Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycles 2013

Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycles 2013
Texas Strategic Action Plan
for Motorcycles
2013–2018
0-6712-P2
Published: June 2013
tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6712-P2.pdf
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was conducted in cooperation with TxDOT and FHWA. The authors thank Project Directors Frank Phillips and Wade
O’Dell and Project Monitoring Committee members Debra Vermillion, James Bailey, Josh Verastique, Lloyd Wolf, Maurice Maness,
Michael Jedlicka, Nicholas Nemec, Shirley Ashbrook, Victor Vargas, and Will Bozeman for their advice and assistance throughout
the project.
Thanks also go to the countermeasure workshop participants for their assistance: Jude Schexnyder, Quinn Brackett, Dan Middleton,
Keith Rovell, Pat Rawlings, Chantal Locke, Jay Kimbrough, Jeffrey del Castillo, Roy Wright, Kenneth Smith, Lee Ann Bell, Dave Lund,
Kenneth Copeland, Jeff Kaufman, Michael Kellett, Jeff Milburn, John Young, Nina Saint, Romona Cook, David Metcalf, and Terri Miller.
ii
Contents
Executive Summary............................................................................................................................ 1
Data Findings........................................................................................................................................ 2
Data Conclusions................................................................................................................................. 3
Plan Development ............................................................................................................................. 4
Implementation and Outreach....................................................................................................... 5
Background .......................................................................................................................................... 6
Characteristics of Those Involved........................................................................................10
Contributing Factors.................................................................................................................10
Where Crashes Occurred........................................................................................................10
When Crashes Occurred.......................................................................................................... 11
Other Characteristics of Crashes.......................................................................................... 11
Texas Rider Survey ...........................................................................................................................12
The Aim of the Plan...........................................................................................................................14
Key Focus Areas..................................................................................................................................15
ITS Technologies................................................................................................................................19
iii
iv
Executive Summary
The Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycles: 2013-2018 provides an integrated
approach to identify implementable strategies and action steps to make the
road environment and infrastructure safer for motorcyclists and other powered
two- and three-wheelers in the State of Texas. The development of this plan
spanned an 18-month period between August 2011 and February 2013 during
the completion of Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Project 0-6712,
“Evaluation of the Measures and the Development of a Plan to Reduce the
Number and Mitigate the Severity of Crashes Involving Motorcyclists on Texas
Highways.”
Several activities were completed during the course of the project to aid in the
plan’s development. The activities included a review of published literature
on motorcycle safety countermeasures, a review of Intelligent Transportation
System (ITS) and other advanced technologies for motorcycles and other vehicles, an analysis of motorcycle crash and injury data, and a statewide survey of
motorcycle riders. These activities culminated in a list of potential motorcycle
crash and injury countermeasures that were evaluated and prioritized in a
workshop attended by motorcycle safety experts and advocates. A separate
report, Development of a Statewide Motorcycle Safety Plan for Texas: Research
Report, fully documents all steps completed under the project.
The five-year plan includes detailed strategies and action steps to reduce
the number of motorcycle fatalities, injuries, and crashes on Texas roadways. It provides guidance to TxDOT and key stakeholders involved
with improving motorcycle safety, including the Texas Department
of Public Safety - Motorcycle/ATV Safety Unit (DPS-MSU), the
Texas Education Agency (TEA), the Texas Department of
State Health Services (DSHS), the Texas Motorcycle Safety
Coalition (TMSC), law enforcement, local agencies, motorcycle clubs/groups, motorcyclists,
and dealers. The plan is dynamic –as strategies
are implemented, other strategies can be added as
identified. The goal of the plan is to focus limited
funding and resources on the areas with the greatest opportunity to reduce motorcycle fatalities,
serious injuries, and crashes in Texas.
1
Data Findings
Crashes occurring between
8 p.m. and 6 a.m. are
more severe thancrashes
occurring between 6 a.m. and
8 p.m. This may be related
to alcohol involvement,
difficultly detecting adverse
road conditions, higher
speeds, etc.
