Flow Rate Transmitter Manual - AW

Flow Rate Transmitter Manual - AW
C O M PA N Y
Flow Rate Transmitter
Installation, Operating &
Maintenance Manual
©2016 AW-Lake Company. All rights reserved. Doc ID:FLOWTRANSMAN082516
Technical Specifications
Measuring Accuracy
±2.0% of full scale
Repeatability
±1% of full scale
Maximum Operating Pressure
Liquids
Aluminum and brass monitors:
3500 PSIG (240 Bar)
Stainless steel: 6000 PSIG (410 Bar)
Flow Measuring Range
0.1-150 GPM (0.5-550 LPM)
2-1300 SCFM (1-600 SLPS)
Air
Aluminum and brass: 600 PSIG (40 Bar)
Stainless steel: 1000 PSIG (69 Bar)
Standard Calibration Fluids
Maximum Operating Temperature
Oil monitors: DTE 25® @ 110°F
(43°C), 0.873 sg
Water monitors: tap water @ 70°F
(21°C), 1.0 sg
Air monitors: air @ 70°F (21°C), 1.0 sg
and 100 PSIG (6.8 Bar)
Media: 185°F (85°C)
Ambient: 185°F (85°C)
Filtration Requirements
74 micron filter or 200 mesh screen
minimum
Viscosity
Standard viscosities up to 110 cSt. For
viscosities between 110 to 430 cSt
contact factory.
DTE 25 is a registered trademark of Exxon Mobil.
Electronic Transmitter Performance
Power Requirements
12-24 VDC
Load Driving capacity
4-20mA: Load resistance is
dependent on power supply voltage.
Use the following equation to
calculate maximum load resistance:
Max Loop Load (�) = 50 (Power
supply volts – 12).
0-5 VDC: Minimum load resistance
1000
1-5 VDC*: Consult factory
Transmission Distance
4-20mA and 1-5 VDC (regulated) are
limited only by wire resistance and
power supply voltage.
<200 feet recommended for 0-5 VDC
and square wave pulse.
Over-Current Protection
Self limiting at 35mA
Resolution
10-bit (0.1%)
Response Time
<100 milliseconds
Square Wave Pulse: Minimum load
resistance 1000 �
The 1-5Vdc output requires an external 249 ohm resistor (not included with transmitter) to be wired at the receiving
device.
*
2
Enclosure Materials of Construction (non-wetted components)
Enclosure & Cover
Painted Aluminum
Seals
Buna-N®
Window
Pyrex®
Din Connector
Polyamide
Buna-N is a registered trademark of Chemische Werke Huls. Pyrex® is a registered trademark of Corning Incorporated.
Flow Meter Materials of Construction (wetted components)
Casing & End Ports
Anodized
Aluminum
Brass
Stainless Steel
Seals
Buna-N (STD),
EPR, FKM or
Kalrez®
Buna-N (STD),
EPR, FKM or
Kalrez®
FKM with PTFE backup (STD),
Buna-N, EPR or Kalrez®
Transfer Magnet
PTFE coated
Alnico
PTFE coated
Alnico
PTFE coated Alnico
All other internal
parts
Stainless Steel
Stainless Steel
Stainless Steel
Kalrez is a registered trademark of DuPont Incorporated.
Mechanical - Size Code
DIM
Series 3
Series 4
Series 5
Series 5
(2” port only)
A
6-9/16” (167mm) 7-5/32” (182mm)
10-1/8” (258mm)
12-5/8” (322mm)
B
2-3/16” (56mm)
2-15/16” (75mm)
3-13/16” (97mm)
3-13/16” (97mm)
C
4” (101mm)
4-1/2” (114mm)
5-5/16” (135 mm)
5-5/16” (135mm)
D
1-7/8” (47mm)
1-7/8” (47mm)
1-7/8” (47mm)
1-7/8” (47mm)
E
4-7/8” (128mm)
5” (127mm)
6-3/4” (172mm)
6-3/4” (172mm)
F
2-1/4” (57mm)
2-7/8” (73mm)
3-3/4” (95mm)
3-3/4” (95mm)
3
Introduction
This manual is a service guide produced by the manufacturer and provides
specific procedures and/or illustrations for disassembly, assembly, inspection,
cleaning, and filtration. When followed properly, these procedures will keep your
flow meter in top operating condition.
