of year
No depreciation
1st half of year
2nd half of year
50% of full year depreciation
2nd half of year
1st half of year
50% of full year depreciation
2nd half of year
2nd half of year*
Full year of depreciation
* To earn the full year of depreciation, the disposal must have been in a year after the
acquisition year.
If the modified half-year is being adopted for a vintage account, it should be
adopted for all additions and all extraordinary retirements.

Midmonth Convention
For ACRS and MACRS real property: A midmonth convention applies to ACRS real
property placed in service after June 22, 1984, and to MACRS residential rental and
nonresidential real property (that is, 27.5-, 31.5-, and 39-year property). Such
property is treated as though it were placed in service or disposed of in the middle
of the month. A half-month’s depreciation is allowed both in the month of
acquisition and in the month of disposition.
For nonrecovery property: A different midmonth convention applies to assets
depreciated by methods other than ACRS and MACRS. For these methods, if the
asset is placed in service after the 15th of the month, no depreciation is taken for
that month. If the asset is placed in service before the 16th of the month, a full
month’s depreciation is allowed. Similarly, if the asset is disposed of before the
16th of the month, no depreciation is taken for that month. If the asset is disposed
of after the 15th of the month, a full month’s depreciation is allowed.

Full-Month Convention
Under a full-month convention, property placed in service at any time during a
given month is treated as if it had been placed in service on the first of that month.
This allows depreciation to be taken for the entire month in which the asset is
placed in service. If the property is disposed of before the end of the recovery
period, no depreciation is allowed for the month in which the property is disposed
of.

Midquarter Convention
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 created a midquarter convention to be used if more
than 40% of the aggregate depreciable basis of newly acquired MACRS personal
property is placed in service during the last 3 months of a tax year. Under this
midquarter convention, MACRS personal property is treated as though it were
placed in service in the middle of the quarter in which it was purchased.
Note: When applicable, the midquarter convention can be used for all MACRS
property except residential rental and nonresidential real property. It is used for
MACRS 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 15-, 20-, and 25-year property (unless the half-year convention
applies).
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Short Tax Years
A short tax year occurs when there is an accounting period of less than 12 calendar
months. A short tax year can be:
• the first tax reporting period,
• the final tax reporting period, or
• the result of a change in an annual accounting period.
A short tax period requires special calculations for depreciation. In general, a short
accounting period requires that you allocate depreciation calculations based on the
number of months in the short year. The way you accomplish this differs depending on
the depreciation method selected.
When annual depreciation allowances for ACRS personal property are determined
using IRS tables (methods AT and ST), an amount of unrecovered short-year
depreciation is created, carried forward, and recovered in the period following the
normal depreciable life. You cannot use the MACRS table method (method MT) if a
short year occurs during an asset’s life.
For ACRS personal property, the full year’s depreciation is multiplied by the short-year
fraction to determine the annual short-year amount. The short-year fraction is:
Months
in a short year----------------------------------------------------12
For example, if a company changes its fiscal year-end month from September to
December, the short-year fraction is 3/12. The remaining unrecovered deduction (9/12
of the full year’s deduction) is taken in the first year of the post-recovery period.
Depreciation methods that use a half-year convention (methods SH, DH, and YH) need
to use the half-rate rule, which requires that one-half of the depreciation calculated for
the full short-year period be used. Depreciation methods that use the modified
half-year convention (methods SD, DD, and YD) apply special rules to the short-year
calculation. When you place an asset in service in the first half of a short year, then the
full amount of the short-year depreciation is allowed. In such cases, the regular
full-year recovery is multiplied by the short-year fraction.
Depreciable Basis
An asset’s depreciable basis is the amount of the asset’s acquisition value for which a
business is allowed to claim depreciation. A percentage of this basis is deducted each year.
The depreciable basis is often (but not always) the cost or acquisition value of the asset.
Under some depreciation rules, other factors adjust the cost to determine the depreciable
basis. These factors are salvage value, Section 179 expense or bonus depreciation, Section
168 Allowance, the ITC amount, and the business use percentage. Each element of the
depreciable basis is discussed in this section.
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In summary, the asset’s depreciable basis equals the following:
the asset’s acquisition value
times
the business-use percentage
minus
the salvage value (if the asset uses a straight-line, sum-of-the-years’-digits, or custom
depreciation method)
minus
* any Section 179 expense deduction or first-year bonus depreciation
minus
any ITC reduction amount
minus
* the 168 Allowance
* The application always reduces the acquisition value by the 168 Allowance and Section
179 expense, if applicable to the depreciation method, when calculating the depreciable
basis. The selection in the Include Section 168 Allowance and Section 179 in Expense field
on the Edit Company dialog does not affect the calculation of depreciable basis. Therefore,
if you select Yes in this field (to include the 168 Allowance and Section 179 expense in
depreciation), the depreciable basis will be less than the accumulated depreciation at the
end of the asset’s life.
To see the figures used to calculate a particular asset’s depreciable basis, run an Asset Basis
report for that asset.

Acquisition Value
One measure of an asset’s acquisition value is its purchase price. If something other
than cash is used to pay for the asset, then the fair market value of the non-cash
payment or consideration determines the acquisition value. A non-cash consideration
often takes the form of an account payable or another obligation to pay. When the value
of the consideration paid can’t be determined, the fair market value of the asset
determines its acquisition value.
With few exceptions, an asset’s acquisition value should also include necessary costs
incurred to place the asset in service. These costs will then be capitalized, not expensed.
Costs that can be capitalized include the invoice price plus incidental costs (insurance
during transit, freight, duties, title search, registration fees, and installation costs).
Exceptions to this rule include interest expenses associated with deferred payments
and real estate taxes paid in the acquisition of property.
The GAAP method used to determine acquisition value may not always apply for tax
purposes. To accommodate different tax and GAAP needs, the application lets you
enter a different acquisition value for each depreciation book maintained.

Business-Use Percentage
Under IRS rules, you can take depreciation only on the portion of an asset that is used
for business. The application multiplies the asset’s basis by the business-use
percentage, and then it subtracts any adjustment for salvage value, Section 179 or
bonus depreciation, ITC, and 168 Allowance to determine the asset’s depreciable basis.

A-14
Business-Use Percentage Example
A company purchases an automobile for $32,000 in December 2005, which is
subject to luxury automobile limits on recovery allowances. The employee who
uses the car is allowed to drive it for personal use as well as for business. The
business-use percentages are 90%, 80%, and 70% for 2005, 2006, and 2007,
respectively, and 60% for the remaining life of the car. The calculation of the
depreciation allowances, using a MACRS table calculation (method MT) over the
life of the car, is as follows:
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation
Business
Use
Year
Gross Allowance
2005
Lesser of:
Equals:
20% x $32,000 ( = $6,400) or $2,960
$2,960
Lesser of:
Equals:
32% x $32,000 ( = $10,240) or $4,700
$4,700
Lesser of:
Equals:
19.2% x $32,000 ( = $6,144) or $2,850
$2,850
Lesser of:
Equals:
11.52% x $32,000 ( = $3,686.40) or $1,675
$1,675
Lesser of:
Equals:
11.52% x $32,000 ( = $3,686.40) or $1,675
$1,675
Lesser of:
Equals:
5.76% x $32,000 ( = $1,843.20) or $1,675
$1,675
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
A
Allowed
Depreciation
x
90%
=
$2,664.00
x
80%
=
3,760.00
x
70%
=
1,995.00
x
60%
=
1,005.00
x
60%
=
1,005.00
x
60%
=
1,005.00
In each of the following years 2011 through 2019, the company claims $1,005 of
depreciation. Finally, in year 2020, the remaining allowable basis of $834 is claimed. Total
depreciation claimed is $21,313.
Unadjusted basis
$ 32,000.00
Depreciation taken
(21,313.00)
Adjusted basis
10,687.00

Deductions lost due to personal use
Salvage Value
The salvage value of an asset is the value it’s expected to have when it’s no longer
useful. In other words, the salvage value is the amount for which the asset could be
sold at the end of its useful life.
Straight-line, sum-of-the-years’-digits, and custom depreciation methods require that
the salvage value be subtracted from an asset’s acquisition value to determine its
depreciable basis. Other methods (such as declining-balance) and vintage account
property do not subtract the salvage value to determine the basis but will not
depreciate an asset below its salvage value. ACRS and MACRS depreciation methods
ignore salvage value in determining the depreciable basis and will depreciate an asset
below its salvage value.

Section 179 Expense Deduction
The Section 179 election lets you treat the cost of certain new assets as an expense rather
than as a capital expenditure to be depreciated. This allows an expense deduction for
part of the cost instead of a depreciation deduction. You cannot depreciate the amount
expensed under Section 179 and you must deduct it from an asset’s acquisition value
when determining its depreciable basis. To qualify for the Section 179 election, an asset
must be recovery property that is purchased and used by an active trade or business.
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A-15
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation

Section 179 Expense Deduction for Real Property
For any tax year beginning in 2010 or 2011, you can elect to expense under Section
179 up to $250,000 of qualified real property purchases. Qualified real property
includes:
• Qualified leasehold improvement property
• Qualified restaurant property, and
• Qualified retail improvement property
Note: Off-the-shelf computer software qualifies for the Section 179 expense deduction
if it is placed in service before 01/01/2013. To enter off-the-shelf computer software,
select property type P, a depreciation method of SF or SB, and an estimated life of 3
years.
For information on entering the Section 179 Expense Deduction, see “179 Deduction,”
page 6-9.

First-Year Bonus Depreciation
An additional first-year depreciation bonus of 20% may be taken for personal property
that was acquired before 1981 and that has an estimated useful life of at least 6 years.
This bonus is in addition to the depreciation that would normally be taken in the first
year. If the bonus is taken, the amount of the bonus is subtracted from the depreciable
basis before any further calculations are made. The 20% first-year bonus depreciation
can be taken on certain assets qualifying for straight-line, declining-balance, or
sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation methods.
The 20% bonus is calculated on the acquisition value of the asset without subtracting
the salvage value. However, the amount that can be taken is limited to $2,000 a year. A
business, therefore, may take the 20% first-year depreciation bonus on no more than
$10,000 of eligible property purchased during the taxable year.
Here’s an example of a straight-line depreciation calculation where a corporation has
taken the 20% first-year bonus:
Acquisition value
$16,000
minus
20% 1st year ($2,000 maximum)
– 2,000
minus
Salvage value
– 2,000
Depreciable basis
$12,000
Depreciable
basis-----------------------------------------=
Estimated life
$12,000
------------------- = $2,000 = Annual depreciation
6
Assuming the asset was placed in service on the first of April, a company with a
calendar year-end would have a first-year deduction of $3,500 (the $2,000 bonus plus
9/12ths of $2,000) instead of a yearly depreciation deduction of $2,333.33 (calculated
from the depreciable basis without the bonus—$14,000—divided by 6 years). This
represents a substantial increase over the first year’s deduction without the bonus. For
years 2 through 5, the depreciation would be $2,000 per year. In year 6, the depreciation
would be $500 (3/12 x $2,000).
The 20% bonus was repealed by the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 effective
December 31, 1980. Its basic intent was continued as Section 179 expense.
A-16
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation

A
Investment Tax Credit (ITC) Reduction Amount
The Investment Tax Credit (ITC) was created to stimulate the purchase of machinery
and equipment. The Energy Tax Incentive Act of 2005 created additional credits. Some
of the credits are ongoing, some take effect for assets placed in service after August 28,
2005, and some take effect for assets placed in service beginning on January 1, 2006.
As a reminder, a tax credit reduces the amount of tax to be paid, whereas a tax
deduction reduces the amount of net income subject to tax.
An ITC was previously allowed for the taxable year in which a qualified asset was
placed in service. The amount of allowable credit depended on the date placed in
service, the type of property, and the estimated life of the asset.
For assets placed in service between 1975 and 1980, the ITC was 10% for those with
estimated lives of 7 years or more, 6.67% for lives of 5 or 6 years, and 3.33% for lives of
3 or 4 years. No credit was allowed for assets with estimated lives of less than 3 years.
For assets placed in service after 1980, the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 and the
Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 set the allowable ITC amounts at 10%
for estimated lives of more than 3 years and 6% for estimated lives of 3 years.
For assets placed in service after 1982 but before 1986, a company has two choices:
• Take the full ITC but reduce the depreciable basis of the asset.
• Take a reduced ITC without adjusting the basis.
Deciding which option is better depends on other tax and depreciation considerations.
You choose the ITC option when you add or change the asset in Asset Detail by
specifying whether to take a full credit (thus reducing the basis) or a reduced credit, or
that the asset meets special ITC option rules for certain property types, such as certified
and noncertified historic structures and energy properties.
Under the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the regular 10% ITC was repealed for property
placed in service after December 31, 1985. Certain assets may still qualify for the ITC
(if, for example, the company was subject to a binding contract to buy the qualifying
property as of December 31, 1985). Certain limitations exist for the ITC on acquisitions
of used property, and the ITC carryover rules continue to apply for property placed in
service before 1986.
When you take the ITC, by default the application automatically reduces the basis
based on the date a property was placed in service and the ITC option (according to
Code Sections 38, 46, and 48). See the following table for details. Any adjustments
because of binding contracts may be entered by overriding the amount of ITC
calculated by the application. You can override the ITC basis reduction through the
Book Overrides Tab in the Edit Company dialog. For more details, see “The Book
Overrides Tab,” page 4-20.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation
ITC Basis Reduction
Placed in Service
No Reduction
50% Reduction
100% Reduction
On or before 12/31/82
All but E and F
None
E, F
On or between 1/1/83
and 12/31/85
B, D
A, C, G, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P, Q, R
E, F, H
On or after 1/1/86
None
G, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P,
R
A, C, E, F, H, Q
ITC option codes:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
New property, full credit
New property, reduced credit
Used property, full credit
Used property, reduced credit
30-year rehabilitation property
40-year rehabilitation property
Certified historical structure rehabilitation
Noncertified historical structure rehabilitation
Biomass property
Intercity buses
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
X
Hydroelectric generating property
Ocean thermal property
Solar energy property
Wind property
Geothermal property
Certified historical transition property
Qualified progress expenditures
Reforestation property
No investment tax credit
Here’s an example of ACRS personal property placed in service in April 1983 with an
unadjusted basis of $50,000 and an estimated life of 5 years:
Reducing the basis:
5-year property unadjusted basis
$50,000
Full ITC rate
x
.10
$ 5,000
Beginning basis
$50,000
Less: one-half of $5,000 ITC
– 2,500
Depreciable basis
$47,500
Depreciation for 1983
15% of $47,500
=
$ 7,125
=
$10,450
=
$ 9,975
=
$ 9,975
=
$ 9,975
Depreciation for 1984
22% of $47,500
Depreciation for 1985
21% of $47,500
Depreciation for 1986
21% of $47,500
Depreciation for 1987
21% of $47,500
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation
A
Note that the basis used for the calculation is adjusted when the full ITC is taken. The
application automatically calculates the adjusted depreciable basis before calculating
depreciation when you choose to take the full credit.
Reducing the credit:
5-year property adjusted basis
$50,000
ITC = 8% of $50,000
4,000
Depreciable basis (unadjusted)
$50,000
Depreciation for 1983
15% of $50,000
=
$ 7,500
=
$11,000
=
$10,500
=
$10,500
=
$10,500
Depreciation for 1984
22% of $50,000
Depreciation for 1985
21% of $50,000
Depreciation for 1986
21% of $50,000
Depreciation for 1987
21% of $50,000

ITC At-Risk Rules
Before the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the tax law provided an at-risk limitation on
losses from business and income-producing activities other than real estate and
certain corporate business activities.
The amount at risk is generally the sum of:
• The taxpayer’s cash contributions to the activity.
• The adjusted basis of other property contributed to the activity.
• Amounts borrowed for use in the activity for which the taxpayer has personal
liability or has pledged property not used in the activity.
The ITC at-risk rules limit the credit base of property used in an activity that is
subject to the loss limitation at-risk rules. They generally provide that nonrecourse
debt on real property be treated as an amount at risk for investment credit
purposes.
The at-risk limitation amounts must be less than or equal to the acquisition value.
The at-risk limitation will be used to calculate tax credits. The tax credit should
equal the at-risk amount multiplied by the credit percentage.
The application assumes the acquisition value of an asset in the Tax book to be the
amount at risk. If it is not, you may need to override the ITC amount calculated by
the application in Asset Detail.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation

168 Allowance
The Job Creation and Workers Assistance Act of 2002 allows you to take an additional
30% depreciation allowance in the year you place an asset in service. In 2003, the
allowance was increased to 50% for assets placed in service after May 5, 2003.
The 2010 Tax Relief Act allows for a 168 Allowance of 100% for assets placed in service
after September 8, 2010 and through December 31, 2011 (or December 31, 2012 for
assets with longer production lives).
The 168 Allowance will still be available for qualified property placed in service in a
special disaster zone through 2012 for personal property and through 2013 for real
property, and for cellulosic biofuel plant property through 2012. Beginning in 2006, the
168 Allowance can also be taken for reuse and recycling property. Currently, there is no
expiration of the 168 Allowance for reuse and recycling property.
Generally, qualifying property includes:
• MACRS property with a recovery period of 20 years or less
• Section 167(f)(1)(B) computer software
• Qualified leasehold improvements
• Water utility property, which has a 25-year recovery period.
• Other property that is also qualified New York Liberty Zone property

Calculating the 168 Allowance
The application first calculates the 168 Allowance by multiplying the asset’s
depreciable basis by .30, .50, or 1.0 and then reducing the depreciable basis by that
amount. The amount appears in the 168 Allowance Amount field in Asset Detail.
Then the application calculates the remaining depreciation for the asset’s life,
using the new depreciable basis.

168 Allowance Example
A company purchases office equipment for $10,000 on October 1, 2001 and places
it in service on that date. The equipment has a recovery period of 7 years.
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
$10,000  .30 = $3,000
Then, the application subtracts the 168 Allowance from the $10,000 to calculate the
new depreciable basis:
$10,000 – $3,000 = $7,000
The application uses the new depreciable basis to calculate the “regular”
depreciation for 2001:
$7,000
----------------  2  1--- = $1,000
7
2
When you calculate depreciation for December 2001, the application enters $1,000
in the Current Year-to-Date and Current Accumulated Depreciation fields. The
application does not add the additional allowance of $3,000 to these fields. The
application treats the additional allowance as a reduction in the asset’s depreciable
basis, not as an increase in the accumulated depreciation. The Net Value of the
A-20
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation
A
asset is $6,000: $10,000 acquisition value, less $3,000 additional allowance, less
$1,000 regular depreciation.
The application displays the 168 Allowance in the 168 Allowance Amount field in
Asset Detail. The application also displays the additional allowance by asset on the
Asset Basis report and in total for the tax year on the Form 4562 - Depreciation and
Amortization report.
Estimated Life and ADS Life
The estimated life of an asset is the period over which an asset is to be depreciated or its
cost is to be recovered. The estimated life often has nothing to do with the physical life span
of an individual asset. Physical life is the normal period of use in the particular business or
trade, during which the asset remains physically productive as a capital asset. Physical life
is usually based on experience in replacing that type of property. Often an asset’s physical
life is far longer than its estimated life. The shorter the estimated life, the more rapidly the
cost of an asset can be recovered through depreciation.
ADS life is similar to estimated life in that it also is a period over which an asset is to be
depreciated, not a period of physical usefulness. ADS life is the life assigned to the asset
type under the MACRS Alternative Depreciation System. For most assets, the ADS life is
the midpoint of the Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) in which the asset belongs. ADS lives
tend to be longer than estimated lives and so are often used in internal books, where they
reduce profits more slowly than estimated lives.
Note: For information on how the application uses entries in the Estimated Life and ADS
Life fields, see “Completing the Book Information Fields,” page 6-5.
To control the tax advantages that result from estimated life, Congress has prescribed
estimated lives for various classes of assets. Estimated lives created under the IRS rules for
ACRS and MACRS assets are called recovery periods. Recovery periods are set by statute
for different kinds of property. These IRS recovery periods are generally shorter than
estimated lives in other depreciation methods and shorter than physical lives. A
combination of shorter recovery lives and higher recovery rates in the early years of an
asset’s life accelerate cost recovery.
Note: To help you determine the correct estimated life and/or ADS life for an asset for the
Tax book, you can use the IRS Table link located in Asset Detail. Here you will find an
easy-to-use version of the IRS ADS Class Life Table.

Recovery Periods
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 and subsequent tax acts set MACRS recovery periods for
the different kinds of property. ACRS recovery periods were also defined by statute.
The statutory ACRS and MACRS lives are shown in the following text. To view a table
that shows the application’s conversion values for estimated life to ADS life when you
do not enter an ADS life, see “The Tax Book Defaults,” page A-23.
Note: In addition to the recovery periods shown below, qualifying Indian Reservation
property must be depreciated over shorter recovery periods than otherwise allowed.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Elements of Depreciation

3-Year Property
Three-year property is tangible ACRS or MACRS personal property having a class
life of more than 1 year and no more than 4 years. It includes automobiles for which
ACRS recovery is elected.

5-Year Property
Five-year property is tangible ACRS or MACRS personal property having a class
life of more than 4 years and less than 10 years. The Tax Reform Act of 1986
specifically added the following assets to the list of 5-year properties (some were
previously 3-year properties):
• Automobiles
• Light-duty trucks (less than 13,000 pounds)
• Qualified technological equipment
• Computer-based telephone central office switching equipment
• Biomass properties that are small power production facilities within the
meaning of Section (3)(17)(c) of the Federal Power Act (16 USC Section
796 (17)(c)), as in effect on September 1, 1986
• Property used for research and experimentation
• Semiconductor manufacturing equipment
• Geothermal, ocean thermal, solar, and wind energy properties

7-Year Property
Seven-year property is tangible ACRS or MACRS property (personal or real) with
a class life of 10 to 15 years, inclusive.

10-Year Property
Ten-year property is tangible ACRS or MACRS property (personal or real) with a
class life of 16 to 19 years, inclusive. Single-purpose agricultural structures are
included if placed in service after 1988.

15-Year Property
Fifteen-year property includes both personal and real property.
MACRS fifteen-year property is tangible property with a class life of 20 to 24 years,
inclusive. It includes roads, municipal waste water treatment plants, and
depreciable landscaping. Leasehold improvements placed in service after
October 22, 2004 and before January 1, 2010 are also considered 15-year property.
ACRS fifteen-year property is real property placed in service after 1980 and before
March 16, 1984, and low-income housing.
A-22

18-Year Property
Eighteen-year property is qualifying ACRS depreciable real property placed in
service after March 15, 1984, but before May 9, 1985.

19-Year Property
Nineteen-year property is qualifying ACRS depreciable real property acquired
after May 8, 1985, but before 1987.

20-Year Property
Twenty-year property is tangible MACRS property, personal or real, with a class
life of more than 24 years (excluding 25-year property and real property with a
class life of 27.5 years and more). It includes farm buildings and various railroad
structures.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation Defaults
A

25-Year Property
Twenty-five-year property is tangible MACRS property set by the Small Business
Job Protection Act of 1996. It is water utility property and municipal sewers that
are placed in service after June 12, 1996.

27.5-Year Residential Rental Property
Residential rental property is MACRS depreciable real property for which 80% or
more of the gross rental income comes from dwelling units. A dwelling unit is a
house (including a manufactured house) or apartment used to provide living
accommodations. A unit in a hotel, motel, inn, or other establishment in which
more than 50% of the units are used on a transient basis does not qualify as a
dwelling unit. If any portion of the building or structure is occupied by the
taxpayer, the gross rental income from the property includes the rental value of the
unit occupied by the taxpayer.

31.5-Year Nonresidential Real Property
Nonresidential real property is MACRS depreciable real property that is neither
residential rental property nor property with an ADS life of less than 27.5 years.
This includes MACRS property with no defined ADS life or with an ADS life of
27.5 years or more. It also includes elevators and escalators that are not part of
residential rental property. Nonresidential real property placed in service before
May 13, 1993, has a recovery period of 31.5 years.

39-Year Nonresidential Real Property
Nonresidential real property placed in service after May 12, 1993, has a recovery
period of 39 years.
Depreciation Defaults
As stated earlier, the application sets defaults for the book information fields in all open
depreciation books based on the entries in the Tax book. This section specifies which
defaults the application sets for each book. After you finish entering information for the Tax
book, press Tab to move to the next open book and the defaults will be set. If you want to
change the defaults, you can override them for any asset by entering other data.
The application copies the ITC option from the Tax book to all other books; you cannot
change it in the other books. The application also copies the date placed in service and the
acquisition value from the Tax book to all other books, where you can override them.
If the tax book is closed when you add an asset, the application cannot set defaults in the
other books. The only exception is the user books, for which you can specify a default
depreciation method using the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company dialog.
The Tax Book Defaults
As soon as you enter the property type and the service date, the application provides a
default depreciation method, estimated life, and ADS life. These can be changed. The
following table summarizes the defaults.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation Defaults
Method
Est.
Life
ADS Life
Before 1981
SL
7
0
1/1/81 - 12/31/86
AT
5
11
1/1/87 - 9/10/01
MF200
7
10
9/11/01 - 12/31/04
MA200
7
10
1/1/05 - present
MF200
7
10
Before 1981
SL
5
5
1/1/81 - 12/31/86
AT
3
5
1/1/87 - 9/10/01
MF200
5
5
9/11/01 - 12/31/04
MA200
5
5
1/1/05 - present
MF200
5
5
1/1/03 - 12/31/04
MA200
5
5
1/1/05 - present
Property Type & Service Date Entered
P - Personal property general
A - Automobile
T - Light Trucks and Vans
Q - Personal property, listed
R - Real property, general
S - Real property, listed
C - Real property, conservation
E - Real property, energy
A-24
MF200
5
5
6/19/84 - 12/31/86
AT
5
11
1/1/87 - 12/31/89
MF200
7
10
1/1/90 - 9/10/01
MF200
7
10
9/11/01 - 12/31/04
MA200
7
10
1/1/05 - present
MF200
7
10
Before 1981
SL
40
40
1/1/81 - 3/15/84
AT
15
40
3/16/84 - 5/8/85
AT
18
40
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
AT
19
40
1/1/87 - 5/12/93
MF100
31.5
40
5/13/93 - present
MF100
39
40
6/19/84 - 5/8/85
AT
18
40
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
AT
19
40
1/1/87 - 5/12/93
MF100
31.5
40
5/13/93 - present
MF100
39
40
Before 1981
SL
40
40
1/1/81 - 3/15/84
AT
15
40
3/16/84 - 5/8/85
AT
18
40
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
AT
19
40
1/1/87 - 5/12/93
MF100
31.5
40
5/13/93 - present
MF100
39
40
Before 1981
SL
40
40
1/1/81 - 3/15/84
AT
15
40
3/16/84 - 5/8/85
AT
18
40
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
AT
19
40
1/1/87 - 5/12/93
MF100
31.5
40
5/13/93 - present
MF100
39
40
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation Defaults
A
Method
Est.
Life
ADS Life
Before 1981
SL
40
40
1/1/81 - 3/15/84
AT
15
40
3/16/84 - 5/8/85
AT
18
40
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
AT
19
40
1/1/87 - 5/12/93
MF100
31.5
40
5/13/93 - present
MF100
39
40
H - Real property, low-income housing
1/1/81 - 12/31/86
AT
15
40
Z - Amortizable property
N/A
SL
5
0
V - Vintage account property
N/A
SD
7
0
Property Type & Service Date Entered
F - Real property, farms
The User Book Defaults
Entries on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company dialog affect the defaults in the user
books (Internal, Custom 1, and Custom 2). See Chapter 4, “Setting Up the Product.” There
you can specify the book that the user book should emulate or which depreciation method
should be the default. If you do not specify these settings, the application does not emulate
any book and defaults to the straight-line (SL) depreciation method.
The application determines the default settings for the book information fields as follows.

Business-Use Percentages and Their Effective Dates
If you chose a book to emulate on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company dialog,
the application copies the default information from that book. If no book is to be
emulated and if the user book’s fiscal year-end date and short-year dates are the same
as in the Tax book, the application copies the information from the Tax book.
Otherwise, the application leaves the default of 100% business use.

Depreciation Method
By default, the application determines the depreciation method as follows:

1.
If you chose a book to emulate on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company
dialog, the application copies the default depreciation method from that book.
2.
If you did not choose a book to emulate, the application uses the default
depreciation method specified on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company
dialog if it is valid for the asset’s property type.
3.
If the default depreciation method is not valid for the property type, the
application chooses the straight-line (SL) method if valid or the straight-line
method with the same averaging convention as the method in the Tax book.
Estimated Life
By default, the application determines the estimated life as follows:
1.
If you chose a book to emulate on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company
dialog, the application copies the default estimated life from that book.
2.
If you did not choose a book to emulate but did enter an ADS life for the asset, the
application uses the ADS life from the Tax book as the default estimated life.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation Defaults

Section 179 or Bonus, Salvage Value, and Beginning Year-to-Date Depreciation
If you chose a book to emulate on the Book Defaults tab on the Edit Company dialog,
the application copies the default information from that book. Otherwise, the
application sets the value to zero.
The State Book Defaults
The application copies the book information field entries from the Tax book directly to the
State book.
The AMT Book Defaults
The defaults for the AMT book are automatically displayed based on the Tax book entries
according to Alternative Minimum Tax rules.

Business-Use Percentages and Their Effective Dates
For these fields, if the Tax book and the AMT book have the same fiscal year end and
short years, the application copies the entries in the Tax book to the AMT book as the
defaults. If not, the business-use percentage defaults to 100%.

Section 179 or Bonus
The application copies the Section 179 or bonus field entries from the Tax book.

Depreciation Method, Rate, and Estimated Life
The application sets the defaults for these fields as shown in the following table. This
table is for assets placed in service before 1999.
The table below displays the AMT defaults that are appropriate for assets placed in service
before 1999. The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 made changes to the AMT Depreciation
Adjustment for assets placed in service after December 31, 1998. For more information, see
“AMT Depreciation Adjustment: Assets Placed in Service After 1998,” page A-27.
AMT Book Defaults
for assets placed in service before 1999
Tax Book
Asset Property Type
Personal (P, Q), luxury auto (A), and
amortizable assets (Z) placed in service
after 1986
Personal (P, Q), luxury auto (A), and
amortizable assets (Z) placed in service
before 1987
A-26
AMT Book
Depreciation
Method (Rate)
Depreciation
Method (Rate)
Estimated Life
AT
AT
Tax book
ST
ST
Tax book
SA
SA
Tax book
MF (200%)
MF (150%)
ADS life (if any)
MT (200%)
MF (150%)
ADS life (if any)
MF (150%)
MF (150%)
Tax book
MT (150%)
MF (150%)
Tax book
AD
AD
Tax book
Any method
other than NO
Tax book
Tax book
NO
NO
Tax book
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Depreciation Defaults
A
AMT Book Defaults
for assets placed in service before 1999
Tax Book
AMT Book
Asset Property Type
Depreciation
Method (Rate)
Depreciation
Method (Rate)
Estimated Life
Real property (R, S, C, E, F)
AT, ST
ST
Tax book
DB, DC, YS
SL
Tax book
Vintage accounts (V)
DH, DI, YH
SH
Tax book
DD, DE, YD
SD
Tax book
MF, MT, AD
AD
40 years
All other
methods
Tax book
Tax book
All methods
Tax book
Tax book
AMT Depreciation Adjustment: Assets Placed in Service After 1998
Besides exempting qualifying small corporations from the Alternative Minimum Tax, the
Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 made two significant changes to the AMT depreciation
Adjustment, effective for property placed in service after December 31, 1998:
• The AMT depreciation Adjustment is eliminated for property that is depreciated for
regular tax purposes under the straight-line method.
• The recovery periods for calculating AMT depreciation on all other property will be
the same as for regular tax purposes, which will decrease the amount of the AMT
depreciation Adjustment.
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 provides a 168 Allowance deduction
of 30%, 50%, or 100% for qualifying MACRS property in the first year you place an asset in
service. There is no AMT adjustment for property using the 168 Allowance deduction.
The ACE Book Defaults
The defaults for the ACE book are automatically displayed based on the Tax book entries,
ADS life field, and the AMT book, if applicable, as needed to calculate Adjusted Current
Earnings.