2
• Helmet use influences crash injury severity and reduces the chances
of fatal and incapacitating injuries.
• Single-vehicle crashes are less likely to result in fatal or incapacitating
injuries, compared to multi-vehicle crashes.
• Older riders tend to suffer more severe injuries in a crash compared
to younger riders.
• Crashes occurring between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. are more severe than
crashes occurring between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. This may be related to
alcohol involvement, difficultly detecting adverse road conditions,
higher speeds, etc.
• Roadway curvature (both horizontal and vertical) is correlated with
motorcycle crash severity. These features increase the likelihood of
more severe crashes. Horizontal curves have a more pronounced
effect than the vertical curves on influencing crash severity.
• Riding under the influence of alcohol or drugs has a strong correlation with crash severity. Riding after drinking significantly increases
the probability of a fatality, regardless if the crash occurrs in an urban
or rural area.
• Crashes involving higher speeds or lane indiscipline (failure to stay
within lane of travel) are more severe in comparison to crashes without these two contributing factors.
• Crashes occurring on higher speed limit roads (such as interstate, U.S.,
and state highways) tend to be more severe than those occurring on
other roads (such as city streets and county roads). In rural areas, crashes occurring on FM roads are more likely to result in more severe (fatal
or incapacitating) injuries.
Data Conclusions
• Continue efforts to increase helmet use, and educate riders about
the effects of alcohol and drug use on riding skills and crash injury
severity.
• Educate older riders about increased risks to severe injuries when
involved in a crash.
• Inform riders about the increased crash risks associated with night
time riding. Encourage riders to use high visibility gear, especially
during evening and night time hours.
• Increase rider awareness about greater crash risks on roadway segments with horizontal and vertical curves.
• Speed limits should be uniformly enforced.
• Reiterate the consequences of speed, alcohol, and unsafe riding in
rider training programs. Encourage safe riding.
Continue efforts to increase
helmet use, and educate riders
about the effects of alcohol and
drug use on riding skills and crash
injury severity.
3
Plan Development
The project goal was to
develop a broad-based plan
that includes strategies and
action steps aimed to prevent
and/or mitigate motorcycle
crashes and injuries.
The project goal was to develop a broad-based plan that includes
strategies and action steps to prevent and/or mitigate motorcycle
crashes and injuries. The plan will serve as a blue print to reduce
motorcycle crashes, fatalities, and injuries on Texas roadways and provide a baseline from which the districts and TxDOT can measure and
track implemented countermeasures and programs, and if necessary,
make changes over time.
The plan development was based on:
• A review of published literature on countermeasures for reducing
the incidence of and/or the severity of motorcycle-involved crashes
and related injuries.
• A review of existing and emerging Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) and other technologies for motorcycles and vehicles.
• An analysis of motorcycle crash and injury data from 2006 through
2010.
• A survey of Texas motorcyclists capturing rider demographics,
riding histories, training and licensing status, use of protective
gear, crash involvement, and attitudes toward motorcycle safety
countermeasures.
• A workshop in which motorcycle safety experts evaluated and prioritized potential crash countermeasures for inclusion in this plan.
4
The plan includes:
• Countermeasures to reduce motorcycle crashes.
• Countermeasures to reduce motorcyclist crash injury severity.
• ITS technologies to improve motorcycle safety.
• Implementation and outreach.
Implementation and Outreach
A comprehensive approach for implementing the research findings is
essential. Fortunately, Texas has several mechanisms and resources in
place to ensure the successful implementation of the plan. Texas has
been proactive in addressing motorcycle safety issues over the past
decade through the leadership and support of TxDOT and many other
diverse agencies and groups. Through the collaborative efforts of the
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), TxDOT, traffic
safety specialists, TxDPS Motorcycle/ATV Safety Unit staff, Texas Motorcycle Safety Coalition (TMSC) members, TTI, and motorcycle safety
instructors and trainers provide a strong infrastructure of support for
broad-based implementation.
