Bidirectional Battery Charger (B2C)

Bidirectional Battery Charger (B2C)
Bidirectional Battery Charger
(B2C)
Installation and operation manual
Caltest Instruments GmbH
Kohlmattstrasse 7 Tel: +49(0)7842-99722-00
D-77876 KAPPELRODECK Fax: +49(0)7842-99722-29
info@caltest.de www.caltest.de
INDEX
1.
2.
3.
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 5
1.1.
Symbols used ................................................................................................................. 5
1.2.
Safety notes ................................................................................................................... 5
1.3.
Quality and regulations ................................................................................................. 5
PRESENTATION ...................................................................................................................... 7
2.1.
Introduction................................................................................................................... 7
2.2.
Power supply features................................................................................................... 8
2.3.
Operation and connection modes ................................................................................ 9
2.4.
Limits ............................................................................................................................. 9
2.5.
Configuration and control of the power supply .......................................................... 10
2.6.
Functional diagram...................................................................................................... 10
2.7.
Principle of operation .................................................................................................. 12
INSTALLATION ..................................................................................................................... 13
3.1.
Important safety instructions ...................................................................................... 13
3.2.
Equipment views ......................................................................................................... 13
3.3.
Equipment reception................................................................................................... 16
3.3.1.
Unpacking and checking the content .................................................................. 16
3.3.2.
Storage ................................................................................................................ 16
3.3.3.
Transport to location ........................................................................................... 16
3.3.4.
Location ............................................................................................................... 17
3.4.
4.
Connection .................................................................................................................. 19
3.4.1.
Earth protection .................................................................................................. 19
3.4.2.
Input connection, terminals (X1 to X5) ............................................................... 19
3.4.3.
Output connection, terminals (X6 to X10) .......................................................... 19
3.4.4.
Emergency Power Off terminals (X12) ................................................................ 19
3.4.5.
Communications ................................................................................................. 20
3.4.6.
Digital inputs and outputs ................................................................................... 20
3.4.7.
Analog inputs and outputs .................................................................................. 21
OPERATION ......................................................................................................................... 22
4.1.
Safety ........................................................................................................................... 22
4.2.
State Machine ............................................................................................................. 22
4.2.1.
Initialization ......................................................................................................... 23
4.2.2.
Standby ................................................................................................................ 23
Page2 / 62
v1.2
4.2.3.
Precharge ............................................................................................................ 23
4.2.4.
Ready ................................................................................................................... 23
4.2.5.
Run ...................................................................................................................... 23
4.2.6.
Alarm ................................................................................................................... 24
4.3.
Operation modes ........................................................................................................ 24
4.3.1.
Current mode ...................................................................................................... 24
4.3.2.
Voltage mode ...................................................................................................... 25
4.3.3.
Power mode ........................................................................................................ 26
4.3.4.
Battery charge ..................................................................................................... 27
4.3.4.1.
Boost Charge ................................................................................................... 28
4.3.4.2.
Equalizing Charge ............................................................................................ 29
4.3.5.
5.
6.
4.4.
Connection modes ...................................................................................................... 30
4.5.
Working with the equipment ...................................................................................... 31
4.5.1.
Start-up................................................................................................................ 32
4.5.2.
Stop ..................................................................................................................... 33
4.5.2.1.
Full stop ........................................................................................................... 33
4.5.2.2.
Standby stop .................................................................................................... 33
4.5.2.3.
Ready ............................................................................................................... 33
4.5.3.
Emergency stop ................................................................................................... 34
4.5.4.
Accidental shut down .......................................................................................... 34
4.5.5.
Alarms.................................................................................................................. 34
4.5.6.
Alarms reset ........................................................................................................ 36
LOCAL TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL PANEL ............................................................................. 37
5.1.
Basic functions............................................................................................................. 37
5.2.
Menus and submenus ................................................................................................. 37
5.2.1.
General ................................................................................................................ 37
5.2.2.
Operational ......................................................................................................... 38
5.2.3.
Battery Pack ........................................................................................................ 41
5.2.4.
Configuration....................................................................................................... 42
5.2.5.
Alarms.................................................................................................................. 44
REMOTE COMMUNICATIONS .............................................................................................. 45
6.1.
7.
Programmable limits ........................................................................................... 30
IQ MANAGEMENT ....................................................................................................... 55
HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE ............................................................................................ 57
8.
7.1.
Operation tab .............................................................................................................. 57
7.2.
Supervision tab ............................................................................................................ 58
7.3.
Alarm tab ..................................................................................................................... 59
7.4.
Batt configuration tab ................................................................................................. 59
7.5.
I, V, P configuration tab ............................................................................................... 60
WARRANTY AND MAINTENANCE ........................................................................................ 61
8.1.
Replacing the output fuses.......................................................................................... 61
8.2.
Fans ............................................................................................................................. 61
8.3.
DC bus capacitors ........................................................................................................ 61
8.4.
Warranty ..................................................................................................................... 61
8.5.
Claim procedure .......................................................................................................... 62
Page4 / 62
v1.2
1. INTRODUCTION
Dear customer, on behalf of CINERGIA team, thank you for the confidence placed in our
company and for the purchase of this product. Please, read carefully this manual before using
the equipment to get familiarized with it to obtain the maximum performance from it.
This document is intended for appropriately qualified personnel. Only personnel with the
appropriate skills are allowed to perform the electrical connection and commissioning of the
equipment.
The information in this documentation is not binding. CINERGIA reserves the right to make
changes in part on in the whole at any time and without prior notice due to technical advance
or product improvement.
1.1. Symbols used
DANGER: Indicates a hazardous situation which can result in death or serious
injury and can cause important damage or destruction of the equipment or the
property
WARNING: Indicates important information that must be taken into account to
operate the equipment. Take the appropriate prevention measures.
INFORMATION: Information that is important but is not safety-relevant
1.2. Safety notes
Improper use of this equipment can cause both important personal injury and physical damage
to the electrical power grid and the loads connected to it. Read this document carefully and
follow all safety precautions at all times.
1.3. Quality and regulations
The equipment is based on a hardware designed, manufactured and commercialized in
accordance with the standard EN ISO 9001 of Quality Management Systems. The marking
shows the conformity to the EEC Directive by means of application of the following standards
• 2006/95/EC Low voltage directive.
• 2004/108/EC Electromagnetic Compatibility directive (EMC)
In accordance with the specifications of the harmonized standards:
5 / 62
• EN-IEC 62040-1. Uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Part 1-1: General and safety