Default Depreciation Method
The default depreciation method in the ACE book for property placed in service after
1993 is NO. You can change the ACE book to emulate the AMT book default data for
post-1993 property. On the Book Defaults tab of the New Company dialog or the Edit
Company dialog, select the AMT: Post-1993 option in the Emulate Book field of the
ACE column. Whether you accept the default of NO as the depreciation method in the
ACE book or change the default to emulate the AMT book, the result is the same: a zero
ACE Depreciation Adjustment amount for post-1993 property when you run the Form
4626 Worksheet. These are simply two different approaches with the same end result.
See “Book Emulation for the ACE Book,” page 4-25.

Business-Use Percentages and Their Effective Dates
For these fields, if the Tax book and the ACE book have the same fiscal year end and
short years, the application copies the entries in the Tax book to the ACE book as the
defaults. If not, the business-use percentage defaults to 100%.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Asset Disposals

Section 179 or Bonus
The application copies the Section 179 or bonus field entries from the Tax book.

Depreciation Method and Estimated Life
The application sets the defaults for these fields as shown in the following table.
ACE Book Defaults
Tax Book
Asset Property Type (Code)
Personal (P, Q), luxury auto
(A), vintage accounts (V),
and amortizable assets (Z)
Real property
(R, S, C, E, F, S)
ACE Book
Depreciation Method
(Rate)
Depreciation
Method (Rate)
Estimated Life
MF, MT placed in service
before 1/1/90
MF (150%)/RV *
ADS life **
AD placed in service
before 1/1/90
AD
Tax book **
MF, MT, AD placed in
service after 12/31/89,
before 1/1/94
AD
ADS life
MF, MT, AD, MI placed in
service after 12/31/93
NO
Not applicable
AA, MA, MR placed in
service after 9/10/01
NO
Not applicable
AT, SA, ST (ACRS
property)
Tax book/RV ***
Tax book/ADS
life ***
All other methods
Tax book
Tax book
MF, MT, AD placed in
service after 12/31/89,
before 1/1/94
AD
40 years
MF, MT, AD, MI placed in
service after 12/31/93
NO
Not applicable
AA, MA, MR placed in
service after 9/10/01
NO
Not applicable
AT, SA, ST (ACRS
property)
Tax book/RV ***
Tax book/ADS
life ***
All others
Tax book
Tax book
* Method MF 150 is used through the close of the last tax year beginning before 1990, at which time
depreciation is calculated using method RV.
** The ACE calculation is based on the remaining ADS recovery period as of the close of the last tax
year beginning before 1990.
***Tax book method is used through the close of the last tax year beginning before 1990, at which
time depreciation is calculated using method RV with the asset’s remaining ADS life.
Asset Disposals
A fixed asset may be disposed of voluntarily or involuntarily. The application categorizes
five kinds of voluntary disposition: sale, abandonment, like-kind exchange, taxable
exchange, and bulk disposal. Similarly, you can choose between two kinds of involuntary
disposition: involuntary conversion and casualty. The application also provides a category
for all other kinds of disposals.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Asset Disposals
A
When you dispose of an asset, the application calculates the realized gain or loss as
appropriate for the kind of disposition. The application has defaults for gain or loss
recognition (shown in a later chart), which you can override. You can also override the
calculated gain or loss amount.
The following text explains each of the available disposal methods, how the application
determines an asset’s gain or loss, and the gain or loss recognition defaults.
Disposal Methods

Sale
This is the default method on the Disposal tab. It applies to assets that you sell either
for:
• Cash
• Cash and non-cash items (if not qualifying as an exchange)
By default, when an asset is sold, the application recognizes gains and losses in all
books.

Abandonment
An asset that is voluntarily scrapped because of obsolescence, lack of suitability, or
other reasons is considered an abandonment. If the asset is abandoned before the end
of its useful life, any basis that has not been depreciated becomes a loss that can be
deducted in the current period. Insurance reimbursements or other proceeds reduce
the amount of the loss and can result in a gain. By default, the application recognizes
gains and losses on abandoned assets in all books.

Like-Kind Exchange: Pre-1/3/2000
A like-kind exchange occurs when an asset is exchanged for a similar asset, such as
exchanging an old car for a new one. The exchange may also include the receipt of
money or dissimilar property. Any resulting gain from a like-kind exchange is
recognized only to the extent of cash proceeds (sometimes called “boot”). Any
resulting loss should be recognized for tax purposes.
In 2000, the IRS issued new guidelines concerning property received in a like-kind
exchange. Use this disposal method for a like-kind exchange that occurred before
1/3/2000, and therefore does not require the use of the new guidelines.

Like-Kind Exchange: Post-1/2/2000
In 2000, the IRS issued new guidelines concerning property received in a like-kind
exchange. Use this disposal method for a like-kind exchange that occurred after
1/2/2000, and therefore requires the use of the new guidelines. For more information,
see “Like-Kind Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions After 1/2/2000,” page 7-8.

Taxable Exchange
An exchange of dissimilar property, such as exchanging a car for land, is generally
taxable and recognized in full. The exchange may also include the receipt of money.
The gain or loss is calculated the same as for a sale.

Bulk Disposal
A bulk disposal occurs when you sell more than one asset for one selling price. When
this occurs, the cash proceeds, any non-cash proceeds, and any selling expenses need
to be prorated for the individual assets. This is done based on the percentage of the
acquisition value of each asset selected over the total acquisition value of all the assets
selected.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Asset Disposals

Casualty
When an asset is stolen or damaged by a sudden natural cause or vandalism, the
disposal is a casualty. Casualties are often compensated for by insurance or other
means, which may produce a taxable gain unless a similar asset is acquired for
replacement. Casualty losses are generally tax deductible only in the tax year in which
the casualty occurred or was discovered. For the user books, the gain or loss is
recognized in the current period.

Involuntary Conversion: Pre-1/3/2000
When an asset is involuntarily retired due to breakdown, condemnation, or reasons
other than casualty, classify the disposal as an involuntary conversion. An involuntary
conversion may be compensated for by a condemnation award or other means, which
may produce a taxable gain unless a similar asset is acquired for replacement. By
default, the application does not recognize the gain or loss from an involuntary
conversion except in the user books.
In 2000, the IRS issued new guidelines concerning property received in an involuntary
conversion. Use this disposal method for an involuntary conversion that occurred
before 1/3/2000, and therefore does not require the use of the new guidelines.

Involuntary Conversion: Post-1/2/2000
In 2000, the IRS issued new guidelines concerning property received in an involuntary
conversion. Use this disposal method for an involuntary conversion that occurred after
1/2/2000, and therefore requires the use of the new guidelines. For more information,
see “Like-Kind Exchanges and Involuntary Conversions After 1/2/2000,” page 7-8.

Other
If the asset was disposed of in a way not addressed by any of the other disposal
methods, choose this method. By default, the application recognizes gains and losses
from such assets in all books.
Gains and Losses
The application calculates the realized gain or loss amount for all disposed assets. You can
decide whether to recognize the gain or loss. This section first describes the gain or loss
calculation, then details the application defaults for recognizing gains and losses.

The Gain or Loss Calculation
Calculating the gain or loss on a disposed asset requires determining the net proceeds
from the disposal and the asset’s adjusted basis. The adjusted basis is then subtracted
from the net proceeds to arrive at the net gain or loss.
Net proceeds are calculated as:
cash proceeds
plus
non-cash proceeds
minus
expenses of the sale
Determining the asset’s adjusted basis is more complex. Most of the components of the
adjusted basis are described in “Depreciable Basis,” page A-13. The others are
explained after the gain or loss equation that follows.
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Asset Disposals
A
The adjusted basis for the gain or loss calculation equals:
the asset’s depreciable basis
plus
the ITC basis addback
plus
the Section 179 addback
plus
the salvage value if it was subtracted in determining the depreciable basis
minus
total accumulated depreciation through the disposal date

The ITC Basis Addback
When you dispose of an asset before the end of its estimated life, you must
recapture a prorated amount of the ITC. If you reduced the asset’s basis for the
original ITC, a percentage of that recaptured amount must be added back to the
asset’s basis.
The following table shows the percentages the application applies to the full ITC
amount to determine the ITC recapture amount. The application uses the
depreciation method and estimated life entered in the Tax book.
ITC Recapture Percentages
Depreciation Methods
MF, MA, MT, MI, MR, AD, AA, AT,
SA, ST, OC
All Other Methods
Holding Period
 3 Year
Est. Life (%)
> 3 Year
Est. Life (%)
3 to < 5 Year
Est. Life (%)
5 to < 7 Year
Est. Life (%)
 7 Year
Est. Life (%)
0
100
100
100
100
100.0
1
66
80
100
100
100.0
2
33
60
100
100
100.0
3
0
40
0
50
66.6
4
0
20
0
50
66.6
5
0
0
0
0
33.3
6
0
0
0
0
33.3
After determining the ITC recapture amount, the application multiplies the
recapture amount by the rate used for computing the ITC. The result is the ITC
basis addback amount.
ITC recapture amt.  ITC basis reduct. factor = ITC basis addback

The Section 179 Addback
When a pre-1987 asset on which the Section 179 expense deduction has been taken
is disposed of during either of the two taxable years following the acquisition year,
all or part of the Section 179 expense must be added back to the asset’s basis (that
is, recaptured).
The calculation for the amount added back to the basis is:
Section 179 taken
–
Depreciation
on 179 amount-------------------------------------------------------------------------Section 179 addback
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Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts
Asset Disposals
where the depreciation on the Section 179 is the amount of depreciation that would
have been taken on the Section 179 amount had there been no Section 179
deduction.

Gain or Loss Recognition Defaults
The application determines the gain or loss recognition defaults according to the
disposal method selected and the depreciation book. You can override the default
when you dispose of the asset.
Gain or Loss Recognition Defaults
Disposal Method (Code)
Tax, State, AMT, and ACE Books
User Books
No cash
Do not recognize
Do not recognize
Cash included
Recognize to the extent of cash
proceeds
Recognize to the extent of cash
proceeds
Involuntary conversion (I)
Do not recognize
Recognize
All others
Recognize
Recognize
Like-kind exchange (L)
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Appendix B
Depreciation Methods
In this appendix:
MACRS Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
ACRS Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15
Straight-Line Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-20
Declining-Balance Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-25
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-29
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life (Method RV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-34
Own Calculation (Method OC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
No Depreciation (Method NO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
Custom Depreciation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-36
There are many different methods used to calculate depreciation. Some methods allow
more depreciation in early years than in later years. Some apply the same percentage each
year while the basis declines. Others apply different percentages each year while the basis
remains the same.
For tax purposes, the depreciation method used for a particular asset depends on the IRS
depreciation rules at the time the asset was placed in service. There is some flexibility in the
choices that you can make. To make sure you select depreciation methods that best suit
your needs, talk to a professional tax advisor.
You do not need to use the same depreciation method for every fixed asset. Once you
choose a method for a particular asset, however, you generally must stick with it. A change
of method requires approval from the IRS except when the change is from
declining-balance to straight-line or remaining life.
The same asset may be subject to various methods of depreciation, depending on the book
for which depreciation is being calculated. Federal tax books may require MACRS
depreciation, for example, while internal books may use straight-line. Other books may use
150% declining-balance depreciation. You may use up to seven depreciation books.
This appendix describes each of the standard depreciation methods available in the
application. They are grouped by general method type:
• MACRS, page B-2
• ACRS, page B-15
• Straight-line, page B-20
• Declining-balance, page B-25
• Sum-of-the-years’-digits, page B-29
• Remaining value, page B-34
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B-1
B
Depreciation Methods
MACRS Methods
Following the standard methods are descriptions of two special depreciation codes for use
within the application:
• Own calculation (OC), page B-36
• No depreciation (NO), page B-36
Finally, this appendix discusses possible uses for custom depreciation methods you can
create and how the application applies depreciation to custom methods. See page B-36.
MACRS Methods
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 created a number of changes in the way depreciation is
calculated for all assets acquired after December 31, 1986. This tax act made significant
changes to the earlier Accelerated Cost Recovery System (ACRS), and created the modified
ACRS (MACRS).
Recovery periods were generally extended. The typical recovery period for most personal
property increased from 5 to 7 years, using 27.5 years for residential real property and 31.5
years for nonresidential real property. (The Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 extended
the life of nonresidential real property placed in service after May 12, 1993, to 39 years.) A
200% declining-balance MACRS formula replaced the 150% declining-balance ACRS
tables. However, the recovery rate for real property fell from 175% declining-balance to a
straight-line computation in MACRS.
The MACRS methods created by the Tax Reform Act of 1986 are mandatory for most
tangible property placed in service after December 31, 1986. Taxpayers could also choose
to use MACRS for certain transitional property placed in service after July 31, 1986, and
before January 1, 1987. Post-1986 depreciation on property placed in service before 1987
will continue to be computed under the method used when the property was placed in
service.
There are three standard MACRS depreciation methods: MACRS formula, MACRS table,
and Alternative Depreciation System (ADS) straight-line MACRS. A fourth depreciation
method, MACRS method MI, permits entry of the shorter recovery periods allowed for
qualifying Indian Reservation property. Method MI is available for qualified assets placed
in service after 12/31/93 and before 2012. This section discusses each method separately.
MACRS Formula (Method MF)
You may apply the MACRS formula method to any assets acquired after July 31, 1986,
except those that must use ADS (straight-line MACRS).

MACRS Formula Conventions
Under MACRS, the half-year convention is used for 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 15-, 20-, and 25-year
property, with assets earning a half year’s depreciation in the year they were acquired.
Unlike ACRS, MACRS also allows a half year’s depreciation in the year of disposition.
(There is an exception, however, for tax years ending after 1/30/91. If an asset is
acquired and disposed of in the same tax year, no depreciation is allowed.) Residential
rental and nonresidential real property (that is, 27.5-, 31.5-, and 39-year MACRS
property) use a special midmonth convention giving a half month of depreciation both
in the month of acquisition and in the month of disposal.
Under MACRS, a midquarter convention was added. This convention is required for
all qualifying MACRS property (generally, personal property) placed in service in a
taxable year, if more than 40 percent of the depreciable value of such property is placed
B-2
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Depreciation Methods
MACRS Methods
B
in service during the last 3 months of the taxable year. Under this convention, the
annual allowable depreciation is multiplied by:

10.5
---------12
for qualifying property placed in service during the first quarter,
7.5
------12
for qualifying property placed in service during the second quarter,
4.5
------12
for qualifying property placed in service during the third quarter, and
1.5
------12
for qualifying property placed in service during the fourth quarter.
MACRS Formula Calculation
Personal property with recovery periods of 3, 5, 7, or 10 years is generally depreciated
using the 200% declining-balance method, 15- or 20-year property uses the 150%
declining-balance method, and 25-year property uses the straight-line method (i.e., MF
100%).
Instead of using the 200% declining-balance method for personal property, you can
elect to use a slower 150% rate. You can elect to use the 150% rate either over the GDS
life, for property placed in service after 12/31/98, or over the longer ADS life, for
property placed in service before 1/1/99. (The change in the recovery period used for
this election was due to the IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998.) The election to
use the 150% rate can be helpful in eliminating the degree of exposure to the
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). The declining-balance method switches to
straight-line at the point in time that maximizes the deduction (the application does
this automatically). A half-year convention is used to calculate allowed depreciation
both in the year of acquisition and in the year of disposal.
MACRS real property has a recovery period of 27.5 years for residential real property
and a recovery period of either 31.5 years or 39 years for nonresidential real property.
The midquarter convention required for personal property by the Tax Reform Act of
1986 does not apply to real property.
To compute the depreciation deduction for real property acquired after 1986, the
application uses the straight-line method over a 27.5-year period for residential real
property and a 31.5-year period for nonresidential real property (if acquired before
May 13, 1993). For nonresidential property placed in service after May 12, 1993, the
application uses a 39-year period. The midmonth convention is used both for the year
of acquisition and the year of disposition. One exception to this rule, however, does
exist for leasehold improvements placed in service after October 22, 2004 and before
January 1, 2010. These improvements are to be depreciated over a 15-year recovery
period (9-year recovery period for Indian Reservation property) using the straight-line
method of depreciation, and half-year convention (or midquarter, if applicable).

MACRS Formula Example
In March 2007, a company placed in service a network server for which it paid $5,000.
Under MACRS, the asset has a 5-year estimated life.
For MACRS personal property, the applicable convention (provided that the
midquarter convention does not apply) is a half-year convention allowing a half-year’s
depreciation in the year of acquisition and disposal.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
B-3
B
Depreciation Methods
MACRS Methods
The rate for the declining-balance computation is determined by dividing the MACRS
rate (200%) by the asset’s estimated life (5 years).
200%
-------------- = 40%
5
The application calculates the depreciation allowance for the computer as follows:
Year 1
1
($5,000 x 40%) x --2
= $1,000
This first year depreciation would be spread evenly over the months in the year that
this asset is in service. In this example, 1,000 divided by 10, or $100, would be the
monthly allocation.
The remaining years would have recovery calculations as follows:
Year 2
($5,000 - $1,000) x 40%
= $1,600
Year 3
($5,000 - $2,600) x 40%
= $ 960
Year 4
($5,000 - $3,560) x 40%
= $ 576
Year 5 *
($5,000 - $4,136) / 1.5
= $ 576
Year 6
1
[($5,000 - $4,136) / 1.5] x --2
= $ 288
* In year 5, the application automatically switches to a straight-line calculation, which allows
for a higher recovery rate than the declining-balance calculation.

MACRS Formula Short-Year Calculation
The short-year calculation differs for personal property and real property. In addition,
for personal property, the calculation depends on whether the half-year or midquarter
averaging convention applies.

Personal Property: Half-Year Convention in a Short-Year
MACRS personal property assets use a declining-balance calculation with the
half-year convention. For a MACRS short-year calculation for personal property,
the amount of depreciation computed for a full year is prorated over the number
of months in the short-year period. The application prorates the amount of
depreciation computed for a full year by multiplying the full year amount by the
short-year fraction (the number of months in the short year divided by 12). The
formula is:
Months in short year
Short year depr. = Full year depr.  -------------------------------------------------12
The prorated amount is deducted from the depreciated balance at the beginning of
the short-year period to determine the depreciated balance at the beginning of the
following taxable year. This calculation is the “simplified method” outlined in IRS
Revenue Procedure 89-15.

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Personal Property: Midquarter Convention in a Short-Year
The test for the use of the midquarter convention for MACRS property in a short
year is based upon the ratio of qualifying MACRS property (generally, personal
property) placed in service during the last three months of the short year divided
by the total depreciable basis of qualifying MACRS property placed in service in
the short year. The midquarter convention applies when the ratio is greater than
40%. In the event of a 3-month short year, the use of the midquarter convention
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would be automatic for any MACRS personal property placed in service during
that short year.
The application of the midquarter convention is separate from the test for using the
convention. The application of the midquarter convention in the event of a short
tax year requires the following steps:
1.
First, determine the four quarters of the short year. For a short year that
consists of 4 or 8 full calendar months, the length of each quarter is measured
in whole months. Otherwise, the quarters are measured in days.
2.
Divide the number of days in the short year by 4 to determine the number of
days in each quarter of the short year.
3.
Define the period for each quarter and determine the midpoint of each
quarter (round up partial days to the following day if the fractional date is
greater than or equal to .5).
4.
From the midpoint date for each quarter, move backward to the nearest 1st or
15th of the month. That will be the date the asset is treated as placed in service
(for example, February 16 becomes February 15, and March 14 becomes
March 1).
5.
From the date determined above, count the number of half months that the
asset is in service during the short year. Perform the short-year recovery
calculation* using the midquarter convention (the formula below).
Half months in svc.
Asset's depr. basis  Annual depr. factor  ---------------------------------------------24
* MACRS personal property assets generally use a declining-balance calculation.
MACRS Personal Property Short-Year Calculation Example
A company has a short tax year that begins on April 1, 2007, and ends on December
31, 2007. In May 2007 the company places in service $10,000 of equipment having
a 5-year life. It uses method MF (MACRS formula) to depreciate. The test for the
midquarter convention shows the use of that convention is required. The recovery
for the short tax year 2007 would be calculated as follows:
4/1/07 through 12/31/07
= 274 days
274
--------4
= 68.5 days per quarter
The first quarter of the short year runs from April 1, 2007, through June 8, 2007 (69
days). The midpoint of the first quarter is May 5, 2007.
Move backward to May 1, 2007, and treat this as the in-service date for purposes of
the midquarter convention. From May 1, 2007, to December 31, 2007, there are 16
half months (8 months).
Given that the asset’s depreciable basis equals $10,000, the annual depreciation
factor is calculated:
1
200%  --------------------- = 40%
Asset life
The number of half months in service for 2007 is 16.
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The annual recovery calculation is shown:
$10 000  40%
16
 ------ = $2 666.64
24
For an asset purchased in May, the monthly allocation of this recovery allowance
would be computed using the formula below:
Monthly recovery
Annual recovery = ---------------------------------------------------------Actual months in service
For this example, the asset would be depreciated by $333.33 each month from May
through December.

Real Property
MACRS real property is calculated using the straight-line method with a
midmonth convention. A half month’s depreciation is allowed in the month of
acquisition and in the month of disposition. As in the straight-line method, the
amount of depreciation computed for a full year is prorated over the number of
months in the short-year period. For example, if an asset were purchased in the
second month of a 9-month short year, the annual short-year depreciation would
be 7.5 times the monthly depreciation amount.
MACRS Formula Plus 168 (Method MA)
MACRS Formula Plus 168 (method MA) is the equivalent of MACRS Formula (method
MF), except it allows an additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation allowance in the
placed-in-service year. Method MA uses the same averaging conventions as method MF.

MACRS Formula Plus 168 Calculation
MACRS Formula Plus 168, like MACRS Formula, is similar to declining-balance
depreciation. It uses the half-year averaging convention for personal property (if the
midquarter convention does not apply). It switches to straight-line depreciation when
the result is equal to or greater than the declining-balance calculation.
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
Depreciable Basis  30% = 168 Allowance
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the depreciable basis to calculate the annual
depreciation for the first year:
Depreciable
Basis – 168 Allowance1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2  --- = Annual Depreciation
Estimated Life in Years
2
In the placed-in-service year, MACRS personal property uses the half-year averaging
convention, which allows a half-year’s depreciation in the year of acquisition,
(provided the midquarter convention does not apply.
Year 2 and later (until the switch to straight-line):
Depr. Basis* – Accum. Depr.---------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 = Annual Depr.
Estimated Life
* In the second year, the application begins with the asset’s depreciable basis after it deducts
the 168 Allowance.
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MACRS Formula Plus 168 Example
XYZ Manufacturing enters an asset with the following attributes:
Acquisition Value:
$16,000
Recovery Period:
5 Years
Salvage Value:
$1,000
Placed-in-Service Date:
11/01/2009
Year 1:
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
$16,000  30% = $4,800
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the $16,000 to calculate the depreciable basis:
$16,000 – $4,800 = $11,200
Here is the calculation for the first-year depreciation:
$11,200
-------------------  2  1--- = $2,240
5
2
Year 2:
$11,200
– $2,240---------------------------------------- 2 = $3,584
5
MACRS Table (Method MT)
When the Tax Reform Act passed Congress in 1986, the IRS had not developed tables of
calculations to assist taxpayers in determining their assets’ MACRS depreciation. Such
tables were issued with Revenue Procedure 87-57 in mid-1987.
In general, the MACRS table method may be used to depreciate any recovery property
placed in service on or after January 1, 1987, and may be adopted for any recovery property
placed in service on or after July 31, 1986. However, there is one exception: the MACRS
table method may not be used in the event of a short tax year at any time in the asset’s life.
The MACRS table method will generally result in the same amount of recovery as method
MF, MACRS formula. Differences tend to be immaterial and are due to calculation
rounding in the development of the IRS tables.
Viewing the MACRS Percentage Tables
The MACRS Percentage tables are located in Section VI of Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation
Fundamentals.
You must have the Adobe Reader on your PC to view the MACRS Percentage tables. You
can install Adobe Reader software from the Adobe web site (www.adobe.com). You can
also install it by double-clicking the Adobe Reader setup file located in the ACROBAT
directory on the installation DVD.
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To view the MACRS Percentage tables
1.
Select Help/Depreciation Fundamentals from the menu bar. The application opens
Adobe Reader and displays Sage Fixed Assets - Depreciation Fundamentals.
2.
Using either the bookmarks on the left or the Table of Contents, navigate to Section VI:
Tables.
3.
Select the link to “How to Use the MACRS Percentage Tables.” The application
displays the section of the MACRS Percentage tables.

MACRS Table Conventions
The conventions used for MACRS tables are the same as the conventions used in the
MACRS formula method. The difference is that the table values take into consideration
the acquisition year convention required to be used for a particular asset.
For MACRS personal property using the MACRS table method, the tables used within
the application generally follow the half-year convention. They allow for a half year of
depreciation in the year of acquisition and a half year’s recovery in the last year of the
asset’s estimated life. If the asset is disposed of before the end of its estimated life, then
the application automatically superimposes the half-year convention on the ordinary
full-year recovery amount in the tables.
Where the midquarter convention applies or is chosen by the user for all MACRS
personal property, the appropriate midquarter tables will be used. (See the preceding
MACRS formula method description for a more complete explanation of the effect of
the midquarter convention election on the allowed recovery amounts in the acquisition
and disposal years.)
For MACRS real property, a midmonth convention is built into the real property tables
and allows for a half month’s depreciation in both the acquisition and disposal months.
The midquarter convention does not apply to real property.

MACRS Table Calculation
The MACRS recovery allowance under the table method is substantially equivalent to
the allowance under the formula method. As with the MACRS formula calculation, the
MACRS table calculation allows personal property to be recovered over its estimated
life at a rate of 200% (declining balance) with a switch to straight-line at the optimal
point. Unlike the formula method, with the table method depreciation is computed by
applying different depreciation rates to a constant property basis over the life of the
asset.
You generally use the 200% declining-balance method to depreciate personal property
with recovery periods of 3, 5, 7, or 10 years, while you use the 150% declining-balance
method for 15- or 20-year property. Instead of using the 200% declining-balance
method for personal property, you can elect to use a slower 150% rate. You can elect to
use the 150% rate either over the GDS life, for property placed in service after
12/31/98, or over the longer ADS life, for property placed in service before 1/1/99.
(The change in the recovery period used for this election was due to the IRS
Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998.) The election to use the 150% rate can be helpful
in eliminating the degree of exposure to the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). While
the application does not support every possible ADS life when electing the 150% rate
for pre-1999 property, it does support a number of the most regularly used ones. For
unusual assets with unusual ADS lives, a MACRS formula calculation allows for more
flexibility in meeting the slower rate, longer-life option.
For real property, the MACRS table calculation allows recovery at a straight-line rate
over the recovery period. Generally, either a 31.5-year or a 39-year estimated life is used
for nonresidential real property (depending on when it was placed in service) and 27.5
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years for residential property. Other valid estimated lives include 7, 10, 15, 20, and 25
years. The tables use 200% declining balance for 7- and 10-year lives, 150% declining
balance for 15- and 20-year lives, and 100% (straight-line) for a 25-year life, regardless
of whether the property type is real or personal.
Note: When an asset’s depreciable life includes a short year, the MACRS table method
cannot be used. The application handles this for you. If you have entered a MACRS
table method and there are short years during the asset’s depreciable life, the
application uses the MACRS formula method instead.

MACRS Table Example
A firm places into service an industrial lathe with an estimated life of 7 years and a total
acquisition value of $100,000.00. The property is placed in service in March 2007. The
company operates on a calendar year-end, and the midquarter convention applies.
The application uses the following depreciation rates, taken from the IRS Table 2,
General Depreciation System:
Year
Depreciation
Rate (%)
Basis ($)
Recovery ($)
2007
25.00
100,000
25,000.00
2008
21.43
100,000
21,430.00
2009
15.31
100,000
15,310.00
2010
10.93
100,000
10,930.00
2011
8.75
100,000
8,750.00
2012
8.74
100,000
8,740.00
2013
8.75
100,000
8,750.00
2014
1.09
100,000
1,090.00
100.00
100,000.00
Depreciation is calculated by determining an asset’s basis and multiplying it by that
year’s depreciation rate. Note that the midquarter convention adjustment is already
taken into consideration within the IRS tables.
Consider the calculation that would have been performed under the MACRS formula
method for the year 2008:
 $100 000 – 25 000    1  7  200%  = $21 428.57
Note that there is a slight rounding difference between the two calculations ($21,430.00
vs. $21,428.57). Either calculation is acceptable for tax reporting.

MACRS Table Short-Year Calculation
A problem is created when MACRS tables are used and a short tax year occurs.
Revenue Procedure 87-57 states:
“The MACRS depreciation tables . . . may not be used in the following situations, where:
• property is placed in service in a short tax year,
• a short tax year occurs during the recovery period of property, or
• a disposition of property occurs in a short tax year.”
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Because of these special restrictions, when a user elects the MACRS table method, the
application checks whether a short year occurred during the year that the asset was
placed in service. If the acquisition year was a short tax year, the user will not be
allowed to select the MACRS table method. Rather, the user will be prompted to use
the MACRS formula method.
If a short year is established after an asset that uses the MACRS table method has been
entered in the application, the asset’s depreciation calculation will be changed. All
depreciation calculations beginning from the start of the first short tax year of the
asset’s life will be made using the formula method. The date of the last calculation
before the short year is considered by the application to be the date of conversion to the
MACRS formula method. All depreciation taken to that date will be treated as total
prior depreciation in computing remaining depreciable basis.
Any differences between the table and formula methods (adjustments due to the effects
of rounding in the tables) are taken into consideration automatically in the formula
calculation, which is based on a declining depreciable basis with a fixed depreciation
rate.
When an asset has its depreciation calculated through the conversion from MACRS
table to MACRS formula, affected reports still show the use of the table method but
will also print an f in the Key Code column, indicating the conversion to the formula
calculation.
ADS, Straight-Line MACRS (Method AD)
Under the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the Alternative Depreciation System (ADS) straight-line
MACRS method replaces the straight-line, alternate ACRS formula and table methods
(methods SA and ST) for assets acquired after 1986. ADS is a straight-line method that
combines the features of straight-line and MACRS depreciation. Under this method, costs
are recovered evenly over recovery periods that are as long as or longer than recovery
periods prescribed under MACRS.
ADS straight-line must be used for certain property (property located outside the United
States, property used for tax-exempt purposes, and others). Businesses that do not want to
take advantage of accelerated depreciation in the early years of an asset’s life can use this
method. The ADS election is made year by year, but for personal property it must be made
for all properties of the same class acquired during the year. For real property, ADS can be
elected on a property-by-property basis.