Texas Motorcycle Safety
Coalition (TMSC) will oversee the
implementation of the plan.
The TMSC will play a key role in the implementation of many of the
countermeasures identified in this plan.
The TMSC serves as a public forum for addressing strategies to improve
motorcycle safety; discusses effective programs, regulations, and other
opportunities to improve motorcycle safety; reviews, proposes, and
makes recommendations concerning motorcycle-related legislation;
and serves to promote rider safety and inform the public about being
aware of motorcycles and sharing the road safely. Representatives from
engineering, planning, enforcement, education, emergency response,
research, government agencies and organizations, and motorcyclists
including riders, motorcycle groups, and organizations actively participate in the TMSC.
Outreach will include posting the plan on www.LookLearnLive.org (a
dedicated website to promote motorcycle safety in Texas) to generate
awareness and support. Other opportunities include advertising in
Texas motorcycle magazines such as TMRA Folly, the Clubhouse, Ride
Texas, etc. and through presentations at traffic and motorcycle safety
conferences.
5
67% of crashes involved
new motorcycles (5 years old
or newer).
The plan also benefits the larger traffic safety community, government,
researchers, industry, highway designers, law enforcement, medical
community, safety trainers/instructors, motorcycle rights groups, and
enthusiasts who are committed to doing whatever is necessary to
make motorcycling safer in Texas. Many of these people will be instrumental in the implementation of countermeasures and outreach
activities identified in this plan.
Background
After a two-year decline, motorcycle deaths in Texas increased by 10%
in 2011, from 435 in 2010 to 479 (NHTSA, FARS). During the same period,
motorcycle registrations also grew by 3%, from 424,218 to 437,878. In
2011 (TDS, 2011), Texas experienced a decrease in the number of motor
vehicle traffic deaths. The increased percentage of motorcyclist deaths
offset gains in road traffic deaths. When compared to all traffic fatalities, the percentage of motorcycle deaths is significant, accounting for
16% of total traffic fatalities in 2011.
Inattention is a significant factor in all motor vehicle crashes, especially motorcycle crashes. One half (50%) of car-motorcycle crashes are
caused by drivers because they generally do not see the motorcyclist in
time or they misjudged the bikes approaching speed. More and more
drivers are talking on cell phones and texting while driving, making it
more important than ever to remind drivers to pay attention and look
for motorcycles.
6
Riders should take precautions, such as making themselves more visible, wearing protective gear, using turn signals, riding unimpaired, and
allowing time for responding to heavy traffic periods and hazardous
roadway conditions.
One-half of all traffic crashes involving motorcyclists are single vehicle.
Many of these crashes are preventable. Riding under the influence of
alcohol is a major problem. In 2010, 36% of Texas motorcycle riders
killed had a BAC of 0.08 g/ml or higher compared to 29% in the US
(FARS, 2011). Nonuse of helmets is also a major factor in motorcycle
fatalities. In 2010, 41% of Texas riders killed did not wear a helmet compared to 58% nationally (FARS, 2011). Some of these deaths may have
been avoided if riders had been properly trained on how to handle
road conditions and curves.
Nonuse of helmets is also a
major factor in the state’s
motorcycle fatalities.
Summary of Texas Motorcycle Crash Statistics
Motorcycle
crashes
Total traffic % of Motorcycle Total traffic
crashes
total fatalities
fatalities
% of
total
Motorcycle
injuries
Total traffic
injuries
% of
total
2003
6,425
459,725
1.4
345
3,822
9.0
6,024
308,360
2.0
2004
6,542
447,037
1.5
294
3,700
7.9
6,144
288,228
2.1
2005
7,894
463,830
1.7
359
3,558
10.1
7,285
292,655
2.5
2006
8,268
437,290
1.9
351
3,521
10.0
7,632
271,126
2.8
2007
8,617
458,289
1.9
408
3,463
11.8
7,814
266,318
2.9
2008
10,642
439,527
2.4
531
3,477
15.3
9,719
243,866
4.0
2009
9,044
428,667
2.1
432
3,089
14.0
8,213
232,580
3.5
2010
7,701
391,101
2.0
435
3,050
14.2
7,043
217,381
3.2
Source: Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Crash Records Information System (CRIS) as of August 14, 2010.
