EMERGENCY PROCEDURE

EMERGENCY PROCEDURE
EMERGENCY PROCEDURE
Introduction
.
Engine Fire During Start
.
Engine Power Loss During Take-Off
Engine Power Loss In Flight
Power Off Landing .
Gear Down Landing .....
Gear Up Landing . . . . . . .
Propeller Overspeed
.
Emergency Landing Gear Extension
Spins
.
Open Door
.
Fire
.
Loss of Oil Pressure
.
Loss of Fuel Pressure
High Oil Temperature
Alternator Failure ..
4-1
..........
..
.
.
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-3
44
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
ARROW II
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
INTRODUCTION
This section contains procedures that are recommended if an emergency condition should
occur during ground operation, take-off, or in-flight. These procedures are suggested as the best
course of action for coping with the particular condition described, but are not a substitute for
sound judgment and common sense. Since emergencies rarely happen in modern aircraft, their
occurrence is usually unexpected, and the best corrective action may not always be obvious.
Pilots should familiarize themselves with the procedures given in this section and be prepared to
take appropriate action should an emergency arise;
Most basic emergency procedures, such as power off landings, are a part of normal pilot
training. Although these emergencies are discussed here, this information is not intended to
replace such training, but only to, provide a source of reference and review, and to provide
information on procedures which are not the same for all aircraft. It is suggested that the pilot
review standard emergency procedures periodically to remain proficient in them.
In the procedures that follow, critical actions with respect to time are indicated by use of
bold print; these actions should be performed immediately if the emergency condition is not to
be aggravated. The remaining procedures are non-critical in the sense that time is usually
available for consulting the check list.
EMERGENCY PR.OCEDURES
ISSUED: JULY 13.1973
4--1
ARROW II
ENGINE POWER LOSS IN FLIGHT
Complete engine power loss is usually caused by fuel flow interruption, and power will be
restored shortly after fuel flow is restored. If power loss occurs at low altitude, the first step is
to prepare for an emergency landing (See POWER OFF LANDING). Maintain an airspeed of at
least 110 MPH lAS, gear and flaps up and if altitude permits proceed as follows:
I. Fuel Selector - Switch to another tank containing fuel.
2. Electric Fuel Pump - On
3. Mixture - Rich
4. Alternate Air - On
5. Engine Gauges - Check for indication of the cause of power loss.
6. If no fuel pressure is indicated, check tank selector position to be sure it is on a tank
containing fuel.
When power is restored:
7. Alternate Air - Off
8. Electric Fuel Pump - Off
If the above steps do not restore power, prepare for an emergency landing. If time permits:
1. Ignition Switch - "L" then "R" then back to "BOTH."
2. Throttle and Mixture - Different settings. (This may restore power if problem is too
rich or too lean a mixture, or partial fuel system restriction.
3. Try another fuel tank. (Water in the fuel could take some time to be used up, and
allowing the engine to windmill may testore power. If power loss is due to water, fuel
pressure indications will be normal).
NOTE
If engine failure was caused by fuel exhaustion, power will not be
restored after tanks are switched until empty fuel lines are filled,
which may require up to ten seconds.
If power is not restored, proceed with POWER OFF LANDING procedures.
POWER OFF LANDING
If loss of power occurs at altitude, trim the aircraft for best gliding angle (105 MPH IAS)
(Air Condo off) and look for a suitable field. (See Note) If measures taken to restore power are .
not effective, and if time permits, check your charts for airports in the immediate vicinity; it
may be possible to land at one if you have sufficient altitude. At best gliding angle, with the
engine windmilling, and the propeller control in full "decrease RPM," the aircraft will travel
approximately 1.6 miles for each thousand feet of altitude. If possible, notify the FAA by radio
of your difficulty and intentions. If another pilot or passenger is aboard, let him help.
When you have located a suitable field, establish a spiral pattern around this field. Try to
be at 1000 feet above the field at the downwind position, to make a normal landing approach.
When the field can easily be reached, slow to 90 MPH IAS for the shortest landing. Excess
altitude may be lost by widening your pattern, using flaps or slipping, or a combination of
these.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
ISSUED: JULY 13,1973
4-3
ARROW
II
Whether to attempt a landing with gear up or down depends on many factors. If the field chosen
is obviously smooth and firm, and long enough to bring the plane to a stop, the gear should be
down. If there are stumps or rocks or other large obstacles in the field, the gear in the down position
will better protect the occupants of the aircraft. If, however, the field is suspected to be excessively
soft or short, or when landing in water of any depth, a wheels-up landing will normally be safer and
do less damage to the airplane.