ADS Conventions
This method uses the same half-year (personal property) and midmonth (real
property) conventions as the other MACRS methods. The half-year convention allows
a half year’s depreciation in both the year of acquisition and the year of disposal. The
midquarter convention rules apply to this method as previously explained for the
MACRS formula method.

ADS Calculation
ADS uses a straight-line calculation over an asset’s ADS life. This generally slows the
rate of recovery as compared with other MACRS methods. Even MACRS real property,
which already uses a straight-line calculation, is recovered more slowly using the
asset’s ADS life.
When electing a depreciation method of AD (MACRS straight-line), enter the asset’s
ADS life in both the Estimated Life field and the ADS Life field in the Tax book. The
application uses the entry in the Estimated Life field for calculating depreciation in the
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Tax book, and the entry in the ADS Life field for setting defaults in other books where
appropriate.

ADS Example
In October 2007, a calendar-year corporation purchased a building for $150,000. Thirty
thousand dollars was attributable to the cost of the land. Under the MACRS formula
method, the 2007 depreciation allowance would be computed as follows:
$150 000 – $30 000-------------------------------------------------=
39
$3,077
Annual MACRS recovery
2.5
-------  $3 077
12
$ 641
2007 depreciation allowance
=
If the corporation elected the ADS straight-line MACRS method, the 2007 depreciation
allowance would be computed as follows:

$150 000 – $30 000-------------------------------------------------=
40
$3,000
Annual MACRS recovery
2.5
-------  $3 000
12
$ 625
2007 depreciation allowance
=
ADS Short-Year Calculation
Under the ADS straight-line MACRS method, the amount of depreciation computed
for a full year is prorated over the number of months in the short-year period. The
application prorates the amount of depreciation computed for a full year by
multiplying the amount by the short-year fraction.
For personal property using this method, the half-year convention applies to the
disposition year, which requires that one-half of the depreciation calculated for the full
short-year period be used. For real property, the midmonth convention applies.
If the property is placed in service or disposed of during a short tax year and the
midquarter convention applies, the deduction is computed as if the property had been
placed in service or disposed of in the middle of the quarter. See the MACRS formula
method for details regarding the use of the midquarter convention.
ADS Straight-Line MACRS Plus 168 (Method AA)
ADS straight-line MACRS plus 168 (method AA) is the equivalent of ADS straight-line
MACRS (method AD), except it allows an additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation
deduction in the first year. Method AA uses the same averaging conventions as method
AD.

ADS Straight-Line MACRS Plus 168 Calculation
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
Depreciable Basis  30% = 168 Allowance
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the depreciable basis to calculate the annual
depreciation for the first year:
Depr.
Basis – 168 Allowance- 1---------------------------------------------------------------------- = Annual Depr.
Estimated Life in Years
2
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In the placed-in-service year, MACRS personal property uses the half-year averaging
convention, which allows a half-year’s depreciation in the year of acquisition
(provided that the midquarter convention does not apply).
Year 2 and later:
Depr. Basis * = Annual Depr.
---------------------------------Estimated Life
* In the second year, the application begins with the asset’s depreciable basis after it deducts
the 168 Allowance.

ADS Straight-line MACRS Plus 168 Example
XYZ Manufacturing acquires an asset with the following attributes:
Acquisition Value:
$16,000
Placed-in-Service Date:
11/01/2009
Estimated Life:
10 Years
Salvage Value:
$1,000
Year 1:
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
$16,000  .30 = $4,800
Then, the application subtracts the 168 Allowance from the $16,000 to calculate the
depreciable basis:
$16,000 – $4,800 = $11,200
Here is the calculation for the first-year depreciation:
$11,200
-------------------  1--- = $560
10
2
Years 2 through 10:
$11,200
------------------- = $1,120
10
Year 11:
$11,200
-------------------  1--- = $560
10
2
MACRS Indian Reservation (Method MI)
In 1993, Congress created a system whereby qualifying Indian Reservation property must
be depreciated over shorter recovery periods than otherwise allowed. This accelerates the
allowable depreciation deductions. Property that qualifies for the shorter recovery periods
must be placed in service after 12/31/93 and before 2012. There is no AMT Adjustment for
Indian Reservation property.

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MACRS Indian Reservation Conventions
This method uses the same averaging conventions as the other MACRS methods:
half-year for personal property and midmonth for real property, with the exception of
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leasehold improvements placed in service after October 22, 2004 and before January 1,
2012 in which case the half-year convention is used.
The MACRS recovery allowance under the MI method is substantially equivalent to
the allowance under the formula method. As with the MACRS formula calculation, the
MACRS Indian Reservation method allows either a 200% or 150% rate
(declining-balance) with a switch to straight-line at the optimal point for personal
property, and a 100% rate (straight-line) for real property. Also, real property in the 15or 20-year property class can use the 150% declining-balance rate; however, if the
property is a leasehold improvement placed in service after October 22, 2004 and
before January 1, 2012, you must depreciate it over a 15-year period using the
straight-line method of depreciation. (If you elect alternative MACRS straight-line
depreciation, use method AD with the appropriate Indian Reservation life.)
The only actual difference between method MI and method MF is that method MI
allows the property to be depreciated over shorter recovery periods.
Property Class
Recovery Period
3-year
2 years
5-year
3 years
7-year
4 years
10-year
6 years
15-year
9 years
20-year
12 years
nonresidential real property
(39-year)
22 years
MACRS Indian Reservation Plus 168 (Method MR)
MACRS Indian Reservation Plus 168 (method MR) is the equivalent of MACRS Indian
Reservation (method MI), except it allows an additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation
allowance in the first year. Method MR uses the same averaging conventions as method MI.

MACRS Indian Reservation Plus 168 Calculation
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
Depreciable Basis  30% = 168 Allowance
Then, the application subtracts the 168 Allowance from the depreciable basis to
calculate the annual depreciation for the first year:
Depr.
Basis – 168 Allowance1
-------------------------------------------------------------------- 2  --- = Annual Depr.
Estimated Life in Years
2
In the placed-in-service year, MACRS personal property uses the half-year averaging
convention, which allows a half-year’s depreciation in the year of acquisition
(provided that the midquarter convention does not apply).
Year 2 and later (until the switch to straight-line):
Depr.
Basis – Accum. Depr.----------------------------------------------------------------- 2 = Annual Depr.
Estimated Life
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
MACRS Indian Reservation Plus 168 Example
XYZ Manufacturing acquires an asset with the following attributes:
Acquisition Value:
$16,000
Recovery Period:
4 Years
Salvage Value:
$1,000
Placed-in-Service Date:
11/01/2009
Year 1:
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
$16,000  30% = $4,800
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the $16,000 to calculate the depreciable basis:
$16,000 – 4,800 = $11,200
Here is the calculation for the first-year depreciation:
$11,200
-------------------  2  1--- = $2,800
4
2
Year 2:
$11,200
– $2,800---------------------------------------- 2 = $4,200
4
Year 3:
$11,200
– $7,000---------------------------------------- 2 = $2,100
4
Year 4:
$11,200 – $9,100- = $1,400
----------------------------------------1.5
Notice that in year 4 the calculation switches to straight-line depreciation, using the
following formula:
Acquisition Cost – Accumulated Depr.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- = Annual Depr.
Remaining Life
Because you have already taken 2.5 years of depreciation, the remaining life is 1.5
years.
Year 5:
$11,200
– $10,500- 1--------------------------------------------- = $700
0.5
2
Year 5 is the last year of the asset’s life. The asset receives only a half-year of
depreciation because of the half-year averaging convention.
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Note: When using the MACRS Indian Reservation depreciation method, you recover
the asset’s full acquisition value. In contrast, declining-balance depreciation does not
recover the salvage value.
ACRS Methods
The Accelerated Cost Recovery System (ACRS) is an IRS-prescribed method for recovering
the cost of personal and real property placed in service from 1981 through 1986. ACRS is a
modification of the Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) method used in the 1970s. It was
created by the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981, which required the use of ACRS or
alternate ACRS for assets placed in service from 1981 through July 1986. ACRS may have
been elected for qualifying assets through December 31, 1986. For tax purposes, assets
acquired after 1986 (other than transitional property) must use one of the MACRS methods
discussed earlier in this appendix.
The application supports three ACRS methods: ACRS table; straight-line, alternate ACRS
formula; and straight-line, alternate ACRS table. The two straight-line, alternate ACRS
methods are essentially the same, except that rounding in the IRS tables produces small
differences from the formula calculation in the recovery amount per period.
ACRS Table (Method AT)
The ACRS table method uses the 150% declining-balance method for personal property
and 175% declining-balance for real property. Recovery periods are assigned by the IRS
according to class of property.

ACRS Table Conventions
ACRS uses different conventions determined by the type of asset being depreciated
and the date that the asset was placed in service. The following table summarizes these
applicable conventions.
ACRS Table Conventions
Asset Type
Date Placed in Service
Applicable Convention
Personal Property
3-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year
1/1/81 - 12/31/86
Half-year
Real Property
15-year
1/1/81 - 3/15/84
Full-month *
18-year
3/16/84 - 6/22/84
6/23/84 - 5/8/85
Full-month *
Half-month **
19-year
5/9/85 - 12/31/86
Half-month **
* Allows for a full month’s recovery in the month of acquisition but no recovery in the month
of disposal.
** Allows for a half month’s recovery in the month of acquisition and a half month’s recovery in
the month of disposal.

ACRS Table Calculations
ACRS depreciation is calculated by multiplying the asset’s depreciable basis by a
percentage for each year in the recovery period. The percentages, which are specified
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in Internal Revenue Code tables, vary according to the type of property, the recovery
period assigned to the asset, and the date the asset was placed in service.

Personal Property
Personal property uses the half-year convention, which is built into the tables.
Under the half-year convention, the tables allow a half year of depreciation in the
first year for each asset regardless of the date it was placed in service. ACRS (unlike
MACRS) does not allow any depreciation for personal property during the year of
disposition.

Real Property
Real property (other than low-income housing) placed in service after 1980 but
before March 16, 1984, is automatically assigned a 15-year recovery period. For real
property placed in service after March 15, 1984, but before May 9, 1985, the
recovery period is 18 years. For real property placed in service after May 8, 1985,
but before 1987, the recovery period is 19 years.
To compute the ACRS depreciation deduction for real property, the application
multiplies the basis of the property by the appropriate recovery percentage from
tables provided by the IRS. Because the recovery period percentage for depreciable
real property depends on the month the property is placed in service, the cost
recovery percentages vary for each asset.

ACRS Table Example
The ACRS cost recovery calculations for a $25,000 drill press and a $10,000 light duty
truck, both purchased in September 1982, are shown below. The drill press is classified
as 5-year property, the truck as 3-year property.
Depreciation for 1982
25% of $10,000 (truck)
15% of $25,000 (drill press)
Total 1982
$2,500
3,750
$6,250
Depreciation for 1983
38% of $10,000 (truck)
22% of $25,000 (drill press)
Total 1983
$3,800
5,500
$9,300
Depreciation for 1984
37% of $10,000 (truck)
21% of $25,000 (drill press)
Total 1984
$3,700
5,250
$8,950
Depreciation for 1985
21% of $25,000 (drill press)
$5,250
Depreciation for 1986
21% of $25,000 (drill press)
$5,250
The half-year convention allowed a half year of depreciation in 1982, although the two
pieces of equipment were only in service for 4 months (September to December). No
B-16
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Depreciation Methods
ACRS Methods
B
extra calculations were needed to handle the half-year convention in the acquisition
year; it is built into the tables.

ACRS Table Short-Year Calculation
The short-year calculation for assets using the ACRS table method differs for personal
and real property.

Personal Property
The amount of ACRS deduction for a short tax year is prorated on a 12-month
basis. The ACRS deduction is computed by determining the recovery deduction
for a full year and multiplying it by the short-year fraction. The numerator for this
equation is the number of months in the short tax year; the denominator is 12.
Recovery allowances for years in a recovery period following a short tax year will
be determined without regard to the short tax year.
The unrecovered short-year allowance is the difference between the recovery
allowance permitted for the short tax year and the recovery allowance which
would have been allowed if the year were not a short tax year. It is claimed in the
tax year following the last tax year of the recovery period.

Real Property
The depreciation calculation for 15-, 18-, or 19-year real property is much simpler
than for personal property if there is a short tax year in the year of acquisition or
disposition. The deduction is based on the number of months in which the
property was in service during the short tax year.
When a short year occurs in a year other than the acquisition year or disposal year,
the table amount for the short year is prorated according to the number of months
in the short year. The remainder of the table factor is taken as unrecovered
short-year amounts in the post-recovery period.
Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS (Methods SA and ST)
As its name implies, straight-line, alternate ACRS depreciation combines features of
straight-line and regular ACRS table depreciation.
Like straight-line depreciation, the alternate straight-line method yields a uniform yearly
depreciation amount. Whereas straight-line depreciation is based on the estimated life of
the asset, alternate straight-line depreciation uses specific recovery periods (defined by
law) similar to those used by ACRS table depreciation.
Under the federal tax law, if you use the alternate straight-line method for a personal
property asset, you must apply the alternate straight-line method to all assets of the same
class placed in service in the same tax year. A different method may be used for assets of
the same class in the next year or for assets of a different class in the same tax year. This rule
does not apply to real property. The choice of depreciation method for real property is
made on a property-by-property basis, not on a class-by-class basis.
The application can calculate straight-line, alternate ACRS depreciation either by using a
formula that divides the asset’s basis by its recovery period or by using IRS tables. The
difference between the two methods in the recovery amount per period is due to rounding
in the tables. The following text applies to both methods unless stated otherwise.

Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS Conventions
The conventions for this method are the same as the ACRS table conventions. For
details, see the ACRS convention table in “ACRS Table (Method AT),” page B-15.
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B-17
B
Depreciation Methods
ACRS Methods

Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS Calculation
For assets using this alternate ACRS depreciation method, the recovery periods vary.
Businesses may choose to use IRS-approved recovery periods that are different from
those used for ACRS depreciation, as shown in the following table.
For method SA, the application uses a formula allowing 16.75% for the first year for a
3-year property, 33.33% for the second and third years, and 16.75% for the fourth year.
Proportionate formulas are used for other recovery periods. For method ST, the
percentages are built into the tables.
ACRS Recovery Periods for Personal Property
ACRS Table
Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS
3 years
3, 5, or 12 years
5 years
5, 12, or 25 years
10 years
10, 25, or 35 years
ACRS Recovery Periods for Real Property

Placed in Service
ACRS Table
Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS
Before 3/16/84
15 years
15, 35, or 45 years
3/16/84 - 5/8/85
18 years
18, 35, or 45 years
5/9/85 - 12/31/87
19 years
19, 35, or 45 years
Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS Example
Following are two examples of straight-line, alternate ACRS depreciation using the
formula (method SA). One example is for personal property and the other is for real
property. An example using the table (method ST) would produce slightly different
recovery period amounts due to rounding differences.

B-18
Personal Property Example
A company purchased a drill press in August 1983 for $20,000. Since the recovery
period for the drill press under regular ACRS table depreciation would be 5 years,
the company has the option of selecting a recovery period of 5, 12, or 25 years.
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Depreciation Methods
ACRS Methods
B
Although the property was placed in service in August, the half-year convention
applies under ACRS rules. Cost recovery of an asset with an elected 5-year life is
therefore taken over 6 years.
Basis
=
$20,000
Recovery period
= 5 years
Rate
=
15
=
$2,000
=
$4,000
=
$4,000
=
$4,000
=
$4,000
=
$2,000
Cost recovery for 1983
1--1
x $20,000 x --5
2
Cost recovery for 1984
1--x $20,000
5
Cost recovery for 1985
1--x $20,000
5
Cost recovery for 1986
1--x $20,000
5
Cost recovery for 1987
1--x $20,000
5
Cost recovery for 1988
1--1
x $20,000 x --5
2

Real Property Example
Depreciation for real property begins in the month the property is placed in
service. The straight-line deductions for the first and last years must be adjusted to
reflect the number of months the property is actually in service.
Assume a corporation acquired a factory building in June 1982 for $400,000. The
land is worth $100,000, so the depreciable basis of the building is $300,000. The date
the building was placed in service makes the property a 15-year property under
regular ACRS table rules and allows the use of 15, 35, or 45 years under alternate
straight-line depreciation. Using the formula, the annual recovery rate for a 35-year
recovery period is 2.857% (1/35 = 2.857%).
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B-19
B
Depreciation Methods
Straight-Line Methods
The calculations look like this:
Depreciation for 1982
7
$300,000 x 2.857% x -----12
=
$5,000
=
$8,571
=
$3,571
Depreciation for 1983
$300,000 x 2.857%
Depreciation for 2017
5
$300,000 x 2.857% x -----12
Notice that in the first and last years, a partial year’s cost recovery was calculated
because the building was in service for less than 12 months in each of those years.

Straight-Line, Alternate ACRS Short-Year Calculation
For an alternate straight-line short-year calculation, the amount of depreciation
computed for a full year is prorated over the number of months in the short-year
period. The application prorates the amount of depreciation computed for a full year
by multiplying the amount by the short-year fraction.
For personal property, the half-rate rule applies; that is, one-half of the depreciation
calculated for the short-year period is taken. In the disposal year, no depreciation is
allowed regardless of whether the disposal year is a full tax year or a short tax year. The
unrecovered allowance is the difference between the recovery allowance permitted for
the short taxable year and the recovery allowance that would have been allowed if the
year were not a short taxable year. It is claimed in the tax year following the recovery
period.
Straight-Line Methods
The straight-line method is the simplest and most commonly used method for calculating
depreciation. It can be used for any depreciable property, but it’s not generally allowed for
ACRS or MACRS property, which for tax purposes must use ADS straight-line MACRS
(method AD) or straight-line, alternate ACRS (methods SA and ST) for straight-line
treatment. Under the straight-line depreciation method, the basis of the asset is written off
evenly over the useful life of the asset. The same amount of depreciation is taken each year.
The straight-line method is approved under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
(GAAP) and is frequently used for internal books. In general, the amount of depreciation
equals an asset’s depreciable basis divided by its estimated life.
The application supports four standard straight-line methods, each using a different
averaging convention: regular straight-line (midmonth convention), full month, half-year,
and modified half-year.
B-20
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Depreciation Methods
Straight-Line Methods
B
Straight-Line (Method SL)
The regular straight-line depreciation method is quite simple and uses a midmonth
convention.

Straight-Line Convention
The midmonth convention gives a full month’s depreciation for the month of
acquisition if the asset is purchased on or before the 15th of a month; no depreciation
is given if the asset is purchased after the 15th. No depreciation is given for the
disposition month if the asset is disposed of on or before the 15th of the month; a full
month’s depreciation is given if the asset is disposed of after the 15th.

Straight-Line Calculation
The basis used in straight-line depreciation is calculated by subtracting the salvage
value from the acquisition value; the result is the adjusted basis. Straight-line
depreciation is calculated by dividing the adjusted basis by the useful life. The first and
last years of the asset’s depreciable life must be prorated if the company places the asset
in service at any time other than the beginning of the first month of the fiscal year. The
total amount depreciated can never exceed the adjusted basis. At the end of the asset’s
estimated life, the salvage value will remain.

Straight-Line Example
For a $14,000 truck placed in service on March 16, 2010, with an estimated life of 6 years
and a salvage value of $2,000, the depreciation calculation for the straight-line method
would look like this:
Original cost
$14,000
– Salvage value
Adjusted basis
2,000
$12,000
Adjusted
basis = $12
 000- = $2 000
----------------------------------------------------Estimated life
6
Yearly depreciation would be $2,000 for the years 2011 through 2015. Under the
midmonth convention, the truck was considered to be placed in service in April, so the
acquisition year depreciation would be 9/12ths of the annual depreciation ($1,500).
The deduction for the last year would be 3/12ths of the annual depreciation ($500).

Straight-Line Short-Year Calculation
For a straight-line short year, the amount of depreciation computed for a full year is
prorated over the number of months in the short-year period. The application prorates
the amount of depreciation computed for a full year by multiplying the amount by the
short-year fraction.
Straight-Line, Full-Month (Method SF)
The straight-line, full-month method is a GAAP-approved method of depreciation that is
very similar to the regular straight-line depreciation method. The key distinction between
the two is a full-month versus a midmonth convention.

Straight-Line, Full-Month Convention
Under a full-month convention, property placed in service at any time during a given
month is treated as if it had been placed in service on the first of that month. This
permits depreciation for the entire month in which the asset is placed in service. If the
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B-21
B
Depreciation Methods
Straight-Line Methods
property is disposed of before the end of the recovery period, no depreciation is
allowed for the disposal month.

Straight-Line, Full-Month Calculation
The calculation for the straight-line, full-month method is the same as for regular
straight-line (method SL), except for the averaging convention.

Straight-Line, Full-Month Example
The example shown for method SL is valid for this method, except that the full-month
convention allows depreciation for the month of March. The acquisition year
depreciation would be 10/12ths of the annual depreciation ($1,666.67) and the final
year depreciation would be 2/12ths of the annual depreciation ($333.33).

Straight-Line, Full-Month Short-Year Calculation
The short-year calculation for this method is the same as for method SL.
Straight-Line, Full-Month Plus 168 (Method SB)
The straight-line, full-month plus 168 depreciation method (method SB) calculates
depreciation in the same manner as straight-line, full-month (method SF), except that the
application takes an additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation allowance in the
placed-in-service year. Method SB uses the same averaging convention as method SF.

Straight-Line, Full-Month Plus 168 Calculation
First, the application calculates the 168 Allowance:
Depreciable Basis  30% = 168 Allowance
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the depreciable basis to calculate the annual
depreciation:
Depreciable
Basis – 168 Allowance- = Annual Depreciation
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Estimated Life

Straight-Line, Full-Month Plus 168 Example
XYZ Manufacturing purchases an asset with the following attributes:
Acquisition Value:
$16,000
Estimated Life:
5 Years
Salvage Value:
$1,000
Placed-in-Service Date:
11/30/01
Year 1:
First, the application subtracts the salvage value from the acquisition value:
$16,000 – $1,000 = $15,000
Next, it calculates the 168 Allowance:
$15,000  .30 = $4,500
Then, it subtracts the 168 Allowance from the $15,000 to calculate the depreciable basis:
$15,000 – $4,500 = $10,500
B-22
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Depreciation Methods
Straight-Line Methods
B
Next, it calculates the first-year depreciation:
$10,500
2-------------------  ----= $350
5
12
The full-month averaging convention allows a full month of depreciation for
November. Therefore, the asset receives two months of depreciation in the first year.
Years 2 through 5:
The application calculates the annual depreciation up to the final year as follows:
$10,500
------------------- = $2,100
5
Year 6:
$10,500
-------------------  10
------ = $1,750
5
12
Straight-Line, Half-Year (Method SH)
The straight-line, half-year method is a method of depreciation that is similar to the regular
straight-line depreciation method. It uses a half-year convention instead of a midmonth
convention.

Straight-Line, Half-Year Convention
As the name implies, straight-line half-year depreciation uses a half-year convention.
The half-year convention gives a half year’s depreciation in the year of acquisition,
regardless of the actual acquisition date, and a half year’s depreciation in the year of
disposal.
If you dispose of an asset in its final year, the amount of depreciation depends on when
it is disposed. If the asset is disposed of before July 1 (or before the first day of the 7th
month of the fiscal year), it receives one half of the depreciation it would have received
if it had not been disposed. The asset will not be fully depreciated. If the asset is
disposed of on or after July 1 (on or after the first day of the 7th month of the fiscal
year), it receives the full amount of depreciation for its final year.

Straight-Line, Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for the straight-line, half-year method is the same as for regular
straight-line (method SL), except for the averaging convention.

Straight-Line, Half-Year Example
For a $14,000 truck placed in service on March 16, 2010, with an estimated life of 6 years
and a salvage value of $2,000, the depreciation calculation for the straight-line method
would look like this:
Original cost
$14,000
– Salvage value
Adjusted basis
2,000
$12,000
Adjusted
basis = $12
 000- = $2 000
----------------------------------------------------Estimated life
6
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B-23
B
Depreciation Methods
Straight-Line Methods
Yearly depreciation would be $2,000 for the years 2011 through 2015. Since the truck
was placed in service in March, the 2010 depreciation using the half-year convention
would be one-half of the annual depreciation, or $1,000. The depreciation for the last
year would also be one-half of the annual depreciation, or $1,000.

Straight-Line, Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
Because this method uses a half-year convention, the half-rate rule applies. The
depreciation is calculated as if the asset were placed in service or disposed of during
the middle of the short tax year. For example, if an asset were placed in service during
a short tax year of 3 months, the annual depreciation would be one-half of the 3-month
depreciation deduction. The formula is:
1
Short year depr. = --- 
2
Months in short year
Full year depr.  -------------------------------------------------12
Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year (Method SD)
Method SD is like the regular straight-line depreciation calculation in every way except
that it uses the modified half-year averaging convention. It is a GAAP-approved method
that allows for an even flow of depreciation over an asset’s life.

Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year Convention
Under the modified half-year convention, assets that are placed in service during the
first half of the year are considered to have been placed in service on the first day of the
year. Therefore, they receive a full year’s depreciation in the acquisition year. Assets
that are placed in service during the second half of the year are considered to have been
placed in service on the first day of the following year. Therefore, they receive no
depreciation in the acquisition year but receive a full year’s depreciation in the
subsequent year.
Applying the modified half-year convention in the disposal year is slightly more
complicated. For details, see the description of this convention in “Modified Half-Year
Convention,” page A-11.

Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for the straight-line, half-year method is the same as for regular
straight-line (method SL), except for the averaging convention.
When calculating depreciation under this method for property type V, vintage account
property, there is no adjustment to the depreciable basis for salvage value. However,
the asset may not be depreciated below its salvage value. This alternate salvage
treatment is applied automatically only to those assets with V for property type.

Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year Example
A piece of equipment with a 5-year life is placed in service in April 2008. The asset,
which was purchased for $10,000 and has a salvage value of $2,000, is sold in July 2012.
Year
B-24
Depreciation
Allowance
Calculation
2008
$1,600.00
2009
1,600.00
[($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years] x 100%
($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years
2010
1,600.00
($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years
2011
1,600.00
($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years
2012
800.00
[($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years] x 50%
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Depreciation Methods
Declining-Balance Methods
B
Had the asset been sold in the first half of the year, no depreciation (rather than 50%)
would have been allowed in the disposal year. This is due to the effect of the
convention type on the disposal year.
In the above example, the asset was placed in service in April, the first half of the year.
Therefore, a full year of depreciation is allowed in the acquisition year. The annual
allowance is earned evenly over the number of months that the asset was in service in
that year.

Straight-Line, Modified Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
The formula is the same as for the regular straight-line method (method SL). However,
because of the modified half-year convention, the treatment in the first and disposal
years is different. Continuing the example shown above, the example below depicts
what would happen in the event that a short tax year of 9 months had occurred in 2011:
Year
Depreciation
Allowance
2011
$1,200.00
2012
800.00
Calculation
9
[($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years] x -----12
[($10,000 - 2,000 salvage) / 5 years] x 50%
In the event of a short year in either the acquisition or disposal year, the determination
of the cutoff date for the first half of the year can get complicated. In such an event, the
following rules apply:
• If the duration of the short year is exactly 1 month, the cutoff of the short year is
the 15th of that month, regardless of the actual number of days in that month.
• If the duration of the short year is an even number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is the last day of the month that ends the first half of the short tax year.
• If the duration of the short year is an odd number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is determined by dividing the number of days in the short year by two
to arrive at the midpoint of the year. From that midpoint, advance or retreat to the
closest end of a month and treat that month’s end as the cutoff. If the midpoint is
an equal distance from the prior month’s end and the current month’s end,
advance to the current month’s end as the cutoff.
Declining-Balance Methods
Declining-balance depreciation is a method that depreciates an asset at a higher rate in the
earlier years of the asset’s life than straight-line depreciation. It applies only to tangible
assets with a useful life equal to or greater than 3 years. The declining-balance methods are
approved under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). For tax purposes, for
new assets placed in service from 1954 through 1980, declining-balance rates were allowed
to a maximum of twice the straight-line rate (200%). When you enter a declining-balance
method, you select the rate you want to apply.
Using declining-balance depreciation for each year of an asset’s life will never completely
depreciate the asset. Therefore, the IRS lets you switch from declining-balance depreciation
to straight-line depreciation once during the life of an asset. This switch is one of few
changes in depreciation method that can be made without special IRS approval.
The application provides 6 standard declining-balance methods. When paired with the 4
possible depreciation rates (125%, 150%, 175%, and 200%), you have 24 choices.
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B-25
B
Depreciation Methods
Declining-Balance Methods
Each method is different based on the percentage used, the averaging convention used, and
whether it will switch from declining-balance to straight-line at the optimal point. The
optimal point for switching to straight-line depreciation is when the deductions allowed
by the straight-line method equal or exceed the deductions allowed by the
declining-balance method. When the change to straight-line is made, the unrecovered basis
of the asset is spread over the remaining estimated life, ensuring that the entire amount is
depreciated. When straight-line depreciation is applied in this way, it is often called
remaining value over remaining life depreciation. The methods are as follows:
DB
Declining-balance, midmonth convention, switch to SL when optimal
DC
Declining-balance, midmonth convention, no switch to SL
DD
Declining-balance, modified half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DE
Declining-balance, modified half-year, no switch to SL
DH
Declining-balance, half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DI
Declining-balance, half-year, no switch to SL
Declining-Balance (Methods DB and DC)

Declining-Balance Convention
The midmonth convention gives a full month’s depreciation for the month of
acquisition if the asset is placed in service on or before the 15th of a month. No
depreciation is given if the asset is placed in service after the 15th. No depreciation is
given for the disposition month if the asset is disposed of on or before the 15th of the
month. A full month’s depreciation is given if the asset is disposed of after the 15th.