2010 data as of February 28, 2013.
7
Texas Motorcycle Fatalities 2000–2010
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
THOUSANDS
Texas Motorcycle Registrations 2000–2010
8
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Of the vehicle and motorcycle
technologies presented,
workshop participants
rated anti-lock braking
systems, electronic stability
systems, adaptive front
lighting, collision warning
and avoidance systems, and
automated crash notification
systems highest for their
potential effectiveness.
9
46% of crashes and 38% of
fatal crashes occurred in cities
with populations of 100,000 or
more; rural areas represented
31% of total crashes and 44%
of fatal crashes.
Characteristics of Those Involved
• 92% of motorcyclists involved in crashes were male.
• 67% of motorcyclists involved in crashes were between 21 and
50 years old.
• 67% of crashes involved newer motorcycles (5 years old or
newer).
Contributing Factors
• In 1.6% of crashes, the rider was under the influence of alcohol.
• 27% of crashes involved excessive speed.
• 7% of crashes involved inattention.
• 5% involved a faulty evasive action.
Where Crashes Occurred
• 46% of crashes and 38% of fatal crashes occurred in cities with
populations of 100,000 or more; rural areas represented 31% of
total crashes and 44% of fatal crashes.
• 37% of crashes and 25% of fatal crashes happened on city
streets.
• 26% of crashes and 31% of fatal crashes happened on U.S. and
state highways.
• 17% of crashes and 25% of fatal crashes happened on farm-tomarket roads.
• 27% of crashes and 26% of fatal crashes occurred at
intersections.
10
When Crashes Occurred
• Most motorcycle crashes occurred on Saturday and Sunday; the
least occurred on Monday.
• 60% of all motorcycle crashes occurred between noon and
8:59 p.m. On weekdays, the most crashes occurred between 6 and
9 a.m.; on weekends, the largest number occurred between 9 a.m.
and noon.
Most motorcycle crashes
occurred on Saturday and
Sunday; the least occurred
on Monday.
Other Characteristics of Crashes
• 52% of all motorcycle crashes were single vehicle.
Helmet Usage by Age, Ethnicity, and Gender: Texas, 2006–2010
Helmet Use
by
Motorcyclist
Age
Motorcyclist
Ethnicity
Motorcyclist
Gender
Level
All (KABC) Crashes
Fatal (K) Crashes
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
20
3,279
95.4%
115
93.5%
21<30
9,589
94.2%
509
91.2%
31–40
7,004
92.4%
389
87.8%
41–50
7,432
90.9%
458
87.2%
51–60
5,384
91.6%
327
88.4%
> 60
1,855
92.3%
139
90.3%
Total
34,943
92.7%
1,939
89.1%
White
25,047
92.7%
1,422
88.7%
Hispanic
6,226
91.6%
310
88.8%
Black
2,989
95.2%
176
92.1%
Asian
355
97.0%
12
100.0%
Other
147
95.9%
15
100.0%
Male
32,704
92.6%
1,874
89.1%
Female
2,179
94.5%
63
90.0%
Source: Data on crashes involving motorcycles from 2006−2010 obtained from TxDOT CRIS.
11
Texas Rider Survey
Texas riders were
surveyed to capture
information about
Texas riders were surveyed to capture information about riding history and
training, protective gear use, crash experiences, and demographic characteristics. A total of 1,507 riders responded to the online survey. Findings include:
• Male - 85% with an average age of 52.5 years. The largest age group was 50
to 59 years, representing 35 percent of respondents.
riding history and
• Approximately 70 percent of respondents ride primarily for recreation.
training, protective
• Most respondents ride on a mixture of roadway types, with rural roads and
highways predominating; however, 38% ride on city streets at least part of
the time.
gear use, crash
experiences, and
demographic
characteristics.
