temporary food establishments operator`s guide

temporary food establishments operator`s guide
 TEMPORARY FOOD
ESTABLISHMENTS
OPERATOR’S GUIDE
THURSTON COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH & SOCIAL SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 412 LILLY ROAD NE OLYMPIA, WA 98506 WWW.CO.THURSTON.WA.US/HEALTH/EHFOOD OFFICE: 360‐867‐2667 Food and Environmental Services Section FAX: 360‐867‐2600, TDD: 360‐867‐2603 April 2011 TEMPORARY FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES
This Operator’s Guide will assist you, the food service operator, to operate a successful temporary food facility at a public event, and to comply with requirements of the Washington State Food Code and the policies and procedures of the Thurston County Public Health and Social Services Department (Health Department). Individuals or groups planning to sell or give away food at a public event are required to obtain a current Temporary Food Service Permit. Temporary event food service requires flexibility and consideration to protect public health. Booth construction, equipment setup, personnel hygiene, food preparation location(s), and food safety practices must be planned carefully. This guide should assist temporary food operators and their employees meet food safety requirements and minimize the potential spread of foodborne illness while operating food service at organized public events. While the same food handling and sanitation practices apply at a temporary food facility, as at a permanent food facility, there are some differences. Several of these differences are addressed in this temporary food operator’s guide. Those responsible for setting up the temporary food establishment and the operation need to be familiar with the information in this guide and know how to apply it to their operation. Please review this document. We recommend keeping a copy available at your temporary event. NOTE: Temporary food establishments that do NOT meet the minimum requirements as written in
the temporary food policy and procedures; along with this Operator’s Guide, will need to apply for
a mobile food facility permit (i.e. vehicle/trailer, push carts, or moveable buildings).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Contents DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................................................................. 3 PERMITTING PROCEDURES, EXEMPTIONS, FEES .......................................................................................................... 5 PERSONEL HYGIENE AND FOOD SAFETY KNOWLEDGE ................................................................................................ 7 HAND WASHING ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 PHYSICAL FACILITIES AND STRUCTURES ....................................................................................................................... 8 COMMISSARY ................................................................................................................................................................ 9 FOOD STORAGE & ICE ................................................................................................................................................. 10 FOOD PREPARATION AND PROTECTION .................................................................................................................... 11 FOOD TEMPERATURE CONTROLS ............................................................................................................................... 12 EQUIPMENT AND UTENSILS ........................................................................................................................................ 14 WATER SOURCE, WASTE WATER & SOLID WASTE ..................................................................................................... 15 WAREWASHING FACILITIES AND SANITIZING ............................................................................................................. 16 INSPECTIONS AND ENFORCEMENT............................................................................................................................. 17 Page | 2 DEFINITIONS The following definitions are used in this Operator’s Guide: APPROVED means acceptable to the REGULATORY AUTHORITY based on a determination of conformity with principles, practices, and generally recognized standards that protect public health. CATERING OPERATION means a person contracted to prepare food in an approved food establishment for final cooking or service at another location. COMMISSARY means an approved food establishment where food is stored, prepared, portioned, or packaged for service elsewhere. (e.g., approved kitchen facility) CONSUMER means a person who is a member of the public, who takes possession of food, is not functioning in the capacity of an operator of a food establishment or food processing plant, and does not offer the food for resale. HEALTH DEPARTMENT means the local regulatory authority or authorized representative having jurisdiction over the Temporary Food Establishment. MULTIPLE TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT means a series of single temporary food events, as defined by TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT, where each event shall not last more than twenty‐one (21) consecutive days in conjunction with an organized public event using a fixed menu. Permits are valid for the calendar year or until the last scheduled event. PERMIT means the document issued by the regulatory authority that authorizes a person to operate a food establishment. PERSON‐IN‐CHARGE (PIC) means the individual present at a food establishment who is responsible for the operation at the time. POTLUCK means an event where: 1.
