VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide Release 3.0

VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide Release 3.0
VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide
Release 3.0-3.2.7000
May 31, 2016
CONTENTS
1
About this Document
1.1 Validity of this Document
1.2 Audience . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Technical Support . . . .
1.4 Specifics of this Document
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2
3
3
3
3
2
Limitations
4
3
Integration Overview
3.1 VSP Integration with Mirantis Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Solution Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
6
7
4
Plugin Installation
4.1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Installing the Nuage Plugin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
10
11
5
Fuel Plugin Configuration
5.1 Configuring the Nuage Plugin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
14
6
Using Mirantis Fuel with VSP and OpenStack
6.1 Nuage VSP and Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
22
7
Troubleshooting
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VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide, Release 3.0-3.2.7000
Release: 3.0-3.2.7000
Issue: 1
Issue Date: May 31, 2016 Document
Number: 1
NUAGE NETWORKS
Nuage Networks and the Nuage Networks logo are trademarks of the Nokia group of companies. Nokia is a registered
trademark of Nokia Corporation. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks or trade
names of their respective owners.
The information presented is subject to change without notice.
Nokia Corporation / Nuage Networks assumes no responsibility for inaccuracies contained herein.
Copyright©2016 Nokia Corporation / Nuage Networks. All rights reserved.
CONTENTS
1
CHAPTER
ONE
ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT
•
•
•
•
Validity of this Document (page 3)
Audience (page 3)
Technical Support (page 3)
Specifics of this Document (page 3)
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VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide, Release 3.0-3.2.7000
For a complete list of applicable user documentation, see the Technical Publications section of the Release Notes for
your Nuage Networks software version.
1.1 Validity of this Document
Printed versions of this document may not be up to date. Only the Web version of this document is current.
1.2 Audience
This manual is intended for enterprise system administrators who are responsible for enterprise network configuration
and administrators for the Nuage VSP/VNS software.
1.3 Technical Support
If you purchased a service agreement for your Nuage Networks VSP/VNS solution and related products from a distributor or authorized reseller, contact the technical support staff for that distributor or reseller for assistance. If you
purchased an Alcatel-Lucent service agreement, contact your welcome center:
• https://www.alcatel-lucent.com/support
OLCS provides registered customers with access to technical support, software downloads, training, documentation,
literature, and other related assets for our products and solutions. For assistance with OLCS, including inability to
access, contact us as follows:
• Inside the U.S. and Canada: 1-866-582-3688, prompt 7.
• Outside the U.S.: 1-630-224-9000
• Via email: olcshelp@alcatel-lucent.com
1.4 Specifics of this Document
This document provides instructions for installing, configuring and using Nuage Networks plugin for Fuel.
Note: Mirantis and Mirantis Fuel are trademarks of Mirantis Corporation.
1.1. Validity of this Document
3
CHAPTER
TWO
LIMITATIONS
• Nuage Networks VSP includes a distributed routing and switching component called the VRS (Virtual Router
& Switch), which is based on Open vSwitch (OVS) and supports tunneling (VXLAN and GRE) to setup the
overlay network. This component replaces the standard OVS on the OpenStack compute node; therefore, you
must choose the “VLAN with networking segmentation” option in the Networking Setup portion of the plugin
configuration. Nuage Networks VSP supports VXLAN and GRE tunnels, but they are managed by the Nuage
Networks VRS instead of the standard OpenStack Compute OVS.
• The deployment of the Nuage Networks VSP requires the replacement of the standard OVS, and due to the tight
coupling between neutron and the default OVS, you may experience the following error when trying to add
additional OpenStack controller nodes to an existing deployment:
The following packages have unmet dependencies: openvswitch-switch :
Depends: openvswitch-common (= 2.3.1-1~u14.04+mos2)
This condition only occurs when an additional OpenStack controller node is added to an existing deployment, which is not very common. Adding OpenStack controllers to an existing setup is not supported in Nuage Network VSP plugin for Fuel 7.0 and will be in the next release (Fuel 8.0) [Reference:
https://bugs.launchpad.net/fuel/+bug/1511809]
• During the installation, the following test case “create mirror => update core repos” will fail. This is expected
and is due to the design of the Nuage Networks VSP and how it works with OpenStack neutron, where the
neutron-l3/dhcp agents are no longer needed after deploying the Nuage Networks VSP as the SDN solution.