It is important for operators and maintenance personnel to be safety conscious
when operating or repairing equipment. Developing a thorough knowledge of
the precautionary areas and following safe operating procedures can prevent
equipment damage and/or personal injury. Before making any repair, read all of
the repair procedures to learn the correct method and all precautions.
Table of Contents
Specifications and General Information.........................................................2-4
Basic Application Information............. ...........................................5
Warning and Precautionary Areas...................................................5
Installation ........................................................................................................6
Basic Installation Instructions..........................................................6
Operation...........................................................................................................7
Operating Principles.....................................................................7
Reading the Meter.......................................................................9
Specific Gravity or Density Effect....................................................9
Viscosity Effect............................................................................9
Pneumatic Meter uses & Operating Theory.......................................................9
Correction Factors.......................................................................12
Special Scales...........................................................................12
Selecting the Proper Meter...........................................................12
Troubleshooting & Maintenance......................................................................21
Disassembly.............................................................................23
Cleaning and Inspection..............................................................25
Contamination and Filtration............................................................................26
Recommended Filtration..............................................................26
Stabilized Contamination..............................................................26
Contamination Sources...............................................................26
Basic Application Information
4
The flow meter can be installed directly in the fluid line without flow straighteners
or special piping. The meter is used to measure the flow rate of most liquids
which do not contain particles greater than 74 micron.
1. Internal components are sealed inside a painted aluminum enclosure which
permit use in areas where the meter may be sprayed or washed with soap
and water.
2. Mount the meter in the most convenient location to allow easy access for
reading and maintenance.
3. The meter should NOT be mounted near hot pipes or equipment that can
increase the ambient temperature above the meter rating. The meter should
be mounted at least one foot (.3 meter) from large electric motors, or the
internal magnet may weaken or become demagnetized.
Warning and Precautionary Areas
1. The standard meters are designed to operate in systems that flow in only one
direction: the direction of the arrow on the flow scale. Attempting operation
in the reverse direction may cause damage to the meter or other system
components. (See page 7 for reverse flow information)
2. To retain accuracy and repeatability many internal moving parts are precision
machined and require filtration of at least 74 micron or a 200 mesh screen.
3. All liquid meters are tested and calibrated at our test facility using a light
hydraulic oil (DTE-25) or water. The units are well drained, but some oil
residue may still remain within the meters. Please check the compatibility with
your fluid. The meter may have to be cleaned before use. (See “Cleaning &
Inspection” section)
4. When installing aluminum or brass meters onto steel pipe caution should be
taken not to over tighten the pipe connections. The thread in the meter end
fittings may strip if over tightened.
5. It is not recommended to install meters to unsupported piping.
6. Operating Pressure: Meters should not be used above the maximum rated
operating pressure.
7. Pressure and flow surges may disengage the outer magnet follower from
the transfer magnet. If this occurs, a shock suppressor should be used to
eliminate malfunction.
8. Thread seal tape: Caution should be used when using Thread seal tape on
pipe thread joints. Leave the first thread of pipe thread exposed from end of
pipe when applying tape.
9. These meters, as well as many other meters, use an internal transfer magnet
in the design. Because of this magnet, be aware of the following:
a) Do not install near highly magnetic devices
b) If metal particles are moving through the system, a magnetic filter may be required.
5
WARNING: Never hit a flow meter or empty fluid with full fluid flow. This fluid
shock or hammering effect on the internals of the flow meter can permanently
damage the internal components.
Installation
Basic Installation Instructions
The meters are mounted in-line and are direct reading. The meters can be
mounted in a vertical or horizontal position as long as the fluid is flowing in the
direction of the arrow on the scale. No straight pipe is required before or after the
meter.
When installing a meter, apply “Thread seal Tape” or “Liquid Thread Sealant”
on pipe threads. If tape is used, be sure to leave the first pipe thread on end of
pipe exposed. Position filter in front of meter and in a location that allows easy
access for routine maintenance. Refer to “Warnings and Precautionary Areas” for
additional information.