Declining-Balance Calculation
Declining-balance depreciation is computed at the same rate each year, but each year
this rate is applied to the asset’s depreciable basis remaining at the beginning of that
tax period. As a result, annual depreciation deduction amounts are greater in the early
years and lower in the later years of an asset’s life.
The four most common rate structures for declining-balance depreciation are 125%,
150%, 175%, and 200%, where the straight-line rate would be 100%. Two hundred
percent, also known as double declining-balance, is the most widely used. Salvage
value does not reduce the depreciable basis for declining balance as it does in other
methods. However, the total amount depreciated cannot exceed the difference between
the acquisition value and the salvage value.
The declining-balance formula is:
1
--------------------------------  Percentage = Rate
Estimated life
Rate  Remaining depreciable basis = Annual depreciation
For an asset with an expected life of 8 years and the double declining-balance method,
the rate would be:
1--8
B-26
 200%
= 25%
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Depreciation Methods
Declining-Balance Methods
B
Remember that if you choose to switch the asset to straight-line (method DB), the
calculation changes when deductions allowed by straight-line equal or exceed
deductions allowed by declining-balance. If you choose not to switch (method DC), the
asset will never fully depreciate and will have a residual value at the end of its
estimated life.

Declining-Balance Example
A company bought new cleaning equipment worth $4,800 on August 15, 2010, with an
estimated life of 8 years and a salvage value of $300. The company would see the
following results from calculating depreciation using double declining-balance
depreciation. If the company uses method DB (switch to straight-line when optimal),
the application calculates straight-line depreciation figures at the same time to
determine when to make the switch. The straight-line amount is calculated on the
remaining basis for each year.
The rate for the double declining-balance computations is figured by dividing the
percentage by the estimated life:
200%
-------------8
= 25%
The beginning depreciable basis for the declining-balance computations is $4,800.
For the first year, during which the equipment was in service only 5 months (August
to December using the midmonth convention), the declining-balance calculation
would be:
5
$4 ,800  .25  ------ = $500
12
For subsequent years, the asset’s remaining depreciable basis is figured by subtracting
the accumulated depreciation from the beginning depreciable basis.
The second and third year declining-balance calculations would be:
Year 2
($4,800 - 500)
x .25 =
$1,075.00
Year 3
[$4,800 - (500 + 1,075)]
x .25 =
$ 806.25
If the company uses method DB (switches to straight-line when optimal), the switch
will occur for the year in which the straight-line depreciation is greater than the
declining-balance depreciation. This occurs in year 7, when straight-line depreciation
is $278.87 and declining-balance is $255.10.

Declining-Balance Short-Year Calculation
For a declining-balance short year, the amount of depreciation computed for a full year
is prorated over the number of months in the short-year period. The application
prorates the amount of depreciation computed for a full year by multiplying the
amount by the short-year fraction.
The prorated amount is deducted from the remaining depreciable basis at the
beginning of the short-year period to determine the remaining depreciable basis at the
beginning of the following taxable year.
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B-27
B
Depreciation Methods
Declining-Balance Methods
Declining-Balance, Half-Year (Methods DH and DI)
For an overview of declining-balance depreciation, see “Declining-Balance Methods,” page
B-25. The methods are the same as the declining-balance methods DB and DC except for
the averaging convention.

Declining-Balance, Half-Year Convention
The half-year convention gives a half-year’s depreciation in the year of acquisition and
a half year’s depreciation in the year of disposal. There is no distinction between real
and personal property for applying the convention.

Declining-Balance, Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for this method is the same as for methods DB and DC except for the
averaging convention applied to the acquisition and disposal years.

Declining-Balance, Half-Year Example
Using the same asset example for this method as for methods DB and DC, the first year
declining-balance, half-year deduction would be $600, as calculated below:
1
$4 ,800  .25  --- = $600
2
Under the half-year convention, this calculation is used regardless of the month in
which the asset was placed in service within that year.

Declining-Balance, Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
The short-year calculation for this method is the same as for methods DB and DC
except that the half-rate rule applies. The depreciation is calculated as if the asset were
placed in service or disposed of during the middle of the short tax year. For example,
if an asset were placed in service during a short tax year of 3 months, the annual
depreciation would be one-half of the 3-month depreciation deduction.
Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year (Methods DD and DE)
These methods are like the declining-balance depreciation methods DB and DC in every
way except that they use a different averaging convention.

Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year Convention
Under the modified half-year convention, assets that are placed in service during the
first half of the year are considered to be placed in service on the first day of the year.
Therefore, they receive a full year’s depreciation in the acquisition year. Assets that are
placed in service during the second half of the year are considered to be placed in
service on the first day of the following year. Therefore, they receive no depreciation in
the acquisition year but receive a full year’s depreciation in the subsequent year.
Applying the modified half-year convention in the disposal year is more complicated.
For details, see the description of this averaging convention in “Modified Half-Year
Convention,” page A-11.
B-28

Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for this method is the same as for methods DB and DC except for the
averaging convention applied to the acquisition and disposal years.

Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year Example
A company places a supply cabinet with a 5-year life in service in June 2009. The asset,
which was purchased for $10,000, is sold in February 2013. The schedule of allowable
depreciation for internal books under the declining-balance method DE, modified
half-year method with a 200% rate (without switching to straight-line) is shown below.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation Methods
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
Year
B
Depreciation
Allowance
Calculation
2009
$4,000.00
[$10,000 x (200% / 5 years)] x 100%
2010
2,400.00
($10,000 - 4,000) x (200% / 5 years)
2011
1,440.00
($10,000 - 4,000 - 2,400) x (200% / 5 years)
2012
864.00
2013
0.00
($10,000 - 4,000 - 2,400 - 1,440) x (200% / 5 years)
No depreciation allowed
In this example, the asset was placed in service in June, the first half of the year.
Therefore, a full year of depreciation is allowed in the acquisition year. Had the asset
been sold in the second half of the year, a half year’s depreciation (rather than none)
would have been allowed in the disposal year.

Declining-Balance, Modified Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
For a declining-balance short-year calculation where the modified half-year
convention is used, the amount of depreciation allowed in the short year is the normal
full year’s allowance prorated over the number of months the asset was in service in
the short year. The formula is the same as for the declining-balance methods DB and
DC.
The example below depicts what would happen in the event that a short tax year of 9
months had occurred in 2012 in the above example.
Year
Depreciation
Allowance
2012
648.00
2013
0.00
Calculation
9
[($10,000 - 4,000 - 2,400 - 1,440) x (200% / 5 years)] x -----12
No depreciation allowed
In the event of a short year in either the acquisition or disposal years, the determination
of the cutoff date for the first half of the year can be complicated. In such an event, the
following rules apply:
• If the duration of the short year is exactly 1 month, the cutoff of the short year is
the 15th of that month, regardless of the actual number of days in that month.
• If the duration of the short year is an even number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is the last day of the month that ends the first half of the short tax year.
• If the duration of the short year is an odd number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is determined by dividing the number of days in the short year by two
to arrive at the midpoint of the year. From that midpoint, advance or retreat to the
closest end of a month and treat that month’s end as the cutoff. If the midpoint is
an equal distance from the prior month’s end and the current month’s end,
advance to the current month’s end as the cutoff.
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
Sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation is another way to accelerate the depreciation of an
asset. It can result in deductions that are larger than those given by double
declining-balance depreciation in the early years. Although the deductions get smaller
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
B-29
B
Depreciation Methods
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
each year, all of the asset’s depreciable basis is written off over the property’s useful life. It
applies only to tangible assets with a useful life equal to or greater than 3 years.
For the Tax book, sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation is normally used only for assets in
service before 1981.
The application provides three standard sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation methods,
each using a different averaging convention: sum-of-the-years’-digits (midmonth),
half-year, and modified half-year.
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits (Method YS)

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Convention
The sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation method applies a midmonth convention,
giving a full month’s depreciation in the acquisition month if the asset is purchased on
or before the 15th of the month. No depreciation is allowed if the asset is acquired after
the 15th. In the disposal month, no depreciation is allowed if the asset is disposed of
before the 16th; a full month’s depreciation is allowed if the asset is disposed of after
the 15th.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Calculation
The sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation method bases its depreciation computations
on a decreasing fraction of the depreciable basis (acquisition value less the salvage
value and any bonus depreciation). The numerator of the fraction changes each year.
For any one year, the numerator represents the remaining estimated life of the asset.
The denominator, which represents (but does not equal) the entire estimated life, does
not change.
Here are two ways to calculate the denominator. One way is to add the digits for each
year in the estimated life; that is, add 1 for the first year, 2 for the second year, and so
on through the final year. For example, the sum of the years’ digits for an asset with an
estimated life of 5 years is:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 15
Another, faster way to calculate the sum, when the life is expressed in whole years only,
is to multiply the estimated life by itself plus 1 and divide the result by 2. The formula
looks like this:
n------------------- n + 1 2
where n = the number of years in the asset’s useful life.
Assuming a 5-year useful life, the calculation is shown below:
5------------------- 5 + 1 - = 30
------ = 15
2
2

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Example
A new forklift was purchased on September 14, 2002, at a cost of $3,000. It had a useful
life of 10 years and a $200 salvage value. The depreciation calculations would look like
the following table.
This example uses a calendar fiscal year. First, calculate the denominator:
10
 10 + 1 - = 55
-------------------------2
B-30
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation Methods
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
B
Then calculate the depreciation. Because the asset was placed in service after the
beginning of the year, the depreciation deduction must be prorated. The total for each
year, except the first year, is the remaining fraction from the previous year plus the
fraction for the current year.
Date Range
Calculations
09/07 - 12/07 *
4-  10
---- ------  2 800 
12  55
Total 2007 depreciation
=
$169.70
=
$169.70
01/08 - 08/08
8-  10
---- ------  2 800 

12  55
=
$339.39
09/08 - 12/08
4
9
------   ------  2 800 

12  55
=
$152.73
=
$492.12
Total 2008 depreciation
01/09 - 08/09
8-  ----9
---- -  2 800 
12  55
=
$305.45
09/09 - 12/09
4-  ----8
---- -  2 800 

12  55
=
$135.76
=
$441.21
Total 2009 depreciation
01/10 - 08/10
8-  ----8
---- -  2 800 

12  55
=
$271.51
09/10 - 12/10
4
7
------   ------  2 800 

12  55
=
$118.79
=
$390.30
Total 2010 depreciation
01/11 - 08/11
8-  ----7
---- -  2 800 
12  55
=
$237.57
09/11 - 12/11
4-  ----6
---- -  2 800 

12  55
=
$101.82
=
$339.39
Total 2011 depreciation
01/12 - 08/12
8-  ----6
---- -  2 800 

12  55
=
$203.64
09/12 - 12/12
4-  ----5
---- -  2 800 
12  55
=
$ 84.85
=
$288.49
Total 2012 depreciation
* Under the midmonth convention, year 1 includes the month of September in the proration
because the asset was acquired before the 16th of the month.
The deductions continue in a similar manner for 5 more years.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Short-Year Calculation
For sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation short-year calculation, a proration is made in
much the same way that a full-year proration is made.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
B-31
B
Depreciation Methods
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
Building from the example above, in the event of a 3-month short year in 2011 (from
January 1, 2011, to March 31, 2011), depreciation would be calculated as follows:
Date Range
Calculations
01/11 - 03/11
3-  ----7
---- -  2 800 

12  55
Total short-year 03/11 depreciation
=
$ 89.09
=
$ 89.09
04/11 - 08/11
5-  ----7
---- -  2 800 

12  55
=
$148.48
09/11 - 03/12
7
6
------   ------  2 800 

12  55
=
$178.18
=
$326.66
Total fiscal-year 2011 depreciation
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year (Method YH)
Method YH is like the sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation (method YS) calculation
except that it uses a different depreciation convention.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year Convention
A half year’s depreciation is allowed in the year of purchase, regardless of the
acquisition date. A half year’s depreciation is allowed in the disposition year,
regardless of the disposal date.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for this method is the same as the calculation for method YS.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year Example
Using the same example for method YH as for method YS, the first-year
sum-of-the-years’-digits, half-year deduction would be $254.55.
6-  10
---- ------  2 800 
12  55
=
$254.55
Under the half-year convention, the first-year calculation would be true regardless of
the month in which the asset was placed in service within the year.
The second-year calculations would then be computed as follows:

B-32
6
10
------   ------  2 800 

12  55
=
$254.55
6-  ----9
---- -  2 800 
12  55
=
$229.09
Total year 2 depreciation
=
$483.64
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
The short-year calculation for method YH is the same as the short-year calculation for
method YS, except when the short year is the acquisition or disposal year. If the short
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation Methods
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits Depreciation
B
year is the acquisition or disposal year, the half-rate rule applies: only one-half of the
depreciation calculated for the full short-year period may be taken.
Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year (Method YD)
Method YD is like the sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation (method YS) calculation except
that it uses the modified half-year averaging convention.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year Convention
Under the modified half-year convention, assets that are placed in service during the
first half of the year are considered placed in service on the first day of the year.
Therefore, they receive a full year’s depreciation in the acquisition year. Assets that are
placed in service during the second half of the year are considered placed in service on
the first day of the following year. Therefore, they receive no depreciation in the
acquisition year, but receive a full year’s depreciation in the subsequent year.
Applying the modified half-year convention in the disposal year is more complicated.
For details, see “Modified Half-Year Convention,” page A-11.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year Calculation
The calculation for method YD is the same as for method YS. When calculating
depreciation under this method for vintage account property (type V) only, there is no
adjustment to the depreciable basis for salvage value. However, the asset may not be
depreciated below its salvage value.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year Example
A single asset is placed in service in October 2001, and treated as vintage account
property with a 10-year life. The asset, which was purchased for $10,000 and had a
salvage value of $250, was sold in July 2010. The schedule of allowable depreciation
under the sum-of-the-years’-digits, modified half-year method is shown below. Notice
that, because the asset is vintage account property, the salvage value is not subtracted
from the acquisition value in determining the depreciable basis.
Year
Depreciation
Allowance
Calculation
2001
$
(Purchased after the midpoint of the year)
0.00
2002
1,818.18
10/55 x 10,000
2003
1,636.36
9/55 x 10,000
2004
1,454.55
8/55 x 10,000
2005
1,272.73
7/55 x 10,000
2006
1,090.91
6/55 x 10,000
2007
909.09
5/55 x 10,000
2008
727.27
4/55 x 10,000
2009
545.45
3/55 x 10,000
2010
295.45
2/55 x 10,000 x 100% *
* Because total depreciation is limited to $9,750 ($10,000 minus the salvage value of $250), 2010
depreciation is limited to $295.45.

Sum-of-the-Years’-Digits, Modified Half-Year Short-Year Calculation
For a short-year calculation where the sum-of-the-years’-digits modified half-year
convention is used, a proration is made in much the same way that a full-year proration
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
B-33
B
Depreciation Methods
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life (Method RV)
is made. The following example shows what would have happened if a short tax year
of 9 months had occurred in 2009.
Year
Depreciation
Allowance
2009
$409.09
2010
409.09
Calculation
39
 ---- 10 000  ----- 55
 12
33-  ----29-
 ------------ 55  10 000  12 +  55  10 000  12  100%
In the event of a short year in either the acquisition or disposal year, the determination
of the cutoff date for the first half of the year can be complicated. The following rules
apply:
• If the duration of the short year is exactly 1 month, the cutoff of the short year is
the 15th day of that month, regardless of the actual number of days in that month.
• If the duration of the short year is an even number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is the last day of the month that ends the first half of the short tax year.
• If the duration of the short year is an odd number of months, the cutoff of the
short year is determined by dividing the number of days in the short year by 2 to
arrive at the midpoint of the year. From that midpoint, advance or retreat to the
closest end of a month, and treat that month’s end as the cutoff. If the midpoint is
an equal distance from the prior month’s end and the current month’s end,
advance to the current month’s end as the cutoff.
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life (Method RV)
Remaining value over remaining life is similar to straight-line depreciation. What makes it
unique is that while the straight-line calculation is static, the remaining value over
remaining life calculation is dynamic. If there is a change in a critical value (for example,
the asset’s estimated life), the straight-line method cannot adjust its future calculations so
that the asset is fully depreciated at the end of its life. The remaining value over remaining
life method, on the other hand, takes the asset’s remaining depreciable basis and
depreciates that amount evenly over the asset’s remaining estimated life.
Converting to remaining value over remaining life is generally the best way to take an
adjustment evenly over the rest of an asset’s life. It is the suggested approach to handling
a change in an accounting estimate under the Accounting Principles Board (APB) Opinion
Number 20.
You can convert from any other depreciation method to the remaining value over
remaining life method. To do this, follow these steps:
B-34
1.
Calculate depreciation through the date that the conversion to remaining value over
remaining life is to be effective.
2.
Change the depreciation method field selection to RV. The application displays a
confirmation message.
3.
Click the Yes button to confirm that you want the application to reset depreciation.
The application displays a message asking if you want to update the beginning
depreciation fields with the current depreciation amounts, or clear the beginning and
current depreciation.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation Methods
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life (Method RV)
B
If you click the Yes button, the application saves the current depreciation information
as beginning depreciation. If you click the No button, the application resets
depreciation to zero.
If you change to remaining life in the Tax book, carefully consider the implications of
replacing the information in the other books with new defaults before you respond to
the prompt concerning changes to the Tax book. Generally, you should respond No.
If the remaining value over remaining life method is chosen for an asset in the year the asset
was placed in service, and if the asset was placed in service on or before the 15th of the
month, the depreciation calculated is identical to that calculated using the straight-line
method.

Remaining Value Over Remaining Life Convention
The remaining value over remaining life method uses a full-month convention in
calculating depreciation allowances. The full-month convention allows an asset a full
month’s worth of depreciation in the month that the asset is placed in service,
regardless of the date of the month. Conversely, no depreciation is allowed in the
month of disposal. The full-month convention applies to all property types.
If you convert an asset to remaining value over remaining life from any other method,
the convention type associated with the former method is disregarded, and the asset’s
remaining life is determined as though the full-month convention had been used in the
acquisition year.

Remaining Value Over Remaining Life Calculation
The calculation of remaining value over remaining life depreciation is implicit in its
name. The calculation takes an asset’s remaining undepreciated basis and depreciates
that amount evenly over the remaining time in the asset’s estimated life.

Remaining Value Over Remaining Life Example
A $10,000 asset was acquired on March 31, 2006, and sold on July 31, 2010. For the
internal books, the taxpayer determines depreciation using the remaining value over
remaining life method over a 5-year life. The amount of depreciation allowed is shown
below.
Year
Depreciation
Allowance
Calculation
$10 000----------------------- 10 months *
60 months
2006
$1,666.67
2007
2,000.00
$10
 000 – 1 666.67
------------------------------------------------ 12 months
50 months
2008
2,000.00
$10
 000 – 3 666.67
------------------------------------------------ 12 months
38 months
2009
2,000.00
$10
 000 – 5 666.67
------------------------------------------------ 12 months
26 months
2010
1,000.00
$10
 000 – 7 666.67
------------------------------------------------ 6 months **
14 months
* A full month’s depreciation is allowed for the month of March 2006.
** No depreciation is allowed for the month of July 2010.
Assume that, for the same asset, the company determined at the beginning of 2008 the
asset had a remaining life of 4 years as of the end of 2007. To make this change, change
the Estimated Life field to 5 years, 10 months (i.e., 4 years plus the 22 months for which
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
B-35
B
Depreciation Methods
Own Calculation (Method OC)
the asset has already been depreciated). When you receive the prompts due to changes
being made to a critical field, answer Yes both times. In this case, you want to save the
existing depreciation (calculated through 12/31/07) before you make the change.
Note the changes in the calculations below:
Year

Depreciation
Allowance
Calculation
$10 000----------------------- 10 months
60 months
2006
$1,666.67
2007
2,000.00
$10
 000 – 1 666.67
------------------------------------------------ 12 months
50 months
2008
1,583.33
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------$10 000 –  1 666.67 + 2 000.00   12 months
48 months
2009
1,583.33
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------$10 000 –  1 666.67 + 2 000.00 + 1 583.33   12 months
36 months
2010
791.67
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------$10 000 –  1 666.67 + 2 000.00 +  2  1 583.33    6 months
24 months
Remaining Value Over Remaining Life Short-Year Calculation
If a short tax year occurs, the amount of depreciation computed for a full year is
prorated over the number of months in the short year. The application prorates the
amount of depreciation computed for a full year by multiplying by the short-year
fraction.
Own Calculation (Method OC)
Method OC provides a means for you to enter depreciation amounts you have calculated
manually. You may want to use this method if you have an asset that needs a special
calculation not provided by the standard methods or by any custom method you set up.
The application will not calculate depreciation for any asset using this code. In Asset Detail,
enter the depreciation amounts in the beginning depreciation fields. They will appear in
applicable reports as current depreciation.
The application cannot check whether any amounts you enter using this code are correct.
As the asset depreciates, you must update the depreciation amounts yourself by entering
new figures in the beginning depreciation fields.
No Depreciation (Method NO)
If you select method NO, the application will not calculate depreciation for the asset.
Method NO applies to all non-depreciable assets, including non-depreciable land. You can
enter any other general asset information you want. Assets using method NO will appear
in the Depreciation Expense report but depreciation amounts will be zero.
Custom Depreciation Methods
You can set up custom depreciation methods through the Customize option on the menu
bar. See “Creating Custom Depreciation Methods,” page 8-20. The custom method codes
must be two characters and can include any number or lowercase letter. The Custom
B-36
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Depreciation Methods
Custom Depreciation Methods
B
Depreciation Methods feature lets you create depreciation method calculations that the
application does not provide.
Custom Depreciation Method Conventions
When you set up the custom depreciation method, you can choose the disposal year
averaging convention. You can choose full month, midmonth, half-year (ACRS, or MACRS
and pre-ACRS), or modified half-year. To learn about the conventions, see “Averaging
Conventions,” page A-11.
Custom Depreciation Method Calculation
Custom depreciation is calculated by multiplying the yearly recovery percentage you
selected by the asset’s depreciable basis (acquisition value minus the salvage value, minus
any bonus depreciation or Section 179 expense). A custom method table can have a
recovery period ranging from 2 years to 60 years.
Custom Depreciation Method Example
A calendar year-end company places a $17,000 truck in service on June 1, 2010, subject to a
3-year recovery period.
Assume that the company had set up a custom depreciation method based on the following
years and percentages:
Year
Percentage
1
14.58%
2
38.00%
3
37.00%
4
10.42%
Total
100.00%
If the depreciable basis ($17,000) were multiplied by the percentage for each year, the
results would be:
Year
Calculation
2010
$17,000 x 14.58%
$ 2,478.60
2011
$17,000 x 38.00%
6,460.00
2012
$17,000 x 37.00%
6,290.00
2013
$17,000 x 10.42%
Total
Depreciation
1,771.40
$17,000.00
Custom Depreciation Methods and Short Years
During a short tax year, the annual percentage in the custom method table is multiplied by
the depreciable basis to determine the annual depreciation. This amount is further reduced
by the short-year fraction (the number of months in the short year divided by 12). The
short-year amount is divided equally among the months in the short tax year.
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B
Depreciation Methods
Custom Depreciation Methods
Using the example above, assume the company had a short tax year because it began
business in June 2010. The calculations must be modified to take into account the short
year. First-year depreciation would equal 7/12ths of the annual amount (June to
December). The balance would be recovered in the year following the last scheduled
recovery period.
Taking into account the short tax year, the percentage for each year would yield these
results:
Year
Calculation
1
$17,000 x 14.58% x 7/12
2
$17,000 x 38.00%
6,460.00
3
$17,000 x 37.00%
6,290.00
4
$17,000 x 10.42%
1,771.40
5
$17,000 x 14.58% x 5/12
1,032.75
Total
B-38
Depreciation
$ 1,445.85
$17,000.00
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Appendix C
Custom Import Helper
In this appendix:
Custom Import Helper File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Importing Depreciation-Critical Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Setting Asset Warning Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Importing Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
List of Importable Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Field Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-14
The Custom Import Helper guides you through the process of importing asset data from
other sources into your Sage Fixed Assets application. When importing data, you can add
the assets into a new or existing company. You can import assets to update existing asset
data, or you can import them as new assets.
When you import data as new assets, you can import both general information and book
information fields. When you import data to update existing assets, you can import only
general information fields. For more information, see “Completing the General
Information Fields,” page 6-3 and “Completing the Book Information Fields,” page 6-5.
Custom Import Helper File Types
Using the Custom Import Helper you can import data from the following sources:
• ASCII Files (tab delimited or comma delimited)
• Excel Spreadsheet Files (Microsoft Excel 97 and later)
The table below shows the types of files that you can import using the Custom Import
Helper, along with their file extensions.
File Type
File Extension
ASCII Files - comma delimited
*.csv
ASCII Files - tab delimited
*.tab
Excel Spreadsheet Files
*.xls
Importing Depreciation-Critical Fields
Each asset contains five fields that are critical to your depreciation calculations. You can
import these fields into each of the seven depreciation books. If you choose to import one
of these fields for a book, you must import all of them for that book. However, you must
import critical fields into at least one book. You are not required to import all seven books.
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Custom Import Helper
Setting Asset Warning Preference
The five critical fields are listed below.
• Property Type
• Placed-in-Service Date
• Acquisition Value
• Depreciation Method
• Estimated Life
Note: Declining balance methods require a depreciation percentage in addition to the
depreciation method. These depreciation methods are MF, MA, MT, MI, MR, DC, DE, DI,
DB, DD, and DH. For further information regarding depreciation methods, refer to
Appendix B, “Depreciation Methods.”
Note: The “Plus 168” depreciation methods require a value in the 168 Allowance % field.
If you use depreciation method MA, MR, SB, or AA, then a value of 30, 50, or 100 must
appear in the 168 Allowance % field.
Setting Asset Warning Preference
The Custom Import Helper reports two types of messages when validating or importing a
data file. Error messages indicate invalid information in your data file, and will always be
displayed. Warning messages indicate data inconsistent with depreciation concepts and
rules. The application does not import an asset if the Import Exceptions report displays an
error message for that asset. However, the application does import an asset if the report
displays a warning message for that asset.
To turn on or turn off the display of asset warnings on the Import
Exceptions report
1.
Select File/Preferences from the menu bar. The Preferences dialog appears.
2.
Select the Display Asset Warnings check box to display asset warnings. Clear the
check box to turn off the display of asset warnings.
Note that if you clear the Display Asset Warnings check box, you will not see any warning
messages when adding or changing assets.
Importing Asset Data
When using the Custom Import Helper to import data, you create a map that correctly links
the field data from your originating source file to the fields in the application. The Custom
Import Helper guides you through this entire process. The order of the data within the
source file is not important; however, you may need to convert some of your data to the
correct format. For more information on preparing your data for import, see “List of
Importable Fields,” page C-12, and “Field Specifications,” page C-14.
You can use the Custom Import Helper to import assets to update existing asset data, or
you can import them as new assets. When you import data as new assets, you can import
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
C
both general information and book information fields. When you import data to update
existing assets, you can import only general information fields.
Navigating the Custom Import Helper
The guidelines below explain the navigation buttons common to all Custom Import Helper
dialogs.

Help Button
Accesses the online Help.

Cancel Button
Cancels the current import and returns you to the main application window.

Back Button
Returns to the previous Custom Import Helper dialog.

Next Button
Accepts the entries in the current Custom Import Helper dialog and display the next
dialog.

Finish Button
Begins the import process.
Follow the steps below to import asset data using the Custom Import Helper.
To import asset data using the Custom Import Helper
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Custom Import from the menu bar. The Custom
Import Helper - Welcome dialog appears.
2.
Click the Next button to continue with the import process. The Custom Import Helper
- Select File dialog appears.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Import Helper - Select File dialog.
3.

Import File
This box displays the importable files found in the specified location. Select the
source file containing the data you want to import.

Browse Button
Click this button to locate the file containing the data that you want to import.
Click the Next button. The Custom Import Helper - Select Company dialog appears.
This dialog allows you to specify the company into which you want the asset data
imported. Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Import Helper - Select
Company dialog.
C-4

Company
Click the down arrow to display a list of available companies. Select the company
into which you want to import the asset data.

New Company Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to create a new company. If
you decide to create a new company at this time, follow the instructions in
“Creating a New Company,” page 4-6.

Database
Click the down arrow to display a list of databases where your Sage Fixed Assets
companies are stored. Select the database containing the company into which you
want to import the asset data.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
4.
C
Click the Next button. The Custom Import Helper - Import Type dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Import Helper - Import Type
dialog.

New Asset
Click this option button if you are importing data for new assets. If you select this
option, the import file should not include system numbers. You can import both
general information and book information fields.

Update Asset
Click this option button if you are importing data to update existing assets. If you
select this option, the import file must contain a system number for each asset. You
can import only general information fields.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
5.
Click the Next button. The Custom Import Helper - Field Map dialog appears.
A Field Map correctly links the data fields from your originating source to the fields in
the application. Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Import Helper Field Map dialog.

C-6
Select Field Map
Select one of the available field map options.

Create New Field Map
Click this option button if you want to create a new field map. When you click
the Next button, you’ll create the map on the Custom Import Helper - Select
Fields dialog.

Use Saved Field Map
Click this option button if you want to use a pre-existing field map. When you
click the Next button, the Custom Import Helper - Select Fields dialog is
completed using the pre-existing map.

Field Map
Click the down arrow to reveal a list of pre-existing field maps. Use the Browse
button to specify the location of the pre-existing field map. Select the
appropriate field map from the list.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
6.
C
Click the Next button. The Custom Import Helper - Select Fields dialog appears.
This dialog allows you to map the columns in the file you are importing to the fields in
the application. This is an essential step to importing data into the application. The File
Display box displays the file you are importing in a spreadsheet format. You match up
the columns in that spreadsheet format to the fields in the application. You do not have
to map all of the columns in your source file to the fields in your application. Follow
the guidelines below to complete the fields on the Custom Import Helper - Select Fields
dialog.

Columns
Select the column you want to map to a system field. The File Display box displays
the column data as it appears in the file you are importing.

Field Category
Select the type of fields you want displayed in the Available Fields list. This option
allows you to limit the number of fields in the list so you don’t have to scroll
through them all.

All Fields
Select this category to display all available fields.

Book Fields
Select this category to display only fields that pertain to the book information
fields in the application.

Critical Fields
Select this category to display only the fields that are critical to calculating
depreciation.

Descriptive Fields
Select this category to display only the descriptive fields that are not critical to
calculating depreciation.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data

C-8
Disposal Fields
Select this category to display only fields that pertain to asset disposals.

Available Fields
After you’ve selected the column you want to map from the Columns list, select
the Sage Fixed Assets system field you want to map to that column. You can select
multiple fields from this list in order to map the data in a column to multiple Sage
Fixed Assets system fields. For example, the placed-in-service date might appear
only once in your source file, but you can map it to the Placed-in-Service field in
all seven books. Once you’ve mapped a field to a column, the field no longer
appears in the Available Fields list.

Field Mapping
This list box displays a list of the fields you’ve added to the map.

File Display
This box displays the column data as it appears in the file you are importing. This
is where you view the data to decide which column you want to map to a system
field.

Begin Import at Row
Type the row number of the file you are importing that you want the application
to start importing from. This option allows you to view header rows from your
source file in the File Display box without importing them.

Add Button
Click this button to add the selected fields to the map file.

Remove Button
Click this button to remove the selected fields from the map file.

Print Map Button
Click this button to send the map you have created to the default printer.

Save Map Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to save the map you’ve
created. For more information, see “Completing the Save As Dialog (Custom
Import Helper),” page C-11, and “Sample Import Field Map Report,” page C-11.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
7.
C
Click the Next button. The Custom Import Helper - Import dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to understand the Custom Import Helper - Import dialog
and to run an Import Exceptions report.