• During the installation, the following test case “create mirror => update core repos” will fail. This is expected
and is due to the design of the Nuage Networks VSP and how it works with OpenStack neutron, where the
neutron-l3/dhcp agents are no longer need after deploying the Nuage Networks VSP as the SDN solution.
4
CHAPTER
THREE
INTEGRATION OVERVIEW
This section includes the following topics:
• VSP Integration with Mirantis Fuel (page 6)
– Terminology (page 6)
– Nuage Plugin Overview (page 6)
• Solution Overview (page 7)
– Virtualized Services Directory (VSD) (page 8)
– Virtualized Services Controller (VSC) (page 8)
– Virtual Routing and Switching (VRS) (page 8)
– Virtual Routing Services Gateway (VRS-G) (page 8)
– Nuage Networks OpenStack Neutron Plugin (Kilo) (page 8)
– OpenStack Heat Support for Nuage Extensions (page 8)
– OpenStack Horizon Support for Nuage Extensions (page 9)
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3.1 VSP Integration with Mirantis Fuel
3.1.1 Terminology
VSP Nuage Virtualized Services Platform which forms Nuage’s Software Defined Networking (SDN) solution
VSD Virtualized Services Directory: Policy and analytics engine of Nuage VSP
VSC Virtualized Services Controller :Control plane of Nuage VSP
VRS Virtualized Routing and Switching :Forwading plane of Nuage VSP
VRS-G Virtualized Routing Services Gateway
REST API Representational State Transfer API
CMS Cloud Management System
PAT Port Address Translation
VXLAN Virtual Extensible LAN: encapsulation protocol for running an overlay network on existing Layer 3 infrastructure
vport Virtual Port
3.1.2 Nuage Plugin Overview
Nuage plugin for Fuel provides automated deployment of Mirantis Openstack with the Nuage Networks Virtual Services Platform (VSP) that can be used by Mirantis OpenStack for implementing an OpenStack networking service.
The Nuage Networks Virtualized Services Platform (VSP) provides Software Defined Networking capabilities for
clouds of all sizes – from small private clouds to the largest public clouds in the world and makes the network as
readily consumable as compute resources. Nuage VSP is implemented as a non-disruptive overlay for all existing
virtualized and non-virtualized server and network resources. No proprietary or purpose-built hardware is required
since all components install in Docker containers, hypervisors or virtual machines.
Features:
• Highly scalable and efficient OpenStack networking service.
• Non-disruptive overlay for all existing virtualized and non-virtualized server and network resources.
• Public network access to virtual machine instances via PAT to Underlay feature and floating IP provisioning.
• Metadata agent proxy for handling metadata requests of clients in Openstack instance.
• Increased data throughput by load balancing and fault-tolerance through NIC aggregation.
Table 3.1: Licensing Information
Component
License
Nuage VSP
Fuel Plugin Nuage
Commercial
Apache 2.0
3.1. VSP Integration with Mirantis Fuel
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Requirements
The plugin has the following requirements for software and hardware:
Table 3.2: Requirements
Requirement
Version/Comment
Fuel
Nuage VSP
OpenStack
7.0
3.2 R4 or above ; with pre-installed VSD and VSC
Kilo. Production environments need to have at least
3 controllers as part of their OpenStack cluster in HA
mode.
3.2 Solution Overview
Nuage Networks Virtualized Services Platform (VSP) is a Software-Defined Networking (SDN) solution that provides
data center (DC) network virtualization and automatically establishes connectivity between compute resources upon
their creation. Leveraging programmable business logic and a powerful policy engine, the Nuage VSP provides an
open and highly responsive solution that scales to meet the stringent needs of massive multi-tenant DCs. The Nuage
VSP is a software solution that can be deployed over an existing DC IP network fabric.
The main components in the Nuage VSP solution are: Virtualized Services Directory (VSD) and Virtualized Services Directory Architect (VSD-A), Virtualized Services Controller (VSC), Virtual Routing and Switching (VRS)
and Virtual Routing and Switching Gateway (VRS-G). For OpenStack deployments, the solution has an OpenStack
Neutron-plugin that is included in the software download bundle provided by Nuage Networks (Reference link).