INSTALLATION DOS AND DON’T
To obtain satisfactory operation from a flow meter, the following points should be
considered:
DO:
• Install a pressure gauge near the inlet of the meter
• Place throttling valves at the outlet of the meter
• Use pipe sealer on the connections
• Install a union on one side of the meter for easy removal for maintenance and
calibration
• Install solenoid valves at meter outlet (as far downstream as possible)
• Mount either vertically or horizontally
DO NOT:
• Use in systems where reverse flow is possible unless using RF option
• Place meter in non-aligned piping
• Over-flow the meter by more than 50% of maximum reading
• Operate at pressures and temperatures greater than specified
• Install restrictions between pressure gauges and the meter inlet
• Install solenoid valves at the meter inlet
6
Fluid Flow in Reverse Direction
The standard meter should not see flow in the reverse direction (opposite
direction to the arrow printed on the flow rate scale). Prolonged flow in the
reverse direction will cause damage to the standard meter’s internal mechanism
that could result in inaccurate readings or premature failure of the meter. If the
standard meter will be installed in a system where reverse flow is possible, Lake
recommends that a check valve be installed in parallel with the meter in order
to facilitate reverse flow around the meter. Check valves are readily available
through fluid component distributors.
Alternatively, flow meters designed to allow reverse flow may be specified.
These meters do not measure in reverse flow for that Bi-Directional meters are
available. These meters are designated by a “-RF” suffix attached to the end of
the standard 8-digit model code.
Reverse flow meters will allow flows in the reverse direction of up to the
maximum flow rate printed on the flow rate scale without any damage to the
monitor’s internals.
Operation
Operating Principles: Mechanical
We have developed a line of unique flow meters which combine the simplicity of
a sharp-edged orifice disk and a variable area flow meter. See Illustration 1 “Flow
Meter Cross Section”.
The meters are tubular, with all internal wetted parts sealed within the body
casing. Running through the center of the body casing is a tapered center shaft
which is centered in the bore by pilot disks at each end. Encircling the shaft is
a sharp-edged, floating orifice disk, transfer magnet and return spring. The disk
and transfer magnet are held in the “no flow” position by the biased return spring.
As the flow moves through the meter it creates a pressure differential across the
floating orifice disk, forcing the disk and transfer magnet against the return spring.
As flow increases, the pressure differential across the disk increases, forcing
the disk and transfer magnet to move along the tapered center shaft. As flow
decreases, the biased return spring forces the disk and transfer magnet down the
tapered center shaft, returning to the “no flow” position.
In metal casing meters the movement of the floating orifice disk and transfer
7
magnet cannot be seen because they are sealed inside the body casing. Therefore, a magnet follower is positioned around the outside of the body casing and
is magnetically coupled to the internal transfer magnet. As the flow rate increases, the internal magnet moves along the tapered center shaft (inside the body
casing) and the magnet follower moves along the outside of the body casing
(under the scale).
Reading the Meter
Notice the black reference line which runs 360° around the white magnetic
follower. This reference line moves under the scale in direct relation to the
movement of the internal orifice disk. When fluid is flowing, the flow rate through
the meter is read by lining up the black reference line with the closest rate line
on the external flow scale.
Specific Gravity or Density Effect
Standard meters are calibrated for either WATER with a specific gravity of 1.0 ,
OIL with a specific gravity of .873 or AIR at specific gravity 1.0. The floating disk
meter is affected by fluid density as are most other similar type meters. Lake’s
Illustration 1
Flow Meter (Cross Section)
5
2
3
4
1
13
10
67
58
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
A
REV.
8
End Porting
Body Casing
Magnet Follower
Seal Assembly
Pilot Disk
Flowing Sharp-Edged
Orifice Disk
DESCRIPTION
REVISIONS
10
8
7.
8.
9.
10.
9
7
Tapered Center Shaft
TransferUNITS:
Magnet
Return Spring
Retainer Ring
12
9
DRAWING NO.: Series 3 meter cross section
TOLERANCES UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED PART NO.:
METRIC
IMPERIAL
UPPER LEVEL:
.XXX .013
.XXXX .0005
.XXX .003
.XX
.07
.XX .01
.X .25
FRAC. .015
ANG.
.5
.5
ANG.