Company Name
This field displays the name of the company into which you are importing the file.

Import File
This field displays the name of the file you are importing.

Field Map
This field displays the name of the selected field map (in brackets). The list below
contains the names of all the fields included in the field map.

Invalid
After you’ve clicked the Validate button, this field displays the number of invalid
records in the data you are importing.

Valid Records
After you’ve clicked the Validate button, this field displays the number of valid
records in the data you are importing.

Exceptions
After you’ve clicked the Validate button, this field displays the number of
individual exceptions in the data you are importing. An exception is an error in the
data you are importing. Each record can have many exceptions. The Import
Exceptions report details these errors.

Validate Button
Click this button to validate the data in the source file you are importing.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
8.

View Report Button
Click this button to display the Import Exceptions report in the report viewer. The
Import Exceptions report provides information about invalid records and their
trouble spots. See “Sample Import Exceptions Report,” page C-12.

Stop Button
Click this button to stop the import process.

Finish Button
Click this button to import the data into the Sage Fixed Assets application. Custom
Import Helper imports only valid records. You can validate the data and view an
Import Exceptions report prior to importing.
Review the data on the Custom Import Helper - Import dialog prior to completing the
import. This ensures the accuracy of your data.
Note: You cannot have the spreadsheet open while you are in the Custom Import
Helper.
9.
Click the Validate button to validate the data of the source file before importing. The
application determines whether the data in the originating source file is valid and
then displays the number of valid and invalid records. You can also run an Import
Exceptions report from this dialog. An Import Exceptions report indicates
incompatible or invalid records in the file you are importing. It also indicates the
reason the record is invalid.
10. If desired, click the View Report button to view the Import Exceptions report, and
then click the Close button. If the application finds invalid fields in the import file, this
report explains why the fields are invalid. If you choose to run the report at this time,
the application displays the report in the report viewer, where you can then print the
report or save it in a file. You must close the report viewer in order to return to the
import function. See “Sample Import Exceptions Report,” page C-12.
11. Correct any errors in your data (you can click the Back button to move backwards
through the dialogs).
12. Click the Finish button. The application imports only valid data from the source file
and displays a completion message, when finished with the import.
Note: Avoid importing valid records twice. The application imports valid records, but
it does not import invalid records. If some records in your data file are invalid, you
can correct the data file and reimport the records that were invalid. Make sure you
import only the records that contained errors, and do not reimport the records that
were valid more than once.
13. To exit from the Custom Import Helper - Import dialog, do any one of the following:
• Press ALT+F4.
• Click the Close button.
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Custom Import Helper
Importing Asset Data
C
Completing the Save As Dialog (Custom Import Helper)
The Save As dialog appears when you click the Save Map button on the Custom Import
Helper - Select Fields dialog. Follow the guidelines below to complete this dialog.

Save In
Specify a storage location for the file you are creating.

File Name
Specify a name for the file you are creating.

Save as Type
The application selects the .IMP file type as a default.
Sample Import Field Map Report
Below is an example of an Import Field Map report. The report displays the connections
you mapped from the columns in your source file to the fields in your application.
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C-11
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Custom Import Helper
List of Importable Fields
Sample Import Exceptions Report
Below is an example of an Import Exceptions report. The report specifies where problems
exist in your source file data, and explains the nature of the problems, if possible.
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List of Importable Fields
The following table contains the list of fields available for mapping with Custom Import
Helper. For each field, the table provides the name and the required format. Some fields
require a particular code that is specified by the application. These fields are noted with an
asterisk in front of the field name. For the correct codes for these fields, see “Field
Specifications,” page C-14. Please pay particular attention to the format of date fields and
the Estimated Life field.
Date Fields
Enter dates in MM/DD/YYYY format.
Please note that the Beginning Date field should always be expressed as the end of the month.
The application assumes that a date entered with only five characters contains a leading
zero in the month field.
Numeric Fields
Numeric fields must be stored as integers (0 through 9), not as formulas or special
functions. Numeric (currency) fields are formatted with nine (or ten) digits and two
decimals (123456789.12).
Estimated Life and ADS Life Fields
The Estimated Life and ADS Life fields generally should be formatted as YYMM. Data
received without leading or trailing zeroes will be assumed to have the following format:
C-12
Data
Format
Example
1 character
Y
5 or five years
2 characters
YY
15 or fifteen years
3 characters
YMM
506 or five years and six months
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Custom Import Helper
List of Importable Fields
C
Fields Available for Importing
Field Name
Format - Width
168 Allow % (all books)
Numeric - 2
Acquisition Date
Date - 10
Acquisition Value (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
* Activity Code
Text - A, D, I, etc.
ADS Life
Numeric - YYMM
Asset ID
Alphanumeric - 50
Beginning Accum (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Beginning Date (all books)
Date - 7
Beginning YTD (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Cash Proceeds
Numeric (currency) - 12
Class
Alphanumeric - 2
Custom Date 1
Date - 10
Custom Date 2
Date - 10
Custom Field 1
Alphanumeric - 25
Custom Field 2
Alphanumeric - 25
Custom Field 3
Alphanumeric - 25
Custom Field 4
Alphanumeric - 25
Custom Field 5
Alphanumeric - 25
Declining Balance % (all books)
Numeric - 3 (150, 175, etc.)
* Deferred Code (all books)
Text - (Y/N/D)
Deferred Date (all books)
Date - 10
* Depreciation Method (all books)
Text - 2
Description
Alphanumeric - 80
Disposal Date
Date - 10
Disposal Method
Text - 1
Estimated Life (all books)
Numeric - YYMM
Expense of Sale
Numeric (currency) - 12
G/L Accum Account
Alphanumeric - 100
G/L Asset Account
Alphanumeric - 100
G/L Expense Account
Alphanumeric - 100
Gain/Loss (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
ITC Amount
Numeric (currency) - 12
ITC Basis Reduction Amt
Numeric (currency) - 12
* ITC Option
Alphanumeric - 1
ITC Percent
Numeric - 6
ITC Recap Amt (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Location
Alphanumeric - 25
* Mid-Quarter Flag (all books)
Text -1 (Y/N)
Non Cash Proceeds
Numeric (currency) - 12
Owner
Alphanumeric - 25
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Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications
Field Name
Format - Width
Placed-In-Service Date (all books)
Date - 10
* Property Type
Text - 1
Purchase Order
Alphanumeric - 25
Salvage Value (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Sec 179 Qual? (all books)
Text - T or F
Sec 179 Recap Amt (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Sec 179/Bonus Amt (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Sec 179/Other Amt (all books)
Numeric (currency) - 12
Sec 179/Other Code (all books)
Text - B, C, D, E, O, or N
Serial Number
Alphanumeric - 25
Vendor
Alphanumeric - 25
Zone Type (all books)
Text - G, K, E, D, or X
* These fields require a particular code that is specified by Sage Fixed Assets.
Field Specifications
The files you import must match the format the application expects to receive. Each file you
import includes multiple records, and each record includes multiple fields that must
contain data of the proper type.
Most general information fields are user-defined. In the description of each field that
follows, general information fields are listed as user-defined. This means you can enter
data of your choice that is appropriate to the field name. For field lengths and formats of
each field listed below, see the table, “Fields Available for Importing,” page C-13.
Note: The order of the fields within a record is not important. For convenience, the fields
in the descriptions below match the order in which they are listed in the table.

168 Allow %
This field is required with depreciation methods MA, MR, SB, and AA.
Enter the Section 168 Allowance percentage. Enter the number as 30 for a 30%
allowance, 50 for a 50% allowance, or 100 for a 100% allowance.

Acquisition Date
User-defined date field.

Acquisition Value
The field must contain the cost of the asset.
The format of this field is Numeric - 12 characters including two digits after the decimal
point. Example: 123456789.12.
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Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications


C
Activity Code
Use one of the codes outlined below.
Activity
Code
Type
Definition
A
Active
Active Asset
D
Disposed
Disposed Asset
I
Inactive
Inactive Asset
ADS Life
The first two digits display the number of years in the ADS life. The last two digits
display the number of months.
The format of this field is YYMM. Example: 0700.

Asset ID
User-defined.
The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 50 characters.

Beginning Depreciation Fields
These fields should contain depreciation data being brought forward from a previous
fixed assets solution.

Beginning Accum
This field should contain the total of all depreciation calculated on the asset since
it was placed in service, including the amount in the Beginning YTD field.
The amount in this field may not be greater than the asset’s depreciable basis or less
than the beginning YTD depreciation amount.

Beginning Date
Required if the beginning accumulated amount is greater than 0. The date must be
in the format MM/YYYY, where the day represents the end of the month.

Beginning YTD
This field should contain the amount of depreciation, if any, already taken on this
asset in this book for the fiscal year in which you are importing the data. This is the
amount of depreciation taken from the beginning of that fiscal year through the
date in the beginning date field. If the beginning date is any date other than the end
of a fiscal year, this field must contain the YTD depreciation to get correct results
when you run depreciation for the current fiscal year. If this field is blank, the
application assumes no depreciation for the fiscal year as of the beginning date has
been taken.
The amount in this field may not be greater than the asset’s depreciable basis, or
the beginning accumulated depreciation amount.

Cash Proceeds
You may leave this field blank. However, if the gain/loss amount is based on this
figure, the number should be entered.

Class
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 2 characters.

Custom Date 1 and 2
User-defined date fields.
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Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications

Custom Fields 1 through 5
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Declining Balance %
Enter the depreciation percentage associated with the declining balance method
specified in the Depreciation Method field. Use this field only if you entered a
depreciation method of MF, MA, MT, MI, MR, DB, DH, DD, DI, DE, or DC.
Enter the number as 100, 125, 150, 175, or 200 without special formatting.
C-16

Deferred Code
Enter “Y” if you want to recognize a gain for a disposal. Enter “N” if you do not. Enter
“D” if you want to defer the gain until a later date.

Deferred Date
Enter a deferred disposal date only if you entered “D” in the Deferred Code field.

Depreciation Method
This field must contain a valid depreciation method code. All depreciation method
codes must be in uppercase letters. The following table contains the valid depreciation
method codes.
Code
Depreciation Method
MA
MACRS formula plus 168 Allowance
AA
ADS straight-line MACRS plus 168 Allowance
MR
MACRS Indian Reservation plus 168 Allowance
SB
Straight-line, full-month plus 168 Allowance
MF
MACRS formula
MT
MACRS table
MI
MACRS Indian Reservation
AD
ADS straight-line MACRS
AT
ACRS table
SA
Straight-line, alternate ACRS formula
ST
Straight-line, alternate ACRS table
SD
Straight-line, modified half-year
SL
Straight-line
SF
Straight-line, full month
SH
Straight-line, half-year
DB
Declining-balance, switch to SL when optimal
DD
Declining-balance, modified half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DC
Declining-balance, no switch to SL
DH
Declining-balance, half-year, switch to SL when optimal
DE
Declining-balance, modified half-year, no switch to SL
DI
Declining-balance, half-year, no switch to SL
YH
Sum-of-the-years’-digits, half-year
YD
Sum-of-the-years’-digits, modified half-year
YS
Sum-of-the-years’-digits
RV
Remaining value over remaining life
OC
Own depreciation calculation
NO
Do not depreciate
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications
C
The depreciation method is interdependent with values in several other fields:
Placed-In-Service Date, Declining Balance %, Property Type, 168 Allowance %, and
Estimated Life.
All custom method depreciation codes must be in lowercase letters.

Description
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 80 characters.

Disposal Date
If the asset has been disposed of, this field must contain a valid date in the format
MM/DD/YYYY.

Disposal Method
If the record includes a disposal date, a disposal method is required. Enter one of the
following codes.

Code
Disposal Method
S
Sale
A
Abandonment
E
Taxable Exchange
C
Casualty
L
Like-Kind Exchange: Pre-1/3/2000
K
Like-Kind Exchange: Post-1/2/2000
I
Involuntary Conversion: Pre-1/3/2000
V
Involuntary Conversion: Post-1/2/2000
R
Other
Estimated Life
This field must have an estimated life in years and months that is valid for the
depreciation method used.
The format of this field is YYMM. For example, enter 5 ½ years as 0506.

Expense of Sale
This field may be left blank. However, if the gain/loss amount is based on this figure,
the number should be entered.

G/L Accum Account
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 100 characters.

G/L Asset Account
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 100 characters.

G/L Expense Account
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 100 characters.

Gain/Loss
Enter the gain/loss amount for this asset. This field may be left blank.
Denote a loss by a negative sign before the amount.

ITC Amount
The ITC Amount field cannot exceed the asset’s depreciable basis.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
C-17
C
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications

ITC Basis Reduction Amt
This field displays the amount of the ITC credit used to reduce the basis when
calculating depreciation. If no value is entered in this field, the application calculates
the basis reduction using the default reduction percentage based on the type of ITC
taken in the ITC Option field.

ITC Option
Complete this field based on whether ITC was taken.


If ITC was taken:
The ITC Option field must display one of the following codes.
Code
ITC Option
1
Heat/Power System
2
Small Wind Energy
3
Geothermal Heat Pump
A
New Property, full credit
B
New Property, reduced credit
C
Used Property, full credit
D
Used Property, reduced credit
E
30-year rehabilitation property
F
40-year rehabilitation property
G
Certified historical structure rehabilitation
H
Noncertified historical structure rehabilitation
I
Biomass property
J
Intercity buses
K
Hydroelectric generating property
L
Ocean thermal property
M
Solar energy property
N
Wind property
O
Geothermal property
P
Certified historical transition property
Q
Qualified progress expenditures
R
Reforestation property
If ITC was not taken:
ITC Option field—Enter the letter X in the ITC field.
ITC Percent, ITC Amount, and ITC Basis should be zero (0).

ITC Percent
The ITC Percent field cannot be greater than 40%.
The format of this field is 0.nnnn, where n is the applicable percent.

C-18
ITC Recap Amt
This field displays the ITC recapture amount as required by tax law (if ITC was taken
on the asset and the asset was disposed of before the end of its recovery life). The
amount in this field is carried to the Form 4255—ITC Recapture worksheet, which is
accessible through the Reports/Tax Reports menu.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications
C

Location
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Mid-Quarter Flag
• Enter “Y” to use the midquarter convention for depreciation methods MF, MA,
MT, MI, MR, AD, or AA.
• Enter “N” to use the half-year convention for depreciation methods MF, MA, MT,
MI, MR, AD, or AA.
• Leave this field blank if using other depreciation methods.

Non Cash Proceeds
This field may be left blank. However, if the gain/loss amount is based on this figure,
the number should be entered.

Owner
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Placed-In-Service Date
The placed-in-service date must be valid for the depreciation method entered in the
Depreciation Method field and the property types listed below.
Property types:
• Property type H is valid only for dates in the range of 01/01/81 to 12/31/86.
• Property types P, R, C, E, F, Z, and V are valid with any placed-in-service date.
• Property types A, Q, and S are valid only for dates after 06/18/84.
Depreciation methods:
• ACRS = 1/1/81 - 12/31/86
• MACRS = Begins 8/1/86 - present (allowed for transitional property between
8/1/86 and 12/31/86)
For an in-depth discussion of depreciation methods and property types, see Appendix
A, “Depreciation and Fixed Asset Concepts.”

Property Type
Enter property type in uppercase letters. The property type field must display one of
the following codes.
Code
Property Type
P
Personal property, general
A
Automobile
T
Light trucks and vans
Q
Personal property, listed
R
Real property, general
S
Real property, listed
C
Real property, conservation
E
Real property, energy
F
Real property, farms
H
Real property, low-income housing
Z
Amortizable property
V
Vintage account property
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
C-19
C
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications
Property type must be valid for the date placed in service in all books.
• Property types P, R, C, E, F, Z, and V are valid with any placed-in-service date.
• Property types A, Q, and S are valid only for dates after 06/18/84.
• Property type T is valid only for dates starting 01/01/03.
• Property type H is valid only for dates in the range of 01/01/81 to 12/31/86.

Purchase Order
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Salvage Value
The salvage value cannot be greater than the asset’s depreciable basis.

Sec 179 Qual?
This field indicates whether the asset is qualified to take a Section 179 deduction and
should be included in the phase-out calculations, whether or not the asset actually
claims a Section 179 deduction.
• Enter “T” (for True) if the asset is qualified Sec. 179 property.
• Enter “F” (for False) if the asset is not qualified Sec. 179 property.

Sec 179 Recap Amt
When a pre-1987 asset on which the Section 179 expense deduction has been taken is
disposed of during either of the two taxable years following the acquisition year, all or
part of the Section 179 expense must be added back to the asset’s basis (that is,
recaptured).
The calculation for the amount added back to the basis is:
Section 179 taken
– Depreciation on 179 amount
Section 179 recapture
In the above equation, the depreciation on the Section 179 amount is the amount of
depreciation that would have been taken on the Section 179 amount had there been no
Section 179 deduction.

Sec 179/Bonus Amt
This field should contain either a zero if no Bonus or Section 179 were taken in the
acquisition year or the total amount of Bonus or Section 179 that was applied to the
asset.
• Bonus amount should not exceed $2,000 or 20% of the asset’s depreciable basis,
whichever is less.
• Section 179 amount may not exceed the asset’s depreciable basis. Limitations for
this field are based on the applicable law.
C-20

Sec 179/Other Amt
Complete this field based on whether or not you are claiming a Section 179 Other
deduction. In order to enter an amount here you must enter a corresponding code in
the Sec 179/Other Code field.

Sec 179/Other Code
Complete this field based on whether a Sec. 179/Other deduction was taken.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications


C
If Sec 179/Other was taken:
The Sec 179/Other Code field must display one of the following codes:
Code
Sec 179/Other Option
B
EPA Sulfur Control Requirements
C
Qualified Refineries
D
Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings
E
Advanced Mine Safety Equipment
O
Other Basis Reduction
If Sec 179/Other was not taken:
Enter the letter “N” in the Sec 179/Other Code field.

Serial Number
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Vendor
User-defined. The format for this field is alphanumeric text, up to 25 characters.

Zone Type
Enter a zone type code in this field if your asset is located in a special zone which
entitles the asset to claim an additional Sec. 179 deduction above the regular dollar
limits.


If the asset is located in a special zone:
The Zone Type field must display one of the following codes.
Code
Definition
G
Gulf Opportunity Zone
K
Kansas Disaster Zone
E
Enterprise Zone
D
Qualified Disaster Zone
If the asset is not located in a special zone:
Enter the letter “X” in the Zone Type field.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
C-21
C
C-22
Custom Import Helper
Field Specifications
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Appendix D
Custom Export Helper
In this appendix:
Exporting Asset Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
List of Exportable Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
The Custom Export Helper guides you through the process of exporting asset data to an
ASCII Comma Separated Value (CSV) file. A wide range of applications, including popular
spreadsheet programs, can read this file format.
Exporting Asset Data
The Custom Export uses a series of wizard dialogs that assist you in exporting asset
information from the application. In addition to creating the CSV file, you also create an
export field map file during the export process. The field map file lists the names of the
asset fields that you are exporting. You can reuse the field map in subsequent exports. By
using an existing field map, you don’t have to select the fields you want to export each time
you perform the export.
Navigating the Custom Export Helper
The guidelines below explain the navigation buttons common to all Custom Export Helper
dialogs.

Help Button
Accesses the online Help.

Cancel Button
Cancels the current export and returns you to the application main window.

Back Button
Returns to the previous Custom Export Helper dialog.

Next Button
Accepts the entries in the current Custom Export Helper dialog and displays the next
dialog.

Finish Button
Begins the export process.
Follow the steps below to export asset data using the Custom Export Helper.
To export asset data
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Custom Export from the menu bar. The Custom
Export Helper - Welcome dialog appears.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
D-1
D
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data
2.
Click the Next button to continue with the export process. The Custom Export Helper
- Select Company dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Export Helper - Select Company
dialog.
D-2

Companies
Use this field to select the company from which you want to export assets.

Databases
Use this field to select the database that contains the company from which you
want to export assets.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data
3.
D
Click the Next button. The Custom Export Helper - Select Group dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Export Helper - Select Group
dialog.

4.
Groups
Use this field to select the group of assets that you want to export. If you want to
export all of the assets of the selected company, select the All FAS Assets group. If
you want to export a subset of assets from the selected company, select another
group.
Click the Next button. The Custom Export Helper - Select Map dialog appears.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
D-3
D
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data
A Field Map lists the names of the asset fields that you are exporting. After you create
a field map, you can reuse it in subsequent exports. By using an existing field map, you
don’t have to select the fields you want to export each time you perform the export.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Export Helper - Select Map
dialog.

Select Field Map
Use these fields to either create a new field map or to select an existing field map.

Create New Field Map
Click this option button if you want to create a new field map. When you click
the Next button, you create the field map on the Custom Export Helper - Field
Map dialog.

Use Saved Field Map
Click this option button if you want to use an existing field map. When you
click the Next button, the Custom Export Helper - Field Map dialog is
completed using the existing map.

Field Map
Select the appropriate field map from the list.

Browse Button
Click this button to specify the location of the existing field map that you want
to use for the export.

Book
Use this field to select the depreciation book (Tax, Internal, AMT, ACE, State, Custom 1,
or Custom 2) that you want to use for the export file. Some depreciation information
differs from one book to another.
5.
Click the Next button. The Custom Export Helper - Field Map dialog appears.
This dialog allows you to select the asset fields that you want to export. Follow the
guidelines below to complete the Custom Export Helper - Field Map dialog.
D-4
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data

D
Field Category
Use this field to select the type of fields you want displayed in the Available Fields
list. This option allows you to limit the number of fields in the list so you don’t have
to scroll through them all.

All Fields
Select this category to display all available fields.

General Info Fields
Select this category to display only the fields that contain general information
about an asset, such as its location, but do not affect the asset’s depreciation
calculations.

Critical Fields
Select this category to display only the fields that are critical to calculating
depreciation.

Book Info Fields
Select this category to display additional data entry fields that affect
depreciation calculations (in addition to the fields in the Critical Fields
category). Most of these fields can have different values in each book.

Depreciation Fields
Select this category to display only the fields that contain depreciation
amounts or information about those amounts (such as the dates for which
depreciation was calculated).

Disposal Fields
Select this category to display only fields that pertain to asset disposals.

Available Fields
Use this field to select the field(s) that you want to include in the field map. You
can add a field to the field map by highlighting it and then clicking the Add button.
The field appears in the Export Field Map list box.

Export Field Map
This list box displays a list of the fields you have added to the field map.

>> (Add Button)
Click this button to add the selected field(s) to the field map file.

<< (Remove Button)
Click this button to remove the selected fields from the field map file.

Print Map Button
Click this button to send the map you have created to the default printer.

Save Map Button
Click this button to display a dialog that allows you to save the field map you have
created.

Up and Down Buttons
Click these buttons to change the order of the fields in the Export Field Map list
box. Select a field and click the Up button to move the field higher in the list. Select
a field and click the Down button to move the field lower in the list.

Include Company Data?
Select this check box if you want the field map to include a header row that
contains the name of the selected company and group.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
D-5
D
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data

6.
Include Column Headers?
Select this check box if you want the field map to include a header row that
contains the names of the selected asset fields.
Click the Next button. The Custom Export Helper - File Destination dialog appears.
If you have not included the System Number field in the field map, a message asks if
you want to continue with the export. Click the No button if you want to return to the
Custom Export Helper - Field Map dialog and select the System Number. Otherwise,
click the Yes button to continue with the export.
If you have not saved your changes to the field map, a message asks if you want to save
the field map. Click the Yes button if you want to save the field map. The Save Field
Map dialog appears.
Enter a name for the field map, and then click OK. Otherwise, click the No button to
continue with the export.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Custom Export Helper - File Destination
dialog.

D-6
File Name
Use this field to enter the name of the file that will contain information about the
assets that you export. You do not have to enter a file extension. The application
automatically adds a CSV extension to the file name.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Export Helper
Exporting Asset Data
7.
D

Location
Use this field to enter the location of the export file.

Browse Button
Click the Browse button to display the Export File dialog that allows you to select
the destination folder for the export file.
Click the Next button. The Custom Export Helper - Export dialog appears.
Follow the guidelines below to understand the Custom Export Helper - Export dialog.
8.

Company Name
This field displays the name of the selected company from which you are exporting
asset information.

Group
This field displays the name of the selected group of assets.

Export File
This field displays the directory path and file name of the export file.

Field Map
This field displays the name of the selected field map (in brackets). The application
uses the list box to display the contents of the export field map.

Exporting Asset
This field displays the progress of the export after you click the Export button.

Stop Button
Click this button to stop the export process once it has begun.

Finish Button
Click this button to begin the export process.
Review the data on the Custom Export Helper - Export dialog prior to completing the
export. This ensures the accuracy of your data.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
D-7
D
Custom Export Helper
List of Exportable Fields
9.
Click the Finish button. The application exports only valid data from the source file
and displays a completion message, when finished with the export.
10. To exit from the Custom Export Helper - Export dialog, do any of the following:
• Press ALT+F4.
• Click the Close button.
List of Exportable Fields
The following table contains the list of fields available for exporting with the Custom
Export Helper. For each field, the table provides the name and the required format.
Fields Available for Exporting
Field Name
Format
General Information Fields
Activity Code
Text – A, D, I, etc.
Asset ID
Alphanumeric
Class
Alphanumeric
Creation Code
Text – O, D, etc.
Custom Date 1
Date
Custom Date 2
Date
Custom Field 1
Alphanumeric
Custom Field 2
Alphanumeric
Custom Field 3
Alphanumeric
Custom Field 4
Alphanumeric
Custom Field 5
Alphanumeric
Description
Alphanumeric
Entity
Alphanumeric
G/L Accum Account
Alphanumeric
G/L Asset Account
Alphanumeric
G/L Expense Account
Alphanumeric
Location
Alphanumeric
Owner
Alphanumeric
Purchase Order
Alphanumeric
Serial Number
Alphanumeric
System Number
Numeric
Vendor
Alphanumeric
Critical Fields
D-8
168 Allowance %
Numeric - 0, 30, 50
Acquisition Value
Numeric (Currency)
Declining Balance %
Numeric - 100, 125, 150, 175, 200
Depreciation Method
Text - MF, MT, SL, SD, etc.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Custom Export Helper
List of Exportable Fields
Field Name
Format
Estimated Life
YYMM
Placed-in-Service Date
Date
Property Type
Text – P, A, T, Q, R, S, C, E, F, H, Z, V
D
Book Information Fields
179 Deduction
Numeric (Currency)
179 Other Amount
Numeric (Currency)
179 Other Code
Text - B, C, D, E, O, or N
179 Qualified?
Text - Yes/No
ACE Basis
Numeric (Currency)
ACE Remaining Life
YYMM
Acquired By
Text – Yes = Exchange, No = Purchase
Acquisition Date
Date
Adjustment Amount
Numeric (Currency)
ADS Life
YYMM
Business Use 100%
Yes/No
Current 179 Recapture
Numeric (Currency)
Current Business Use %
Percentage – e.g., 60.5
Current Remaining Life
YYMM
ITC %
Percentage – e.g., 40.00
ITC Amount
Numeric (Currency)
ITC Basis Reduction Amt
Numeric (Currency)
ITC Option
Alphanumeric – 1, 2, 3, A, C, Q, R, etc.
Last Calc Date
Date
Net Book Value
Numeric (Currency)
Salvage Value
Numeric (Currency)
Zone Type
Text - G, K, E, D, or X
Depreciation Fields
168 Allowance Amount
Numeric (Currency)
Begin Prior Accum Depr
Numeric (Currency)
Beginning Accum
Numeric (Currency)
Beginning Date
Date
Beginning YTD
Numeric (Currency)
Current Accum
Numeric (Currency)
Current Key Codes
Text – m, l, a, etc.
Current Through Date
Date
Current YTD
Numeric (Currency)
Depreciation This Run
Numeric (Currency)
Exclude on Depr Report?
Text - Yes/No
Prior Accum Depr
Numeric (Currency)
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
D-9
D
Custom Export Helper
List of Exportable Fields
Field Name
Format
Disposal Fields
D-10
Cash Proceeds
Numeric (Currency)
Deferred Code
Text - Y, N, D
Deferred Date
Date
Disposal Date
Date
Disposal Method
Text – S, A, T, etc.
Expense of Sale
Numeric (Currency)
Gain/Loss
Numeric (Currency)
ITC Recapture
Numeric (Currency)
Non-Cash Proceeds
Numeric (Currency)
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Appendix E
Sage Fixed Assets Links
In this appendix:
Selecting a Favorite Sage Fixed Assets Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
Sage Fixed Assets Link Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
ProSystem fx Tax Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7
Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-24
The Sage Fixed Assets links enable you to electronically create and post depreciation
expense directly from the application to your accounting software. Using a link will reduce
duplicate data entry, eliminate keyboard errors, and keep the asset register up to date with
the accounting solution.
Note: For complete instructions on using all of the Sage Fixed Assets links, refer to the
Sage Fixed Assets - Links Guide located on your installation DVD.
The Sage Fixed Assets link creates a depreciation expense journal entry for one company
or group within a company at a time (the company that has been selected when you run
the link). The link cannot export depreciation transactions for multiple companies within
the same output file.
In the simplest terms, the Sage Fixed Assets link accomplishes these tasks:
• Identifies assets in the data files for a given company.
• Accumulates the Depreciation This Run expense amounts for these assets.
• Creates a depreciation expense journal entry. For some Sage Fixed Assets links, the
application creates an output file that you must import into your general ledger
software. For other Sage Fixed Assets links, the application sends the depreciation
expense journal entry directly to your general ledger software when you run the link.
The application installs several links automatically at no additional cost when you install
the application. You do not have to install these links. These links enable you to post
depreciation to many Sage products, including Sage ERP MAS 500, Sage 50 (Sage
Peachtree), Sage Timberline Office, and more.
However, you can install additional links if needed. You must enter a serial number when
you install one of these additional links. To purchase a link and receive your serial number,
call your Sage Fixed Assets sales representative.
You access the desired link from the Links menu.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
E-1
E
Sage Fixed Assets Links
Selecting a Favorite Sage Fixed Assets Link
Selecting a Favorite Sage Fixed Assets Link
You can select the Sage Fixed Assets link that you run most often. After you select your
favorite link, it appears at the bottom of the Links menu, so that you can run the link with
a single mouse click.
To select a favorite Sage Fixed Assets link
1.
Select File/Preferences from the menu bar. The Preferences dialog appears.
2.
Open the drop-down list box in the Favorite Link field, and select one of the links.
3.
Click OK to close the Preferences dialog. The selected link appears at the bottom of the
Links menu.
Sage Fixed Assets Link Process
Each time you transfer depreciation information from Sage Fixed Assets to the standard
output file, you will follow the steps outlined below:
1.
E-2
Add new assets and change existing assets as necessary. Make certain that the G/L
Expense Account number and G/L Accum Account number have been entered for
every asset included in your posting. See “Step 1: Entering G/L Account Numbers,”
page E-3.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Sage Fixed Assets Links
Sage Fixed Assets Link Process
2.
E
Calculate depreciation for the period you want to post. Typically, users post
depreciation amounts once a month. Calculate depreciation by selecting the
Depreciate command from the Depreciation menu. This procedure calculates
depreciation for the period and updates the Depreciation This Run column on the
Depreciation Expense report. Depreciation This Run must equal the period you want
to post. See “Step 2: Calculating Depreciation Before Running the Sage Fixed Assets
Link,” page E-4.
Note: If Depreciation This Run is too high, depreciate to the previous month and then
to the current month. That will ensure the monthly posting amount is correct.
3.
Run the Sage Fixed Assets link to generate the depreciation expense journal entry. For
some Sage Fixed Assets links, the application sends the depreciation expense journal
entry directly to your general ledger when you run the link. See “Step 3: Running a
Sage Fixed Assets Link,” page E-5.
4.
For some Sage Fixed Assets links, you must now import the ASCII file that the
application has just created into your general ledger system.
Step 1: Entering G/L Account Numbers
The application uses two account numbers to post depreciation: the G/L Expense Account
number and the G/L Accum Account number. The format of these account codes must
match the format used by your general ledger software.
• G/L Expense Account: This is the depreciation expense account number and should
be entered as it is set up in the Chart of Accounts in your general ledger software. This
account usually has a debit balance. The application uses it to create the journal entry
to be transferred to your general ledger software.
• G/L Accum Account: This is the accumulated depreciation expense account number
and should be entered as it is set up in the Chart of Accounts in your general ledger
software. This is a contra asset account and usually has a credit balance. The
application uses it to create the journal entry to be transferred to your general ledger
software.
Before you run the Sage Fixed Assets link, you should make sure that all of the assets on
which you calculate depreciation contain information in their G/L account fields. To
quickly discover if any assets have blank G/L account fields, follow the steps below.
To check for blank G/L account fields
1.
Go to the Asset List.
2.
Select the All FAS Assets group.
3.
Double-click the G/L account field name.
Double-clicking on a column heading in the Asset List sorts the column temporarily. Any
assets with blank G/L account fields will appear at the top of the list.
If you have any assets for which you calculate depreciation with blank G/L account fields,
select the asset and click the Asset Detail button to view the asset information. The general
ledger fields will appear in the general asset information in Asset Detail.
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Enter the G/L Accum Account number and G/L Expense Account number for every asset
on which you calculate depreciation. Use the same format for these account numbers as the
format used in the general ledger software.
Note: You may save time by using the Replace feature.
Important Note if You Customize G/L Account Fields
Many Sage Fixed Assets users facilitate data entry of the G/L account fields by using the
Customize Fields dialog. For example, suppose your G/L Expense Account numbers
consist of three numbers, a hyphen, and then three more numbers. In the Customize Fields
dialog, you could select the G/L Expense Account field and enter NNN-NNN in the Entry
Mask field. When you begin to enter an account number in the G/L Expense Account field,
the application enters the hyphen automatically.
However, the application does not recognize the entries in the Entry Mask field when you
use the Sage 50 Link. If the account number fields contain hyphens entered automatically
by the application because of entries in the Entry Mask field, these hyphens will not appear
in the link export file.
Therefore, if you want the G/L account numbers to have hyphens, you must enter the
hyphens manually in the G/L account fields.
Step 2: Calculating Depreciation Before Running the Sage Fixed
Assets Link
Before you run the Sage Fixed Assets link, you must calculate depreciation for all assets to
be included in your link file. You should calculate depreciation for each period (whether
monthly, quarterly, or annually) you plan to post. Do this through the Depreciate command
on the Depreciation menu. Calculate depreciation through the posting date, making sure
to select the depreciation book you use for financial reporting, typically the Internal book.
Run and review the report for all assets to be included in your output file.
Note: The application uses the amount in the Depreciation This Run column for the
depreciation amounts in the output file. Therefore, it is important that the amount of
depreciation in the Depreciation This Run column represents the depreciation expense for
the period you want to post. To ensure the amounts in the Depreciation This Run column
represents the period you want to post, follow the guidelines below.
If you post depreciation monthly and calculate depreciation monthly, simply run the Sage
Fixed Assets link after you calculate your monthly depreciation figures. However, if you
are not sure what period was included in the last depreciation run figures, use the
following procedure:
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1.
Calculate depreciation through the month-end before the beginning of the posting
period. For example, to create a Sage Fixed Assets link file for October 2011, first
calculate depreciation through September 2011.
2.
Calculate depreciation through the end of the posting period. Continuing the
example, you would calculate depreciation through October 2011. The period
included in the Depreciation This Run column, shown on the Depreciation Expense
report, would include only the month of October (the period since the last time you
calculated depreciation).
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3.
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Run the Sage Fixed Assets link using a posting date of October 2011.
In most cases, you will want to include all assets in both the depreciation calculations and
the link file. To include all assets, calculate depreciation for the group All FAS Assets.
Step 3: Running a Sage Fixed Assets Link
Before you run a Sage Fixed Assets link, you should have performed the following tasks:
• Make sure that the G/L Expense Account number and G/L Accum Account number
have been entered for every asset included in your posting.
• Calculate depreciation for the period you want to post. Typically, users post
depreciation amounts once a month. Calculate depreciation by selecting the
Depreciate command from the Depreciation menu. Calculate depreciation through the
posting date, making sure to select the depreciation book you use for financial
reporting (typically the Internal book). Run and review the report for all assets to be
included in your output file.
To run a Sage Fixed Assets link
1.
Do one of the following:
• Select Links/Depreciation Links from the menu bar.
• Select Links/Asset Addition Links from the menu bar.
Note: Asset addition links allow you to create assets in the application. The asset
information is sent to the application as you enter invoices and/or purchase orders.
For information on running an asset addition link, see the Sage Fixed Assets - Links
Guide.
• Select Links/Tax Links from the menu bar.
Note: If you have selected a favorite general ledger link, you can select the link
directly from the Links menu.
2.
Select the link that you want to run. The Link dialog for the selected Sage Fixed Assets
link appears.
3.
Complete the Sage Fixed Assets Link dialog, and then click the Preview button to
view the G/L Posting report. This is a required step.
4.
Click the Post button to run the Sage Fixed Assets link.
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Completing the Sage Fixed Assets Link Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Sage Fixed Assets Link dialog.