Fig. 3.1: Nuage VSP Topology
3.2. Solution Overview
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3.2.1 Virtualized Services Directory (VSD)
The Nuage VSD is a programmable policy and analytics engine. It provides a flexible and hierarchical network
policy framework that enables IT administrators to define and enforce resource policies in a user-friendly manner.
The VSD contains a multi-tenant service directory which supports role-based administration of users, compute, and
network resources. It also manages network resource assignments such as IP addresses and ACLs. For the purpose of
service assurance, the VSD allows the definition of sophisticated statistics rules such as collection frequencies, rolling
averages and samples, as well as Threshold Crossing Alerts (TCA). When a TCA occurs it will trigger an event that
can be exported to external systems through a generic messaging bus. Statistics are aggregated over hours, days and
months and stored in a Hadoop® analytics cluster to facilitate data mining and performance reporting. The VSD runs
as a number of processes in a virtual machine (VM) environment.
3.2.2 Virtualized Services Controller (VSC)
The Nuage VSC is the industry’s most powerful SDN controller. It functions as the robust network control plane
for DCs, maintaining a full view of per-tenant network and service topologies. Through the VSC, virtual routing and
switching constructs are established to program the network forwarding plane, the Nuage VRS, using the OpenFlow™
protocol. The VSC communicates with the VSD policy engine using Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol
(XMPP). An ejabberd XMPP server/cluster is used to distribute messages between the VSD and VSC entities. Multiple
VSC instances can be federated within and across DCs by leveraging MP-BGP.
3.2.3 Virtual Routing and Switching (VRS)
The Nuage VRS component is an enhanced Open vSwitch (OVS) implementation that constitutes the network forwarding plane. It encapsulates and de-encapsulates user traffic, enforcing L2-L4 traffic policies as defined by the VSD. The
VRS tracks VM creation, migration and deletion events in order to dynamically adjust network connectivity.
3.2.4 Virtual Routing Services Gateway (VRS-G)
The software-based VRS-G can be run in a dedicated bare-metal server or as a virtual machine, allowing the incorporation of bare-metal assets as virtualized extensions of the data center, as well as providing an exit gateway for the
DVRS’ overlay, floating-IP and shared-services traffic.
3.2.5 Nuage Networks OpenStack Neutron Plugin (Kilo)
The Nuage Neutron Plugin allows OpenStack to take advantage of this scale and flexibility. Unlike many other
OpenStack Networking plugins, the Nuage Neutron Plugin provides fully distributed L2 and L3 networking, including
L2 and L3 network isolation, without requiring centralized routing instances such as the Neutron L3 Agent. The Nuage
Neutron Plugin also allows connectivity between OpenStack defined networks and other cloud networks, permitting
users to deploy flexible network configurations, including routers and subnets, which are shared between OpenStack
and other Cloud Management Systems. This allows Cloud administrators unparalleled flexibility in deploying cloud
applications and migrating workloads and applications from one CMS to another.
3.2.6 OpenStack Heat Support for Nuage Extensions
Nuage VSP version 3.2R2 and higher support OpenStack Heat (Kilo) with Neutron supported APIs, and Nuage extensions including: VSD-managed subnet, Gateway and Application Designer.
3.2. Solution Overview
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3.2.7 OpenStack Horizon Support for Nuage Extensions
Nuage VSP version 3.2R2 provides Nuage extensions for OpenStack Horizon (Kilo). Supported extensions include:
Net Partition, VSD-Managed Subnet, Gateway and Application Designer.
3.2. Solution Overview
9
CHAPTER
FOUR
PLUGIN INSTALLATION
This section includes the following topics:
• Prerequisites (page 10)
• Installing the Nuage Plugin (page 11)
4.1 Prerequisites
Please follow the Mirantis user guide (https://docs.mirantis.com/openstack/fuel/fuel-7.0/user-guide.html) to create an
OpenStack cluster using Fuel and the Nuage Networks VSP 3.2 Installation Guide to setup the Nuage Networks VSP.
This guide assumes that you have already installed Fuel and that all of the OpenStack and Nuage Networks VSP nodes
are discovered and functional, including the Nuage Networks VSD (standalone or cluster), VSC(s) and VRS-G.