requirements for UPS’s used in accessible areas by end users.
• EN-IEC 60950-1. IT equipments. Safety. Part 1: General requirements.
• EN-IEC 62040-2. Uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Part 2: Prescriptions for
Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).
• EN-IEC 62040-3. Uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Part 3: Methods of operation
specification and test requirements.
The manufacturer responsibility is excluded in the event of any modification or intervention in
the product by the customer’s side.
6 / 62
v1.2
2. PRESENTATION
2.1. Introduction
The B2C is a Bidirectional Battery Charger, a power electronics equipment with the following
main functionalities:
-
-
It converts the AC input, of the main grid, in a controlled DC output by using an IGBTbased switching topology and DSP-based state-of-the-art digital control.
It is based on CINERGIA’s DCPS, so it can be operated as:
o Constant voltage output
o Constant current output
o Constant power output
As a B2C it has a special operation mode for battery charging/discharging
It is a bidirectional power source: energy can flow from the grid to the load or
viceversa.
The AC current consumed from the grid is sinusoidal (THD < 2%)
The user can define the reactive power to be injected by the power supply and also
choose between capacitive or inductive
The power range covered by the B2C power supplies goes from 6.75 to 160kW at the output.
The parallelization of power supplies is possible to increase output power.
Reference
B2C7.5
B2C10
B2C15
B2C20
B2C30
B2C40
B2C50
B2C60
B2C80
B2C100
B2C120
B2C160
B2C200
Rated Power
Rated Current
kVA
kW
AC
(rms)
DC
(per channel)
DC
(total)
DC
Dimensions
(mm)
DxWxH
7.5
10
15
20
30
40
50
60
80
100
120
160
200
6.75
9
13.5
18
27
36
45
54
72
90
108
128
160
10A
15A
20A
30A
40A
55A
70A
85A
115A
145A
175A
230A
290A
10A
15A
20A
25A
40A
50A
65A
80A
105A
130A
155A
185A
230A
30A
45A
60A
75A
120A
150A
195A
240A
315A
390A
465A
555A
690A
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
0-750V
700x450x1100
700x450x1100
700x450x1100
700x450x1100
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
805x590x1320
850x900x2000
850x900x2000
7 / 62
Rated Voltage
2.2. Power supply features
Magnitude
Value
Power
6.75kW-160kW
Input
AC Voltage
Rated
3x400V+Neutral+Earth
Voltage range
+15% / -20 %
RA
AC Current
2Arms -290Arms
Frequency
50/60Hz
Power Factor
Controllable
-1/1 (capacitive/inductive)
Efficiency
at full load
>92%
Overload
125% for 10 min / 150% for 60 s
DC Outputs
DC Current
3 independent channels
0-230A (per channel)
DC Current
1 parallelized channel
0-690A
DC Voltage
0-750V
Minimum voltage
at rated power
220V
Modes of operation
Range
Resolution
Ripple
Constant Current (CC)
0-100%
<±0.1%
<1%
Constant Voltage (CV)
0-100%
<±0.1%
<1%
Constant Power (CP)
0-100%
<±0.1%
<1%
Battery Charge (BC)
Combination of CC and CV modes to charge batteries
GENERAL
Measurements
Input Voltage (Vrms) and Current (Irms)
Active and Reactive Input Power (P,Q)
Output Voltages (Vdc) and Currents (Idc)
Output Power
Temperatures
User interface
3.2” Touchscreen
Control port: 3 analog inputs, 3 analog outputs, 5 digital inputs, 3 relay
Communication
Protocols: Modbus/TCP
outputs
Communication Ports: Ethernet, RS485 (optional)
Customized communications for IEC61850, ERP or MATLAB® (optional)
Humidity
10-90% (Absolute maximum, without condensation)
Temperature
5-40°C (Absolute maximum)
Refrigeration
Forced air
Protections
Over
Current,
Over
Shortcircuit
Voltage
Over Temperature
Galvanic Isolation (optional)
Standards
Safety
EN-62040-1-2, EN-60950-1
EMC
EMC: EN-62040-2
Please note that items marked as optional shall be requested specifically at additional cost.
8 / 62
v1.2
2.3. Operation and connection modes
The output of the power supply is formed by three channels referenced to a common negative
channel. The power supply can be used in two different connection modes:
-
Independent channel: each channel (U,V,W) is controlled independently. The setpoint
and also the operation mode can be different for each channel.
Parallel channels: the three channels are controlled by the control software as a
unique channel to multiply the output current by 3. The setpoint and the operation
mode are the same for all three channels. It is mandatory to shortcircuit by hardware
the three output channels. All operation modes are available in this connection mode.
However, four operation modes are allowed:
-
Constant Voltage (CV): the output voltage is controlled to the setpoint value.
Constant Current (CC): the output current is controlled to the setpoint value.
Constant Power (CP): the output power is controlled to the setpoint value.
Battery Charge (BC): the output DC combines constant current and constant voltage
modes to charge the battery in a IUoU charge mode.
2.4. Limits
The B2C output limits are defined by:
-
Maximum voltage: 750V
Maximum current: defined in the datasheet as Rated Current DC (per channel) or
Rated Current DC (total)
Maximum power: defined in the datasheet as Rated Power (kW)
For example, below the limits of a B2C160 power supply (with 750 V as maximum voltage) are
shown:
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800
700
Output voltage (V)
600
500
400
B2C160
300
200
100
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
170
195
220
245
270
295
320
345
370
395
420
445
470
495
520
545
555
0
Output current, 3ch (A)
2.5. Configuration and control of the power supply
The power supply can be interfaced by three means:
-
-
-
Local touchscreen: a 3.2” colour local touchscreen panel can be used to configure,
monitor and operate the power supply. See section Local Touchscreen Control Panel
for further information.
Analog and digital inputs / outputs: the power supply owns:
o 5 optocoupled digital inputs
o 3 relay outputs
o 3 isolated analog inputs
o 3 isolated analog outputs
Remote interface: an Ethernet communication interface with protocol MODBUS/TCP
can be used to configure, monitor and operate the power supply. By using HMI
software application provided by CINERGIA, downloading of excel files is also possible.
2.6. Functional diagram
The diagram below is the conceptual functions blocks diagram of the power supply:
BIDIRECTIONAL BATTERY CHARGER
OPTIONAL
GRID
ACTIVE RECTIFIER
Protections
Input EMI
filter
Input LCL
filter
AC
DC/DC
DC
DC
DC
Output LCL
filter
Output EMI
filter
Protections
LOAD
The main components of the diagram are the following (from grid side to load side):
10 / 62
v1.2
-
Isolation transformer: a 50/60Hz isolation transformer can be provided optionally in
order to isolate the output channels. In this case, an isolation monitor can be
integrated in the power supply to detect isolation faults too. This isolation transformer
is mandatory if the power supply is to be used as a 4 quadrants equipment (by
connecting the load between two output channels).
-
Input protections: these protections include a thermal-magnetic circuit breaker and
fuses. The connection of the power supply input with the grid is done by screw
terminals. Please follow safety instructions in Installation section to connect the
battery charger.
-
Input EMI filter: an electromagnetic filter is integrated to fulfil electromagnetic
compatibility regulations. The structure of the filter in question is the same as the one
of the output EMI filter.
-
Input LCL filter: the purpose of this filter is to reduce the current distortion at
frequencies equal to or higher than switching frequency and thus reduce THD.
-
Active Rectifier: a three-branch IGBT active front end is integrated in the equipment to
consume/inject a sinusoidal current from/to the grid.
The DC link voltage is set to 430V providing a regulation margin for fast transients at
the output of the battery charger.
The active rectifier has bidirectional power flow capability and the injected reactive
power (grid side) can be defined by the customer.
-
DC/DC output converter: a three-branch IGBT converter allows three buck-boost DCDC conversions from the DC bus to each of the output channels. Each channel can be
controlled independently or, by software, the three channels will share the same
operation mode and setpoints.
-
Output LCL filter: this filter reduces current distortion (caused by switching) at the
output of the power supply.
-
Output EMI filter: a high frequency common mode LC filter is used to reduce
electromagnetic disturbances at the output of the battery charger.
-
Output protections: the DC outputs are protected by fuses. A disconnector is provided
to isolate the output from the load. Screw terminals are also integrated to connect the
load. Please, follow safety instructions in Installation section to connect the power
supply.
11 / 62
2.7. Principle of operation
Below, a technical diagram of the power supply is shown:
DC output
1/3 channels
B2C
PE
PE
-U
PE
PE
EMC
filter
-U
R
S
T
N
PE
EMC
filter
U
V
W
N
PE
Current
sensor x3
Voltage
sensor x3
Drivers x6
Voltage
sensor x2
Drivers x6
Current
sensor x3
DSP
board
CAN
DSP
board
Voltage
sensor x3
CAN/
Ethernet
board
MODBUS/TCP
ETHERNET
(Please note that earth protection cable is only connected to the cabinet chassis).
State-of-the art digital control is used in all CINERGIA products. In the B2C case, the control
system algorithms are computed in a dual core DSP-based hardware, designed by CINERGIA,
allowing a multitask execution of the regulation systems for the Active Rectifier and the DC/DC
output. This produces a fast transient response and high performance against load changes. A
12 bits analog to digital conversion, with digital processing, allows a high resolution output up
to 0.1% with high stability too.
Resonant control
Control algorithms based on Resonant Control are used in the AC side. The regulation is
structured in blocks resonating at a given frequency. Within the resonant frequency each block
allows the suppression of gain and phase errors of the controlled magnitude: voltage, current,
…etc. Thanks to this, each harmonic can be controlled independently and thus it can be
generated or suppressed, as needed.
PID control
The DC side control algorithm is based on a traditional PID controller which will be explained
later.
12 / 62
v1.2
3. INSTALLATION
3.1. Important safety instructions
As a device with class l protection against electric shocks, it is essential to install a protective
earth wire (connect earth
). Connect the protection earth wire to the terminal (X5) before
connecting the grid to the battery charger input.
All the electrical connections, including those for control (interface, remote control…etc.), shall
be done with the switches in OFF position and with the mains supply disconnected (thermalmagnetic circuit breaker in OFF position too
It must never be forgotten that the B2C is a power supply, so users must take all
necessary precautions against direct or indirect contact.
Warning labels should be placed on all primary power switches installed in places far from the
device to alert the electrical maintenance personnel of the presence of a voltage in the circuit
up to 10 minutes after stopping the device.
In devices without isolation transformer, precautions must be taken as they are
not isolated from the alternating input line, and there might be dangerous voltage
between the battery terminals and the ground.
3.2. Equipment views
Electrical connections:
X6
X7
X4
X1
X5
X2
X3
X10
X8
X9
Local front panel:
13 / 62
Front view (with the door open):
Q2
Q3
Q1a
Detailed view of the signal connectors:
X11
X12
X13
X14
X15
X16
X17
14 / 62
v1.2
General view (with the front door closed):
Protection elements (Q*):
 (Q1a)
Input thermal-magnetic circuit breaker or disconnector according to power of
the equipment.
 (Q2) Output disconnector.
 (Q3) Output fuses.
Connection elements (X*):











(X1) Phase input terminal R.
(X2) Phase input terminal S.
(X3) Phase input terminal T.
(X4) Neutral input terminal N.
(X5) Earth connection terminal for main supply input (
(X6) DC phase output terminal W.
(X7) DC phase output terminal V.
(X8) DC phase output terminal U.
(X9) DC negative terminal N.
(X10) Earth connection terminal for load or loads (
(X11) DB9 connector for RS485 communications.
15 / 62
).
).