I
On aircraft equipped with the backup gear extender at airspeeds below approximately 105 mph
IAS the gear will free fall, and will take six to eight seconds to free fall and lock. If a gear up landing
is desired, it will be necessary to latch the override lever in the up position before airspeed drops to
115 mph to prevent landing gear from inadvertently free falling.
Touchdown
should normally be made at the lowest possible airspeed.
GEAR DOWN LANDING
For a
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
gear down landing, proceed as
Gear selector switch - down
Close throttle and shut off the
Flaps as desired
Turn the fuel selector valve to
Mixture - Idle cut-off
6. Tighten seat belt (and shoulder
7. Touchdown at lowest possible
follows when committed
to landing:
master and ignition switches
off
harness, if available)
airspeed
NOTE
On aircraft equipped
with the backup gear extender, the
mechanism will extend the gear below approximately 105 mph IAS
with power off. Be prepared to latch the emergency override lever
UP before airspeed drops to 115 mph to prevent landing gear from
inadvertently free falling, until gear extension is desired.
NOTE
With the master switch off, the landing gear cannot be retracted.
GEAR UP LANDING
In the event a gear up landing is desired, proceed as follows when committed to landing:
1. On aircraft equipped
with the backup gear extender,. lock emergency gear
lever in "Override Engaged" position before airspeed drops to 11S mph to prevent
landing gear from inadvertently free falling.
2. Flaps as desired.
3. Close throttle and shut off the master and ignition switches.
4. Turn the fuel selector valve to off.
S. Tighten seat belt (and shoulder harness, if available).
6. Contact surface at minimum possible airspeed.
NOTE
With the master switch off, the landing gear cannot be retracted.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
REVISED: JANUARY 31,1987
ARROW II
PROPELLER OVERSPEED
Propeller overspeed is caused by a malfunction in the propeller governor, or low oil pressure,
which allows the propeller blades to rotate to f~ll low pitch. If this should occur, proceed as
follows:
1. THROTTLE - RETARD.
2. OIL PRESSURE - CHECK.
3. PROPELLER
CONTROL
- FULL DECREASE
RPM, THEN SET IF ANY
CONTROL AVAILABLE.
4. REDUCE AIRSPEED.
5. THROTTLE - AS REQUIRED TO REMAIN BELOW 2700 RPM.
EMERGENCY LANDING GEAR EXTENSION
Accomplish the following checks prior to initiation of the emergency extension procedure:
1.
Master Switch - Check On.
2.
Circuit Breakers - Check.
3.
Panel Lights - Off (in daytime).
4.
Gear Indicator Bulbs - Check.
If landing gear does not check down and locked:
5.
Reduce airspeed below 100 mph.
6.
Move landing gear selector switch to gear down position.
7.
If gear has failed to lock down, on aircraft equipped with the backup gear extender,
raise emergency gear lever to "Override Engaged" position.
8.
If gear has still failed to lock down, move and hold emergency gear lever down to
Emergency Down position.
9.
If gear has still failed to lock down, yaw the airplane abruptly from side to side
with the rudder.
NOTE
If all electrical power has been lost, the landing gear must be
extended using the above emergency procedures. The landing gear
position indicator lights will not be operative.
NOTE
Refer to page 3-11 for differences when emergency
procedure is performed for training purposes."
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
REVISED: FEBRUARY 7, 2005
extension
4-5
ARROW II
SPINS
Intentional spins are prohibited in this aircraft. If a spin is inadvertently entered, immediately
use the following recovery procedures:
1. THROTTLE - IDLE.
2. RUDDER - FULL OPPOSITE TO DIRECTION OF ROTATION.
3. CONTROL WHEEL - FULL FORWARD.
4. RUDDER - NEUTRAL (WHEN ROTATION STOPS).
5. CONTROL WHEEL - AS REQUIRED TO SMOOTHLY REGAIN LEVEL FLIGHT
ATTITUDE.
NOTE
On aircraft equipped with the backup gear extender, the landing
gear will extend in this flight condition, but will retract during
recovery, and has no adverse affect on the spin characteristics.
OPEN DOOR
The cabin door on the Cherokee Arrow II is latched at four points so the chances of its
opening in flight are remote. However, should you forget to completely close or latch the door, it
may open partially. This will usually happen soon after take-off. An open door will not affect the
normal flight characteristics, and a normal landing can be made with it open. If the door opens it
will trail in a slightly open position, and the airspeed will be reduced slightly.