It is important to note that for this guide and to install the Nuage Networks Plugin you will need the Nuage Networks
VRS and neutron packages for your operating system (rpm/deb). Please contact your Nuage Networks account team
to obtain the URL to download the Nuage Networks VSP Software Packages and Installation guides. Here is a list of
all the files needed prior to the installation of the Nuage Networks Plugin:
• nuage-openstack-heat_*.*
• nuage-openstack-horizon_*.*
• nuage-openstack-neutron_*.*
• nuage-openstack-neutronclient_*.*
• nuagenetlib_*.*
• nuage-metadata-agent_*.*
• nuage-openstack-upgrade-*.tar.gz (needed for step 4.2.6)
On the Nuage Networks VSD, you must create an an admin user for OpenStack, you can use the default username/password in the Installation guide or create a new one “osadmin” for example. However, before proceeding
to the next section, you must add that user to the following groups: CMS Group, Operator Group and Root Group.
See the Nuage Networks VSP Install Guide for steps on how to assign a user to a group.
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4.2 Installing the Nuage Plugin
1. Make sure the Fuel Master node is installed and running.
Please refer to the official Mirantis
user guide for details (https://docs.mirantis.com/openstack/fuel/fuel-7.0/user-guide.html).
Then, download the Nuage plugin from the Fuel Plugins Catalog that can be found in the following location:
https://www.mirantis.com/products/openstack-drivers-and-plugins/fuel-plugins/
Please refer to the Nuage Networks VSP Install Guide for steps on how to assign a user to a group.
2. Copy the rpm downloaded at previous step to the Fuel Master node and install the plugin:
scp nuage-openstack-fuel-plugin-3.2-3.2.7000-1.noarch.rpm <Fuel Master
Node IP>:/tmp/
3. Log into the Fuel Master node and install the plugin:
ssh <Fuel Master Node IP>
fuel plugins --install /tmp/
nuage-openstack-fuel-plugin-3.2-3.2.7000-1.noarch.rpm
You should get the following output:
Plugin nuage-openstack-fuel-plugin-3.2-3.2.7000-1.noarch.rpmwas
successfully installed
4. In order to list the Nuage Fuel plugin installed on the Fuel Master node:
fuel plugins --list
[root@fuel tmp]# fuel plugins --list
id | name
| version | package_version
---|-------------------|---------|---------------1 | nuage-openstack-fuel-plugin| 3.2.7000 | 3.0.0
5. Copy Nuage neutron, VRS debian and Metadata Agent packages (obtained from Nuage Networks by
subscription, see Prerequisites above) to the Fuel Master node at /var/www/nailgun/plugins/nuageopenstack-fuel-plugin-3.2/repositories/ubuntu location. The folder (nuageopenstack-upgrade-*.tar.gz) containing the scripts to generate a unique CMS ID for a given
Openstack cluster within a Nuage Networks VSD organization must also be copied to the same location.
Note:
All packages placed at the above location on the Fuel Master node must be compressed into
Packages.gz file using the following command before starting the deployment:
dpkg-scanpackages ./ | gzip -c - > Packages.gz
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6. Starting with Kilo 3.2.R4 Release, CMS ID needs to be enabled for the Nuage Plugin to work. Copy the
nuage-openstack-upgrade-*.tar.gz scripts to the Fuel Master node. Then generate the CMS ID on
the Fuel Master node as follows:
mkdir -p <dir-upgrade-scripts>
tar -xzvf nuage-openstack-upgrade-*.tar.gz -C <dir-upgrade-scripts>
cd <dir-upgrade-scripts>
cp
/var/www/nailgun/plugins/nuage-openstack-fuel-plugin-3.2/deployment_scripts/
configure_vsd_cms_id.py /root/<dir-upgrade-scripts>
python configure_vsd_cms_id.py --server <vsd-ip:8443> --serverauth
<vsd-username:vsd-password> --organization <vsd-organization>
--auth_resource /me --serverssl True --base_uri /nuage/api/v3_2
where:
vsd-ip:
VSD IP address
vsd-username:
VSD UI login username
vsd-password:
VSD UI login password
vsd-organization:
VSD organization name
4.2. Installing the Nuage Plugin
12
CHAPTER
FIVE
FUEL PLUGIN CONFIGURATION
This section includes the following topics:
• Configuring the Nuage Plugin (page 14)
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5.1 Configuring the Nuage Plugin