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People are gathered to share food People attending are expected to bring food to share. There is no compensation provided to people for bringing food to the event. There is no charge for any food or beverage provided at the event; and The event is not conducted for commercial purposes. PRIVATE EVENT means a private gathering restricted to members and guests of members of a family, organization, or club; where the event is not open to the general public; and where food is provided without compensation. Page | 3 PUBLIC EVENT means an organized event which is: (a) Advertised in any way to the public (i.e. flyers, banners, articles, radio, etc.), or other incentives are offered for the public to attend, and (b) Where large numbers of persons may gather or participate at a given location for a specific purpose that is self limited in connection with events such as fairs, carnivals, public exhibitions, celebrations, tasting events, trade shows, sporting events, bazaars, concerts, fundraising activities or other approved events that includes food service. Each event must have a defined start and stop date, with the event not to exceed twenty‐one (21) consecutive calendar days. SEWAGE means liquid waste containing animal or vegetable matter in suspension or solution and may include liquids containing chemicals in solution. TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT means a food establishment: 1. Operating at a fixed location, with a fixed menu, for not more than twenty‐one consecutive days in conjunction with a single event or celebration, such as a fair or festival; or 2. Operating not more than three days a week at a fixed location, with a fixed menu, in conjunction with an approved, recurring, organized event, such as a farmers market. TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT does not include: 1. Permanent location and food service, or the intention of permanent location and food service. (i.e. restaurant) 2. A temporary establishment that offers only commercially prepared and packaged foods that is not potentially hazardous and requires no preparation or handling. 3. A produce stand that offers only whole, uncut fresh fruits and vegetables. 4. A private home where food is prepared and/or served for private family, religious, or charitable functions where the public is NOT invited or allowed. 5. The premises of a church, temple, synagogue or other location where food is normally prepared and/or served for private family, religious or charitable functions to which the public (other than members of the organizations) is not invited and where food is provided without compensation. 6. A push cart, vehicle, trailer, or other mobile food service establishment permitted for permanent operation by the Health Department. TIME/TEMPERATURE CONTROL FOR SAFETY FOOD means a food that requires time/temperature control for safety to limit pathogenic microorganism growth or toxic formation. WAREWASHING means the cleaning and sanitizing of utensils and food‐contact surfaces of equipment. Page | 4 PERMITTING PROCEDURES, EXEMPTIONS, FEES PERMITING: Individuals or organizations, who decide to serve food at a public event, should obtain a copy of this Operator’s Guide to use as a reference as they complete their application for a temporary food service permit. Applications may be found by visiting our office or website: 412 LILLY ROAD NE OLYMPIA, WA 98506 360‐867‐2667, (TDD: 360‐867‐2603) Office Hours M‐F 8:00 am to 4:00 pm www.co.thurston.wa.us/health/ehfood Temporary food permits are issued in one of three operational categories and each has their own separate application form; TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS, MULTIPLE TEMPORARY ESTABLISHMENTS and BLANKET TEMPORARY EVENT. If these applications are not in conjunction with an organized public event, they will not qualify as a temporary food permit. In cases such as these, the applicant(s) would need to seek approval as a mobile food unit, pushcart, or moveable building. Applications shall be legible, accurate and completed in their entirety. Temporary food permit fees, which are listed on the applications, are determined by the level of risk posed by the types of food being served or offered for sale to the public and the extent of food preparation being done onsite; LOW RISK and MODERATE/HIGH RISK FOODS. Thus, it’s critical we get the entire list of food served and the extent of meal preparation needed. All food service related requirements and health standards must be in compliance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Food Code Chapter 246‐215. Low Risk means a temporary food establishment serving the items listed below: a. Shelf‐stable food, produced in an APPROVED facility, portioned and served at the event (e.g., confections or baked items made by the applicant); b. Hot dogs or similarly preserved meat‐based products that are prepared and packaged at a FOOD PROCESSING PLANT, are labeled by the manufacturer as “fully cooked” or “ready to eat”, and will not have TIME/TEMPERATURE CONTROL FOR SAFETY FOOD added to it, nor require extensive preparation; c. Espresso drinks (non‐blended); d. Non‐prepackaged frozen confections, such as scooped hard ice cream, gelato, or yogurt; e. Raw animal protein items to be further cooked/prepared by the consumer, and pre‐portioned at an APPROVED facility, that last up to three (3) days per week in conjunction with a reoccurring PUBLIC EVENT (e.g., farmers’ market); f. Any other foods deemed to be low risk by the department (requires supervisor approval). Moderate and High Risk means a temporary food activity serving TIME/TEMPERATURE CONTROL FOR SAFETY FOOD, which includes (but is not limited to): a. Burgers, soups, grilled items, fried items, or cooking raw protein products; b. Soft‐serve frozen confections; c. Salads, sandwiches, cut fruit or vegetables; d. Blended drinks made on‐site. Page | 5 The applicant or person‐in‐charge (PIC) must sign the bottom of the application acknowledging that they read this Operator’s Guide and/or understand the food safety standards, and agree to comply with all temporary food service