• The most common motorcycle type overall and among respondents aged
18–49 is a cruiser (40% of all riders, 47% of riders 18–49). Touring motorcycles are more popular among riders 50 and older; dual-purpose and sport
bikes were frequent choices for riders aged 18–29.
• Nearly all of the riders surveyed (96.5%) hold a motorcycle license, endorsement, or learner’s permit, and most (74%) have been riding for more than
10 years. About 72% have completed one or more motorcycle training
courses; of these, 82% rated the training courses they took as highly effective for improving safe riding skills.
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• Most surveyed riders wear safety gear most or all of the time; 84% wear DOT-approved helmets, 89% wear boots, 85% wear gloves, 73% wear protective eyewear,
and 57% wear protective jackets. Protective pants, reflective clothing, and body
armor were all worn by more than 20% of riders. Of the riders who do not choose
to wear a helmet, the most frequent reason given was “personal freedom.”
• When asked about alcohol consumption, 69% of surveyed riders stated that during
the past year, they had not consumed any alcohol within an hour of riding. Another 28% had consumed one to two drinks within an hour of riding; 3% had consumed three or more drinks.
• Over half (56%) of surveyed riders have been in at least one motorcycle crash. Characteristics of these self-reported crashes are similar in many ways to the statistics revealed by the analysis of crash data described in the next section. A contributing factor mentioned by 47% of riders who had been involved in a crash that
involved another vehicle was “the vehicle driver said he/she didn’t see me.”
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The Aim of the Plan
In an environment where motorcycles and other two-and threewheeled motor vehicles are an increasing component in roadway
vehicle-mix in Texas, the plan seeks to identify strategies and action
steps that will:
• Reduce the rate of motorcycle crashes per registered motorcycles.
• Reduce the rate of fatal and severe motorcycle injuries by 15% by
2015, as compared to 2010.*
*Goal established in the Texas Strategic Highway Safety Plan,
Report of Progress 2012.
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Key Focus Areas
The plan is organized under 13 key focus areas. For each area, the plan identifies several initiatives and action
steps, prioritized by motorcycle safety experts who participated in a one-day workshop. The group prioritized
and ranked approximately 73 crash reduction countermeasures on the basis of their effectiveness in preventing motorcycle crashes and in reducing the severity of injuries to riders. The initiatives under each key area are
not listed in any particular order of importance.
GOAL: Improve awareness among motorcyclists of their vunerability in a crash and ways to increase conspicuity.
Motorcycle/rider conspicuity
Educate motorcycle riders in conspicuity products, techniques, and strategies
Timeframe
2 Years
Increase motorcyclists’ use of high-visibility clothing, conspicuity products
3-5 Years
Encourage visibility enhancements for motorcycles, such as auxiliary headlights, auxiliary brake
lights, headlight modulators, position lamps, underbody LED lighting, etc.
3-5 Years
Compile and distribute information on legal lighting/technology options in Texas
2 Years
Enhance training on strategic lane positioning for increasing motorcyclist conspicuity in traffic
3-5 Years
Encourage industry participation
3-5 Years
GOAL: Increase motorists’ awareness of the presence of motorcycles on the road.
Motorist awareness of motorcycles
Increase motorist knowledge/awareness about sharing the road with motorcyclists and other vulnerable road users:
• Produce brochure on TxDOT’s “Share the Road” sign program and process for requesting a sign
• Update and add information on sharing the road and rider conspicuity in the Texas driver’s
education handbook
• Develope smartphone application (e.g., a game called “How Many Motorcycles Have You Seen
Today?”), YouTube/social media, etc.