Database
Use this field to specify the database that contains the company and group of assets for
which you want to export depreciation expense information to the general ledger
software.

Company
Use this field to specify the company that contains the group of assets for which you
want to export depreciation information to the general ledger software.

Group
Use this field to specify a group that you have defined using the Group Manager or the
Save as Group command. If you do not select a group from the list, the standard output
file will include information for “All FAS Assets” for the current company, in order by
G/L account number.

Book
Use this field to select the depreciation book (Tax, Internal, State, AMT, ACE, Custom 1,
or Custom 2) for which you want to post depreciation expense. The Internal book is the
default selection.
The Sage Fixed Assets link will post depreciation for any of the seven books, but it will
only do so for one book at a time. On the Book Defaults tab of the Edit Company dialog,
make sure that the book for which you are posting depreciation is open.

Type (Sage Fixed Assets Universal Link Only)
Use this field to specify the level of detail that you want to include in your journal entry
posting file.

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Summary Journal Entry
Select this option if you want the posting file to include only the total Depreciation
This Run amounts for each G/L Expense Account number and G/L Accum
Account number.
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Detail Journal Entry
Select this option if you want the posting file to include the System Number, asset
description, depreciation expense, and accumulated depreciation for each asset in
the selected group.

Period Posting Date
Use this field to specify the end of the period through which you want to post
depreciation expense. Enter the date in MM/DD/YYYY format. The application
validates that the date entered is the end of a period. The journal entry will include the
Depreciation This Run figures only for the assets for which depreciation has been
calculated through the posting date you enter in this field. If you do not enter a date in
this field, you are unable to preview the Posting report or post depreciation.

Journal Entry Date
Use this field to specify the date on which you want to post the transaction in your
general ledger software. Enter the date in MM/DD/YYYY format. The default date is
the system date; generally, this is the date that you are completing the dialog. However,
you can change this date if you want.
Example: Suppose you closed the books for March in the general ledger software, but
inadvertently did not post the depreciation expense journal entry at that time. Now it
is April, and you want to post the depreciation expense journal entry for March. You
would enter a March date in the Period Posting Date field and an April date in the
Journal Entry Date field.

Reference Number
Enter up to 10 alphanumeric characters as the journal entry number for your general
ledger. The application uses this number as a reference number for each record (or row)
in the standard output file. This field can include numbers, letters, and hyphens.

Link File
Use this field to indicate a path and file name for the ASCII files that will be created.
You can accept the default directory path and file name, or you can click the Browse
button to create a different directory path and/or file name.

Preview Button
Click this button to create a G/L Posting report containing depreciation expense and
accumulated depreciation information for the selected group of assets. The Preview
button is available only after you enter a date in the Period Posting Date field.

Post Button
Click this button to create the depreciation expense journal entry for the selected group
of assets.
ProSystem fx Tax Link
Note: The ProSystem fx Tax Link is not available for this release of Sage Fixed Assets. The
link will be available in the next release.
The integration between Sage Fixed Assets Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax allows you
to import depreciation calculations, ITC, and disposal information from Sage Fixed Assets
into ProSystem fx Tax for the preparation of your year-end tax return.
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Note: We refer to the Sage Fixed Assets products as “Sage Fixed Assets.” In this chapter,
Sage Fixed Assets does not include Sage Fixed Assets - Tracking or Sage Fixed Assets Planning.
Version Compatibility
Each year, the Sage Fixed Assets product supports the latest tax laws, as well as the
updated Form 4562. The version number of the Sage Fixed Assets product indicates that it
supports the Section 179 limits and automobile limits for that year and all previous years,
and the Form 4562 for the previous tax year. For example, the 2011 release of Sage Fixed
Assets supports the Section 179 limits and automobile limits for 2011 and the Form 4562 for
the 2010 filing year.
The ProSystem fx Tax product supports a single tax year. The version number of the
ProSystem fx Tax product indicates the tax year that it supports. For example, the 2010 Tax
Prep product supports the Form 4562 for the 2010 filing year. You can have Tax Prep
products for multiple years on a single computer.
The Sage Fixed Assets 2012.1 product is compatible with the 2011 Tax Prep product.
Sage Fixed Assets Companies and ProSystem fx Tax Returns
In Sage Fixed Assets, a company is a collection of assets that you define as you prefer; it is
not necessarily a legal entity. For example, you might want to define a company for the
assets in each department or in each location in your organization.
It is important to remember that one or more Sage Fixed Assets companies could belong to
a single ProSystem fx Tax return.
Using the Link
The integration between Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax is a four-step process:
Step 1: Set up the Link between the two applications. You need to set up the link just once
for each Sage Fixed Assets company from which you’ll be importing information into
ProSystem fx Tax. See “Step 1: Setting Up the Link,” page E-9.
Step 2: Assign an entity to each asset. See “Step 2: Assigning an Entity to Each Asset,” page
E-15.
Step 3: Calculate depreciation. See “Step 3: Calculating Depreciation,” page E-17.
Step 4: Import depreciation into ProSystem fx Tax, either in summary or in detail. You can
import information from more than one Sage Fixed Assets company into each ProSystem
fx Tax return when importing in detail. See “Step 4: Importing Depreciation into ProSystem
fx Tax,” page E-19.
Note: The integration features in Sage Fixed Assets are available only if ProSystem fx Tax
is installed on your computer.
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Step 1: Setting Up the Link
Setting up the link between Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax consists of two parts:
1.
Enter an EIN in the New Company or Edit Company dialog within Sage Fixed Assets.
See “Entering an EIN,” page E-9.
2.
Complete the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog in Sage Fixed Assets. See “Accessing the
ProSystem fx Tax Setup Dialog,” page E-10.
Entering an EIN
The EIN (Employer Identification Number) is used for validation purposes when you
import entity information from ProSystem fx Tax into Sage Fixed Assets. You can enter an
EIN when you create a new company, or you can enter an EIN for an existing company.
To enter an EIN for a new company
1.
Select File/New Company from the Sage Fixed Assets menu bar. The New Company
dialog appears.
2.
In the Name field, enter a name for the new company.
3.
In the Identification Number (EIN) field, enter the EIN for the company.
Enter the EIN as a 9-digit number in NN-NNNNNNN format. You must enter the first
two digits, followed by a dash, and then enter the remaining seven digits.
4.
Complete the remaining fields on the New Company dialog, and then click OK.
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To enter an EIN for an existing company
1.
Open the company for which you want to enter the EIN.
2.
Select File/Edit Company from the Sage Fixed Assets menu bar. The Edit Company
dialog appears.
3.
In the Identification Number (EIN) field, enter the EIN for the company.
Enter the EIN as a 9-digit number in NN-NNNNNNN format. You must enter the first
two digits, followed by a dash, and then enter the remaining seven digits.
4.
Click OK to close the Edit Company dialog.
Accessing the ProSystem fx Tax Setup Dialog
The second step in setting up the link between Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax is
to complete the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog in Sage Fixed Assets.
To access the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog, select Links/Tax Links/ProSystem fx Tax from
the menu bar. The application displays the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog.
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Completing the Map Books Tab of the ProSystem fx Tax Setup Dialog
Use the Map Books tab to select the Sage Fixed Assets depreciation books that you want to
send to ProSystem fx Tax and to indicate the proper use for each book.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Map Books tab of the ProSystem fx Tax Setup
dialog.

Book
Use this field to select the Sage Fixed Assets book(s) from which depreciation will be
sent to ProSystem fx Tax. You can map a Sage Fixed Assets book more than once. For
example, you can use the State book for both Virginia and South Carolina depreciation
purposes.

Use
Use this field to identify the use for the selected Sage Fixed Assets book. A Use can be
mapped to a book only once. In order for the link to operate successfully, one Sage
Fixed Assets book must be identified as being in use for federal depreciation purposes.
Note: You can select no more than four states from the Use list.

Add Button
Click this button to add the selected Sage Fixed Assets book and its intended use to the
Book Map list box.

Remove Button
Click this button to remove the selected Sage Fixed Assets book from the Book Map list
box.

Book Map
This field displays the selected Sage Fixed Assets books and their intended uses.
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
Save Book Map Button
Click this button to save the information in the Book Map list box. When you click this
button, the application validates the Book Map list. For example, the application makes
sure you have selected a federal use in the Use list.
Completing the Manage Entities Tab of the ProSystem fx Tax Setup
Dialog
The integration between Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax operates by linking each
asset in the fixed asset application to an entity in the tax application. In order to facilitate
the assignment process, use the Manage Entities tab to set up a list of Entities to which each
asset belongs.
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Manage Entities tab of the ProSystem fx Tax
Setup dialog.


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Entity List
This field displays the list of entities that you can assign to assets.

Entity
This column displays the Entity Type and Entity ID, separated by a dash.

Description
This column displays a description of the entity.
Import Button
Click this button to connect to ProSystem fx Tax and import a list of entities. When you
click the button, the application prompts you to enter a fiscal year-end. You must enter
a valid fiscal year-end in MM/DD/YYYY format. The year must be 2004 or later. After
you enter the fiscal year-end and click OK, the application displays a series of wizard
dialogs that allow you to import the list of entities from the ProSystem fx Tax return
that corresponds to the fiscal year entered. For more information, see “Importing
Entities from ProSystem fx Tax,” page E-13.
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Add Button
If you want to enter entity information as you create assets throughout the year, you
may need to create new entities before you install next year’s tax application. Click the
Add button to display a dialog that allows you to manually enter a new entity. When
you click this button, the application prompts you to select an entity type and to enter
an entity number and description.
After you enter this information and click OK, the application returns to the Manage
Entities tab and adds the new entity to the list.

Edit Button
Click this button to change the information for the selected entity. First, select an entity
from the Entity List. When you click this button, the application displays a dialog that
allows you to change the entity type, entity number, and description. After you click
OK, the application returns to the Manage Entities tab and displays the changed
information in the Entity List.

Delete Button
Click this button to remove the selected entity from the Entity List.
Note: Any edits made to the entity list using the management buttons (Import, Add, Edit
and Delete) will require an update to existing assets.
That completes the setup process. After you set up the link, you are ready for Step 2:
Assigning an entity to each asset.
Importing Entities from ProSystem fx Tax
You may import a list of entities from ProSystem fx Tax into Sage Fixed Assets using the
List of Entities wizard. Before you can import entities into Sage Fixed Assets, you must first:
• Be logged in to a currently running session of Sage Fixed Assets.
• Open a Sage Fixed Assets company for which the ProSystem fx Tax setup has already
been performed.
• Install the ProSystem fx Tax year corresponding to the Fiscal Year Begin you are
requesting.
To import entities from ProSystem fx Tax
1.
Select Links/Tax Links/ProSystem fx Tax from within Sage Fixed Assets. The
ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog appears.
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2.
Click the Manage Entities tab.
3.
Click the Import button. The Import from ProSystem fx Tax wizard will open. If
ProSystem fx Tax is available on multiple locations, continue to Step 4, otherwise, go
to Step 5.
4.
Select which version of ProSystem fx Tax (Network or Laptop) should be used for the
list of entities, and click the Next button.
5.
If you are required to log in to ProSystem fx Tax, the login dialog will display. Enter
your login information and click OK. The Select Filters dialog appears.
6.
Enter the appropriate filters to create a list of returns. (With the resulting list of
returns, you will select a return from which to import the list of entities into your open
company in Sage Fixed Assets).
7.
Click the Next button. The Applicable Returns dialog appears listing the returns that
meet the filter criteria you entered.
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Highlight a return and click the Finish button to begin the import.
The return you select:
• Must contain entities.
• Must have an Employer Identification Number (EIN).
• Cannot be in use.
• Must be saved prior to the request for a list of entities.
If any of the entities are not validated in the import, Sage Fixed Assets will produce an
Entity Exceptions report.
Step 2: Assigning an Entity to Each Asset
Note: Before you assign entities to assets, you must have already created a list of entities
on the Manage Entities tab of the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog.
If your company already contains assets, you must associate an entity with each active asset
and each asset disposed during the current year. You need to select an entity for each asset
that has a net book value. You do not need to associate an entity with assets that have been
disposed in previous years.
The quickest way to assign an entity to multiple assets at one time is to use the Replace
feature.
To use the Replace feature to globally assign entities
1.
In Sage Fixed Assets, in the Asset List, display the group of assets for which you want
to assign an entity.
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2.
Click the Select All box in the upper-left corner of the Asset List to select all of the
assets in the group.
3.
Select Edit/Replace from the menu bar. The Replace on Selected Assets dialog
appears.
4.
In the Look In field, select Entity.
5.
Click the All Values in Field check box.
6.
In the Replace With field, enter the entity that you want to assign to the group of
assets.
Note: The value in the Replace With field must be formatted as <Entity Type>-<Entity
Number>-<Entity Description> in order to match the values on the Manage Entities
tab of the ProSystem fx Tax Setup dialog. For example, you might enter the following
in the Replace With field: Rental-3-410 E. Main St.
7.
Click the Replace All button. The application displays a message confirming that you
want to assign the entity.
8.
Click the Yes button. A message confirms the value of the Entity field was replaced.
9.
Click the Yes button to close the message.
As you continue to enter assets in the application throughout the year, you should assign
an Entity to each asset while in Asset Detail.
To assign an entity to a new asset
1.
Within Sage Fixed Assets, do one of the following:
• Select Asset/Add from the menu bar.
• Click the Add an Asset task on the navigation pane.
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A blank set of asset tabs appears in Asset Detail.
2.
Click the Assign an Entity task on the navigation pane. The Assign Entity dialog
appears.
Note: The Assign an Entity task is not available in Asset Detail unless ProSystem fx
Tax is installed on your computer.
The Current Entity field displays the name of the entity currently assigned to the asset.
3.
To assign a new entity (or a different entity), select the entity from the list, and then
click the Update button. The application updates the Current Entity field with the
selected entity.
4.
Click the Close button. The application returns to the selected asset in Asset Detail.
Step 3: Calculating Depreciation
Before you can send depreciation to ProSystem fx Tax, you must calculate depreciation for
all active assets.
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Note: When you calculate depreciation, make sure you select the correct fiscal year-end in
the Depreciate dialog. The integration supports only tax years beginning in 2004 or later.
To calculate depreciation
1.
Do one of the following:
• Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the Sage Fixed Assets menu bar.
• Click the Calculate Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
The Depreciate dialog appears.
2.
Complete the Depreciate dialog, and then click OK. The application calculates
depreciation for the selected group of assets, then either displays the results in a
Report Viewer or sends them to a printer.
Tip: We recommend that you print the Depreciation Expense report. The amount in
the Current Year-to-Date column represents the current depreciation that will be
imported into ProSystem fx Tax.
Completing the Depreciate Dialog
Follow the guidelines below to complete the Depreciate dialog.

Group
Use this field to select a group for which you want to calculate depreciation. To create
a new group, you select Group Manager from the Customize menu.

Books
Use this field to select the books for which you want to calculate depreciation. You
should select each book that you mapped to a ProSystem fx Tax use in the ProSystem
fx Tax Setup dialog.

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Select All/Unselect All Button
Click this button either to select the check boxes for all available books or to clear
the check boxes for all available books.
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Date
Use this field to enter the date (in the format MM/YYYY) through which you want to
calculate depreciation. All assets placed in service through the last day of the month
you enter are included. The date can be for any period, including an earlier period,
however, the current depreciation figures for all assets included in the calculation are
reset to the depreciation amounts for that earlier period.
Note: Certain date validations occur during the depreciate process. Refer to
“Calculating Depreciation for Your Assets,” page 8-4, for an explanation of
depreciation calculation dates.

View Reporting Period Button
Click this button to view a dialog that allows you to select the reporting period for
each book. For more information, see “Completing the Current Reporting Period
Dialog,” page 9-9.

Force Recalculation
Select this check box to recalculate depreciation on assets for which you have already
calculated depreciation through this date. You should select this check box if you have
changed the company’s fiscal year-end or the adjustment convention in the Edit
Company dialog since you last calculated depreciation. Otherwise, you can save
processing time by clearing this check box.

Update Current Reporting Period
Select this check box to change the current reporting period to the date entered in the
Date field. For more information, see “Setting the Current Reporting Period,” page 9-8.

Send To
You can send a report to two possible destinations: a display window or a printer.
Select the appropriate check box. If you do not want to generate a report, clear both
check boxes. When no boxes are selected, depreciation is calculated for the selected
assets and depreciation amounts are updated in Asset Detail.
Now that you have calculated depreciation on all of your assets that contain a net book
value, you are ready for Step 4, Importing depreciation into ProSystem fx Tax.
Step 4: Importing Depreciation into ProSystem fx Tax
This import will transfer data to the ProSystem fx Tax DP-series of Interview Forms, or their
Worksheet equivalents, for the Corporation (1120), S Corporation (1120S), and Partnership
(1065) tax products.
Before you can import deprecation into ProSystem fx Tax:
• The company(ies) you select to import from must be calculated, unlocked, and have
an EIN assigned in Sage Fixed Assets that matches the EIN of your ProSystem fx Tax
return.
• The assets of the selected company(ies) must be associated with entities.
To import depreciation from Sage Fixed Assets into ProSystem fx Tax
1.
Open a Corporation, S Corporation, or Partnership tax return in ProSystem fx Tax
Preparation.
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2.
Select File/Import/Fixed Assets/Sage FAS. The Import Wizard for Sage FAS will
open.
3.
Click Save to save the open return.
4.
Click Next.
• If there is more than one Sage Fixed Assets application available, continue to Step
5.
• If there is only one Sage Fixed Assets application available to you, continue to
Step 6.
5.
Highlight the Sage Fixed Assets application to use for importing data to the open
return, and click Next.
Note: Once the Sage Fixed Assets application has been selected, the selection cannot
be changed. If you need to select a different system, you must cancel the current
import, and begin the import process again.
Note: If you select a network application, you must be currently connected to the
network.
6.
If there is more than one Sage Fixed Assets database, highlight the database to use for
importing data to the open return, and click Next. If there is only one database, go to
Step 7.
Note: Only one database can be imported to an open return in a single import.
However, you do have the option to perform the import for the same return multiple
times, and select different databases each time.
Note: The database you select must be unlocked and contain at least one company
assigned an Employer Identification Number (EIN) matching that of the tax return.
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7.
If you are not currently logged in to Sage Fixed Assets (and the User ID and Password
entered for ProSystem fx Tax are not valid for Sage Fixed Assets), and the security
option is selected, you will be prompted for your Sage Fixed Assets User Name and
Password. Click OK.
8.
Select the Sage Fixed Assets company from which to import fixed assets data, and
click Next.
Note: If the following criteria are not met, you will receive an Exception log.
• The company you select must match the Employer Identification Number
(EIN) and tax year for the open return.
• The company you select to import from must be calculated, and unlocked.
• The assets of the selected company must be associated with entities.
9.
Select a group for each company listed on the Assign Groups to FAS Companies
dialog. The default is All FAS Assets.
10. Click Next when you have completed your selections.
If...
Then...
You selected only one company in Step 8
the Choose Method of
Importing dialog will appear
You selected two or more companies in Step 8 the Choose Asset Details
or
Method Option dialog will
You selected a Sage Fixed Assets application appear
that is older than the tax year of the open
return (for tax years after 2004)
Go to Step #...
11
13
11. Review the notes on the dialog and choose one of the following:

Totals only

Asset detail
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12. Click Next. If you chose Totals only, skip to Step 15.
13. Choose one of the following options:

Full Import (default)
Overwrites all existing depreciation input, and replaces it with the detail data
imported from Sage Fixed Assets.

Append
Adds the detail data from the selected Sage Fixed Assets company(ies) to the
return’s existing depreciation input. No data matching will take place, and no
overwriting of existing data will occur.
14. Click Next. The Choose Add or Bypass Entities dialog appears.
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15. Choose one of the following options:

Add Entity (default)
Creates new depreciation input records for data relating to any entity that is
unmatched in the open return.