requirements. Failure to follow these requirements may result in suspending of the temporary food permit or closure of the booth if the applicant or PIC is not able to meet compliance in a timely manner. The review is primarily based on the menu, method of food preparation, and the type of facility to prepare and serve the food. An Environmental Health Specialist will review the application and follow‐up with the applicant regarding questions and any necessary changes. Once your application is approved, a permit will be issued, usually with conditions, specific to the menu and facility according to the submitted application. Thus, it is important to serve only those foods that are specified on your permit. Last minute menu changes must be approved by the Health Department. APPLICATIONS TO THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT MUST BE SUBMITTED AT LEAST 14 DAYS BEFORE YOU PLAN TO OPERATE. APPLICATIONS RECEIVED LESS THEN 48 HOURS BEFORE THE SCHEDULED EVENT MAY NOT BE ACCEPTED. EXEMPTIONS: The REGULATORY AUTHORITY may exempt an individual or organization from the provisions of WAC 246‐215‐200(1) to operate without a temporary food permit, provided that the individual or organization DOES NOT USE ANY FOOD PREPARED IN A RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN OR OTHER NONAPPROVED FACILITY and the types of food served are limited to the following non‐potentially hazardous foods: popcorn, cotton candy, dried herbs/spices, machine‐crushed ice drinks with approved ice, whole roasted peppers, caramel apples, individual samples of sliced fruits/vegetables and commercial processed ice cream, or other foods as approved by this department. Those requesting an exemption must submit a written application and fees at least fourteen (14) calendar days before providing food service at the event. The application must include properly prepared plans and specifications of the food service facilities and equipment if the regulatory authority requires it for approval. A temporary food service permit is NOT required for vehicles/trailers, push carts, or moveable buildings, if already permitted by the Health Department as a mobile food establishment (an annual permit). CATERING OPERATIONS‐ Caterers are NOT exempt from temporary food permits even though they may currently posses a permit to conduct food service for only contracted catered events. Caterers who choose to operate at a public event as a temporary food service operation SHALL submit a temporary food application and receive a permit prior to the event. FEES –TEMPORARY FOOD SERVICE: •
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Fee amount is based on the level of risk associated with the type of menu offered for sale or offered for consumption by the public. Refer to the temporary food application to determine the current fee amount due upon submitting the application. No refund of fees for permitted days of food service left unused. Temporary food establishments that use off‐site approved food facilities for food preparation may require an additional health inspection. The temporary food applicant is responsible for the fees accrued from this inspection. Page | 6 PERSONEL HYGIENE AND FOOD SAFETY KNOWLEDGE 9
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No smoking, eating or drinking is allowed while working in the food booth Hand sinks must be fully operational prior to start of food preparation Cashiers and other workers handling money must not handle food without washing hands between activities HYGIENE: Food service workers shall maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness and shall conform to good hygiene practices during all working periods. Workers shall have clean outer garments and aprons. Workers shall not touch hair or skin when working with food. Everyone involved in the preparation and service of food, including management, must use effective hair control. This can be accomplished with hats, hairnets, or by tying back long hair. The use of hair spray alone is not sufficient. Only healthy workers will prepare and serve food. Anyone who shows symptoms of a disease such as nausea, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, sore throat, jaundice, excessive coughing and sneezing, etc., cannot work with food until they are well. Anyone with open sores or infected cuts on the hands should not work with food unless the affected area are bandaged and gloved. Only authorized food workers are allowed in the preparation area. Visitors, non‐workers, other family members, small children, and animals must be excluded. Food workers shall wash their hands before starting to work with food: clean equipment and utensils, or unwrapped single‐service and single use articles. Also, wash hands after handling anything dirty; touching bare human body parts; after sneezing, coughing, using a handkerchief or disposable tissues,; using tobacco, eating, or drinking; when switching between working with raw and ready‐to‐eat food; and after engaging in other activities that contaminate the hands. FOOD WORKER CARDS: At least one person with a current Washington State issued food worker card must be present in the temporary food establishment at all times. For food worker class time schedule or questions, please call 360‐867‐2665. The fees for a food worker card are $10.00 for an original card and $5.00 for a replacement card. Keep copies or original food worker cards available inside the booth for inspection. The applicant or main contact of a temporary food establishment should have knowledge of the food code prior to completing the application and shall require the Peron‐In‐Charge (PIC) of the temporary food establishment to obtain a valid food worker card prior to submitting the temporary food application. The PIC shall demonstrate knowledge of the food code and is responsible for compliance with the food code requirements and regulations. It is recommended that ALL food workers have current food worker cards. We recommend that the PIC have a copy of this operator’s guide at the temporary food booth for all workers to read and understand prior to start of the event. You can now take your Food Worker Card test on‐line!