SURFACE FINISH: 64 MAX SURFACE FINISH: 64 MAX
INTERNAL USE ONLY
A
01/18/2013 XX
DATE
11
9
46
BY
XXX
XX
ECN APVD
B
THIRD ANGLE
THIS PRINT, INCLUDING THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN IT IS
THE PROPERTY OF AW-LAKE COMPANY. IT IS CONSIDERED
PROPPRIETARY IN NATURE AND MAY NOT BE USED OR
DISCLOSED OUTSIDE OF AW-LAKE COMPANY, EXCEPT UNDER
PRIOR WRITTEN AGREEMENT. ANY MODIFICATIONS MADE TO
OR COMMENTS WRITTEN ON THIS DRAWING BY
UNAUTHORIZED PERSONNEL WILL VOID THIS DRAWING. ALL
DIMENSIONS SHOWN ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT
NOTICE.
DESCRIPTION:
Series 3 meter cross section w cart
MATERIAL: N/A
MODELED BY:
DATE:2/15/2016
DRAWN BY: T. Binninger
DATE:2/15/2016
SIZE:
REVISION:
SCALE: 1:2
SHEET: 1 OF 1
A
8809 Industrial Drive
Franksville, WI 53126
Phone: (262) 884-9800
Fax: (262) 884-9810
meters have less of this effect because of the sharpness of the floating orifice
disks being used.
The indicated flow reading will read high for heavier fluids and low for lighter
fluids. A corrective factor can be applied to the standard scale or a special scale
can be added at a slight additional costs. When measuring fluids with other
specific gravities, the basic equations below can be used to develop corrected
readings.
For AIR Meters use: √1.0/Specific Gravity x scale reading
For WATER Meters use: √1.0/Specific Gravity x scale reading
For OIL Meters use: √.873/Specific Gravity x scale reading
Figure 1.
Viscosity Effect
The meters incorporate a unique floating, sharp-edged orifice disk. The floating,
sharp-edged orifice disk offers greater operating stability and accuracy over a
wide range of viscosities up to 500 SUS and for applications above 500 SUS
contact factory.
9
Pneumatic Meter uses & Operating Theory
Our rugged, high-pressure, pneumatic meters are designed for permanent
installation in compressed gas systems. These products provide a low cost
means to measure compressor volumetric outputs, pneumatic tool consumptions
and other industrial gas flow rates.
The meters operate using the variable annular orifice method with compression
spring return –the identical method used in our field proven liquid flow rate
meters. The product’s follower, where the measurement is indicated, is
magnetically coupled through a high pressure casing to the meter’s internal
orifice assembly.
Benefits of these design features are:
• High operating pressure
• Linear displacement of the follower with respect to flow rate
• Measuring accuracy ±2.5% of full scale in the center third of the measuring
range, ±4% in upper and lower thirds
• Operation in any mounting orientation
Lake meters are offered in three standard materials of construction:
• Aluminum for standard monitoring applications to 600 PSIG
• Brass for media/material compatibility to 600 PSIG
• Stainless steel for compatibility and operation to 1000 PSIG
• Measuring ranges cover 2-12 SCFM through 150-1300 SCFM
Twenty-four port sizes from 1/4” through 2” in NPTF, SAE and BSPP can be
ordered to meet specific plumbing requirements. Lake’s pneumatic meters are
also available in alarm and basic meter configurations for electronic monitoring
applications.
10
Illustration 2
14.7 PSIA (0 PSIG)
29.4 PSIA (14.7 PSIG)
58.8 PSIA (44.1 PSIG)
Standard Cubic Feet
Lake’s meter are calibrated to measure
the flow of compressible media (gases)
in SCFM – standard cubic feet per
minute. A “standard” cubic foot is
defined as a cubic foot of dry air at
standard atmospheric conditions: 70°F
and 14.7 PSIA (0 PSIG) measured at
sea level.
When a standard cubic foot of air is
compressed, its actual volume will
decrease proportionally as absolute
pressure increases. For example, a
standard cubic foot of air’s actual volume
will decrease by 50% and density
will increase by 100% as the air is
compressed from atmospheric pressure
14.7 PSIA (0 PSIG) to 29.4 PSIA (14.7
PSIG). See Illustration 2.