(X12) Terminals for external Emergency Power Off (EPO) button.
(X13) DB9 connector for CAN communications (input).
(X14) DB9 connector for CAN communications (output).
(X15) RJ45 connector for MODBUS interface.
(X16) DE15 connector for digital inputs and outputs.
(X17) DE15 connector for analogic inputs and outputs.
3.3. Equipment reception
3.3.1. Unpacking and checking the content
On receiving the device, make sure that the power supply has not suffered any damage during
the transportation. Otherwise, make all pertinent claims to the supplier or to CINERGIA.
The packing of the device consists of a wooden palette, a cardboard or wooden packaging
(depending on the case), expanded polystyrene corner pieces, a polyethylene sleeve and
bands; all recyclable materials. Therefore they should be disposed of according to current
regulations. We recommend to keep the packaging in case its use is necessary in the future.
In order to unpack, cut the bands and remove the cardboard packaging with a vertical
movement. In case of wooden packaging, remove it with the appropriate tools. Afterwards,
remove the corner pieces and the plastic sleeve. At this point the equipment will be unpacked
on the pallet. Please, use suitable tools to lower the power supply from the pallet.
After unpacking the equipment, check that the data in the nameplate (stuck on the inner part
of the front door) correspond to those specified in the purchase order. Contact the supplier or
CINERGIA in case of disconformity.
Keep the equipment in the original package if it will not be used in order to protect it from any
possible mechanical damages, dust, dirt …etc.
3.3.2. Storage
The equipment shall be stored in a dry, ventilated place and protected against rain, water jets
or chemical agents. It is advisable to keep the power supply into its original package, which has
been designed to assure the maximum protection during the transport and storage.
Do not store the unit where the ambient temperature exceeds 40°C or falls below
-20°C, as this may degrade the electrical characteristics of the batteries.
3.3.3.
Transport to location
The equipment includes castors to facilitate its transport to its final location.
It is important to check previously if the weight of the power supply is appropriate for the site
where it will be located.
16 / 62
v1.2
It is also important to consider the most suitable means to place the power supply in its final
location (floor, hoist, lift, stairs, …etc).
3.3.4. Location
It is necessary to leave a minimum of 25 cm in the contour of the equipment for its ventilation.
If possible, as shown in following figures, it is recommended to leave additional 75 cm to
facilitate the operations of maintenance of the equipment or the interventions of the technical
service in case of breakdown.
Recommendable minimum distance, 1 m.
Recommendable minimum distance, 1 m.
Recommendable minimum
distance, 1 m.
17 / 62
Recommendable minimum
distance, 1 m.
Recommendable minimum distance, 1 m.
Recommendable minimum distance, 1 m.
Recommendable minimum
distance, 1 m.
The equipment may be installed in any place as long as the safety and ventilation requirements
are fulfilled.
The power supply includes 2 levelling elements located near the front castors, which serve to
immobilize the unit once it is in place.
To adjust the level, open the front door of the cabinet and proceed as follows:

By hand, loosen the levelling elements by turning them anticlockwise until they touch
the floor, and then, using a spanner, continue loosening until the castors are raised off
the floor by a maximum 0.5 cm.