www.FoodWorkerCard.wa.gov Page | 7 Languages include: Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Cambodian HAND WASHING Proper hand washing is critical to prevent foodborne illness. Hands must be washed before starting work, after handling raw meat, after using the restroom, and any other times hands become soiled. The hand wash station must be set up prior to beginning food preparation or service, and shall be located so it is easily accessible and convenient for all temporary food workers. FACILITIY: A hand wash station is required at all Temporary Food Establishments that have open food products, including establishments that are sampling food. Required items: 1. A five‐gallon or larger insulated container kept supplied with warm water for handwashing delivered through a continuous‐flow spigot or sprout. (No push button spigots) 2. A container for waste water retention (i.e. 5 gallon bucket), which must be disposed of into an approved sewer or wastewater system once full. 3. Hand soap and paper towels (sanitizers DO NOT replace hand washing). Hand washing facilities MUST be checked frequently and restocked as needed. PHYSICAL FACILITIES AND STRUCTURES RESTROOMS: •
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Approved toilet facilities MUST be provided within 200 feet of each temporary food facility and supplied with soap, paper towels and warm running water. When portable toilets are provided, they MUST be accompanied with an adequate number of outside hand washing stations equipped with soap and paper towel dispensers and garbage receptacles. FOOD BOOTH CONSTRUCTION: •
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The food preparation area shall have a booth designed AND constructed to protect from cross contamination and security, including but not limited to dirt, dust, inclement weather, and unauthorized personnel from gaining access into the temporary food booth. A roof, awning, canopy or other top covering, impermeable to weather, over the entire food preparation, service, clean‐up, and storage area, is required. DON’T FORGET THE ANCHORS! Two side walls (recommended), which will reduce the entry of dust, dirt and exclude non‐authorized personnel from accessing the booth. The front service wall shall be a counter, half‐wall or table draped to the floor. The back wall may be open for employee access or solid wall if necessary. Adequate and covered lighting shall be provided for all events that occur at dusk or at night. Page | 8 COMMISSARY A commissary is an approved food establishment where food is stored, prepared, portioned, or packaged for service elsewhere. For example, if you are selling food at a park and your menu requires advance food storage, preparation, cooking or packaging that cannot be completed at the park, then it MUST be done at an approved off‐site commissary. It could also be a location where you can take dirty dishes, equipment and utensils to be washed, rinsed and sanitized. The equipment needed at a commissary depends entirely on the things you are proposing to do there. Getting approval for your commissary: •
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If possible, start with a food facility already permitted by the Health Department. Describe in detail the activities or food preparation that will happen at the commissary, as well as the equipment that will be used at the commissary. If your proposed commissary is not already permitted, additional fees may be charged to evaluate it depending on what you are proposing to do there. Complete the commissary agreement included with the temporary food application. TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT SETUP EXAMPLE
Page | 9 FOOD STORAGE & ICE o All food and beverages must be stored and prepared at an approved location. o All food must be from an approved commercial source or approved by the Health Department. It shall be safe, unadulterated, and honestly presented. o
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All ingredients must come from an approved retail source and remain free from contamination. RAW MILK OR ICE MADE FROM HOME IS NOT ALLOWED. Pre‐packaged food sold directly to the public must be prepared and packaged at an approved food facility using only food grade materials. Home canned foods are not allowed. If packaged or canned food products are prepared off‐site at a licensed Washington Department of Agriculture facility and sold at a public event, provide a copy of the license and have it available at the event for verification. All packaged foods shall be labeled in accordance with FDA guidelines (product name, contact info, etc.) Food containers or packaging must be clearly labeled. Shipping tags must be provided for all shellfish. CONSUMER ADVISORY: When undercooked meats, eggs, dairy products, seafood or unpasteurized juices are offered for sale as ready‐to‐eat, they must be disclosed as such in one of the following ways: • On the menu • On the label • Or on a clearly visible sign, such as: “Cider is raw” or Juice is squeezed from raw fruit/vegetables” and include a health reminder “consuming raw or undercooked foods may increase your risk of foodborne illness.” What about ICE! Yes…ice is defined as a food source. All ice used for cold holding or consumption must be from an approved source. Ice and ice chests may be used to keep food cold provided:
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Foods are pre‐chilled to below 41˚F or below before placing them in the ice; Insulated coolers are used when transporting food with ice or ice packs inside the chest; Food product must be completely surrounded by ice at or above the level of the highest food stored inside the cooler or display case; You must provide enough ice at all times to maintain food temperature of 41˚F; Ice used for refrigeration cannot be used for human consumption, including beverages; Store prepackaged foods (i.e. sandwiches) in sealed containers rather than in direct contact with ice to prevent contamination from melting ice water; Unpackaged food may not be stored in direct contact with undrained ice; Raw foods must be stored in separate ice coolers from ready‐to‐eat foods. A thermometer is placed inside the insulated coolers to monitor temperatures. Coolers filled with too much food and little ice is not acceptable. Plan ahead and bring plenty of ice chests filled with ice to adequately maintain perishable foods at 41˚F or below. During the warmer months, checking the weather forecast may determine how much ice is necessary during a public event if the event lasts more than 4 hours. Page | 10 FOOD PREPARATION AND PROTECTION FOOD PREPARATION: •
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Adequate facilities shall be provided at the temporary food establishment for all necessary food preparation steps. All food preparation shall occur INSIDE the temporary food facility enclosure. All potentially hazardous food which is pre‐cooked and pre‐cooled off‐site for service at the temporary food service event must be prepared at an approved food establishment or commissary. Use of an off‐
site facility requires a Commissary Agreement form completed and turned in with the application. Home prepared foods are NOT allowed. All foods must be prepared and stored in an approved facility. Fruits and vegetables must be pre‐washed in an approved location prior to cutting or slicing them (such as in a food preparation sink at an approved facility), unless specifically approved to do so on‐site by the Health Department. Use commercially prepared food products such as canned chili or store‐bought salads in order to minimize preparation steps required on‐site. Only those food items requiring limited preparation shall be prepared on‐site. Foods requiring multiple steps or extensive hand contact are prohibited from sale or distribution. Always use disposable gloves or utensils when assembling or preparing ready‐to‐eat foods. Gloves worn must be changed once contaminated. Hands must be washed between glove changes. BARE HAND CONTACT WITH
READY-TO-EAT FOODS IS
PROHIBITED
FOOD PROTECTION: •
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NO SMOKING , EATING, OR DRINKING IS ALLOWED WHILE WORKING IN THE BOOTH. All food (including ice) and food containers must be stored inside the temporary food facility. The only cooking allowed outside the booth is open‐air barbecue where food is in direct contact with heat. Provide pallets, boxes, tables or shelves so all food, utensils, and single service items can be stored at least 6 inches off the ground. Food shall be transported and stored in properly designed food‐grade containers and protected from potential contamination during transport. Chemicals such as liquid bleach, detergents and cleaning supplies must be stored in a separate area away from food preparation and display areas. Cover all foods to protect them from contamination. Self‐service containers must be protected by the use of sneeze guards. Minimize bare hand contact with food. Workers must use tongs, gloves, tissue paper, napkins, or other utensil when handling ready‐to‐eat foods. Provide a back‐up supply of clean spoons, scoops, tongs, and cutting boards. Separate clean utensils from soiled utensils by storing in different labeled containers. All food storage outside the temporary food establishment must be at approved locations. Condiments MUST be in single‐service packets, pump‐type containers, squeeze bottles or condiment containers with self‐closing lids to protect from potential contamination. Food prepared 12 or more hours BEFORE service increases the risk of temperature abuse. THINK AHEAD. Page | 11 FOOD TEMPERATURE CONTROLS Maintaining safe food temperatures is a primary concern for food service. Your establishment must provide adequate means for cooking, reheating, and hot and cold holding as needed. As an operator, you must have an accurate probe‐type thermometer to check food temperatures. It must have both a hot and cold scale (0˚F to 220˚F) for the widest use. Be sure to clean and sanitize before each use (The use of alcohol swabs is appropriate).