There are three factors that affect the
Flow Meter Calibration: specific gravity,
pressure and temperature. Lake meters
are calibrated for air (specific gravity of
1.0) at 70°F and 100 PSIG. Most low
pressure rotameters are calibrated at 0
PSIG and require corrections for use at
any other pressure.
Lake products are designed for
pneumatic systems where pressures
between 90 -110 PSIG are used. In
these common applications, a Lake
monitor with a standard calibration
can be read directly without applying
corrections.
11
Correction Factors
If a flow meter is installed in a system where conditions differ from the standard
listed on page 9 (Figure 1.) correction factors will need to be applied to retain
the design accuracy of the meter. The appropriate correction factor equations
are detailed on page 9. To assure the best monitoring accuracy, pressure and
temperature measurements should be taken directly at the meter’s inlet port.
Special Scales
Special calibrations can be performed by Lake Monitors to correct for the
following system characteristics:
• System temperature
• Media specific gravity
• Various measuring units (i.e. LPM, LPS, m3/hr, etc.)
• Any combination of the above
Consult Lake’s factory or your distributor for details and prices.
Selecting the Proper Meter
To order a pneumatic flow meter the following information is required:
• Pipe size and port style
• Media (air, nitrogen, argon etc.) – for material compatibility and specific gravity
considerations
• Flow range required
• Nominal System pressure
• System temperature
Operation
Operation Principle: Electronics
The Flow Transmitters are typically used to transmit a signal proportional to flow
rate to a process control computer, a PLC, a recorder, or a panel-mount display.
The Flow Transmitters are used as the primary input device to record flow rates
through hydraulic, water and pneumatic systems.
12
The universal output transmitter circuit employed by the Lake Flow Transmitter
is capable of producing output signals of 4-20 mA, 0-5 VDC, and 0-2000 Hz
square wave pulse. A 1-5 VDC signal may be obtained by connecting a 249 Ω
resistor to the 4-20 mA loop.
Overview
Illustration 3 shows a Flow Transmitter with the cover removed. The follower
moves in unison with an orifice plate inside of the unit’s pressure vessel via
a magnetic coupling in order to indicate flow rate. As the follower moves with
changes in flow rate, the flow rate is determined by relating the position of the
flow indicator line to the increments on the flow rate scale.
The sensor array located in the sensor assembly sends a signal relative to the
position of the follower to the signal conditioning circuit. The signal conditioning
circuit converts the signal from the sensor array into three different signals. These
signals are all directly proportional to the reading that is determined by relating
the position of the flow indicator line to the flow rate scale.
The user may choose between reading a 0-2000 Hz square wave pulse, a 0-5
VDC analog signal, or a two-wire 4-20 mA analog signal by connecting to the
appropriate pins on the 4-pin Hirschmann® DIN connector and by placing the
programmable jumper in the appropriate position for the desired output.
An analog 1-5 VDC output may also be obtained by configuring the unit for the
two-wire 4-20 mA output and then connecting a 249 ohm resistor to the current
loop. The exact output pins and jumper positions that correspond to each output
are discussed later in this manual.
13
Illustration 3
4-20 mA Output Connections
Input Voltage
The supply voltage must be between 12 and 35 VDC. The maximum resistance
that may be placed within the current loop is given by the following formula:
Where: Rmax = the maximum resistance that may be placed in the
current loop (Ω)
Vs = the value of the supply voltage (VDC)
14
Illustration 4
Illustration 5
4-20 mA Output Connections
Wiring Instructions (Refer to Illustrations 4 and 5 above):
1. Move the jumper on the signal conditioning board into the position closest to
the meter’s outlet, as shown in Illustration 5.
2. Connect the positive DC power source (+12 to +35 VDC) to terminal #1 on
the DIN connector
3. Connect terminal #2 of the DIN connector to the positive current input on the
receiving device.
4. If the power source does not originate from the receiving device, the
negative side of the power supply must be connected to the signal ground of
the receiving device.
5. If the transmitter is operating properly, the green LED on the signal
conditioning board will illuminate dimly at zero flow and will increase in
intensity as flow increases.
Illustration 6
Illustration 7
15
0-5 VDC Output Connections
Wiring Instructions (Refer to Illustrations 6 and 7 above):
1. Move the jumper on the circuit board into the position closest to the meter’s
inlet, as shown in Illustration 7.