Close the door once more.
18 / 62
v1.2
3.4. Connection
3.4.1. Earth protection
As a device with class l protection against electric shocks, it is essential to install a protective
earth wire (connect earth
). Connect the protection earth wire to the terminal (X5) before
connecting the grid to the B2C input.
On the other hand, connect the protection earth wire to the terminal (X10) before connecting
the load to the battery charger output.
3.4.2. Input connection, terminals (X1 to X5)
Connect the grid cables R, S, T and N to the terminals (X1), (X2), (X3) and (X4) respectively. This
connection must always be done according to the label placed under the input screw
terminals.
In case of discrepancies between labelling and this manual instructions, the label information
will always prevail.
3.4.3.
Output connection, terminals (X6 to X10)
The equipment has 3 output channels (U, V and W) and a common negative return (N).
Therefore, the load must be connected between the channels and the common negative
return (phase-N):
-
DC phase output terminal U (X8)
DC phase output terminal V (X7)
DC phase output terminal W (X6)
DC negative terminal N (X9)
In case of discrepancies between labelling and this manual instructions, the label information
will always prevail.
3.4.4. Emergency Power Off terminals (X12)
The equipment owns two terminals dedicated to external Emergency Power Off (EPO).
The EPO must act as a normally closed contact, and thus, there are two possible options for
connection:
a) Connecting an external Emergency pushbutton to X12
b) Installing a cable bridge to close the circuit in terminal X12 (in case EPO is not desired)
If option a) is chosen, the procedure is as follows:
1. Emergency shutdown activation: the Emergency pushbutton must be set in the
position in which it forces to open the circuit between the two terminals of X12.
2. Normal mode restoration: the Emergency pushbutton position must be inverted in
order to close the circuit again between the two terminals of X12.
19 / 62
X12
3.4.5. Communications
There are several connectors dedicated to communications, which are listed below:
-
Connector for RS485 communications (X11): DB9 connector to be used when Modbus
RS485 option is chosen.
-
Connectors for CAN communications (X13, X14): DB9 connectors to be used when
parallelization of battery chargers is needed (X13 works as input and X14 works as
output).
-
Connector for MODBUS interface (X15): RJ45 connector. A standard Ethernet cable
must be connected between X15 and a Hub or a Router to communicate a remote PC
with the battery charger.
3.4.6. Digital inputs and outputs
Digital inputs and outputs are gathered in X16. All of them are isolated and configurable.
Specifically, there are 5 digital inputs which operate at 24 V and 3 relay digital outputs.
20 / 62
v1.2
3.4.7. Analog inputs and outputs
Analog inputs and outputs are gathered in X17.
The analog inputs of B2C are isolated and accept a voltage range from -10 to 10V. There are 3
analog inputs and, depending on the connection mode, there are two possible configurations
for them:
-
Parallel channels: the analog input Analog_In_1 is the reactive power command and
the Analog_In_2 depends on the power supply operation mode.
-
Independent channels: there is no reactive power command and each analog input
corresponds to one phase. Their functionality depends on the power supply operation
mode.
As it has been previously mentioned, an analog input can be configured as one magnitude
(current, voltage…etc.) setpoint of a specific output channel. In this case, the magnitude in
question of the output channel is proportional to the voltage of the respective analog input.
For example, in independent current mode, for a 10 V analog input, the current of the
respective output channel will be the maximum that the B2C withstands (see catalogue).
Regarding analog outputs, they are also isolated and accept a voltage range from 0 to 10 V.
Analogously to inputs, there are 3 analog outputs and each one corresponds to one different
output channel scaled magnitude.
21 / 62
4. OPERATION
4.1. Safety
Before operating the equipment, check that the Protective Earth is properly
connected.
Check out the electrical installation in both sides (input and output) of the
cabinet. All wires shall be connected and secured before proceeding to the
power supply start-up.
4.2. State Machine
The operation of the power supply is based on 6 different states (square) and 5 transitions
(rhombs). Each state defines the behaviour and possible operations of the power supply.
From any
Initialization
No
Error
Yes
No
EMCY
sequence?
Reset?
Yes
Standby
Enable?
Yes
Precharge
No
Ready
Yes
Run?
Enable?
Yes
No
Run
Yes
Yes
Run?
22 / 62
Enable?
v1.2
4.2.1. Initialization
During the initialization, the power supply control system checks the presence of all internal
components, the embedded PC loads the operating system and the isolation detector runs a
self-test.
No voltage is present at the DC bus and the IGBTs PWMs are completely stopped.
The transition from Initialization state brings the power supply to the Standby state as long as
the emergency stop is deactivated (equipment armed) and the isolation detector performs a
complete self-test successfully.
4.2.2. Standby
The Standby state keeps the power supply in low power mode until an Enable signal is
received. While the power supply is in standby only the internal power supplies are energized.
In particular, this means that there is no voltage in the DC link and no voltage/current is
applied to the output of the power supply.
The transition from the Standby state is the Enable signal or, in case of errors, a Fault signal.
The Enable signal will bring the State Machine to Precharge and eventually to the Ready state.
If an error is detected the power supply will go into Alarm state.
4.2.3. Precharge
The Precharge is an internal transition state between Standby and Ready. During this state the
DC link is gradually charged through resistors until the rated DC link voltage is reached. The
transition will finish successfully as long as, in less than 10 seconds of precharge, the DC link
has reached the specified voltage. Otherwise, the next state will be Alarm.
The Precharge state is only applicable to the grid side converter.
4.2.4. Ready
In the Ready state the power supply is ready to operate but no PWM signal is sent to IGBTs.
The DC bus is charged to the rectified voltage and there is no voltage/current applied to the
outputs.
The transition from Ready state can be the Run signal, the Not enable signal or, in case of
errors, a Fault signal. When a Run signal is received the State Machine will evolve to the Run
state. When a Not enable signal is received the State Machine puts the power supply on
standby, thus discharging the DC link capacitors. If a fault is detected the power supply goes to
Alarm state.
4.2.5. Run
In this state, the power supply is completely operational. Due to the power supply
architecture, the grid side converter (Active Rectifier) will make the transition first while
23 / 62
stabilizes the DC link voltage. After that, the output side will measure the actual output state
(voltage levels) and will start the control algorithms and PWM.
This state can evolve to Standby state when a Not enable signal is received, to Ready state
when a Not run signal is received or to Alarm state if an error condition is detected.
Please, note that, while the power supply is in Run state, it is not possible to change the
connection mode from independent channels to parallelized channels.
4.2.6. Alarm
In this state, the power supply is stopped and kept in a safe condition: the DC link is discharged
and the PWM signals are stopped.
The Alarm state can be reached by any fault detected during the normal operation of the
power supply, for instance, an emergency stop activation (see Alarms chapter for further
detail).
The only possible transition from Alarm state is to Initialization state. Once in Alarm state a
Reset signal is required from the customer after clearing the fault condition. If the fault
condition has not been cleared the power supply state will be kept in Alarm (for example,
when heatsink overheating has occurred and the temperature is still high).
4.3. Operation modes
The Bidirectional battery charger has 4 operation modes:
-
Constant Current mode (CC): the power supply regulates the output current to the
setpoint defined by the user.
-
Constant Voltage mode (CV): the power supply regulates the output voltage to the
setpoint defined by the user.
-
Constant Power mode (CP): the power supply regulates the output power to the
setpoint defined by the user.
-
Battery Charge mode (BC): the power supply regulates the output current and voltage
to charge a battery following the configuration profile defined by the user.
4.3.1. Current mode
The current mode is based on a PID controller with dynamic saturation limits which depend on
the current limit configured. Find below the current regulation block diagram:
24 / 62
v1.2
Current
setpoint
PID
PWM
Converter
Current feedback
The user can configure:
-
Amplitude: desired output current value.
-
Sign: a positive sign represents a current sourced from the power supply. A negative
sign represents a current sunk by the power supply.
-
Setpoint limitation: this limitation can be lower than the maximum power supply
output current. It can be useful when the power supply is connected to batteries since
they may have different current limits for charging and discharging and those limits
may be lower than the maximum power supply current.
Depending on the loads connected, the voltage limitation may be useful too and is
available in any mode.
4.3.2. Voltage mode
The voltage mode is based on a PID controller with dynamic saturation limits which depend on
the current limit configured. The power supply will limit the output current in case of reaching
the configured limit.
25 / 62
Max.
Charging
current
PID
Voltage/
power consig
PID
Max.
Discharging
current
PID
PWM
Converter
Current feedback
Voltage feedback
The user can configure:
-
Amplitude: desired output voltage value.
-
Sign: the output voltage between channels U,V,W is always positive with respect to N.
No negative voltages can be set.
-
Setpoint limitation: the maximum current may be controlled in this operation mode.
The maximum available voltage will affect to the limit of the voltage setpoint given,
but it will not be controlled. Therefore, in those applications where the load imposes a
higher voltage than the maximum available, the power supply will trigger an
overvoltage alarm.
4.3.3.
Power mode
The power mode is implemented with a current PID. In this case, taking into account that the
power equals to V·I, a linear controller may not be the optimum option to close this control
loop. Consequently, in order to take advantage of the PID controller benefits, a linearization is
made by dividing the power command by the output voltage of the power supply.
26 / 62
v1.2
Power
consig
÷
PID
PWM
Converter
Current feedback
Voltage feedback
As in current mode case, the user can configure:
-
Amplitude: desired output power value.
-
Sign: a positive sign represents a current sourced from the power supply. A negative
sign represents a current sunk by the power supply.
-
Setpoint limitation: this limitation can be lower than the maximum power supply
output current. It can be useful when the power supply is connected to batteries since
they may have different current limits for charging and discharging and those limits
may be lower than the maximum power supply current.
Depending on the loads connected, the voltage limitation may be useful too. However,
there is no voltage control; only an alarm is triggered if the power supply voltage is
beyond the limits set by the user.
4.3.4. Battery charge
The battery charge controller is based on an inner-loop current regulation and an outer-loop
voltage regulation. This provides the power supply with the stability needed for controlling
voltage and current during all the charging process.
Setpoint
generator
PID
Saturated@max.
charging current
PID
PWM
Converter
Current feedback
Voltage feedback
The battery charge procedure has three states:
1. Constant current phase: the battery is charged at the constant current value
configured by the user (recommended by the battery manufacturer) until a specified
voltage is reached (the boost voltage or the equalizing voltage). The user can define
this value in the HMI parameter Recommended Charging Current.
27 / 62
2. Constant voltage phase: in this phase the battery is charged at a constant voltage
determined by CW (0: Boost Charge, 1: Equalizing Charge). As a consequence the
charge current decreases at a rate imposed by the battery. The user can define the
boost voltage value in the HMI parameter Battery Boost Voltage and the equalizing
voltage in the parameter Equalization Battery Voltage.
3. Floating charge phase: a constant voltage is applied to compensate the battery selfdischarge. Therefore, this phase allows to keep the battery fully charged without
overcharging it. The user can define this value in the HMI parameter Battery Floating
Voltage.
The current phase of the charging procedure is shown in Battery Status Word in the HMI:
4.3.4.1.
Boost Charge
Boost charging allows the quick charging of the batteries. A high voltage is applied to reach 8090% of the battery capacity in a relatively short time.
The constant voltage phase is divided into 2 substates:
a. Boost: the power supply raises the topping voltage in order to reduce the charging
time. The transition occurs by time (Max time in Boost) or by reaching configured
current value ( [A] for leaving boost mode).
b. Full: the power supply keeps the voltage at its recommended charging value. This state
transition is also by time (Max time in Full) or it happens when a configured current is
reached ([A] for leaving full mode).
The following diagram shows the whole process for Boost charging:
28 / 62
v1.2
VBoost
VFull
VFloating
IBOOST2FULL
IFULL2FLOAT
tBOOST
tFULL
4.3.4.2.
Equalizing Charge
Equalizing charge is an operation required for preventive maintenance of the battery system.
This charge brings all cells to similar voltage levels. Please refer to the battery manufacturer
technical sheet for recommended maintenance periods and voltages. Equalize the batteries at
least every six months.
To equalize manually the batteries write “1” to CW for equalization mode while the power
supply is in the constant current phase. The constant equalization voltage phase transition is
by time (Max time in Equalizing) or by reaching the configured current value ([A] for leaving
equalizing mode).
The following diagram shows the whole process of Equalizing charge:
VEqualizing
VFloating
IEQUALIZING2FLOAT
tEQUALIZING
Please read carefully the instructions and safety manual of the battery
manufacturer in order to configure correctly the voltage settings (float, boost,
equalizing, etc...). Wrong settings may lead to battery damage and hazard.
29 / 62
4.3.5. Programmable limits
In constant current, constant voltage and constant power modes the maximum current and
maximum voltage of the power supply can be limited too. The user can configure these values
through the HMI:
Current
When the power supply reaches the configured value, the output current will be regulated to
the limit defined. This limitation can be useful to protect a load with a maximum allowable
current below the maximum current of CINERGIA power supply. For instance, to protect a
battery against excessive discharge in constant current mode.
Voltage
The voltage protection differs from the current protection in that the output voltage will not
be regulated. When the voltage reaches the maximum or minimum voltage defined by the
user, an alarm will be triggered and the power supply will be stopped in alarm state (DC
Overvoltage or DC Undervoltage).
4.4. Connection modes
As it has been previously mentioned, there are two different ways of connecting the power
supply output:

Independent mode: each output channel is connected to an independent load. In this
way, the power supply could, for instance, charge three independent battery systems
at the same time with different capacities, voltages, currents, etc.
Please be sure that no electrical connection between the channels exists, i.e.
that the loads are completely independent. Keep in mind that, if two channels
are interconnected, a shortcircuit may appear in voltage based modes.

Parallel mode: all three channels are connected in parallel to increase the maximum
power supply output current. It is mandatory to shortcircuit by hardware the three
output channels. All operation modes are available in this connection mode.