THE DANGER ZONE:
Except during preparation, TIME/TEMPERATURE CONTROL FOR SAFETY FOODS must be maintained at either 41۫ F (or lower), or at 140˚F (or higher). The DANGER ZONE is the temperature between these two temperatures. After any preparation at room temperature, foods must be cooked or returned to refrigeration as rapidly as possible. The total time that potentially hazardous food remains in the DANGER ZONE cannot exceed four hours. This includes all thawing, food preparation, cooking and cooling times. Foods found in the danger zone are subject to destruction or removal from sale and service. COOLING FOOD IS NOT ALLOWED IN A TEMPORARY FOOD ESTABLISHMENT
COLD HOLDING: •
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To cold hold, potentially hazardous (perishable) foods must be stored at temperatures of 41˚F or below. Absolutely NO room temperature storage of potentially hazardous foods. Provide sufficient ice chests (with plenty of ice) or refrigerators (recommended) for cold foods. Refer to the section of the guide on ICE (page 10) for further information about its use for cold holding and/or consumption. Cold holding containers must be pre‐chilled to 41˚F or less prior to placing ANY food for cold hold storage. Foods stored in refrigerated trucks should be stored in the coldest section away from entrances to maintain the proper temperatures. If using mechanical refrigeration units, confirm that adequate electrical supply is available and working. HOT HOLDING: •
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To hot hold, potentially hazardous foods must be stored at temperatures of 140۫ F or above at all times. Electrical equipment, propane stoves, grills or other approved units must be capable of holding foods at 140˚F or above. An adequate amount of sternos should be available to maintain food temperatures when using chafing dishes and hot holding cabinets. Before placing hot foods in a steam table, chafing dishes using water, or other type of hot holding method, the units should be heated to at least 140˚F. AT THE END OF EACH EVENT DAY, HOT PERISHABLE FOODS MUST BE DISCARDED. NO COOLING. Page | 12 COOKING TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS: MINIMUM COOKING INTERNAL TEMPERATURES:
PORK, BEEF, FISH, LAMB, (RAW) EGGS………...…….……..145˚F GROUND BEEF, COMMINUTED MEATS OR FISH…….…..155˚F POULTRY, STUFFED MEATS, CASSEROLES……….…….…….165˚F PLANT FOOD, COMMERCIALLY PROCESSED FOOD………140˚ F •
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Cooking temperatures shall be monitored by use of a stem-type thermometer or thermocouple capable of
measuring all proper food temperatures. Thermocouples are recommended for hamburger patties or other
thinly sliced meat products. Infrared thermometers are not acceptable for checking internal temperatures.
When cooking, it is ALWAYS safer to use pre-cooked, fully cooked and pasteurized products.
Operators must consult with the Health Department if considering cooking roasts to ensure compliance.
REHEATING FOOD:
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ALL potentially hazardous foods, which have been previously cooked and cooled at an APPROVED
FACILITY, must be rapidly re-heated for hot holding from 41˚ F to 165˚ F within 1 hour so that all parts of
the food reach 165˚ F for at least 15 seconds.
Food produced and packaged inside a commercial food processing plant (i.e. canned chili, bagged soups,
fully cooked beef, etc.) must be heated for hot holding from 41˚ F to140˚ F or above within 1 hour.
Crock pots, steam tables, bain-maries, chafing dishes, or other hot-holding devices CANNOT BE USED to
reheat foods. Must use equipment like microwaves, ovens, burners, or grills for reheating food.
Reheat food no more than one time. Discard after being hot held. Absolutely no cooling at the booth.
IMPORTANT: COOKED OR REHEATED FOOD MUST BE HOT HELD AT 140˚ F.
COOLING: (Only permitted in an approved kitchen facility with a commissary agreement)
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Cooling of potentially hazardous foods is prohibited at temporary food service facilities.
The only cooling allowed is at an off-site approved kitchen facility.
Freshly-cooked and hot-held foods not sold or used by the end of the day must be discarded.
USE OF LEFTOVERS IS NOT ALLOWED
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When cooling, use an ice water bath and stir frequently, or place the food in a shallow pan
with no more than 2 inches of product and store uncovered inside a commercial refrigerator.
THAWING: (Options #1 and 2 only permitted in an approved facility with a commissary agreement)
Thawing foods for temporary food events shall be done using one of the following methods:
1. In a commercial refrigerated unit at temperatures not to exceed 41˚F.
2. Under cold running water not to exceed 70˚F inside an approved food preparation sink.
3. Only foods less than 4 inches thick may be thawed by a continuous cooking process (i.e. frozen
hamburger patties, sausages, chicken breasts, etc.)