Bypass Entity
Skips data relating to any entity that is unmatched in the open return.
16. Click the Next button. The Confirm Import Selections dialog appears.
17. Click the Finish button to start the import. The Import Status dialog appears.
• If there are no exceptions and the import is successful, a success message displays.
• If any of the information is not validated in the import, Sage Fixed Assets will
produce an Exceptions report as shown below. If this is the case, continue to Step
18.
18. Do one of the following:
• Click the Close button to close the dialog and cancel the import.
• Click the Print button the report.
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Sage Fixed Assets Links
Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax Differences
• Click the Copy To Clipboard button to copy the report to the clipboard to paste
into another application.
Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax Differences
Differences between the Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax applications may cause
presentation differences on the Form 4562 when you import assets from Sage Fixed Assets
into ProSystem fx Tax. The total depreciation claimed on the Form 4562 will reconcile
appropriately, but in certain situations the reporting of information on the form may be
different.
The following differences exist between the two applications:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Indian Reservation Property
Averaging Conventions
Negative Assets
Gain/Loss Deferred
Like-Kind Exchanges
Investment Tax Credit
Casualties
Property Type S
Indian Reservation Property
In 1993, Congress created a system whereby qualifying Indian reservation property must
be depreciated over shorter recovery periods. These assets have shorter GDS lives than
would otherwise apply if they were not located on an Indian reservation.
For example, a computer on an Indian reservation has a 3-year life; if it were not located on
an Indian Reservation, it would have a 5-year life. On the Form 4562, Sage Fixed Assets
reports Indian Reservation property (depreciation method MR or MI) according to the class
life table found in the Form 4562 instructions and using the asset’s reduced Indian
reservation recovery period.
ProSystem fx Tax reports the property on the line corresponding to the property’s original
recovery period if it were not on an Indian reservation.
Continuing with the computer example above, Sage Fixed Assets reports the property on
Line 19a of the Form 4562; ProSystem fx Tax reports the same property on Line 19b. The
calculated depreciation will be the same, but the data is reported on different lines when
comparing the two forms.
Averaging Conventions
A Sage Fixed Assets asset imported into the ProSystem fx Tax application may display a
different averaging convention on the Form 4562.
For example, an asset using the mid-quarter convention in Sage Fixed Assets may appear
on the Form 4562 as using the half-year convention. Sage Fixed Assets specifies the
averaging convention on an asset by asset basis. It is up to you to ensure that each asset is
correctly using the averaging convention prescribed by law. In ProSystem fx Tax, a
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company-level option either forces the mid-quarter convention, forces the half-year
convention, or recalculates depreciation based on the asset information.
Because multiple assets flow to the same line on the Form 4562, and because there is a
potential for each asset to have a different averaging convention in Sage Fixed Assets,
ProSystem fx Tax has been set to recalculate the averaging convention when importing
assets from Sage Fixed Assets.
Note: The actual depreciation numbers are not recalculated; only the presentation of the
averaging convention on the Form 4562 is affected.
Negative Assets
Sage Fixed Assets allows you to enter assets with a negative cost value, and will depreciate
the negative asset accordingly. However, these assets will not be imported into ProSystem
fx Tax as this application does not allow for negative assets.
If you have entered a negative asset into Sage Fixed Assets, you’ll need to make the
appropriate adjustments to your depreciation expense in the ProSystem fx Tax application.
Gain/Loss Deferred
Sage Fixed Assets allows you to defer a gain/loss from the disposition of an asset to a given
tax year by selecting Defer in the field Recog GL, and then entering a date in the Defer Date
field on the Disposal tab. If the gain/loss is deferred it does not appear on the Form 4797
Worksheet until the year of the deferral date.
When the asset disposal is imported into the ProSystem fx Tax application, the value in the
Recog GL field will be ignored, and the gain/loss will be recognized and will flow to the
Form 4797 for the year it was disposed. If the gain/loss should be deferred to a future tax
year the appropriate information should be entered into the ProSystem fx Tax application
to allow for the deferral. For example, if the gain/loss should be deferred due to an
Installment Sale, the information pertaining to the sale should be entered for the Form 6252
to allow the ProSystem fx Tax application to properly calculate the realized and recognized
gain/loss from the sale.
Like-Kind Exchanges
While Sage Fixed Assets supports Like-Kind Exchanges, it does not include fields to gather
all information needed to complete the IRS Form 8824 - Like-Kind Exchanges.
When importing a LKE from Sage Fixed Assets, enter all applicable information related to
the Like-Kind exchange in ProSystem fx Tax to complete the transaction.
Investment Tax Credit (ITC)
Both Sage Fixed Assets and ProSystem fx Tax provide support for the Investment Tax
Credit (ITC); however, the specific codes for the credits vary with each application.
After importing an asset for which the ITC was taken, the reduced basis will be imported
and the correct depreciation will be calculated and reported on the IRS Form 4562.
However, if the imported asset was either placed into service or disposed of during the tax
year, and ITC was taken on that asset, the appropriate ITC code will need to be entered on
the Form DP-1 within the ProSystem fx Tax application to correctly complete the IRS Form
3468 (Investment Credit) or Form 4255 (Recapture of Investment Credit).
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The ITC codes supported in Sage Fixed Assets are as follows:
Code
Description
1
Heat/Power System
2
Small Wind Energy
3
Geothermal Heat Pump
4
Advanced Energy Project
A
New Property, Full Credit
B
New Property, Reduced Credit
C
Used Property, Full Credit
D
Used Property, Reduced Credit
E
30-year Rehabilitation Property
F
40-year Rehabilitation Property
G
Certified Historic Structures
H
Pre-1936 Buildings
R
Reforestation Property
S
Solar Energy Property
T
Other Energy Property
U
Fuel Cell Property
V
Microturbine Property
W
Advanced Coal Project
X
No Investment Tax Credit
Y
Gasification Project
The ITC codes supported in ProSystem fx Tax are as follows:
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Code
Description
R
Rehabilitation of Pre-1936 Building
HS
Certified Historic Structure
T3
Transition Property - 30 year Buildings
T4
Transition Property - 40 year Buildings
TH
Transition Property Historic Structure
H
Solar Energy Equipment
P
Geothermal Equipment
F
Fuel Cell Property
M
Microturbine Property
CI
Advanced Coal - Integrated Gasification
CO
Advanced Coal - Other
G
Gasification Project
T
Reforestation (Pre-2005 assets only)
N
Regular Investment Credit
O
Enhanced Oil Recovery Credit (Pre-2006 assets)
I
Qualified Indian Reservation Property
EZ
Qualified Enterprise Zone Property
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Casualties
Sage Fixed Assets does not support the IRS Form 4684; therefore, the gain/loss from a
casualty or theft will flow directly to the Form 4797 Worksheet.
When importing an asset disposal from Sage Fixed Assets into ProSystem fx Tax with a
disposal method of Casualty, the gain/loss will correctly flow to the IRS Form 4684.
Property Type S
In Sage Fixed Assets, if an asset is entered with a Property Type of S (Real, Listed) it will be
reported on Form 4562, in Part V - Listed Property.
When importing an asset with a Property Type of S from Sage Fixed Assets into ProSystem
fx Tax, it will be reported in Part III, line 19i of the Form 4562, assuming it is a MACRS asset.
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Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Appendix F
How Do I ...?
In this appendix:
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1
Force Depreciation Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-5
Change Critical Depreciation Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-5
Reset Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-7
Fix the Depreciation This Run Amount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-8
Import Assets into the Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-9
Undo a Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-9
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period
Depreciation must always be calculated for the same period as the report date you want to
run. Simply running reports does not calculate depreciation.
Option 1: Running Depreciation for a Prior Period
We highly recommend that you make a backup of your company before you perform these
steps.
To run depreciation for a prior period
1.
Calculate depreciation for the period before the desired period by selecting Depreciate
from the Depreciation menu or by clicking the Calculate Depreciation task on the
navigation pane. The Depreciate dialog appears.
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F
How Do I ...?
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period
For example, if you want to run depreciation for October 2010, you would first run
depreciation for September 2010. This run of depreciation is just to set the Prior
Through date for the assets. Do not attempt to tie these numbers to old reports.
2.
Calculate depreciation for the desired period.
In our example, you would calculate depreciation for October 2010.
3.
Run the desired reports for the same period.
In our example, you would run reports for October 2010.
4.
Run depreciation back to the current period.
5.
Run the desired reports for the same period.
The above procedure has some considerations and drawbacks:
• Deleted assets will remain deleted and will NOT appear on the report.
• Any asset with a Beginning Date will not show if the Beginning Date is after the
depreciation run date.
• There may be rounding differences when running for a past period or rerunning back
to the current period.
• If adjustments have recently been turned on, the adjustments will hit in the prior
period. (We strongly recommend a backup.)
If any of these issues continue after you run depreciation back to the current period, it may
be necessary to restore the backup file.
Option 2: Restoring a Backup (if available)
Another option is to restore a backup of your company that was made at the time that you
want to run the report.
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How Do I ...?
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period
F
To restore a backup
1.
Select File/Company Utilities/Restore Company from the menu bar. The Restore Select Companies dialog appears.
2.
Select the backup file and click the Next button. The Restore - Choose Destination
dialog appears.
3.
Choose the database to which you want to restore the backup and click the Next
button. The Restore - Purge History dialog appears.
Note: If the combined number of assets in all companies in your existing database will
exceed 8,000 to 10,000 assets, then we strongly recommend that you restore the
company to a new database.
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F
How Do I ...?
Get Depreciation Numbers for a Prior Period
4.
Select the history events that you want to delete from the database, if any, and then
click the Restore button.
If you decide to use an existing database, a message indicates that a company with that
name already exists in the database and asks if you want to overwrite the company or
rename it.
5.
Type a new company name, and then click the Rename button. (You may want to
name the company after the date of the backup, such as Restore FY END 2010.)
Note: If you click the Overwrite button, you will lose your current company
information.
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6.
After the company is restored, open the restored company and rerun the reports for
that same restored period. You will not have to recalculate depreciation using this
method.
7.
You may want to delete the restored company when finished, or leave it for future
use.
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
How Do I ...?
Force Depreciation Numbers
F
Force Depreciation Numbers
The blue current depreciation fields are calculated fields; therefore, you cannot enter
information in these fields directly.
You can use the beginning depreciation fields to force the desired depreciation numbers.
Any amounts you enter into the beginning depreciation fields will be pulled automatically
into the Current Accum (current accumulated depreciation) fields (for that period only).
• Beginning Date: Enter the month/year for which you want to force depreciation.
Enter the date in MM/YYYY format.
• Beginning YTD (Year to Date): Enter the Current YTD (Year to Date) depreciation that
you want to show for that same Beginning Date.
• Beginning Accum (Accumulated Depreciation): Enter the Current Accum
(Accumulated) Depreciation from that same period.
Important Notes:
While the Current Accum and Current YTD fields will show the amounts that you
entered, the Depreciation This Run column on the Depreciation Expense report will not
include this adjusted amount. You will need to make a journal entry to adjust your GL for
this adjusted amount.
If you force depreciation on assets that still have life, you may also want to consider
changing the method to RV (remaining value over remaining life). This ensures that the
asset will fully depreciate without a remainder. Otherwise, you should consider using the
Adjustments option.
Changing assets with existing beginning depreciation information will OVERWRITE
the previous beginning depreciation information. Thus, if you were to run depreciation
for a period prior to the Beginning Date, the report will not show this asset for that time.
The application will continue calculating depreciation (if there is remaining life on the
asset) starting the month following the Beginning Date entered.
Change Critical Depreciation Fields
How do you make changes to fields that are critical to calculating depreciation, such as
Acquisition Value, Estimated Life, Placed-in-Service Date, Depreciation Method, or
Property Type?
Before you make changes to a critical depreciation field, we recommend that you print the
Main tab of the asset you are changing to ensure that you have the original asset
information. You may also want to make a backup of the company before making the
change in case you do not get the desired outcome.
Follow the steps below to change a critical field (any field in the lower portion of Asset
Detail).
To change a critical depreciation field
1.
Go to Asset Detail for the asset whose depreciation-critical information you want to
change.
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F
How Do I ...?
Change Critical Depreciation Fields
2.
Change the information in one of the depreciation-critical fields. When you tab out of
the field, a message warns you that you are making a change to a depreciation-critical
field and asks if you want to continue.
3.
Click the Yes button to continue. The Critical Depreciation Change dialog appears.
You have four options:
• Placed-in-Service Date: Any depreciation in the Current Depreciation, Period
Close, and Beginning Depreciation fields is reset to zero.
• Beginning Date: Current depreciation will be reset to the Beginning Depreciation
amounts. Period Close amounts will be reset to zero.
• Period Close Date: Current and Beginning depreciation will be reset to the Period
Close amount.
• Current Through Date: Beginning Depreciation will be set to the Current
depreciation amounts. Period Close amounts will be reset to zero if the Period
Close date is prior to the Current Through Date.
4.
Click one of the four option buttons, and then click OK. The information in the
Beginning Depreciation, Current Depreciation, and Period Close is updated.
5.
Click the Save Asset button.
Note: If you select anything except Placed-in-Service Date in step 4, and the depreciation
method is currently SL, SF, or SH and the changes make the asset under-depreciated as
related to the new values, the asset may not fully depreciate over the life of the asset. In
this case, we recommend changing the Depreciation Method to RV. The Depreciation
Adjustment report can assist you in identifying under-depreciated assets.
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How Do I ...?
Reset Depreciation
F
Reset Depreciation
Resetting depreciation should be reserved for clearing disposals or clearing Beginning
Dates from assets.
Note: You should always make sure you have a current backup of your company before
resetting depreciation. There is no way to undo this operation without a backup.
To reset depreciation for a single asset
1.
Select the asset on which you want to reset depreciation.
2.
Select Depreciation/Reset Depreciation from the menu bar or click the Reset
Depreciation task on the navigation pane. The Reset Depreciation dialog appears.
3.
Select the books to be reset.
4.
Select Placed-in-Service Date, Beginning Date, or Period Close Date.
• Placed-in-Service Date: Resets the Current Through Date to zero. This will clear
any Beginning Date and Period Close Date information.
• Beginning Date: Resets the Current Through Date to the Beginning Date.
• Period Close Date: Resets the Current Through Date to the last period close date.
5.
Select the Clear Convention check box if desired (affects MACRS assets only).
6.
Click OK to execute the command.
7.
Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the menu bar or click the Calculate Depreciation
task on the navigation pane to recalculate depreciation after the reset.
To reset depreciation for a group of assets
1.
Create a group of assets to be reset.
2.
In the Asset List, select this group of assets in the Group field.
3.
Select Edit/Select All from the menu bar or click the Select All box in the upper-left
corner of the Asset List.
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F
How Do I ...?
Fix the Depreciation This Run Amount
4.
Select Depreciation/Reset Depreciation from the menu bar or click the Reset
Depreciation task on the navigation pane.
5.
Select the books to be reset.
6.
Select Placed-in-Service Date, Beginning Date, or Period Close Date.
• Placed-in-Service Date: Resets the Current Through Date to zero. This will clear
any Beginning Date and Period Close Date information.
• Beginning Date: Resets the Current Through Date to the Beginning Date.
• Period Close Date: Resets the Current Through Date to the last period close date.
7.
Select the Clear Convention check box if desired (affects MACRS assets only).
8.
Click OK to execute the command.
9.
Select Depreciation/Depreciate from the menu bar or click the Calculate Depreciation
task on the navigation pane to recalculate depreciation after the reset.
Fix the Depreciation This Run Amount
What if Depreciation This Run is incorrect?
What do you do if you believe the Depreciation This Run amount on the Depreciation
Expense report is incorrect? For example, the amount is too high or too low, or the amount
is for the wrong month.
There could be several reasons for the problem. You may have skipped a month when
running depreciation. You may have run depreciation on the same asset(s) more than once.
Depreciation This Run is defined as the depreciation from the last time depreciation was
run to the current run of depreciation. For example, if you last ran depreciation for August
2010 and then ran depreciation for September 2010, the Depreciation This Run on the
September Depreciation Expense report will be one month of depreciation. (We are
assuming the asset is still taking depreciation and is not taking adjustments due to
adjustment conventions.) If you last ran depreciation for September 2009 and then ran
depreciation again for September 2010, then Depreciation This Run will reflect one year’s
worth of depreciation.
When you dispose of an asset in a given month, the application calculates depreciation
through that month and marks that asset with a through date of the month of disposal. If
you then calculate depreciation on that asset for the month of disposal, the application sees
it as the second time the asset has been run for the same month, so it reports Depreciation
This Run from the Beginning Date (or Placed-in-Service Date if there is no Beginning Date).
You can check this by looking at the Prior Thru column for the asset on the Depreciation
Expense report.
To fix the Depreciation This Run amount
1.
Calculate depreciation for the period (or month) before the desired period by selecting
Depreciate from the Depreciation menu or by clicking the Calculate Depreciation task
on the navigation pane.
For example, if you want to run depreciation for October 2010, you would first run
depreciation for September 2010. This run of depreciation is just to set the Prior Thru
date for the assets. Do not attempt to tie these numbers to old reports.
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How Do I ...?
Import Assets into the Application
2.
F
Calculate depreciation for the desired period (or month).
In our example, you would calculate depreciation for October 2010.
The Prior Thru column on the Depreciation Expense report represents the month that
depreciation was last run. If you ran for September 2010 last month and October 2010
this month, you will see 09/2010 in the Prior Thru column. If the Prior Thru column
says 00/00/00, this would represent an asset that was reset to its placed-in-service date
or a new asset depreciated for the first time.
Import Assets into the Application
For instructions on importing assets into the application, see Appendix C, “Custom Import
Helper.” If you are having trouble importing assets, here are some things you may want to
check:
• Make sure that the Excel file does not have extra worksheets. Even blank sheets need
to be deleted. Only a file containing a single worksheet will import.
• The file cannot have any special formatting (besides General, Text (preferred), or
Date-MMDDYY or MM/DD/YYYY). if you click on the upper-left hand corner box
that highlights all cells in the worksheet and then right-click, select Formatting and
choose Text. Then format the date columns to Date (MMDDYY or MM/DD/YYYY).
• The spreadsheet cannot contain formulas. If you suspect formulas may be the issue,
you can Cut/Paste Special Values into a new worksheet.
• Save the file as an Excel 97 or later worksheet or ASCII (.csv or .tab) file.
• If you are importing any assets that have a depreciation percentage (for example,
MT100, MF200, DB150), you will have to map a column for Depreciation Method and
another column for Depreciation Percentage. The percentage column should be an
integer, usually 100, 150, or 200 without the percent sign (%).
• Import as many fields as you can for as many books as you will need. When
importing book information, you must include all the relevant information for each
book because you cannot update book information for existing assets using the
Custom Import Helper. However, you can update general information on existing
assets using custom import at a later time.
• If you do not see a preview of your spreadsheet during the import process, there is
some formatting you still have to remove from the data.
Undo a Disposal
Follow the steps below to undo a disposal.
To reset depreciation
1.
Select the disposed asset.
2.
Select Depreciation/Reset Depreciation from the menu bar or click the Reset
Depreciation task on the navigation pane. The Reset Depreciation dialog appears.
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F
How Do I ...?
Undo a Disposal
3.
Select any book.
4.
Select either Beginning Date or Period Close Date.
5.
Click OK.
Note: You will need to run depreciation for the month prior to the month of disposal
before redoing the disposal of the asset, and then run depreciation on the asset for the
current month.
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Glossary
For greater detail about many of the terms in this glossary, see the appropriate section of this manual. The
index will direct you to specific pages.
A
abandonment
A type of disposal where you voluntarily scrap an asset because of obsolescence, lack of suitability,
or other reasons.
accounting period
An accounting period is the economic cycle for which financial records are maintained. It may be
a twelve-month period or a year that is less than twelve months (a short year). A calendar year is
an accounting period that begins on January 1 and ends on December 31.
accumulated depreciation
Current accumulated depreciation for an asset is the amount of depreciation taken, including
current year-to-date depreciation, from the date the asset was placed in service to the date through
which depreciation was last calculated.
ACE
ACE means Adjusted Current Earnings. ACE, as defined in Code Section 56(g), is the recalculation
of C corporation income for purposes of computing an adjustment amount as required for the
Alternative Minimum Tax.
acquisition value
An asset’s acquisition value is the cost of obtaining the asset. This may be the asset’s purchase
price, its fair market value, or its basis in the hands of the transferor, depending on the type of
transaction. The acquisition value is used as the beginning value for calculating the depreciable
basis. See “depreciable basis.”
acquisition date
The acquisition date is a general information field. It represents the date the asset was actually
acquired, which may not be the same as the date it was placed in service.
ACRS
ACRS means Accelerated Cost Recovery System, a depreciation method created by the Economic
Recovery Tax Act of 1981. ACRS allows faster depreciation of fixed assets than earlier depreciation
methods. It provides a tax break and was intended to encourage the purchase of capital goods. It
was modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1986 to become modified ACRS. See “MACRS.”
adjusted basis
The application uses an adjusted basis for the gain or loss calculation when assets are disposed.
This adjusted basis is the depreciable basis plus a percentage of the ITC recapture amount (if any),
plus salvage value (if subtracted in determining depreciable basis), minus current accumulated
depreciation.
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Glossary-1
Glossary
Adjusted Current Earnings
See “ACE.”
ADR
ADR means Asset Depreciation Range. ADR is a pre-1981 (that is, pre-ACRS) depreciation system
that grouped assets by industry type.
ADS
ADS means Alternative Depreciation System. ADS is a straight-line alternative MACRS
depreciation method using generally longer recovery periods than GDS recovery periods. ADS
was created by the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
ADS life
The ADS life is generally used to depreciate pre-1999 MACRS property for AMT purposes. This is
approximately the midpoint of the Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) in which the asset belongs.
alphanumeric field
An alphanumeric character is any letter or number you can create using your keyboard.
Alternative Depreciation System
See “ADS.”
Alternative Minimum Tax
See “AMT.”
amortization
The tax law requires taxpayers to recover certain specified capital expenditures through a process
known as amortization. Amortization uses a straight-line calculation over certain specified time
periods. Many intangible assets that can’t be depreciated can be amortized, such as business
startup expenses, covenants not to compete, trademarks, and goodwill. Some tangible assets, such
as pollution control facilities, some low-income housing, and the rehabilitation of certified historic
structures, can also be amortized.
AMT
AMT means Alternative Minimum Tax. The Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the Alternative
Minimum Tax rules to make it more difficult to avoid tax through the use of certain tax benefits
known as tax preference items. The provisions for depreciation under the Alternative Minimum
Tax rules serve to reduce the advantages available under the regular tax rules for accelerated
depreciation and other preferences. The reductions in these advantages are added to taxable
income.
ASCII file
ASCII means American Standard Code for Information Interchange. An ASCII file is a text file
without any special control characters such as for bold text or underlining.
Asset Depreciation Range
See “ADR.”
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Glossary
asset group
An asset group is a request from a user to search the company database for assets matching the
range criteria the user has entered. For example, you could specify a range of 0 to 500 for the
acquisition value field, and the application would display a list of assets having an acquisition value
of $500 or less. For more information, see “Understanding Groups,” page 1-4.
asset ID
Many companies have an existing asset numbering system. The application lets you enter the
asset’s existing number in the asset ID field and lets you search for the asset using that number.
at-risk basis
An Investment Tax Credit on Section 38 property is allowable only to the extent that the asset
holder is at risk. Except for real estate acquisitions, nonrecourse financing does not create risk in
an investment.
averaging conventions
Averaging conventions assume assets are placed in service or disposed of at designated dates
throughout the year. An averaging convention generally adopts a prescribed in-service date that
simplifies depreciation calculations and record keeping.
Examples of averaging conventions are the midmonth convention, full-month convention,
half-year convention, modified half-year convention, and midquarter convention.
B
basis
Basis usually refers to the acquisition value (that is, purchase price); however, basis can have a
number of meanings depending on the descriptive word that precedes it. For instance, depreciable
basis is generally the acquisition value adjusted for the percentage of business use, ITC taken,
Section 179 expense or bonus depreciation, and salvage value (for certain depreciation methods
only).
beginning date
The date through which depreciation was calculated for the asset at the time you entered it in the
application.
beginning depreciation
Beginning depreciation is the amount of depreciation taken on an asset before the date you want
to start calculating the asset’s depreciation. For example, if you switch from another depreciation
system to Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation in May 2008 and you want the application to
calculate depreciation from the beginning of the 2008 calendar year, an asset’s beginning
depreciation would be all depreciation taken on it before 2008. For details, see Chapter 6, “Working
with Assets.”
bonus
For assets acquired before 1981, some depreciation methods allowed an optional first-year bonus
of up to 20% of the property’s basis. In the year of acquisition, this represented an additional
amount of allowable depreciation. If the optional bonus was taken, the bonus amount was
subtracted from the asset’s acquisition value before the year’s regular depreciation was calculated.
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Glossary-3
Glossary
book information fields
The book information fields are the data entry fields for which you enter (or accept) separate
values in each depreciation book. All of these fields affect the depreciation calculations. Examples
of book information fields include the depreciation method and the acquisition value.
boot
In a trade-in of one asset for another, boot is any cash or note payable given to the seller in addition
to the asset traded.
bulk disposal
A type of disposal that occurs when you sell multiple assets for one selling price.
business-use percentage
Some assets used in a business may also be for personal use. However, a business may only take
depreciation on an asset to the extent that it is used for business. The percentage that an asset is
used for business, if less than 100%, reduces the asset’s depreciable basis.
C
calendar year
A calendar year is the period of twelve months beginning January 1 and ending December 31. It is
the most widely used accounting period.
cascade
This command under the Window Menu places dialogs on top of each other, with the active dialog
on top and the inactive dialog(s) slightly visible behind.
casualty
A type of disposal that occurs when an asset is stolen or damaged by a sudden natural cause or
vandalism.
class
Class refers to user-defined classification codes for grouping fixed assets. Most companies have
such codes. For example, a company might use this kind of coding system:
A
Automobiles
FF
Furniture and fixtures
HW
Computer hardware
company
A company is an organization you define for the purpose of grouping assets and is not necessarily
a legal entity. For example, it may be an entire company, a division, a plant, or a branch.
company setup
Defines critical depreciation-related elements of a company, such as short years and book defaults.
complex expression
An expression that uses the and operator or the or operator to search for multiple criteria.
Glossary-4
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Glossary
credit
A tax credit is an amount that is subtracted from the income tax liability in a given year. Tax credits
differ from deductions: credits are subtracted from the tax itself, resulting in a dollar-for-dollar
reduction in the tax liability; deductions are subtracted from either gross income or adjusted gross
income, resulting in a reduction in the amount of income subject to tax.
criteria string
A statement or series of statements that qualifies the characteristics of assets to be included in a
group. Also called an expression.
current accumulated depreciation
See “accumulated depreciation.”
current through date
The current through date is the date depreciation was last calculated for the asset in a given book.
It is displayed in Asset Detail. Depreciation can be calculated by executing the Depreciate
command from the Depreciate menu.
current year-to-date depreciation
Current year-to-date depreciation includes all depreciation expense from the beginning of the
fiscal year containing the current through date up to and including the through date. (The through
date is the last date through which you calculated depreciation.)
custom depreciation method
The application lets you create custom depreciation methods. You enter annual depreciation
percentages for the life of the asset and specify the disposal year averaging convention. When an
asset uses the custom depreciation method, the application calculates depreciation each year based
on that year’s percentage.
D
database
An internal software structure that stores data in a way that makes it extremely easy to search, sort,
organize, and retrieve.
declining-balance depreciation
Using a declining-balance method of depreciation, assets are depreciated faster than using
straight-line depreciation. The asset’s net book value is multiplied by a constant rate (125%, 150%,
175%, or 200%, divided by the estimated life or recovery period), which results in a greater amount
of depreciation being expensed in the early years of an asset’s life and a smaller amount in later
years.
default
A default is a selection that appears or is used automatically if you press Enter or make no other
choice. For example, if you select OK at the New Company dialog, a message appears in a dialog
asking if you want to create the new company. The highlighted frame is on the Yes button.
Therefore, Yes is the default.
A default also occurs when you enter data in certain book information fields and the application
automatically enters information in others. For example, when you enter the Property Type and the
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Glossary-5
Glossary
Placed-in-Service Date fields, the application provides a default depreciation method, estimated life,
and ADS life.
depreciable basis
Depreciable basis is the acquisition value adjusted to arrive at the total amount to be depreciated.
See also “basis.”
depreciation
Depreciation is the process of allocating the cost of an asset used in a business over the period of
time during which the asset is used. It also suggests that an asset declines in value because of use,
wear and tear, or obsolescence.
depreciation adjustment
The application lets you enter year-to-date and accumulated depreciation amounts from your
current depreciation books as beginning depreciation. The application then compares the
difference between the depreciation entered and what the application would have calculated for
the beginning period. The difference between the two, if any, is stored as an adjustment amount
and appears in the Depreciation Adjustment report.
If not enough depreciation was taken for the asset, you may choose a depreciation adjustment to
adjust for the difference immediately, in the post recovery period, or not at all. For instructions on
choosing a depreciation adjustment for each depreciation book, see “The Book Overrides Tab,”
page 4-20.
depreciation methods
The depreciation method determines the pattern of allocating the asset's cost to the specific years
of its life. For example, a straight-line depreciation method allocates the asset's cost uniformly over
its useful life. A declining balance depreciation method allocates a greater cost at the beginning of
the useful life than at the end.
directory
A directory is a place on a hard drive, equivalent to a folder in a filing cabinet, where the
application stores information. In Windows 95, directories are called folders.
disposal date
The disposal date is the date on which the asset was sold, lost, damaged, stolen, exchanged, used
up, worn out, broken, retired, or given away. It is not determined by the estimated life or recovery
period, but by the actual disposal or retirement of the asset.
disposal method
There are eight disposal methods: sale, abandonment, like-kind exchange, taxable exchange,
involuntary conversion, bulk disposal, casualty, and other. The disposal method determines the
default gain or loss treatment.
E
energy credit
Energy credits are available for certain assets used in the conservation of energy.
Glossary-6
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Glossary
estimated life
Estimated life is the period over which an asset is to be depreciated or its cost is to be recovered.
The estimated life often has nothing to do with the physical life span of an individual asset. The
shorter the estimated life, the more rapidly the cost of an asset can be recovered.
expression
A statement or series of statements that qualifies the characteristics of assets to be included in a
group.
F
field
A field is an area that holds (or can hold) application data. Each field on the dialog is labeled for
its intended purpose. For example, the first field on the Bulk Disposal dialog is labeled “Disposal
Date.”
fiscal year
A fiscal year is the twelve-month period you use to define your accounting year.
fixed asset
A fixed asset is property acquired by a business for use in its operations and having an estimated
life of more than one year.
G
GAAP
GAAP stands for Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. These include both guidelines and
specific rules and procedures issued by bodies within the accounting industry, principally the
Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the American Institute of Certified Public
Accountants (AICPA), to standardize accounting practices. The goal of these principles is for firms
to produce financial records that fairly reflect their operations.
gain or loss
Fixed assets that are disposed of usually are sold at a price above or below the net book value of
the asset. This results in a gain or loss. For tax purposes, gain or loss is further affected by ITC
recapture and Section 179 expense deductions and recapture. The Disposal Report shows whether
the disposal of an asset results in a gain or loss. The calculated gain or loss is the amount realized;
if this amount is reported for tax purposes, all of the amount may not be recognized. (Gains and
losses on certain types of dispositions need not be recognized.) Recognition may also be deferred.
GDS
GDS means General Depreciation System. GDS is the principal system used for depreciating
MACRS property. Compared to the MACRS Alternative Depreciation System (ADS), the GDS
system generally uses shorter recovery periods and faster depreciation methods.
general information fields
General information fields hold information about assets that does not affect the depreciation
calculations but which is useful for asset management. For example, you can enter information
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Glossary-7
Glossary
about the G/L asset account, the purchase order, and the vendor. You can customize the general
information fields and also define and use seven additional fields for your own purposes.
general personal property
All personal property other than listed personal property and automobiles.
general real property
All real property that is not listed real property or required to be reported separately for tax
purposes.
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
See “GAAP.”
group
An asset group is the result of a request from a user to search the company database for assets
matching the criteria the user has entered. For example, you could specify a range of 0 to 500 for
the Acquisition Value field, and the application would display a list of assets having an acquisition
value of $500 or less.
By defining and using groups you can quickly and efficiently view, run reports, and/or project
depreciation for a selected group of assets.
H
half-year convention
The half-year averaging convention treats all property placed in service during any taxable year
(or disposed of during any taxable year) as if it were placed in service (or disposed of) at the
midpoint of such year.
I
inactive assets
Assets can be inactivated. This removes them from all reports except the File Listing. Inactive
assets can be reactivated. Inactive assets will not be depreciated, so be sure assets are fully
depreciated before they are inactivated.
intangible assets
Intangible assets are those assets that provide future economic benefit but have no physical
substance. Examples include goodwill, patents, copyrights, and trademarks.
Internal book
The Internal book is for the depreciation calculations used in the preparation of financial
statements. It follows Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
Investment Tax Credit (ITC)
The ITC is a tax credit that can be taken for the purchase of specific types of business property.
Although the ITC was eliminated by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, excess credit from previous years
can be carried forward. Also, there are a few special situations in which the credit is still available.
The credit must, however, be taken for the year in which the purchase was made, and it is limited
Glossary-8
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Glossary
by a maximum amount. Assets eligible to qualify for the ITC include business property, energy
property, and rehabilitation property.
involuntary conversion
A type of disposal that occurs when you involuntarily retire an asset due to a breakdown,
condemnation, or reasons other than a casualty.
ITC recapture
If an asset for which ITC was taken is disposed of before the end of its recapture period, the tax
credit is recaptured by the IRS (repaid by the owner) on a prorated basis. The amount to be repaid
is the ITC recapture amount.
L
like-kind exchange
A type of disposal that occurs when you exchange an asset for a similar asset. It can include the
receipt of money or dissimilar property.
listed property
Section 280F of the Internal Revenue Code defines certain kinds of property for which special
information must be provided on IRS Form 4562. These assets are those that can be used for both
business and personal purposes. They include passenger cars and other forms of transportation;
and entertainment, amusement, and recreational properties.
low-income housing
Low-income housing means any building that has met certain federal guidelines and where the
dwelling units are held for occupancy on a rental basis by families and individuals of low or
moderate income.
M
MACRS
MACRS is an acronym for Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System. It is a method of
depreciation as modified by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, and it is used for most property placed in
service after 1986.
menu bar
A standard Windows interface tool used to access specific functions or actions in the application.
midquarter convention
The midquarter convention is a special averaging convention that applies only when more than
40% of qualifying MACRS property is placed in service in the last three months of the tax year.
Under this convention, qualifying MACRS property is treated as though it were placed in service
in the middle of the quarter in which it was purchased.
Modified ACRS
See “MACRS.”
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Glossary-9
Glossary
N
net value
The net value of an asset is its acquisition value minus any Section 179 expense deduction minus
its total accumulated depreciation.
numeric field
A numeric field accepts only numbers (no letters or other keyboard characters except a single
decimal point). For example, a field used to enter dollar values is a numeric field.
O
168 Allowance
The 168 Allowance refers to the additional 30%, 50%, or 100% depreciation allowance that the
application calculates when you select a “plus 168” depreciation method for a qualified asset
placed in service after September 10, 2001.
P
personal property
Personal property generally includes fixed assets that are movable (that is, not attached to the
land), and that are not real property (buildings). Equipment and machinery are examples of
personal property.
placed-in-service date
The date that an asset is ready and available for a specified use is the date it was placed in service
for depreciation purposes. This date is entered for each depreciation book and may be different
from the date it was acquired. You can enter an acquisition date in the general information field if
you need it for warranty, insurance, or other purposes.
“plus 168” depreciation method
A “plus 168” depreciation method is one that provides an additional 30%, 50%, or 100%
depreciation deduction in the year you place an asset in service. The application has four “plus
168” depreciation methods: MA, MR, AA, and SB.
postrecovery period
The postrecovery period is the period that begins immediately after the end of an asset’s normal
depreciable life.
printer port
A printer port is where your printer cable connects to the computer.
property type
There are two major types of property: tangible and intangible. Tangible property is either
personal property or real property. The application breaks down personal and real property into
eleven types. The property type you enter for the asset determines which depreciation methods
Glossary-10
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Glossary
you can use and other factors in the depreciation calculation, such as how to apply averaging
conventions.
R
RAM
RAM stands for random access memory. It is your computer’s internal memory, which the
application uses as its work space and temporary storage area. The application saves data
permanently on your computer’s hard drive.
range
You can specify which assets to include in an Asset Group or in a report by selecting a range of
assets. The range specifies which values must be found in the selected field for the asset to be
included. For example, if the range for acquisition value is 0 to 500, any asset having an acquisition
value of $500 or less will be included in the group results or in the report.
reactivate assets
An asset that has been made inactive may be made active again. An inactive asset is no longer
depreciated and does not appear on reports. After being reactivated, the asset again appears in
reports and recommences depreciation, if its cost is not fully recovered.
real property
Real property includes land and generally anything erected on or attached to the land, such as a
building or a parking lot.
recovery period
As compared with the period of time over which an asset may reasonably be expected to be useful,
the recovery period is a statutory designation of depreciable lives under ACRS and MACRS.
Therefore, it is the period of time over which such an asset is depreciated.
recovery property
Recovery property is property depreciated under ACRS or MACRS (method AT, SA, ST, MF, MT,
MI, or AD), which requires the use of a recovery period as the asset’s estimated life.
refresh
Updates all data in the current group. Select View/Refresh from the menu bar.
remaining life
Remaining life is an asset’s original estimated life less the number of years for which depreciation
has already been taken.
remaining value
Remaining value is an asset’s original depreciable basis less depreciation taken to date. It is also
called remaining basis.
replicate [an asset]
Fixed assets that are similar or identical can be entered once and then replicated as many as 999
times to speed up the data entry process. For example, if you had four identical chairs, you might
enter the first one and then replicate that asset three times.
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Glossary-11
Glossary
S
sale
A type of disposal that occurs when you sell an asset for:
• Cash
• Cash and noncash items (if not qualifying as an exchange).
salvage value
The salvage value of an asset is the value it’s expected to have at the end of its useful life.
Straight-line, sum-of-the-years’-digits, and custom depreciation methods subtract salvage value
from an asset’s depreciable basis, while other methods will not depreciate below the salvage value.
ACRS and MACRS methods disregard salvage value in calculating depreciation.
scroll
Scrolling refers to the movement of a dialog display in a manner similar to unrolling a scroll. This
scrolling can be done by using the scroll bars or the arrow keys. You can scroll a report up, down,
left, and right.
Section 179 expense
Section 179 of the Internal Revenue Code allows the costs of certain new assets to be treated as
expenses rather than capital expenditures and to be deducted in the year placed in service instead
of depreciated.
short year
A short year occurs when there is an accounting period of less than twelve calendar months. It
often appears in the first and last years of a company’s life.
simple expression
An expression that searches for just one criterion.
SmartList
A SmartList is a customized drop-down list box of available entries for a field. You can give a field
a SmartList by using the field customization feature.
sort
To sort a report means to put the items in the report in a specified order. For example, the simplest