Four quadrant mode: the four quadrant mode is a particular case of the independent
mode in which the power supply may only be operated as a voltage source. In this case
30 / 62
v1.2
the load is connected only between phases without any reference to the N phase. As
far as the load has no reference to the negative phase, the connected phases may be
charged at any potential (keep it in mind).
In order to operate the output phases, Cinergia recommends a start-up voltage of
200V for each connected phase. From this initial voltage, sum the desired setpoint
divided by 2 to one phase and subtract the same value to the other phase.
Changing the polarity of the load implies switching the setpoint values in the phases.
Due to the blanking time of the IGBTs, it is not possible to operate in this mode with
voltages near 0V.
Please remember to disconnect the equipment before modifying the connection
mode.
4.5. Working with the equipment
Before powering the cabinet check step by step the following items (if the
cabinet is powered for the first time, place the fuses in the fuseholder
before proceeding):
 The power supply output must be disconnected:
 The grid side of the power supply is protected by a thermal-magnetic circuit breaker.
Be sure that this breaker is switched off:
31 / 62
 Check that all wires are connected and secured before proceeding to the power supply
start-up.
If these steps are validated the power supply is ready to be started.
4.5.1. Start-up
Switch on the thermal-magnetic circuit breaker of the grid side of the power supply. After
switching it on, the power supply will initiate the start-up sequence. This sequence will activate
the cabinet fans for one second and, if an internal isolation transformer is used, an internal
relay for the transformer precharge will also be activated.
At this point the power supply will start the initialization process, as described before. During
this time the embedded PC will load the operating system and the communications program.
The isolation detector will also perform a self-test before being operative. The power supply
will ignore any command during this process.
The Initialization state can last up to 15 seconds. If every step is completed successfully the
power supply will move automatically to Standby state.
Summarizing, to put the equipment in Run state the user should follow step by step the next
checklist:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Connect the mains.
Turn on the input thermal-magnetic circuit breaker.
Activate the cabinet output by switching the disconnector.
Deactivate the emergency stop (pull out the button). (Initialization  Standby)
Send the Enable signal. (Standby  Precharge  Ready)
Select the connection mode between independent or parallel. This option cannot be
undone while the power supply is running.
7. Select the operation mode. Please keep in mind that not all loads are compatible with
all operation modes. For example, if the power supply is acting like a voltage source,
do not connect any other voltage sources at the output.
8. Send the Run signal. (Ready  Run)
Please keep in mind that not all loads are compatible with all operation modes.
If the power supply is operated as a voltage source, please do not connect any
other voltage sources at the output. If the power supply is operated as a current
source, please do not connect any other current sources at the output.
32 / 62
v1.2
4.5.2. Stop
Once the equipment is running (Run state) it may be stopped in three ways:
4.5.2.1.
Full stop
This type of stop is recommended if the electrical connections are to be modified or the power
supply will be stopped for a long time.
When the power supply is running, special care must be taken. It is strongly recommended to
follow the next steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Send the Not enable signal to the power supply (Run Ready Standby)
Press the emergency stop button (Standby Alarm)
Disconnect the output disconnector
Wait at least 60 seconds (time to get discharged the internal DC link capacitors)
Disconnect the input thermal-magnetic circuit breaker
Before manipulating the cables in the cabinet terminals, please check the
voltages with a voltmeter to assure no voltage is present. The grid cable and
the load must be completely unpowered before connecting or disconnecting
the cables. The user must be sure that the input and output switches are both
in OFF position.
4.5.2.2.
Standby stop
This type of stop is recommended if the power supply will be stopped during some hours. The
DC link is discharged and therefore aging of the DC bus capacitors is prevented.
Send the Not enable signal to the power supply. If the user wants to lock the power supply in
order to avoid an accidental start-up, press the emergency stop button, and keep it pressed.
For restarting operation, release the emergency stop button and send the Reset signal. After
doing this, proceed as a standard start-up sending the Enable signal.
NEVER connect or disconnect the cables while the power supply in Standby
state.
4.5.2.3.
Ready
This type of stop is recommended if the power supply will be stopped for a short time. The DC
link is kept charged and the power supply is ready to run.
When the power supply is running, the user may send the Not run signal at any time. This will
stop the IGBT’s PWM signals but all internal parts will be kept powered. To restart operation,
send the Run signal.
33 / 62
NEVER connect or disconnect the cables while the power supply is in Ready
state.
4.5.3. Emergency stop
The emergency stop button may be pressed at any time bringing the power supply to the
Alarm state. The emergency stop shall be only used when an emergency is detected. Please,
avoid to stop the equipment with the emergency button as a “normal practice” since it will
contribute to premature component aging. To lock the power supply and bring it to the Alarm
state, follow the Full stop procedure.
The emergency stop unpowers all the electromechanical devices in the cabinet so the power
supply is stopped by hardware assuring a full stop. The internal contactors will be open so no
power will be present at the DC link or at the ouput of the power supply. Only the control
boards, the embedded PC and the local touchscreen remain powered.
4.5.4. Accidental shut down
When the power supply is suddenly disconnected from the mains special care must be taken
for restarting it. When the power supply is shut down with a charged DC link, some thermal
protections of the internal power supplies will prevent its start-up.
When an accidental shutdown happens, disconnect the mains and wait for at least 2 minutes
for powering the cabinet again.
4.5.5. Alarms
There are different sources of alarm in the power supply. The following table describes them
and offers possible causes and solutions to the user.
Code Name
Cause
1
Watchdog
Internal
error.
2
Emergency
sequence
The emergency stop button Unpress the emergency stop
is activated or the EPO wire button or reconnect the EPO
in no longer connected.
wire.
3
Drivers
IGBTs saturation protection
has been activated. This
alarm is triggered when
there
is
a
sudden
overcurrent in the power
34 / 62
Solution
microcontroller If this alarm persists, contact
Cinergia’s technical support.
Contact Cinergia for technical
support if this alarm persists.
Check the equipment under test
before restarting the power
v1.2
supply output.
supply.
4
Precharge
timeout
Internal error caused by a Check the grid voltage.
low voltage in mains.
5
Overload in
precharge
Internal alarm caused by a Contact Cinergia for technical
shortcircuit.
support.
6
Overvoltage in
the DC link
The DC link voltage has Reduce the DC output step
exceeded its maximum transition time.
value.
Contact Cinergia for technical
support if this alarm persists.
7
Undervoltage in
the DC link
Undervoltage in the DC link Reduce the DC output step
caused by fast output transition time.
transient.
Contact Cinergia for technical
support if this alarm persists.
8
Phase
overvoltage
The voltage in the grid is Check the grid voltage.
too high.
9
Phase
undervoltage
The voltage in the grid is Check the grid voltage.
too low.
10
DC Overcurrent
The output current has Check the output load.
exceeded the configured
limitation.
11
Heatsink
overtemperature
Overtemperature
heatsink.
in
the Check enough space exists
between the power supply and
the wall.
There is insufficient air flow inside
the power supply. Check that the
fans are working correctly.
11
Sensor offset
Error caused by transducers Turn off the equipment, wait one
malfunction.
minute, and turn it on again. This
alarm can occur when the power
supply is switched off accidentally
under load.
Otherwise, contact Cinergia for
technical support.
12
No Heart Beat
Communication
cable Contact Cinergia in order to
broken or control board isolate the problem.
35 / 62
without response.
13
PLL error
The frequency of the grid is Check the grid frequency.
too high or low.
14
Mains lost
There is no voltage on the Check the grid voltage.
grid (short interruption or
voltage dip).
15
Open loop
The power supply has The load is not connected or its
reached the maximum impedance is too high for the
voltage in current or power current setpoint.
operation mode.
16
Isolation
The isolation detector has Check if isolation fault disappears
detected a fault in the when the power supply has no
galvanic isolation.
load connected to the output. If it
does, the isolation problem is in
the load. If it does not, contact
Cinergia.
17
Overload
The power supply is Check the parameters configured.
working beyond its rated
values.
18
Shortcircuit
The power supply has Check the equipment under test
detected a shortcircuit in impedance.
the equipment under test
4.5.6. Alarms reset
The user shall follow the next steps for resetting the alarms:




Press the emergency stop button.
Send a Reset signal to the power supply.
Send a Not enable and Not run signals (note: this step is done automatically when the
user is interfacing the power supply by the LCD or by the software provided by
Cinergia).
Proceed as a standard start-up process by deactivating the emergency stop (pull out
the button).
A Reset will be performed only in the case that the alarm source has been cleared. If the
problem persists after resetting the power supply, a new alarm will be triggered.
36 / 62
v1.2
5. LOCAL TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL PANEL
5.1. Basic functions
The LCD touchscreen main purpose is to provide the user with the necessary information
about the battery pack and the power converters. Besides, the touchscreen allows the user to
interact with the mother board and control multiple variables in regard to the DC power
output of the power converters.
By means of the black bar in the upper side of the touchscreen, the user is constantly aware of
the following variables:



Control
Mode
State of the power converters
The rest of information can be found throughout the menus and submenus.
5.2. Menus and submenus
5.2.1. General
There are four main menus:




Operational
Battery pack
Configuration
Alarms
A description of each one can be found in the following points.
37 / 62
5.2.2. Operational
The main purpose of the Operational menu is, in case the LCD Control is activated, to allow the
user to manage the power converters State Machine and to introduce current, voltage and
both active and reactive power setpoints.
The user gets to read the following information as well:





Connection mode
Output voltage
Output current
Output active power
Reactive power
State Machine
By means of the ENABLE and RUN buttons the user can manage the power converters State
Machine as long as the Control variable is set to LCD.