2. Connect the positive voltage source (+12 to +35 VDC) to terminal #1 of the
DIN connector.
3. Connect terminal #2 of the DIN connector to the negative side of the DC
voltage source.
4. Connect terminal #3 of the DIN connector to the 0-5 VDC input of the
receiving device.
5. If the power source does not originate at the receiving device, a wire will
need to be connected between the negative side of the voltage source and
the signal ground of the receiving device.
6. If the transmitter is operating correctly, the green LED on the circuit board
will illuminate brightly when power is applied to the unit.
NOTE: The input impedance (resistance) of the receiving device must not be lower than 1000 Ω or
non-linearities may result. Lower impedance will not damage the transmitter.
Illustration 8
Illustration 9
0-2000 Hz Pulse Output Connections
Wiring Instructions (Refer to Illustrations 8 and 9 above):
1. Move the jumper on the circuit board into the position closest to the meter’s
inlet, as shown in Illustration 9.
2. Connect the positive voltage source (+12 to +35 VDC) to terminal #1 of the
DIN connector.
3. Connect terminal #2 of the DIN connector to the negative side of the DC
voltage source.
16
4. Connect the “G” terminal of the DIN connector to the pulse input of the
receiving device.
5. If the power source does not originate at the receiving device, a wire will
need to be connected between the negative side of the voltage source and
the signal ground of the receiving device.
6. If the transmitter is operating properly, the green LED on the circuit board
will illuminate brightly when power is applied to the unit.
NOTE: The input impedance (resistance) of the receiving device must not be lower than 1000 Ω or
non-linearities may result. Lower impedance will not damage the transmitter.
Connectors
Standard flow sensors are prewired with 4-wire Hirschmann-type DIN connectors
which consist of a female section as shown in Illustration 10 and a male section
as shown in Illustration 11. In order to make the user connections, the screw
terminals located inside of the female section must be accessed.
To open the female section, first remove the screw and then lift the connector
portion out of the casing by inserting the head of a screwdriver into the slot
marked for that purpose.
Illustration 12 shows the disassembled female section. The screw terminal
connections can be seen on the piece located at the far right side of the
illustration. Alternate connectors are available on a custom basis.
Illustration 10
Illustration 11
Illustration 12
17
Illustration 13
18
19
Troubleshooting & Maintenance
TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
Symptom
Solution
The green LED does not illuminate
when power is applied.
Re-check the wiring diagram for the
signal output that is being used and
verify that the wiring is correct.
Verify that the DC supply that is being
used is capable of producing at least 12
VDC.
Make sure that the cable that is soldered
to the DIN connector inside of the sensor
enclosure is plugged into the connector
opposite to the programmable jumper.
The readings obtained from the
electronic output do not agree with
the readings shown on the printed
flow rate scale.
Make sure that the programmable
jumper is in the correct position for the
signal output that is being used and
verify that the wiring is correct.
The green LED illuminates, but no
readings are obtained from the
sensor’s electronic output.
Re-check the wiring diagram for the
signal output that is being used and
verify that the wiring is correct.
Make sure that the cable from the
sensor assembly is plugged into the
connection on the signal conditioning
board located near the sensor inlet.
When the flow rate in the systems
changes, the follower and electronic
output do not respond.
20
Remove the flow sensor from the hydraulic systems and inspect the internals
to see if anything has caused them to
become jammed. Make sure that the 200
mesh, 74 micron filtration required of
the flow sensor is being observed.
Troubleshooting & Maintenance
TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
Malfunction: Magnet follower sticks in mid-scale and will not return
to the “no flow” position.
Possible Cause:
Corrective Action:
Horizontal/Vertical Mount
Disassemble and inspect meter for
contamination. Install proper filtration or
problem may reoccur.
Particulate, thread seal tape, rust or
other foreign matter is holding the
internal parts from returning.
Horizontal/Vertical Mount
A surge or shock in the fluid flow
moved the internal magnet faster then
the external follower could follow,
thus separating the follower from the
magnet.
Remove cover and manually slide
follower until it re-couples with internal
magnet.
Malfunction: Meter scale reading is off an equal amount at all points
and the magnet follower still moves freely.
Possible Cause:
Corrective Action:
Reading the scale using the top or
bottom edge of the magnet follower.