way to sort a report is to let the application print the assets in order by System Number. You can
specify that you want the assets sorted by some other field, such as by class, if you want the assets
organized for a particular purpose. Use the Group Manager to define how you want the assets to
be sorted.
straight-line depreciation
Straight-line depreciation generally allows an equal amount of depreciation for each year in the
asset’s estimated life. Exceptions for the first and last years in the life are caused by the averaging
convention in use for the asset.
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Glossary
sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation
Sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation is an accelerated method of depreciation that results in a
greater amount of depreciation being expensed in the early years of an asset’s life and a smaller
amount in later years.
system (or SYS) number
The application assigns each asset a permanent system number that can be used to find the asset
in the data files. The number is different for each asset. When you set up a company, you determine
what the beginning system number will be. The application also uses the system number in sorting
assets in reports.
T
tab
The application makes efficient use of the space on a dialog by providing tabs which provide
access to different types of information on that dialog.
tangible assets
Tangible assets are those assets that provide economic benefit and have physical substance. See
also “intangible assets.”
Tax book
The Tax book is for the depreciation calculations used when reporting regular depreciation on
federal tax returns under IRS rules.
tax credit
A tax credit reduces, dollar for dollar, the amount of tax to be paid.
tax deduction
A tax deduction reduces the amount of net income subject to tax.
tax preference (ACRS)
A tax preference for ACRS real property is the difference between depreciation calculated by
ACRS and that calculated using straight-line depreciation. Other pre-1987 real property also
creates a tax preference to the extent that accelerated depreciation exceeds the straight-line
depreciation amount. Tax preferences are used in calculating the Alternative Minimum Tax.
taxable exchange
An exchange of dissimilar property, such as exchanging a car for land. It can also include the
receipt of money.
taxable year
Taxable year means the period for which taxable income is computed. It may be a twelve-month
period or a year that is less than twelve months (a short year). If it is a calendar year, it begins on
January 1 and ends on December 31.
template
An asset template is predefined asset information for a certain kind of asset. Once you have saved
as much or as little data as you want for an asset as an asset template, you can use the template to
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Glossary-13
Glossary
quickly create new assets that need only a small amount of modification to be unique, for example,
giving each asset its own asset number.
through date
The date through which the application last calculated depreciation for the asset in a given book.
It is displayed in Asset Detail. Depreciation can be calculated by executing the Depreciate
command from the Depreciate menu.
transitional property
If, at the time that a tax provision expires, a company has a firm agreement that certain property
be delivered, that property is called transitional property. The rules of the tax provision can usually
be applied to transitional property even though the property is not yet placed in service when the
tax provision expires.
U
user books
User books are depreciation books not designated for specific tax reporting purposes. The
predefined user book is the Internal book. The default information in the Internal book conforms
to GAAP. The other user books, Custom 1 and Custom 2, may be defined as you wish.
utilities
Utilities are programs or functions of an application that help the user maintain the database and
perform other tasks that are not the primary purpose of the application. For example, some of the
utilities let you inactivate assets, reset depreciation, and export ASCII files.
V
vintage account
Asset Depreciation Range (ADR) depreciation allowed multiple asset accounts to be used from
1971 through 1980. These accounts are called vintage accounts, referring to the year in which the
multiple assets that comprised a particular account were placed in service.
Glossary-14
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Index
Numerics
168 Allowance
calculating ............................................................. A-20
changing depreciation method ............................ 8-27
electing ..................................................................... 8-24
electing out .............................................................. 8-31
including in depreciation expense ....................... 8-31
luxury auto limits ................................................... A-6
qualifying assets ......................................... 8-26, A-20
switch, qualifying assets ....................................... 8-30
switching depreciation methods .......................... 8-28
168 Allowance % field ............................................... 6-12
168 Allowance amount field .................................... 6-15
179 deduction field ...................................................... 6-8
A
abandonment ............................................................ A-29
Accelerated Cost Recovery System
See ACRS depreciation
ACE book ........................................................... 4-11, A-3
See also Adjusted Current Earnings (ACE)
book emulation ....................................................... 4-20
defaults .................................................................. A-27
acquisition date field ................................................... 6-5
acquisition value
field ............................................................................. 6-6
overview ................................................................ A-14
ACRS depreciation
ACRS table (AT) .................................................... B-15
methods, overview ................................................ B-15
straight-line ACRS (SA and ST) .......................... B-17
activating assets .......................................................... 7-14
activity codes ................................................................. 7-1
adding assets ................................................................. 6-1
Adjusted Current Earnings (ACE)
ACE book ............................................ 4-11, 4-20, A-3
defaults .................................................................. A-27
adjustments to depreciation ..................................... 4-16
ADS (MACRS Alternative Depreciation System)
ADS life .................................................................. A-21
ADS life field ............................................................. 6-7
depreciation method ............................................. B-10
alternate ACRS, straight-line .................................. B-17
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)
AMT book ..................................................... 4-11, A-2
defaults .................................................................. A-26
amortizable property ............................................... A-10
AMT book ......................................................... 4-11, A-2
See also Alternative Minimum Tax
defaults .................................................................. A-26
Annual Projection report .......................................... 8-10
application
field names .............................................................. 4-35
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application (continued)
navigating ................................................................. 3-2
apply defaults ............................................................ 6-22
Asset Detail
History tab .............................................................. 3-23
Main tab .................................................................. 3-21
Notes tab ................................................................. 3-22
overview ................................................................. 3-19
Transactions tab ..................................................... 3-22
asset ID .......................................................................... 7-1
field ............................................................................ 6-3
Asset List
customizing ............................................................ 3-13
hiding fields ............................................................ 3-15
overview ................................................................. 3-10
printing ................................................................... 6-30
removing fields ...................................................... 3-15
restoring view ........................................................ 3-15
asset sort order, temporary changing .................... 3-13
assets
See also purging asset history
activating ................................................................ 7-14
Asset Detail ............................................................. 3-19
Asset List ................................................................. 3-10
assigning entity ...................................................... E-15
blank data collection forms .................................. 6-29
browsing ................................................................... 3-8
copying .................................................................... 6-21
creating .......................................................... 6-21, 6-24
deleting ................................................................... 7-15
deleting disposals .................................................. 7-15
disposals, overview .............................................. A-28
disposing ................................................................... 7-2
editing ..................................................................... 6-20
editing disposal information ............................... 7-12
entering new ............................................................. 6-1
finding ..................................................................... 3-23
historical actions, list ............................................. 6-32
identification ............................................................ 7-1
identifying disposed ............................................... 7-2
inactivating ............................................................. 7-14
notes ........................................................................ 3-22
printing asset information .................................... 6-29
replacing data ......................................................... 3-16
replicating ............................................................... 6-21
reviewing for tax compliance .............................. 8-47
save as group .......................................................... 4-26
searching for ........................................................... 3-23
selecting .................................................................. 3-11
templates ....................................................... 6-24, 6-26
viewing ...................................................................... 3-9
Assets area .................................................................... 3-4
Assistance Center area ................................................ 3-7
at-risk rules ...................................................... 6-13, A-19
audit advisor validations ......................................... 8-49
Index-1
Index
automobiles ................................................................. A-5
averaging conventions
midquarter ................................................................ 8-3
overview ...................................................... 4-15, A-11
backups
backing up company ............................................... 5-9
restoring backed-up company .............................. 5-11
beginning accum field .............................................. 6-15
beginning date field .................................................. 6-14
beginning depreciation ............................................. 6-14
changing .................................................................. 8-15
period close fields ................................................... 8-18
beginning YTD field ................................................. 6-14
bonus depreciation ........................................... 6-8, 6-11
overview ................................................................ A-16
using 179 deduction field ...................................... 6-17
book defaults .............................................................. 6-22
book information fields .............................................. 6-5
books
ACE .......................................................................... A-3
AMT ......................................................................... A-2
Book Defaults tab ................................................... 4-11
Book Overrides tab ................................................ 4-15
copying information .............................................. 6-22
Custom ..................................................................... A-4
emulate ......................................................... 4-12, 4-20
Internal ..................................................................... A-2
overview .................................................................. A-2
setting defaults ....................................................... 4-11
State .......................................................................... A-2
Tax ............................................................................ A-2
budgetary projection
annually ................................................................... 8-10
monthly ...................................................................... 8-9
running ...................................................................... 8-8
bulk disposals ................................................... 7-6, A-29
business start date field .............................................. 4-9
business use %
entering .................................................................... 6-16
field ............................................................................. 6-8
overview ................................................................ A-14
companies (continued)
Book Defaults tab .................................................. 4-11
Book Overrides tab ................................................ 4-15
changing settings for ............................................... 5-2
Contact Information tab ....................................... 4-19
copying ...................................................................... 5-4
creating ...................................................................... 4-6
deleting ..................................................................... 5-3
editing company setup ........................................... 5-1
Notes tab ................................................................. 4-20
opening existing company ..................................... 2-2
overview ................................................................... 1-3
restoring backed-up company ............................. 5-11
Short Years tab ....................................................... 4-14
why use more than one .......................................... 1-3
complex expressions ................................................. 4-22
contacting Sage Fixed Assets .................................... 2-4
conventions
See also averaging conventions
adjustment conventions ........................................ 4-16
copying
assets ........................................................................ 6-21
book information ................................................... 6-22
company ................................................................... 5-4
short year information .......................................... 6-23
current accum field ................................................... 6-15
current reporting period, setting .............................. 9-8
current through date field ....................................... 6-16
current YTD field ...................................................... 6-15
Custom 1 and 2 books ......................... 4-11, A-4, A-25
custom date fields ....................................................... 6-4
custom depreciation methods ................................. 8-20
Custom Export Helper ............................................... D-1
custom fields ................................................................ 6-4
Custom Import Helper ............................................... C-1
customer number, viewing and updating .............. 2-5
customized reports
adding to favorites ................................................ 9-17
reporting period, setting ......................................... 9-8
customizing
asset fields ..................................................... 4-31, 4-37
depreciation methods ................................. 8-20, B-36
own depreciation calculation ............................... B-36
SmartLists ............................................................... 4-37
C
D
calculation assumptions ........................................... 9-21
calculator, using the Windows ................................ 3-28
calendar, entering dates ............................................ 3-26
casualty loss .............................................................. A-30
changing critical depreciation fields ...................... 8-12
class field ....................................................................... 6-4
column
changing order in Asset List ................................. 3-13
changing width in Asset List ................................ 3-14
companies ...................................................................... 5-1
activate on startup .................................................... 4-3
backing up ................................................................. 5-9
data
exporting ........................................................ 5-16, D-1
importing ....................................................... 5-15, C-1
replacing ................................................................. 3-16
database
creating ...................................................................... 4-4
deleting ..................................................................... 5-3
locating .................................................................... 5-16
managing ................................................................ 5-16
overview ................................................................... 1-3
renaming ................................................................. 5-18
Database List Manager ................................... 5-16, 5-19
B
Index-2
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Index
date fields .................................................................... 3-26
beginning date ........................................................ 6-14
current through date .............................................. 6-16
current YTD ............................................................. 6-15
placed-in-service date .................................. 6-5, A-10
declining-balance depreciation
declining-balance (DB and DC) ........................... B-26
declining-balance, half-year (DH and DI) ......... B-28
declining-balance, modified half-year (DD
and DE) ......................................................... B-28
methods, overview ................................................ B-25
defaults
ACE book .............................................................. A-27
AMT book ............................................................. A-26
applying book defaults .......................................... 6-22
depreciation ................................................ 4-13, A-23
gain or loss recognition ....................................... A-32
setting folder for file creation ................................. 4-2
State book .............................................................. A-26
Tax book ................................................................ A-23
user book ............................................................... A-25
deleting
asset transactions .................................................... 7-15
assets ........................................................................ 7-15
companies .................................................................. 5-3
databases ................................................................... 5-3
disposals .................................................................. 7-15
groups ...................................................................... 4-26
history ........................................................................ 5-8
depreciable basis ...................................................... A-13
depreciation ................................................................ B-36
See also depreciation methods
adjustments ............................................................. 4-16
averaging conventions .............................. 4-15, A-11
calculating ........................................................ 8-2, 8-4
calculating before running link ............................. E-4
calculating for different books ............................... 8-4
calculating for earlier periods ................................. 8-3
calculation dates ....................................................... 8-2
concepts ........................................................... 8-2, A-1
creating custom methods ...................................... 8-20
critical fields, changing .......................................... 8-12
current through date .............................................. 6-16
defaults ........................................................ 4-13, A-23
elements of .............................................................. A-4
first-year bonus, overview .................................. A-16
importing into ProSystem fx Tax ........................ E-19
methods ............................................................ 6-6, B-1
midquarter convention ................................ 8-3, A-12
monthly figures ........................................................ 8-3
no depreciation ...................................................... B-36
overview ......................................................... A-1, A-4
own depreciation calculation .............................. B-36
period close ............................................................. 8-15
projecting ................................................................... 8-8
property types ......................................................... A-5
quick projection ...................................................... 8-10
resetting ............................................................ 8-3, 8-6
short years ............................................................. A-13
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
depreciation (continued)
storing calculations ............................................... 8-15
this run ...................................................................... 8-2
through date ............................................................. 8-5
depreciation adjustments, setting defaults .......... 4-16
depreciation books
See books
Depreciation Fundamentals, viewing ..................... 2-3
depreciation method field ......................................... 6-6
depreciation methods
ACRS ....................................................................... B-15
changing for 168 Allowance ................................ 8-27
custom methods ........................................... 8-20, B-36
declining-balance ................................................... B-25
MACRS ..................................................................... B-2
overview ................................................................... B-1
remaining value over remaining life .................. B-34
straight-line ............................................................ B-20
sum-of-the-years’-digits ....................................... B-29
switching for 168 Allowance ............................... 8-28
description field .......................................................... 6-3
detail view of history ................................................ 6-33
detail, subtotals and totals ....................................... 9-11
Disaster Assistance property
designating assets as QD Zone property ........... 8-46
Qualified Disaster Zone defined ......................... 8-45
Section 179 limits for ............................................. 8-46
Disposal worksheet .................................................... 7-6
disposals
bulk ............................................................................ 7-6
deleting ................................................................... 7-15
editing disposal information ............................... 7-12
how to dispose assets .............................................. 7-2
methods ................................................................. A-29
overview ........................................................ 7-2, A-28
resetting depreciation ............................................. 8-6
viewing current-year ............................................. 7-13
viewing disposal calculation ............................... 7-13
worksheet, viewing ............................................... 7-13
drilling down in reports ........................................... 9-23
E
editing
asset data ............................................. 3-16, 3-17, 6-20
company setup ......................................................... 5-1
disposal information ............................................. 7-12
groups ..................................................................... 4-26
emulating books .............................................. 4-12, 4-20
entering G/L account numbers ................................. E-3
Enterprise Zone, Section 179 limits for ................. 8-39
entry mask field ......................................................... 4-33
estimated life
field ............................................................................ 6-7
overview ................................................................ A-21
exchange or conversion field .................................... 6-5
exporting
asset data ........................................................ 5-16, D-1
fields, available ....................................................... D-8
Index-3
Index
exporting (continued)
report ........................................................................ 9-24
expressions ....................................................... 4-21, 4-28
F
fields
available for exporting ........................................... D-8
available for importing ......................................... C-12
book information ...................................................... 6-5
critical depreciation, changing ............................. 8-12
critical depreciation, importing ............................. C-1
customizing .................................................. 4-31, 4-37
general information ...................................... 3-20, 6-3
names used by application ................................... 4-35
overview .................................................................... 1-6
period close, clearing ............................................. 8-19
SmartLists ................................................................ 4-37
file creation, setting default folder ........................... 4-2
finding assets or data ................................................ 3-23
using wildcard characters ..................................... 3-25
first-year bonus
See bonus depreciation
fiscal year-end field ................................................... 4-12
formatting report ........................................................ 9-12
full-month convention ............................................ A-12
G
G/L accumulated account field .................................. 6-3
G/L asset account field ................................................ 6-3
G/L expense account field .......................................... 6-4
gains and losses ........................................................ A-30
recognizing ................................................................ 7-4
general information fields ......................................... 6-3
global data replacement ............................................ 3-17
go field ......................................................................... 3-24
GO Zone
definition ................................................................. 8-41
depreciation rules for ............................................. 8-40
designating assets as GO Zone property ............ 8-41
Section 179 limits for .............................................. 8-41
Group Manager, creating group .............................. 4-25
group tree on reports ................................................. 9-22
groups
creating .................................................................... 4-24
criteria ...................................................................... 4-22
deleting .................................................................... 4-26
editing ...................................................................... 4-26
field criteria ............................................................. 4-28
Group Manager ...................................................... 4-25
operators .................................................................. 4-22
overview .................................................................... 1-4
refresh ............................................................. 4-3, 4-31
renaming .................................................................. 4-26
sort criteria .............................................................. 4-30
sorting ...................................................................... 4-27
specifying criteria ................................................... 4-21
updating ......................................................... 4-3, 4-31
viewing in Asset List ............................................. 3-11
Index-4
Gulf Opportunity Zone
definition .................................................................
depreciation rules for ............................................
designating assets as GO Zone property ...........
Section 179 limits for .............................................
8-41
8-40
8-41
8-41
H
half-year convention ...................................... 4-16, A-11
help
contacting Sage Fixed Assets ................................. 2-4
Depreciation Fundamentals ................................... 2-3
online Help ............................................................... 2-3
Sage Live Connect ................................................... 2-4
history
purging during restore ......................................... 5-11
purging from database ........................................... 5-8
setting up history events ........................................ 5-6
viewing asset .......................................................... 6-32
History tab of Asset Detail ...................................... 3-23
detail view .............................................................. 6-33
summary view ....................................................... 6-33
I
identifying assets ........................................................ 7-1
implementing application ......................................... 1-1
importing data .................................................. 5-15, C-1
available fields ....................................................... C-12
critical depreciation fields ...................................... C-1
Custom Import Helper ........................................... C-2
field specifications ................................................. C-14
file types .................................................................... C-1
Import Exceptions report ..................................... C-12
Import Field Map report ...................................... C-11
setting asset warnings ............................................. C-2
inactivating assets ..................................................... 7-14
include Sec. 168 Allowance and Sec. 179 in
expense field ................................................ 4-10
using ........................................................................ 8-31
Indian Reservation property ................................... B-12
installation
See the Quick Start Guide
Internal book ......................................... 4-11, A-2, A-25
Investment Tax Credit (ITC)
addback .................................................................. A-31
at-risk rules .................................................. 6-13, A-19
Investment Tax Credit field ................................. 6-12
reduction of basis .................................................. A-17
setting defaults ....................................................... 4-18
involuntary conversions
defined ................................................................... A-30
entering ..................................................................... 7-9
IRS guidelines .......................................................... 7-8
luxury automobiles ............................................... 7-12
IRS table ...................................................................... 3-20
ITC
See Investment Tax Credit
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Index
K
N
Kansas Disaster Zone
definition ................................................................. 8-43
designating assets as KD Zone property ............ 8-44
Section 179 limits for .............................................. 8-44
Key Code column in reports .................................... 9-21
keyboard commands ................................................. 3-27
navigating application ............................................... 3-2
net book value field .................................................. 6-16
New York Liberty Zone
definition ................................................................. 8-34
depreciation rules for ............................................ 8-33
entering assets ........................................................ 8-34
Section 179 limits for ............................................. 8-35
no depreciation .......................................................... B-36
notes
assets ........................................................................ 3-22
companies ............................................................... 4-20
Notes tab of Asset Detail ......................................... 3-22
L
leasehold improvement property ......................... A-10
light trucks and vans ................................................. A-7
like-kind exchanges
definition ............................................................... A-29
entering ...................................................................... 7-9
example ...................................................................... 7-8
IRS guidelines ........................................................... 7-8
luxury automobiles ................................................ 7-12
link
calculating depreciation before running .............. E-4
G/L account numbers ............................................ E-3
link process ............................................................... E-2
ProSystem fx Tax, setting up ................................. E-9
running ..................................................................... E-5
selecting a favorite .................................................. E-2
listed property ............................................................ A-9
location field ................................................................. 6-3
losses ........................................................................... A-30
recognizing ................................................................ 7-4
low-income housing .................................................. A-9
luxury automobiles .................................................... A-5
involuntary conversions ........................................ 7-12
like-kind exchanges ............................................... 7-12
M
MACRS ADS
See ADS
MACRS depreciation
ADS straight-line (AD) ......................................... B-10
ADS straight-line plus 168 (AA) ......................... B-11
formula (MF) ............................................................ B-2
formula plus 168 (MA) ........................................... B-6
Indian Reservation (MI) ....................................... B-12
Indian Reservation plus 168 (MR) ...................... B-13
methods, overview .................................................. B-2
table (MT) ................................................................. B-7
main application window .......................................... 3-1
Main tab of Asset Detail ........................................... 3-21
methods
See depreciation methods
midmonth convention ............................................. A-12
midquarter convention ............................................... 8-3
definition ............................................................... A-12
setting ....................................................................... 4-16
modified half-year convention .............................. A-11
Monthly Projection report .......................................... 8-9
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
O
online Help ................................................................... 2-3
overdepreciated assets .............................................. 4-17
own depreciation calculation .................................. B-36
owner field ................................................................... 6-4
P
period close ................................................................. 8-15
beginning depreciation fields .............................. 8-18
clearing .................................................................... 8-19
saving calculations ................................................ 8-17
period close accum field .......................................... 6-16
period close date field .............................................. 6-16
period close YTD field ............................................. 6-16
placed-in-service date
field ............................................................................ 6-5
overview ................................................................ A-10
predefined groups ..................................................... 4-21
preferences, setting ..................................................... 4-1
printing
asset information ................................................... 6-29
Asset List ................................................................. 6-30
blank data collection forms .................................. 6-29
report ....................................................................... 9-19
setting up your printer ........................................... 2-6
SmartList report ..................................................... 4-40
prior depreciation, beginning depreciation ......... 6-14
projecting depreciation
annually .................................................................. 8-10
budgetary .................................................................. 8-8
monthly ..................................................................... 8-9
quick ........................................................................ 8-10
property type
field ............................................................................ 6-5
overview .................................................................. A-5
ProSystem fx Tax
assigning entity to asset ........................................ E-15
calculating depreciation ....................................... E-17
differences with Sage FAS .................................... E-24
importing depreciation into ................................. E-19
importing entities from ......................................... E-13
overview ................................................................... E-7
setting up link .......................................................... E-9
Index-5
Index
purchase field ............................................................... 6-5
purchase order field ..................................................... 6-4
purging asset history
during restore ......................................................... 5-11
from database ........................................................... 5-8
Q
Qualified Disaster Zone
definition ................................................................. 8-45
designating assets as QD Zone property ............ 8-46
Section 179 limits for .............................................. 8-46
quick projection ......................................................... 8-10
Quick Projection report ............................................ 8-11
R
reactivating assets ...................................................... 7-14
recognize gain or loss .................................................. 7-4
Recovery Assistance property
designating assets as KD Zone property ............ 8-44
Kansas Disaster Zone defined .............................. 8-43
Section 179 limits for .............................................. 8-44
recovery periods ....................................................... A-21
refresh group ...................................................... 4-3, 4-31
refreshing view ........................................................... 4-31
remaining value over remaining life
depreciation ................................................. B-34
renaming groups ........................................................ 4-26
replacing data .............................................................. 3-16
replicating assets ........................................................ 6-21
report viewer ............................................................... 9-19
drilling down for more details ............................. 9-23
group tree ................................................................ 9-22
reports
Annual Projection ................................................... 8-10
calculation assumptions ........................................ 9-21
changing sort order ................................................ 9-13
Disposal Worksheet ................................................. 7-6
exporting ................................................................. 9-24
favorites ................................................................... 9-17
for selected assets ..................................................... 9-5
formatting ................................................................ 9-12
Import Exceptions ................................................. C-12
Import Field Map .................................................. C-11
interpreting common data .................................... 9-20
Key Code column ................................................... 9-21
list of available .......................................................... 9-1
Monthly Projection ................................................... 8-9
printing .................................................................... 9-19
Quick Projection ..................................................... 8-11
Report Definition dialog ......................................... 9-7
Reports tab ................................................................ 9-6
round to whole dollars .......................................... 4-10
running ...................................................................... 9-4
setting currency rounding option ........................ 9-12
setting orientation .................................................. 9-12
setting page break .................................................. 9-14
SmartList ....................................................... 4-40, 4-42
Index-6
reports (continued)
verifying run date .................................................... 9-7
viewing .................................................................... 9-19
Reports area .................................................................. 3-5
resetting
book defaults .......................................................... 6-22
depreciation ...................................................... 8-3, 8-6
restoring backups ...................................................... 5-11
right mouse button, using ......................................... 3-8
round to whole dollars ............................................. 4-10
run date on reports ...................................................... 9-7
running link ................................................................. E-5
S
Sage Live Connect ....................................................... 2-4
sale of assets .............................................................. A-29
salvage value
field .......................................................................... 6-12
overview ................................................................ A-15
Section 179 expense deduction ................................. 6-8
addback .................................................................. A-31
including in depreciation expense ...................... 8-31
limits for Enterprise Zone property .................... 8-39
limits for Gulf Opportunity Zone property ....... 8-41
limits for Kansas Disaster Zone property .......... 8-44
limits for New York Liberty Zone property ...... 8-35
limits for Qualified Disaster Zone property ...... 8-46
maximum dollar limit ............................................. 6-8
overriding on Form 4562 ...................................... 8-37
overview ................................................................ A-15
sport utility vehicles ............................................... A-9
using Section 179 field .......................................... 6-17
selecting assets ........................................................... 3-11
serial number field ...................................................... 6-4
short years .................................................................. A-13
clearing .................................................................... 4-15
copying .................................................................... 6-23
Short Years tab ....................................................... 4-14
simple expressions .................................................... 4-22
SmartLists ................................................................... 4-37
creating .................................................................... 4-37
overview ................................................................... 1-6
printing report ....................................................... 4-40
sorting
asset list ................................................................... 4-30
assets for reports .................................................... 4-30
changing asset sort order ..................................... 3-13
sport utility vehicles, Sec. 179 limit on .................. A-9
starting application ..................................................... 2-1
starting system number field .................................. 4-10
State book .......................................................... 4-11, A-2
defaults ................................................................... A-26
straight-line depreciation
methods, overview ................................................ B-20
straight-line (SL) .................................................... B-21
straight-line, full-month (SF) ............................... B-21
straight-line, full-month plus 168 (SB) ............... B-22
straight-line, half-year (SH) ................................. B-23
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Index
straight-line depreciation (continued)
straight-line, modified half-year (SD) ................ B-24
subtotals and totals only ........................................... 9-11
summary view of history .......................................... 6-33
sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation
methods, overview ................................................ B-29
sum-of-the-years’-digits (YS) ............................... B-30
sum-of-the-years’-digits, half-year (YH) ............ B-32
sum-of-the-years’-digits, modified
half-year (YD) ............................................... B-33
System Administration area ...................................... 3-6
system number ........................................................... 4-10
system requirements
See the Quick Start Guide
T
Tax book ............................................................ 4-11, A-2
defaults .................................................................. A-23
tax compliance, reviewing assets for ...................... 8-47
taxable exchange ...................................................... A-29
templates
applying ................................................................... 6-26
copying .................................................................... 6-27
creating .................................................................... 6-24
deleting .................................................................... 6-28
editing ...................................................................... 6-25
renaming .................................................................. 6-27
saving asset as ......................................................... 6-24
threshold amounts for Sec. 179 ................................ 6-10
Transactions tab of Asset Detail ............................. 3-22
troubleshooting
See the Quick Start Guide
types of property ........................................................ A-5
U
underdepreciated assets ............................................ 4-17
user book
Book Defaults tab ................................................... 4-11
defaults .................................................................. A-25
V
vendor field ................................................................... 6-4
verifying report run date ............................................ 9-7
viewing
assets .......................................................................... 3-9
reports ...................................................................... 9-19
vintage account property ........................................ A-10
Y
year-end closing, period close ................................. 8-15
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
Index-7
Index
Index-8
Sage Fixed Assets - Lite Depreciation User’s Guide
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