ENABLE: the function of this button depends on the power converters state:
o Standby State: the ENABLE button is released. By pressing the ENABLE button
the user orders the system to move to the Ready state.
o Ready & Run States: the ENABLE button is pressed. By pressing the ENABLE
button the user orders the system to disable the power converters.
The ENABLE button has no effect in every other state.

RUN: the function of this button depends on the power converters state:
o Ready State: the RUN button is released. By pressing the RUN button the user
orders the system to move to Run State.
o Run State: the RUN button is pressed. By pressing the RUN button the user
orders the system to return to Ready State.
The RUN button has no effect in every other state.
38 / 62
v1.2
Commands
The button COMMANDS allows the user to introduce different setpoints:



Voltage setpoints
Current setpoints
Active power setpoints
Once again, this function is only permitted when the Control variable is set to LCD. Information
about the different kinds of setpoints that the user can introduce through the touchscreen can
be found below. When the COMMANDS button is pressed, the following keyboard will appear.
The kind of setpoint to introduce will depend on the operation mode (Constant Voltage,
Constant Current, Constant Power or Charger) and the connection mode (Independent or
Parallel).The procedure to send a setpoint consists of the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press COMMANDS button.
Introduce the first setpoint and press Enter.
Introduce the second setpoint and press Enter.
Introduce the third setpoint and press Enter.
Press SEND button.
If the user needs to erase the current setpoint being edited, the Cancel button (grey one) sets
it to zero.
39 / 62
In case the user wants to set a negative setpoint, this can be made by pressing the button +/-.
The Cancel button (green one) can be pressed anytime to return to the Operational menu
without sending any setpoint.
40 / 62
v1.2
Voltage setpoint
The user can introduce an independent voltage setpoint per every channel.
Current setpoint
The user can introduce an independent current setpoint per every channel.
Active power setpoint
The user can introduce an independent power setpoint per every channel.
SET REACTIVE
The SET REACTIVE button allows the user to introduce a global reactive power setpoint. The
procedure to follow is the same as with the COMMANDS button. Regardless the current mode,
the user is allowed to enter the desired reactive setpoint.
5.2.3. Battery Pack
The Battery Pack window is exclusively informative. By means of the scrolling buttons the user
can change the current screen and thereby, the information to visualize.
The user may check the following battery bank variables in the first screen:


Charge stage
Voltage
41 / 62
In the second screen the following variables are accessible:


State of charge
Battery errors
5.2.4. Configuration
The Configuration window provides the user with some helpful information about the
following variables:



Connection mode
Mode
Control
By means of the upper buttons shown, the user may manage these variables in case the
current Control variable is set to LCD.
42 / 62
v1.2
Connection mode
The following screen appears when the user presses the Connection mode button:
In case the Control variable is set to LCD, the user may change the current connection mode.
Two types are available for the user to choose:


Independent
Parallel
Pressing the BACK button the user can return to the main Configuration window.
Mode
The following screen appears when the user presses the Mode button:
In case the Control variable is set to LCD, the user may change the current mode. Four types of
mode are available for the user to choose:




Constant V
Constant C
Constant P
Charger
43 / 62
Pressing the BACK button the user can return to the main Configuration window.
Control
The following screen appears when the user presses the Control button:
In case the Control variable is set to LCD, the user may change the current control mode. Three
types of control mode are available for the user to choose:



LCD
Modbus
Analog input
Pressing the BACK button the user can return to the main Configuration window.
5.2.5. Alarms
The Alarms window displays information about the power converters alarms. Any existing
alarm will appear in this window.
In case the user is willing to reset the system, the RESET button permits him to do so.
44 / 62
v1.2
6. REMOTE COMMUNICATIONS
CINERGIA’s power supplies can be operated and supervised remotely through an Ethernet
communications bus. An internal embedded PC, with CINERGIA’s proprietary software, allows
the exchange of information between the internal CAN bus and the external Modbus TCP/IP
(Ethernet). In this way, the customer can build specific HMI client software application while
CINERGIA’s power supply acts as a Modbus TCP/IP server.
DC output
1/3 channels
B2C
PE
PE
-U
PE
PE
EMC
filter
-U
R
S
T
N
PE
EMC
filter
U
V
W
N
PE
Current
sensor x3
Drivers x6
Voltage
sensor x2
Drivers x6
Current
sensor x3
DSP
board
CAN
DSP
board
Voltage
sensor x3
Voltage
sensor x3
CAN/
Ethernet
board
MODBUS/TCP
ETHERNET
This Modbus TCP/IP slave has the following properties:
Property
Function Codes:
CRC
Multiple connections
Idle connections
Other
Implementation
0x04: READ_INPUT_REGISTER
0x03: READ_HOLDING_REGISTER
0x10: WRITE_MULTIPLE_REGISTER (Note: only 2 registers Write is allowed)
Not used. Included in the TCP stack.
Only one master at one time allowed.
Additional connection requests might be delayed or even rejected.
Idle connections might be closed by the slave.
However, the listen socket will force the master to keep the connection
active, even when there is no active connection at all.
All variables are 32 bits long (2 registers). Their MODBUS addresses are 1
register long each one.
All Read operations must start at the beginning of one variable, and must
read an even number of registers.
As for Write operations, ONLY 1 WRITE OPERATION OF 1 VARIABLE IS
ALLOWED AT ONE TIME.
The memory map is as follows:
45 / 62
Variable
Size
ACCESS
TYPE
MIN
MAX
AR_VRS
MODBUS Address
(dec)
154
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhR-PhS
AR_VST
156
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhS-PhT
AR_VTR
158
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhT-PhR
AR_VRN
162
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhR-N
AR_VSN
164
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhS-N
AR_VTN
166
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhT-N
AR_IR
170
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhR
AR_IS
172
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhS
AR_IT
174
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhT
AR_FR
178
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-440)
_IQ(440)
// Frequency PhR
AR_FS
180
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-440)
_IQ(440)
// Frequency PhS
AR_FT
182
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-440)
_IQ(440)
// Frequency PhT
AR_VDC
184
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(850.0)
// DC link voltage
AR_TEMPIN
188
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-10.0)
_IQ(175.0)
// Input temperature
AR_TEMPOUT
190
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-10.0)
_IQ(175.0)
// Output temperature
AR_ERRORS
198
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Active Rectifier Errors Vector
AR_HOBBESCW
220
2
RW
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Active Rectifier Control Word
AR_HOBBESSW
222
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Active Rectifier Status Word
AR_READP0
226
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power Global
AR_READPR
228
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power R
AR_READPS
230
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power S
AR_READPT
232
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power T
AR_READQ0
236
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Reactive Power global
AR_READQR
238
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Reactive Power R
AR_READQS
240
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Reactive Power S
46 / 62
v1.2
DESCRIPTION
AR_READQT
242
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Reactive Power T
AR_SETQ0
256
2
RW
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Reactive Power (Set-Point)
DCDC_VAB
296
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhA-PhB
DCDC_VBC
298
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhB-PhC
DCDC_VCA
300
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhC-PhA
DCDC_VAN
304
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhA-NEG
DCDC_VBN
306
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhB-NEG
DCDC_VCN
308
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(440.0)
// Voltage PhC-NEG
DCDC_IA
312
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhA
DCDC_IB
314
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhB
DCDC_IC
316
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-100.0)
_IQ(100.0)
// Current PhC
DCDC_VDC
326
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(850.0)
// DC link Voltage
DCDC_TEMPOUT
332
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(-10.0)
_IQ(175.0)
// Output temperature
DCDC_ERRORS
340
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// DCDC Errors Vector
DCDC_ERRORIRMS
342
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(80.0)
// Error limit RMS Current
DCDC_ERRORIPIC
344
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(100)
// Error limit Peak Current
DCDC_ERRORVAC
346
2
RW
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(620)
// Error limit Voltage Output
DCDC_ERRORVDC
348
2
RW
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(800)
// Error limit DC link voltage
DCDC_ALARMIRMS
352
2
RO
IQ21
0
_IQ(70.0)
// Alarm limit RMS current
DCDC_ALARMIPIC
354
2
RO
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(80)
// Alarm limit Peak current
DCDC_ALARMVAC
356
2
RW
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(580)
// Alarm limit Voltage Output
DCDC_ALARMVDC
358
2
RW
IQ21
_IQ(0)
_IQ(750)
// Alarm limit DC link voltage
DCDC_HOBBESCW
362
2
RW
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// DCDC Control Word
DCDC_HOBBESSW
364
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// DCDC Status Word
DCDC_READP0
368
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power global
DCDC_READPA
370
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power A
DCDC_READPB
372
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power B
47 / 62
DCDC_READPC
374
2
RO
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power C
DCDC_SETP0
388
2
RW
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power global (Set-Point)
DCDC_SETPA
390
2
RW
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power A (Set-Point)
DCDC_SETPB
392
2
RW
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power B (Set-Point)
DCDC_SETPC
394
2
RW
IQ10
_IQ10(-2000000)
_IQ10(2000000)
// Active Power C (Set-Point)
DCDC_BATSTATUSWORDGL
410
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Status Word (parallelized)
DCDC_BATERRORWORDGL
412
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Error Word (parallelized)
DCDC_ALARMBATHGL
414
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery High Voltage Alarm (parallelized)
DCDC_ALARMBATLGL
416
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Low Voltage Alarm (parallelized)
DCDC_ALARMBATMAXCHGL
418
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Charging Current Alarm (parallelized)
DCDC_ALARMBATMINCHGL
420
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
DCDC_SETCHIGL
422
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Discharging Current Alarm
(parallelized)
// Recommended charging current (parallelized)
DCDC_SETCHVGL
424
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Equalization battery voltage (parallelized)
DCDC_FLOATINGVGL
426
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Floating voltage (parallelized)
DCDC_SETCHPGL
428
2
RW
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery capacity (parallelized)
DCDC_BATSOCGL
430
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery State of Charge (parallelized)
DCDC_BATVDCGL
432
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery DC voltage measured (parallelized)
DCDC_BATIDCGL
434
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Drain Current measured (parallelized)
DCDC_AHMEASUREDGL
436
2
RO
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Ah measured (parallelized)
DCDC_TIMEMEASUREDGL
438
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Time measured (parallelized)
DCDC_BATSTATUSWORDA
442
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Status Word A
DCDC_BATERRORWORDA
444
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Error Word A
DCDC_ALARMBATHA
446
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery High Voltage Alarm A
DCDC_ALARMBATLA
448
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Low Voltage Alarm A
DCDC_ALARMBATMAXCHA
450
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Charging Current Alarm A
DCDC_ALARMBATMINCHA
452
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Discharging Current Alarm A
48 / 62
v1.2
DCDC_SETCHIA
454
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Recommended charging current A
DCDC_SETCHVA
456
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Equalization battery voltage A
DCDC_FLOATINGVA
458
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Floating voltage A
DCDC_SETCHPA
460
2
RW
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery capacity A
DCDC_BATSOCA
462
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery State of Charge A
DCDC_BATVDCA
464
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery DC voltage measured A
DCDC_BATIDCA
466
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Drain Current measured A
DCDC_AHMEASUREDA
468
2
RO
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Ah measured A
DCDC_TIMEMEASUREDA
470
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Time measured A
DCDC_BATSTATUSWORDB
474
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Status Word B
DCDC_BATERRORWORDB
476
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Error Word B
DCDC_ALARMBATHB
478
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery High Voltage Alarm B
DCDC_ALARMBATLB
480
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Low Voltage Alarm B
DCDC_ALARMBATMAXCHB
482
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Charging Current Alarm B
DCDC_ALARMBATMINCHB
484
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Discharging Current Alarm B
DCDC_SETCHIB
486
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Recommended charging current B
DCDC_SETCHVB
488
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Equalization battery voltage B
DCDC_FLOATINGVB
490
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Floating voltage B
DCDC_SETCHPB
492
2
RW
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery capacity B
DCDC_BATSOCB
494
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery State of Charge B
DCDC_BATVDCB
496
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery DC voltage measured
DCDC_BATIDCB
498
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Drain Current measured B
DCDC_AHMEASUREDB
500
2
RO
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Ah measured B
DCDC_TIMEMEASUREDB
502
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Time measured B
DCDC_BATSTATUSWORDC
506
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Status Word C
DCDC_BATERRORWORDC
508
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Error Word C
DCDC_ALARMBATHC
510
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery High Voltage Alarm C
49 / 62
DCDC_ALARMBATLC
512
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Low Voltage Alarm C
DCDC_ALARMBATMAXCHC
514
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Charging Current Alarm C
DCDC_ALARMBATMINCHC
516
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Max Discharging Current Alarm C
DCDC_SETCHIC
518
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Recommended charging current C
DCDC_SETCHVC
520
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Equalization battery voltage C
DCDC_FLOATINGVC
522
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Floating voltage C
DCDC_SETCHPC
524
2
RW
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery capacity C
DCDC_BATSOCC
526
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery State of Charge C
DCDC_BATVDCC
528
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery DC voltage measured C
DCDC_BATIDCC
530
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Battery Drain Current measured C
DCDC_AHMEASUREDC
532
2
RO
IQ10
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Ah measured C
DCDC_TIMEMEASUREDC
534
2
RO
UINT32
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Time measured
DCDC_DCVOLTAGEGLOBAL
538
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Global DC voltage command
DCDC_DCVOLTAGEPHA
540