Be sure to read the scale using the black
reference line which runs around the
magnet follower.
Possible Cause:
Corrective Action:
Fluid being monitored may not be
compatible with standard meter scale.
Standard meters are calibrated for .873
SP. Gr oil at 110°F (43°C) , water 1.0 sg at
70°F (21°C) and air at 1.0 sg 70°F (21°C),
and 100 PSIG (6.8 bar). Check your fluid
data for variance or call the factory for
assistance.
21
Disassembly
IMPORTANT: It is not necessary to remove window tube or window seals to clean
the meter. Note also how the meter disassembles for ease of reassembly.
WARNING: Shut down system before
removing meter from flow line.
Illustration 3
1. Use a clean dry cloth to remove all
foreign material from exterior of meter,
especially around threaded ends.
2. Remove meter from the flow line.
3. With the arrow on the scale pointing
upward, mount the meter in a vice.
See Illustration 3. Use the flats of the
inlet end porting when securing the
meter in the vice.
IMPORTANT: DO NOT wrench or tighten
vice on window tube.
4. Install a wrench across the flats
of the outlet end porting and
turn counterclockwise to loosen
assembly. Do not remove end
porting at this time.
5. Remove meter from vice. Hold
the meter so the end port that is
loose, is on top. Remove loose
end porting.
22
Illustration 4
Cleaning & Inspection
Note: If the inner cartridge is damaged or contaminated beyond repair, the complete meter can be
sent to the manufacturer for evaluation. The manufacturer will repair or replace parts as needed.
1. Inspect inner cartridge and body casing for contamination. If the inner
cartridge did not slide out freely, it may be a sign of contamination. Locate
and eliminate the source of contamination before reconnecting meter to the
system or the same problem will reoccur. It may be necessary to install finer
filtration or a magnetic filter in the system.
2. Soak inner cartridge assembly in a suitable cleaning solvent. Naptha or
Stoddard is recommended.
3. Remove parts from solvent. Use an air hose and/or scrub with a light brush
to remove any remaining contaminants. Remove any magnetized particles
from transfer magnet.
4. Inspect inner cartridge for scored or worn parts.
5. Remove any contaminants from inside body casing.
6. Clean and inspect seal assemblies (O-rings and seals) for nicks or cuts.
Replace as needed.
23
Properly filtered meters will provide years of trouble-free service. If the meter is
not properly filtered, it may be damaged and malfunction. Meter damage caused
by excessive contamination is not covered under warranty.
Contamination and Filtration
Recommended Filtration
The manufacturer recommends system filtration of at least 74 micron filter or
a 200 mesh screen. It has been found that if inadequate filtration has caused
meter failure, it will normally fail in the open position. Some systems may require
a magnetic filter.
IMPORTANT: Meter damage caused by excessive contamination is not covered
under warranty.
Contamination Sources
Fresh Fluid
When fresh fluid is stored in holding tanks, it may be contaminated with scale or
metal flakes from inside the tank. To prevent this type of contamination, be sure
to filter fresh fluid before adding to the system.
New Machinery Contamination
When building new machines, a certain amount of built-in contamination is
unavoidable. Typical built-in contamination consists of dust, dirt, chips, fiber,
sand, flushing solutions, moisture, weld splatters and pipe sealants. Flushing the
system before operation can reduce contamination, but cannot eliminate it totally.
Unless the system is flushed at a high velocity, some contamination will not be
dislodged until the system is in operation. System contamination can cause fluid
component malfunction.
Environmental Contamination
When performing routine maintenance, the system’s fluid is commonly exposed
to environmental contamination. Exercise caution during routine maintenance to
prevent this type of contamination. Be sure to change breather filter and systems
air filter regularly.
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Self-Generation Contamination
Self-generated contamination is a product of wear, cavitation, fluid breakdown
and corrosion. Systems that are carefully flushed, maintained, and have fresh
fluid added, mainly have self-generated contamination. In this case, proper
filtration can prevent fluid component malfunction.
C O M PA N Y
414.574.4300 | www.aw-lake.com
2440 W. Corporate Preserve Dr. #600 Oak Creek, WI 53154
©2016 AW-Lake Company. All rights reserved. Doc ID:FLOWTRANSMAN082516
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