Timeframe
2 Years
Support the use of emerging vehicle technologies (add-on or original from manufacturer)
3-5 Years
Enact legislation that permits drivers who are ticketed for right of way (ROW) violations involving a
motorcycle to attend a motorcycle safety class or other modified course emphasizing motorcycle
awareness
3-5 Years
Add questions about sharing the road on Texas driver’s license exam, i.e. (a) about #1 type of
collision (turning left in front of a motorcycle); (b) why are motorcycles difficult to see? Add course
content about scanning for motorcycles (legislative change required)
3-5 Years
15
GOAL: Ensure proper licensing of all motorcycle operators riding on public roadways in Texas.
Licensing
Timeframe
Revise regulations to require specific license for operators of 3-wheel motorcycles
2 Years
Enact legislation to require a motorcycle endorsement before registering a motorcycle
3-5 Years
Encourage law enforcement to use a zero tolerance approach regarding unlicensed riders
3-5 Years
Require proof of motorcycle endorsement before issuing parking permits (large employers, state
and local government agencies, university campuses, etc.)
3-5 Years
GOALS: Provide training to all riders who need or seek it; increase motorcyclists’ knowledge of the benefits of
advance training, including awareness of hazards, motorcycle operation techniques, and conspicuity.
Rider Education and Training
Timeframe
Increase/reallocate funding toward safety training:
• Improve type and quantity of motorcycles used for rider training
• Update quality assurance plan to increase the number of site and instructor visits and standardizes the review and remediation process
2 Years
Promote importance of rider training to new and experienced motorcyclists
2 Years
Educate riders on potential roadway obstacles (pavement markers, manhole covers, steel plates,
etc.) and collision avoidance
2 Years
Revise and update DPS motorcycle operator’s manual and translate into Spanish
3-5 Years
Expand course availability for three-wheeled vehicles classified as motorcycles OR change classification of vehicles
3-5 Years
GOAL: Reduce the number of crashes in which motorcyclists are impaired by alcohol or other drugs.
Impaired riding
Encourage zero BAC/reduced BAC laws for all motorcycle riders
3-5 Years
Promote peer-to-peer outreach among riders discouraging drinking and riding
2 Years
Engage rider’s group leadership to discourage alcohol use at motorcycle events
2 Years
Explore effectiveness of alcohol interlock devices for motorcycles
Promote Bikers Responsibility Initiative (BRI) and taking responsibility for actions
16
Timeframe
3-5 Years
2 Years
GOALS: Reduce the number of speed-related motorcycle crashes and increase motorcyclists knowledge on the
dangers of excessive speed.
Speeding
Timeframe
Include motorcycles in speeding enforcement activities
2 Years
Develop outreach/education to riders about dangers of excessive speed
2 Years
Educate riders about selecting a motorcycle compatible with skill level
2 Years
GOAL: Increase the usage of all protective equipment by motorcyclists and passengers.
Personal protective gear
Timeframe
Conduct PI&E campaign to promote using motorcycle safety gear (helmets, jacket, pants, footwear,
etc.)
2 Years
Work with riders’ groups and dealerships to promote the use of protective gear
2 Years
Provide training for law enforcement on identifying non-DOT compliant helmets
3-5 Years
GOAL: Accommodate the safety needs of motorcyclists in road design, construction, and maintenance.
Roadway/Infrastructure
Timeframe
Communicate roadway condition information (construction, maintenance, hazardous locations) on
DOT websites, social media, and 511)
2 Years
Include information regarding fresh seal-coat and milled surface areas during construction. Add
potential for crowd-sourcing roadway condition information. Develop a smartphone application
2 Years
Post specific warnings for motorcyclists where unavoidable hazardous conditions exist (reduced
traction, roadway surface irregularities)
3-5 Years
GOAL: Encourage and support legislative initiatives that promote motorcycle safety.