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase A voltage command
DCDC_DCVOLTAGEPHB
542
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase B voltage command
DCDC_DCVOLTAGEPHC
544
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase C voltage command
DCDC_ACVOLTAGEGLOBAL
548
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Global DC current command
DCDC_ACVOLTAGEPHA
550
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase A current command
DCDC_ADCVOLTAGEPHB
552
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase B current command
DCDC_ADCVOLTAGEPHC
554
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase C current command
DCDC_MAXAGLOBAL
558
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Current limit (Global)
DCDC_MAXAPHA
560
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Current limit (Phase A)
DCDC_MAXAPHB
562
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Current limit (Phase B)
DCDC_MAXAPHC
564
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Current limit (Phase C)
DCDC_MAXVGLOBAL
568
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Global DC maximum allowable voltage
DCDC_MAXVPHA
570
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase A maximum allowable voltage
DCDC_MAXVPHB
572
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase B maximum allowable voltage
50 / 62
v1.2
DCDC_MAXVPHC
574
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase C maximum allowable voltage
DCDC_MINVGLOBAL
578
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Global DC minimum allowable voltage
DCDC_MINVPHA
580
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase A minimum allowable voltage
DCDC_MINVPHB
582
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase B minimum allowable voltage
DCDC_MINVPHC
584
2
RW
IQ21
0
0X7FFFFFFF
// Phase C minimum allowable voltage
The Bit Coded Variables descriptions are:
CONTROL WORD
bits
31..12
11
10
9
8..5
4..3
2
1
0
Definition
reserved
reserved
reserved
Connection mode
Function
LocalRemote
RunReady
Enable
Reset
0: Independent
1: Parallel
0: Voltage
1: Icnt
2: Pcnt
3: Bat. Charge
4:Rsvd
0: Local
1: Modbus
2: External ADC
0:Ready
0: Disabled
1:Reset
STATUS WORD
bits
31..17
16
15
11
10..8
7..6
5
4
3..0
Definition
reserved
reserved
reserved
Connection mode
Function
LocalRemote
RunReady
Enable
State Machine
0: Independent
1: Parallel
0: Voltage
1: Icnt
2: Pcnt
3: Bat. Charge
4:Rsvd
0: Local
1: Modbus
2: External ADC
0:Ready
0: Disabled
s_Init: 1
s_StandBy: 2
s_PreCharge: 3
s_Ready: 4
s_Run: 5
s_Alarm: 6
s_Calibration: 7
51 / 62
ERRORS
bits
6
5
Phase
overvoltage
Undervoltage in
the DC link
Overvoltage in
the DC link
Precharge
overload
Precharge time
Drivers
EMCY
sequence
Watchdog
Overvoltage in
phase
The DC link is
discharged
The DC link is
overcharged
Overload in
Precharge State
Internal error,
the voltage in
mains is too low
Internal error
Emergency
stop or
isolation
device is
activated
Digital processor is
blocked
bits
21
18
15
12
11
10
9
8
Definition
Mains lost
PLL error
Node without
heartbeat
Transducers offset
Room
overtemperature
Heatsink
overtemperature
Phase
overcurrent
Phase undervoltage
There is no
voltage in the
grid
PLL out of
range
Internal error,
communication
between
converters is
lost
Some transducers
are not working
properly
Not used
Heatsink
overtemp
Overcurrent
in one
phase
Undervoltage in phase
bits
31..26
25
24
23
22
Definition
reserved
Shortcircuit
Overload
Isolation
detector
Open loop
The power
supply output is
shortcircuited
The power
supply is beyond
its rated limits
There is an
isolation
fault in the
power
supply
When the power supply is
in current or power mode,
the circuit is opened
Definition
52 / 62
7
4
3
v1.2
2
1
0
BATTERY ERRORS
bits
Definition
31..9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
Shortcircuit
Circuit Opened
Battery Discharge
Overcurrent
Battery Charge
Overcurrent
Battery Undervoltage
The battery
has been
shorted
The battery has
been
disconnected
Battery exceeded its
maximum current
during discharge
Battery exceeded
its maximum
current during
charge
Battery exceeded its
minimum voltage
during discharge
BATTERY STATUS WORD
bits
Definition
31..10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2..0
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
Charge_Stage
0:Constant Current
1:Boost
2:Full
3:Equ
4:Floating
5: No Bat Presence
53 / 62
6.1. IQ MANAGEMENT
Many of the parameters of this equipment are defined as IQ numbers (Texas Instruments
nomenclature). An IQ number refers to a 32 bit signed fixed point number where the number
of fractional bits is specified. For instance, IQ21 means that the number has 21 fractional bits,
10 integer bits and 1 bit is for the sign.
For the representation of the negative numbers:
And for the positive numbers:
As an example, 1.4142 in IQ10 representation:
Below there is a C# sample code for the representation:
IQ10 functions:
public double IQ10toFloat(double Var)
{
if (Var > 2147483648) //if the value is bigger than 2^31 (positive)
{
Var = Var - 4294967296;
// Var - 2^32
Var = Var / (1024); // Var/(2^10)
}
else
{
Var = Var / (1024);
}
return Var;
}
public UInt32 FloatToIQ10(double Var)
{
UInt32 Retorn=0;
if (Var <0 )
{
Var = (1024*Var) + 4294967296;
}
else
{
Var = Var * (1024);
}
Retorn = Convert.ToUInt32(Var);
return Retorn;
// if negative
// x*2^10 + 2^32
}
55 / 62
IQ21 functions:
public double IQ21toFloat(double Var)
{
if (Var > 2147483648) //if the value is bigger than 2^31 (positive)
{
Var = Var - 4294967296;
// Var - 2^32
Var = Var / (2097152);
// Var / (2^21)
}
else
{
Var = Var / (2097152);
//Var/(2^21)
}
return Var;
}
public UInt32 FloatToIQ21(double Var)
{
UInt32 Retorn = 0;
if (Var < 0)
// if negative
{
Var = (2097152 * Var) + 4294967296; // Var*2^21 + 2^32
}
else
{
Var = Var * (2097152);
// Var*2^21
}
Retorn = Convert.ToUInt32(Var);
return Retorn;
}
56 / 62
7. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE
CINERGIA delivers, within the scope of the supply, a Human Machine Interface software that
communicates with the equipment using MODBUS protocol. This application is based on
Windows 7/Windows XP. The software can be installed by executing Setup.exe file in
Administrator Mode and following the instructions of the application.
The software is based in a Tab Dialog, so each tab has different uses:
-
OPERATION
SUPERVISION
ALARM
BATT CONFIGURATION
I, V,P CONFIGURATION
7.1. Operation tab
A- Information about the status of the equipment and buttons to control it:
-
Enable / Disable: the corresponding led shows whether the equipment is
enabled or disabled.
Run / Ready: the corresponding led shows whether the equipment is running or
is ready for operation.
Reset: it allows the user to reset all the alarms that have occurred and that have
been previously announced.
B- Selection of the operating mode and information about the active one:
-
Current Control / Voltage Control / Power Control / Battery Charge
Parallelized Outputs / Independent Outputs
57 / 62
C- Connection parameters for the communications:
-
IP of the equipment (192.168.55.204), port (502). This equipment has a fixed IP.
Pooling time [ms] is the time to refresh all parameters. The minimum value
recommended is 500 ms.
Connect / Disconnect / Pause buttons
D- Information about the State Machine of the two converters of the equipment (Active
Rectifier and DC/DC Output).
7.2. Supervision tab
A- Information about electrical parameters of both converters:
-
Voltage, current, frequency, temperatures, active and reactive power.
B- Trend plots of voltage, current and power:
-
58 / 62
Only one variable per plot is allowed at the same time.
The refreshing time is defined by the pooling time, therefore it is not possible to
detect fast transients of the variable.
7.3. Alarm tab
In this tab, the alarm status of each converter is shown.
7.4. Batt configuration tab
The behaviour of the equipment when operating in Battery Charging mode is configured
through this tab:
A- Information about the electrical parameters for the Battery Charge operation mode. To
update the data and change the configuration the Send button must be pressed.
B- Electrical limits for each phase when the power supply is in Constant Current, Voltage or
Power mode. The information is sent to the equipment after pressing the Send button.
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7.5. I, V, P configuration tab
A- Information and setpoints for the electrical parameters associated to the Current, Voltage
and Power operating modes. By using the Send button the data is downloaded to the
equipment.
B- Setpoint of the reactive power for the grid-tied Active Rectifier. The information is sent to
the equipment after pressing the Send button.
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8. WARRANTY AND MAINTENANCE
Fans and capacitors must be replaced at the end of their useful lifetime.
Inside the equipment there are dangerous voltages and metallic parts at high
temperatures even when the equipment is stopped. The direct contact may
cause electrocutions and burns. All the operations must be done by authorized
technical staff.
8.1. Replacing the output fuses
This operation must be performed by personnel experienced with electrical
systems. The direct contact can cause electrocutions and burns.
In order to replace the output fuses follow procedure below:
1. Stop the power supply following the instructions of FULL STOP
2. Turn the output switch-disconnector (Q2) to the OFF position
3. Open the fuse holder and replace the fuses
The battery fuses can only be replaced by ultrafast models type Gould aR 660V
(14x51 or 22x58 mm, depending on the unit model) of the same dimensions and
rating.
8.2. Fans
The useful lifetime of the fans used to cool the power circuits depends on the use and
environment conditions. It is recommended their preventive replacement by authorized
technical staff.
8.3. DC bus capacitors
The useful lifetime of the DC bus capacitors and those ones used in the input and output
filtering depends on the use and the environment conditions. It is recommended their
preventive replacement by authorized technical staff.
8.4. Warranty
CINERGIA warrants that the delivered equipment is free from any defect affecting the
functioning thereof for a time period not exceeding one (1) year from the Ex Works delivery
date. If a purchased CINERGIA product becomes defective because of a faulty component or
manufacturing, at any time during its standard warranty period, CINERGIA shall provide one of
the following solutions:
• On-site technical assistance;
• Product or component repair at CINERGIA’s premises.
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• Replacement of the defective product or component;
The decision whether to perform the assistance on-site, to repair or replace the faulty product
and/or component shall be taken in any case exclusively by CINERGIA.
8.5. Claim procedure
The warranty rights can be exercised during the validity of the warranty period and
immediately upon detecting any abnormalities, except in the case of visible defects, in which
case the claim shall be submitted within a maximum time of 7 days from the date of receipt of
the equipment and always prior to their installation.
If defect of malfunction is detected, please proceed as follows:
• Immediately notify in writing CINERGIA by submitting a brief report describing the type of
fault detected and all the data contained in the product data plate, attaching a copy of the
purchase invoice/receipt. Such documentation shall be sent to the email address of the Sales
Team (comercial@cinergia.coop).
• Upon receiving the documentation, CINERGIA will analyse it to decide whether the
intervention required is covered by the warranty terms described herein.
• If the claim is covered by the warranty terms, CINERGIA shall provide on-site technical
assistance or, alternatively, can request the shipping of the defective product and/or
component to have it repaired at CINERGIA premises. At last, CINERGIA shall decide to send a
replacement product and/or component. The faulty product and/or component shall be
returned to CINERGIA. Any shipping damages attributable to improper packaging shall not be
covered by warranty.
• Failure to return the replaced equipment within 10 (ten) standard days shall authorize
CINERGIA to invoice the equipment supplied as replacement.
• In case the defect of the returned equipment is deemed not to be covered by the warranty,
CINERGIA shall issue an invoice to the purchaser for the repair activity.
• If on arrival at CINERGIA’s premises the returned equipment is deemed to be in perfect
operating conditions, CINERGIA shall be authorized to issue an invoice for all the costs
resulting from its replacement (analysis and testing of the equipment and shipping costs).
• CINERGIA reserves the right to provide a different model of product and/or component to
process the claims covered by the warranty terms, in case the original model and/or
component is out of production.
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