Remember To Check Your Temperatures Frequently During Your Operation Page | 13 EQUIPMENT AND UTENSILS Adequate equipment for maintaining potentially hazardous foods at required temperatures must be used. Operators need to be familiar with the performance of equipment and utensils under temporary or outdoor conditions by complying with the following: • All equipment must be clean, cleanable, made of non‐toxic components and in a state of good repair. • With exception to cooking equipment, all other equipment and utensils must be stored inside the booth. Uncovered cooking equipment and deep fryers are not allowed for use in rain or other adverse conditions. • Outside cooking equipment shall have an adequate separation barrier around it to prevent consumer injury. Rope off cooking equipment by at least 4 feet to protect the public. • Store all utensils at least 6 inches above the ground. Use tables, pallets, and crates or turn over empty boxes to store items on. • All food contact surfaces shall be made of durable and easily cleanable food grade materials. • Only single service articles (i.e. plates, forks, spoon, cups) for use by consumers are allowed at temporary food establishments. • Except when using a sneeze guard, service equipment must not be placed on front tables/counters, where food may be contaminated by customers. Serve food items from side or back booth tables. • Vehicles used for food transport must be kept clean and free of contaminants. • Use ice scoop when scooping ice for beverages. No dragging the cups along the ice to fill up. • To eliminate hand‐to‐hand contact with ready‐to‐eat foods, use disposable gloves or utensil. • Keep plenty of extra utensils and gloves onsite to last during all hours of operation or properly clean and sanitize utensils using methods described in the next section. • Equipment and utensils must be cleaned and sanitized at least every 4 hours. TIP: Storing in­use utensils (i.e. knives, scoops, etc.) inside temperature controlled food products is permitted OR placed inside a container of ice water in­between uses. If using ice, we recommend wiping utensils initially with a disposable towel if the utensil has a significant amount of food caked on it. Replenish the ice and water as needed and clean the utensils at least every 4 hours. Because of potential cross contamination, storing utensils directly inside the sanitizer bucket is NOT allowed. Page | 14 WATER SOURCE, WASTE WATER & SOLID WASTE WATER SOURCE: An adequate supply of potable water shall be available on site for cooking and drinking purposes; for cleaning and sanitizing equipment, utensils, and food contact surfaces; and for handwashing. ALL WATER MUST COME FROM AN APPROVED PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY
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City water supply (i.e. municipal water) and Public Water Systems (i.e. public well water) are approved sources for public water supplies. ¾
The water supply system and hoses carrying water must be constructed with approved food contact materials. ¾
The water supply must be installed to preclude the backflow of contaminants into the potable water supply. ¾
All hose and other connections to the potable water supply shall be maintained a minimum of 6” above the ground. Use only food grade hoses for filling water tanks. ¾
A supply of bottled drinking water or sanitary potable water storage tanks may be allowed if approved by the Health Department prior to the event if an approved water source is not available. ¾
Private wells shall NOT be accepted as a public water source. Use of a private well requires taking bacteriological samples and conducting an onsite well assessment at the property. Fees are applied in order to conduct these tasks, and there are no guarantees of approval. WASTEWATER DISPOSAL: The operator/applicant is responsible for the disposal of wastewater to a sanitary sewer system. •
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Wastewater shall be disposed in an approved wastewater disposal system. Wastewater may not be dumped onto the ground surface; into waterways; or into storm drains. Wastewater shall be collected and dumped into a leak proof container or sink drain designated for the collection of wastewater or into a toilet directed to a sanitary sewer. (Not portable toilets) Wastewater containers or tanks shall have a minimum capacity that is 15% greater than the potable water tanks. SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL: The operator/applicant is responsible for the disposal of their solid waste (garbage) to the proper area assigned for solid waste disposal. Solid waste must be stored in leak proof containers and disposed of properly. Double bagging is recommended. An adequate number of non‐absorbent, easily cleanable garbage containers should be provided both inside and outside of each temporary food establishment site. Dumpsters must be covered, rodent‐proof, and non‐absorbent. Grease must be disposed of properly and shall not be dumped onto the ground surface.
