PP2271 Triple IR Flame Detector IG Issue 3.indd

PP2271 Triple IR Flame Detector IG Issue 3.indd
PP2271/Issue 3
Technical Data
Supply voltage
Quiescent current
Alarm current
Switch-on surge current
Power-up time
Remote LED voltage
Remote LED current
Fire alarm threshold
Operating range
Field of view/angle of reception
Operating temperature
Storage temperature
Relative humidity
IP rating
Housing material
Size and weight
Cable gland entries
14–28V DC
2.2mA
4.2mA
30mA (peak) for 15mS
4 seconds
0–28V DC
limited to 2mA
Analogue value 55 returned after 10Hz fl ame
fl icker for 1.5 seconds
25m for 0.1m² n-heptane fi re
35m for 0.2m² n-heptane fi re
45m for 0.4m² n-heptane fi re
90° Cone
–10°C to +55°C
–20°C to +65°C
95% (no condensation)
65
Die cast zinc alloy (ZA 12)
142 x 108 x 82mm, 2 kg
2 x 20mm
XP95 Triple IR Flame Detector
Installation & Maintenance Guide
Approval and Regulatory Information
0832
010an/13
010an/14
14
CD0006/FLAME
EN54-10
Flame Detectors - Point Detectors
Additional Equipment
Flame detector weathershield, part no 29600-206
Flame detector weathershield for fl ameproof version, part no 29600-228
Flame sensor test unit, part no 29600-226
Flame detector bracket, part no 29600-203
General
The XP95 Triple Infra-red (IR) Flame Detectors, part no 55000-020 and 55000-021 are
designed for use where open fl aming fi res may be expected. They are sensitive to lowfrequency, fl ickering infra-red radiation emitted by fl ames during combustion. False alarms
due to such factors as fl ickering sunlight are avoided by a combination of fi lters and signal
processing techniques.
Response to Flames
In quiescent condition, ie, in the absence of a fl ame, the detector returns an analogue
value of 25. When a fl ame is visible, the detector signals an alarm by increasing the analogue value returned to 55, usually within 1.5 seconds. The analogue value may continue to
rise until it reaches a pre-set maximum of 64.
In the alarm state the XP95 Flame Detector latches for 20 seconds, with the analogue value
decreasing to 25 once the fl ame is no longer detected.
Electrical Considerations
The XP95 IR Flame Detector is loop powered and needs no external supply. It is connected
to a control panel using either the XP95 or Discovery protocol. A remote LED alarm indicator
may be connected to the fl ame detector.
Sensor Window Contamination
It is important to keep the sensor window clean and checks should be carried out at
regular intervals–determined locally according to the type and degree of contamination
encountered–to ensure optimal performance of the fl ame detector. Although fl ames can
be detected when the window is contaminated, there may be a reduction of sensitivity as
shown in the table overleaf.
It is recommended that the fl ame detector is disabled when the window is being cleaned.
© Apollo Fire Detectors Limited 2014
36 Brookside Road, Havant, Hants, PO9 1JR, UK
Tel +44 (0) 23 9249 2412 Fax +44 (0) 23 9249 2754
www.apollo-fire.co.uk
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1
Contaminant
Typical percentage of
normal response
Water spray
75
Steam
75
Smoke
75
Oil fi lm
86
Salt water fi lm
86
Dry salt deposits
86
Table 1 Sensor window contamination
Applications for Flame Detectors
Flame detectors are used when detection is required to be unaffected by convection currents, draughts or wind; tolerant of fumes, vapours, steam, dust and mist; responsive to a
fl ame more than 25m away and fast reacting.
Typical applications examples are:
Functional Testing
When polled by a compatible panel or test set, the fl ame detector, in quiescent condition,
should return an analogue value of 25 nad input bits set to ‘0’.
If output bit 2 is set to logic 1 on two or more consecutive pollings, the red ‘FIRE’ LED on the
fl ame detector will illuminate.
If output bit 1 is set to 1 on two or more consecutive pollings the fl ame detector will perform
a self test. It does this by causing internal LEDs to fl icker in the field of view of the fl ame
detector, thus simulating the behaviour of fl ames.
If output bit 0 is set to 1 on two or more consecutive pollings the fl ame detector will switch
on a remote LED.
Finally, provided it is safe to do so, carry out a fl ame test using a fl ickering fl ame source,
such as a portable bunsen burner. A still, non-fl ickering fl ame will not produce a response
from the detector.