Legislation and regulations
Timeframe
Reinstate universal helmet use law
3-5 Years
Re-examine and update motorcycle laws:
• Review, streamline, and modernize terminology and laws
• Coordinate among all agencies responsible for motorcycle laws, definitions, and regulations
(DPS, DOT, DMV, and other) to develop legislation specifying who is in charge of what regarding motorcycles
• Review committee comprised of TxDOT, law enforcement, DMV licensing, TMSC
3-5 Years
17
GOAL: Ensure that state and local motorcycle safety program include and involve a law enforcement component.
Law enforcement
Create a quick reference guide for law enforcement officers specific to motorcycles with statute
references. Develop a website with this information for print-out. Consider designing as a mobile
website or application instead of printing hard copies
Increase funding for motorcycle safety efforts by law enforcement
Timeframe
2 Years
3-5 Years
GOALS: Incorporate plan initiatives with TxDOT Traffic Safety motorcycle safety program goals and objectives.
Ensure funding of projects that support the initiatives outlined in the plan. Ensure funding of projects that support
the initiatives outlined in the plan.
Program management
Timeframe
Increase funding for motorcycle safety by elevating their importance to state highway safety office
3-5 Years
Focus resources in the top 10 counties for motorcycle fatalities and identify countermeasures that
work then develop best practices tools for use statewide
3-5 Years
GOALS: Ensure avalibility of accurate data on motorcycle crashes, injuries, and fatalities to assist state and local
agencies prioritize motorcycle safety activities. Conduct targeted studies on motorcycle-related issues to ensure
that motorcycle safety decisions are data-driven.
Program evaluation and data
Add motorcycle specific information to the Texas traffic crash report for increased understanding of
motorcycle crashes; promote inter- and intra-agency efforts to link crash, injury, licensing, violation,
training, and registration records
Conduct detailed evaluation of police-reported motorcycle crash reports to determine contributing crash causation factors. Compare findings to existing training materials and adjust curricula to
address the issues
18
Timeframe
2 Years
3-5 Years
Conduct research to determine why motorcyclists are unlicensed and how to reach out to this
group
2 Years
Develop partnerships with trauma centers, health department, insurance agencies, and dealerships
(if possible) for data sharing
2 Years
Determine the impact of funded research and programs on reducing motorcycle crashes, injuries, and
fatalities:
• Fatigue
• Edge drop-off design
• Use mileage data (from vehicle inspection data) to normalize crash rates
3-5 Years
Investigate simulation and computer modeling to better understand motorcycle crash risk and
injuries
3-5 Years
GOALS: Ensure that motorcycles are included for key technology that improves safety by making other road users
more aware of their presence and movements, and motorcycles more visible to other road users.
Motorcycle and vehicle technologies/ITS
Timeframe
Promote availability and benefits of technologies that improve motorcyclist safety and increase rider
conspicuity
3-5 Years
Engage with the motorcycle industry to encourage the development and promotion of motorcycles with safety-related technologies
3-5 Years
ITS Technologies
Workshop participants ranked up to five technologies that they felt had the most
potential for reducing motorcycle crashes and injuries. Based on weighted scores, the
top five technologies included anti-lock braking systems, electronic stability program,
adaptive front lighting, airbag vest, and airbag system.
Technology
Weighted Total Score
(10 participants)
Anti-lock Braking Systems
37
Electronic Stability Program
18
Adaptive Front Lighting
15
Airbag Vest
15
Airbag System
14
Collision Warning and Avoidance Systems
12
Electronic Licenses or Smart Cards
11
Curve Speed Warnings
10
Brake Assist
8
Linked Braking Systems
8
Crash Data Recorder
7
Helmet Mounted Displays
7
Road Surface Condition Monitoring
7
Lane Keeping and Departure Warnings
6
Pedestrian Detection System
5
Driver Status Monitoring
4
Speed Alert/Limiting Systems
4
Automated Crash Notification System
3
Rearview Displays
2
19
College Station, TX 77843-3135
(979) 845-1734
tti.tamu.edu
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