Page | 15 WAREWASHING FACILITIES AND SANITIZING WAREWASHING FACILITIES: All food contact items such as cooking equipment, storage containers, utensils, cutting boards, and service items must be properly WASHED, RINSED, SANITIZED, AND AIR DRIED to effectively kill germs. •
The operator/applicant of a temporary food establishment must ensure access within two hundred feet to a three‐compartment sink with approved drain boards and an adequate supply of hot and cold running water to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils when: 1. Equipment or utensils are reused on site; or 2. The temporary food establishment operates for two or more consecutive days; except 3. The Health Department may approve an alternative utensil cleaning method when three‐
compartment sinks with drain boards are not available and no health hazard will result. (i.e. bus tubs, buckets or temporarily plumbed three‐compartment sink) Several temporary food establishments may share a warewashing facility if it is centrally located and adjacent to all of the sharing facilities. This requirement may be waived or modified by the Health Department when limited food preparation occurs (i.e. hotdogs); or additional clean utensils are available and utensil washing takes place at an approved commissary or servicing area. •
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PLEASE NOTE…HOMES ARE NOT AN APPROVED LOCATION FOR WAREWASHING WASH­­­­­ ­­­Hot soapy water. RINSE­­­­­­­­Warm clear/clean water SANITIZE­­ (i.e. 50­100 ppm chlorine) AIR DRY­­­­­­Disposable towels ok/ no cloths SANITIZING: Wiping cloths used for wiping counters and tabletops must be clean and used for no other purpose and available at all times during food preparation and food service. Re‐soak and ring out wiping cloths in sanitizing solution as needed. If you choose to use liquid bleach (most common) as the sanitizer, add one teaspoon (1/2 cap) of bleach to one gallon of cold water. A separate bucket must be used for raw meats only. On food contact surfaces, allow surfaces to air dry prior to use. Empty and rinse sanitizer buckets at least every 2 hours and replace with fresh sanitizer. FLIES TEND TO AVOID SURFACES THAT HAVE BEEN WIPED WITH BLEACH WATER. You must have test strips to determine the correct concentration of sanitizer. Be sure the test strips purchased are appropriate for the type of sanitizer being used; •
CHLORINE (white test strips that turn light blue) to a concentration of 50‐100 ppm . •
QUATERNARY (yellow test strips that turn green) to a concentration of 200 ppm. DUE TO POTENTIAL CROSS CONTAMINATION STORE CHEMICALS IN SEPARATE AREAS CAUTION!!!!! AWAY FROM FOOD PREPARATION, STORAGE, SERVICE AND DISPLAY AREAS. Page | 16 INSPECTIONS AND ENFORCEMENT Temporary food establishments will be inspected based on the Health Department’s risk assessment. The risk assessment takes into account menu items and preparation, volume of food service, length of an event and the operator’s level of knowledge. As an operator or applicant, you must first decide on the following list of items PRIOR to seeking a temporary food establishment permit: •
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The complete menu, including beverages The booth structure (whether provided by the event sponsor or the vendor) The required equipment , including a handwash facility Methods to maintain and measure hot and cold product temperatures How all foods will be transported and stored Where and how equipment clean up will be conducted Who will be responsible during operation (A person‐in‐charge shall be assigned during all hours of operation and shall demonstrate knowledge of the food code and possess a copy of their food worker card.) During the inspection, any violation noted MUST be corrected immediately. The operator and PIC of a temporary food establishment must comply with the requirement of WAC 246‐215 Food Code, except as otherwise outlined in this guide. The Health Department may modify specific requirements for physical facilities when no imminent hazard will result, OR may impose additional requirements to protect against health hazards related to the operation of the temporary food service establishment and may: •
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LIMIT PREPARATION STEPS; PROHIBIT SOME MENU ITEMS; and/or RESTRICT THE MODE OF OPERATION WHEN FACILITIES OR EQUIPMENT ARE INADEQUATE TO PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH Permit suspensions will occur for the following violations: 1. Vendors without valid permits will be issued a “cease and desist” and the establishment will be closed immediately, unless otherwise permissible based on the complexity of the menu and operation. (In such cases, an investigation fee will be applied to the permit fee) 2. Booths that do not have a functional hand sink. 3. Foods from unapproved sources (i.e. foods stored or prepared from home, illegal vendors, or other unapproved sources). 4. Conditions presenting an imminent health hazard. Food unsafe for human consumption may be reconditioned, impounded, destroyed or denatured. THE BOTTOM LINE.…taking protective measures during food transportation, preparation, cooking, serving and cleaning not only helps protect the food from potential cross contamination and/or temperature abuse, but it allows your temporary food service operation to operate successfully, and most importantly, it reduces the likelihood of food borne illnesses occurring at public events. YOUR COOPERATION IS GREATLY APPRECIATED!
Page | 17 Thurston County Public Health & Social Services Department Environmental Health Division Food and Environmental Services Section 412 Lilly Rd NE Olympia, WA 98506 Ph 360.867.2667 Fax 360.867.2600 TDD 360.867.2603 Document produced March 2011 by Jerry Caird, R.S., et al To request this document in an alternative format, please contact the Food and Environmental Section at the numbers above. Cover image used under license from iStockPhoto LP Page | 18 
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