Maintenance Guide
The fl ame detector is designed to give years of trouble-free operation with minimal attention. However the periodic maintenance steps listed below are essential to maintain reliable fi re protection.
• agriculture – grain and malt processing, animal feed manufacture
1. Inform all appropriate personnel of intention to work on the fl ame detector.
• aircraft hangars
2. Disable any automatic systems that may be activated by the fl ame detector if not
required as part of the maintenance check.
• automotive industry – spray booths, parts manufacture
• chipboard and MDF manufacture
• power plants
• printing
Alarms
Extinguishers
Control
Audio/Visual
Gas systems
Plant stops
Auto diallers
Water sprays
Dampers/doors
3. Check that the fl ame detector’s control panel is functioning correctly and shows no
faults.
• transformer stations
Applications and locations to avoid:
4. Inspect the detector viewing window for any build-up of dust or other contaminants
on the optical surface. If necessary clean the optical surface with a cotton wipe wet with
commercial liquid glass cleaner. Rinse with clean water and dry with a clean cloth.
• ambient temperatures above 55°C
• close proximity to cell phone and CB transmitters
• sunlight falling directly onto IR optics
The detector specification for performance is with a clean optical sensor window. Contaminants like dust, oil and paint will reduce sensitivity.
• exposure to severe rain and ice
5. Ensure the detector still has a clear line of sight of the area it is protecting and no obstacles obstruct its view.
• fl ickering or moving hot objects
6. Check that the detector is securely fitted.
• fl ood or spot lighting falling directly on IR optics
7. Visually check the exterior of the detector for any mechanical or corrosive damage.
• large amounts of fl ickering refl ections
8. Test the operation of the detector with either a portable fl ame sensor test unit or if practical a fl ickering yellow fl ame.
• large IR sources above 200°C – heaters, burners, fl are stacks
9. Reinstate any automatic system disabled during maintenance.
• microwave ovens and dryers
10. Inform all appropriate personnel on completion of the maintenance work and if necessary record this work.
• RF heaters
• obstructions to field of view
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Quantities Required and Positioning of Detectors
The number of detectors required and their positioning depends on:
• the anticipated size of the fl ame
• the distance of the fl ame from the detector
• the angle of view of the fl ame detector
The XP95 fl ame detector is designed to operate to Class 1 performance as defi ned in EN54:
Part 10. The detector will, therefore, detect a yellow fl ickering fl ame of approximately 0.1m²
or a clear fl ame of 0.25m² at 25m.
Fig 3 Mounting plate, supplied with detector, and optional bracket, part no 29600-203
In fact, the fl ame detector will detect fi res at distances of up to 40 metres, but the fl ame size
at such distances needs to be proportionally greater in order to be sure of reliable detection. Thus the yellow fl ickering fl ame that can be detected at 25m, provided that its size is
not less than 0.1m², will have to be 0.4m² in order to be detected at 40 metres. In a rectangular room the distance from the fl ame detector to the fi re is calculated by the formula:
The adjustable mounting bracket is used wherever it is necessary to adjust the viewing
angle up or down or left to right. It has two fi xing holes of 6.35mm diameter at 58mm
centres.
Flame detectors should be fitted to solid walls or to rigid constructions that do not move
and are not subject to vibration.
L² + W² + H²
In the example shown in Fig 1 the room in which the fl ame detector is to be installed measures 20m x 10m x 5m; the distance from the detector to the fl ame will therefore be:
Wiring
The fl ame detector has five connections: Line 1, Line 2, +Remote, –Remote and functional
earth/screen. The connections are accessed by removing the front plate of the fl ame
detector. The cable is passed through the gland at the base of the detector. See Fig 4 for
connection diagram.
20² + 10² + 5²
= 22.9m
Height
L2+
L1-
R+
R-
Fig 4 Flame detector wiring connections
Terminal Descriptions
1
+L2
+Line IN and OUT
Width
Terminals 6 to 8 are not used
Length
2
–L1
–Line IN and OUT
3
+R
+Remote LED
4
–R
–Remote LED
5
SCREEN
Functional Earth/Screen (Isolated)
Fig 1 Calculation of distance from detector to fl ame
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3
The fl ame detector has an angle of view of approximately 90°, as shown in the diagram
below.