To close the door in flight, proceed as follows:
1. Slow aircraft to 100 mph !AS.
2. Cabin Vents - Close.
3. Storm Window - Open.
4. If upper latch is open - latch. If lower latch is open - open top latch, push door
further open, and then close rapidly. Latch top latch.
A slip inthe direction of the open door will assist in latching procedure.
4-6
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
REVISED: JANUARY 31, 1987
ARROW II
FIRE
The presence of fire is noted through smoke, smell, and heat in the cabin. It is essential
that the source of the fire be promptly identified through instrument readings, character of the
smoke, or other indications, since the action to be taken differs somewhat in each case.
1.
Source of Fire - Check
a. Electrical Fire (Smoke in Cabin):
(1 J Master Switch - Off.
(2) Vents - Open
(3) Cabin Heat - Off
(4) Land as soon as practicable.
b.
Engine Fire:
(I) In case of engine fire in flight
(a) Fuel Selector - OFF
(b) Throttle - CLOSE
(c) Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF
(d) Heater - Off (In all cases of fire)
(e) Defroster - OFF (In all cases of fire)
(f) If terrain permits - Land Immediately
The possibility of an engine rue in flight is extremely remote. The procedure given above is
general and pilot judgement should be the deciding factor for action in such an emergency.
(2)
In case of engine fire on the ground
(a) If engine has not started
1. Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF
2. Throttle - OPEN
3. Turn engine with starter (This is an attempt to pull the rue into
the engine.)
(b) If engine has already started and is running, continue operating to try
pulling the rue into the engine.
(c) In either case stated in (a) and (b), if the fire continues longer than a
few seconds, the rue should be extinguished by the best available
external means.
(d) If external rue extinguishing is to be applied
1. .Fuel Selector Valves - OFF
2. Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF
LOSS OF OIL PRESSURE
Loss of oil pressure may be either partial or complete. A partial loss of oil pressure usually
indicates a malfunction in the oil pressure regulating system, and a landing should be made as
soon as possible to investigate the cause and prevent engine damage.
A complete loss of oil pressure indication may signify oil exhaustion or may be the result
of a faulty gauge. In either case, proceed toward the nearest airport, and be prepared for a
forced landing. If the problem is not a pressure gauge malfunction, the engine may stop
suddenly. Maintain altitude until such time as a dead stick landing can be accomplished. Don't
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
ISSUED: JtJL Y 13. 1973
4-7
ARROW II
change power settings unnecessarily, as this may hasten complete power loss.
Depending on the circumstances, it may be advisable to make an off airport landing while
power is still available, particularly if other indications of actual oil pressure loss, such as sudden
increase in temperatures, or oil smoke, are apparent, and an airport is not close.
If engine stoppage occurs, proceed to POWER OFF LANDING.
LOSS OF FUEL PRESSURE
1.
2.
3.'
Electric Boost Pump - On.
Mixture Control Forward.
Fuel Selector - Check on full tank ..
If problem is not an empty fuel tank, land as soon as practicable and have the fuel system
checked.
HIGH OIL TEMPERATURE
An abnormally high oil temperature indication may be caused by a low oil level, an
obstruction in the oil cooler, damaged or improper baffle seals, a defective gauge, or other
causes. Land as soon as practicable at an appropriate airport, and have the cause investigated.
A steady, rapid rise in oil temperature is a sign of trouble. Land at the nearest airport and
let a mechanic investigate the problem. Watch the oil pressure gauge for an accompanying loss
of pressure.
ALTERNATOR FAILURE
Loss of alternator output is detected through a zero reading on the ammeter. Before
executing the following procedure, insure that the reading is zero. and not merely low by
actuating an electrically powered device, such as the landing light. If no increase in the ammeter
reading is noted, alternator failure can be assumed.
1. Reduce electricalload.
2. Alternator Circuit Breakers - Check.
3. "Alt" Switch - Off (for 1 second), then On.
If the ammeter continues to indicate no output, or alternator will not stay reset, turn off
"Alt" switch, maintain minimum electrical load, and land as soon as practical. All electrical
power is being supplied by the battery.
NOTE
If the battery is fully discharged, the gear will have to be lowered
using the "EMERGENCY LANDING GEAR EXTENSION"
procedure, and the position lights will of course not be operating.
4-8
EMERGPlCY PROCEDURES
REVISED: JUNE 18. 1974
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