CENTRELINEOFDETECTOR
—
n—
MÁFLAMESEEN
ATMINSTRAIGHTLINE
FROMFLAMEDETECTOR
DETECTIONOFMÁFLAME
addr
—
—
n—
MÁFLAMESEEN
ATMINSTRAIGHTLINE
FROMFLAMEDETECTOR
MÁFLAMENOTSEEN
ATMSINCEITISNOT
INTHEFIELDOFVIEWOF
THEFLAMEDETECTOR
n—
—
—
n—
n—
A complete list of address settings is shown in the following table.
DETECTIONOFMÁFLAME
—
n—
Address Setting
Before installing the fl ame detector it is necessary to set the address using the DIL switch,
which is accessed by removing the front cover, using a 5mm hexagonal key. 7 segments of
the switch are set to 0 or 1, using a small screwdriver or similar tool.
M
—
M
© Apollo Fire Detectors Limited 2000-2005/RHD
Fig 2 Angle of view of XP95 Flame Detector
The fl ame detector should be positioned at the perimeter of the room, pointing directly at
the area of the anticipated fl ame or at the centre of the area to be protected. If the detector cannot ‘see’ the whole of the area to be protected, one or more additional detectors
may be required.
The fl ame detector is not affected by normal light sources but should be positioned so that
sunlight does not fall directly onto the viewing window.
Loop Design
The XP95 fl ame detector is powered from the loop; it draws 2.2mA in quiescent state and
4.2mA in alarm. In order to determine the number of fl ame detectors that can be connected to a given loop, please refer to the Loop Calculation program, which can be
downloaded from the Apollo website or requested from Apollo’s Technical Sales department as a CD.
DIL switch
setting
1234567
addr
DIL switch
setting
1234567
addr
DIL switch
setting
1234567
addr
DIL switch
setting
1234567
addr
DIL switch
setting
1234567
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1000000
0100000
1100000
0010000
1010000
0110000
1110000
0001000
1001000
0101000
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
1101000
0011000
1011000
0111000
1111000
0000100
1000100
0100100
1100100
0010100
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1010100
0110100
1110100
0001100
1001100
0101100
1101100
0011100
1011100
0111100
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
1111100
0000010
1000010
0100010
1100010
0010010
1010010
0110010
1110010
0001010
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
1001010
0101010
1101010
0011010
1011010
0111010
1111010
0000110
1000110
0100110
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
1100110
0010110
1010110
0110110
1110110
0001110
1001110
0101110
1101110
0011110
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
1011110
0111110
1111110
0000001
1000001
0100001
1100001
0010001
1010001
0110001
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
1110001
0001001
1001001
0101001
1101001
0011001
1011001
0111001
1111001
0000101
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
1000101
0100101
1100101
0010101
1010101
0110101
1110101
0001101
1001101
0101101
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
1101101
0011101
1011101
0111101
1111101
0000011
1000011
0100011
1100011
0010011
101
102
103
104
105
1010011
0110011
1110011
0001011
1001011
106
107
108
109
110
0101011
1101011
0011011
1011011
0111011
111
112
113
114
115
1111011
0000111
1000111
0100111
1100111
116
117
118
119
120
0010111
1010111
0110111
1110111
0001111
121
122
123
124
125
126
1001111
0101111
1101111
0011111
1011111
0111111
Table 2 DIL switch address settings
We recommend that the address be set before the fl ame detector is mounted on the wall.
Sensitivity Setting
The eighth segment of the DIL switch referred to in the previous section is used to set the
sensitivity of the fl ame detector to class 1 or class 3. For most practical purposes the switch
should be set to class 1, the sensitivity required to detect fl ames as described in the section
‘Quantities required and positioning of detectors’.
In exceptional cases the fl ame detector may be set to class 3 operation in order to avoid
nuisance alarms being caused by radiation sources that are close to the detector and
cannot be moved.
To set the DIL switch to class 1, switch to position ‘1’. To set to class 3, switch to position ‘0’.
Installation
The fl ame detector is mounted using either the mounting plate, which is supplied with the
detector, or the adjustable mounting bracket, part no 29600-203, which is bolted to the
mounting plate.
The standard mounting plate (supplied) is used for horizontal viewing, eg, along corridors or
along the length of industrial processes or vertical viewing inside fume cupboards or over
hoppers. It has two fi xing holes of 8.5mm diameter at 74mm centres.
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