1. Create a new OpenStack environment with Fuel UI wizard:
Fig. 5.1: Creating a new OpenStack environment with the Fuel Wizard
2. Select KVM or QEMU hypervisor type for your environment.
Fig. 5.2: Select KVM or QEMU hypervisor type for your environment
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3. Select Neutron with VLAN segmentation network model, which is the only network type supported with Fuel
Nuage Plugin.
Fig. 5.3: Selecting Neutron with VLAN segmentation network model
4. This deployment skips using any Ceph storage node as a part of the cluster:
Fig. 5.4: Skip Ceph storage, use default providers
5.1. Configuring the Nuage Plugin
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5. Now your Mirantis Openstack Environment has been created and is ready to use:
Fig. 5.5: Finish creating the new OpenStack environment
6. Now assign roles to your OpenStack nodes as follows:
• At least 3 Controllers for High Availability (HA) deployment (16GB memory/64GB HDD at least)
• At least 2 Computes (16GB memory/64GB HDD at least)
Fig. 5.6: Assigning roles to your OpenStack nodes
To configure NIC bonding for your OpenStack node; bond the two interfaces in a bonded interface “bond0” as
5.1. Configuring the Nuage Plugin
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seen below before starting the Fuel deployment. For more details; you can refer to the Mirantis 7.0 User guide
for the NIC aggregation section.
Fig. 5.7: Configuring NIC bonding for OpenStack Nodes
7. Make sure the “Networks” tab reflects using “Neutron with VLAN segmentation” as your network:
Fig. 5.8: Use Neutron with VLAN segmentation as your network
5.1. Configuring the Nuage Plugin
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8. Also, you will see the Fuel Nuage plugin in the list of Installed plugins in the “Plugins” tab of your Fuel UI:
Fig. 5.9: Look for the Fuel Nuage plugin in the list of Installed plugins
9. Now open Settings tab of the Fuel Web UI and select the “Fuel Nuage Plugin” tab and enable the plugin by
selecting the checkbox:
Fig. 5.10: Select the Fuel Nuage Plugin tab and enable the plugin
5.1. Configuring the Nuage Plugin
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10. Enter the Nuage VSD authentication details as per your VSP environment for the relevant fields shown in the
previous screen:
• Nuage Net Partition name: default_net_partition_name ; parameter required in Nuage plugin
file on the OpenStack controller node
• VSD IP address: Management IP address of the VSD node in the cluster
• VSD username: VSD UI login username (mandatory field, and is the admin user mentioned in the section
Prerequisites)
• VSD password: VSD UI login password (mandatory field, and is for the admin user mentioned in the
section Prerequisites)
• VSD organization name: VSD Organization name
• Nuage base uri version: v3_2 (Since we are using Nuage VSP 3.2)
• Active VSC IP address: IP address of the active VSC in the Nuage VSP cluster
• Backup VSC IP address: IP address of the standby (backup) VSC in the Nuage VSP cluster
11. To enable Nuage metadata agent services on the OpenStack compute nodes as a part of the Nuage Fuel plugin
deployment; the following UI fields must be set:
Fig. 5.11: Enabling the Nuage Metadata Agent
Nuage Metadata agent port number: Port on which metadata agent listens to metadata requests from the tenant
VMs on compute nodes (defaults to 9697 as seen above).
Nova metadata port number: Port on which metadata agent listens to metadata requests coming from compute
nodes on the controller nodes (defaults to 8775 as seen above).
Nova Region Name: Region name required to setup metadata agent service (Defaults to “RegionOne”).
Nova API Endpoint type: Defaults to “publicURL” as seen above.
12. On the Fuel UI, populate the CMS ID generated on the Fuel node in section 4.2, step 6 (mandatory value):
Fig. 5.12: Populating the CMS ID
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13. The plugin also provides support for PAT to underlay feature wherein tenant VMs can reach public network
without configuring floating IPs. In order to enable this feature; select the PAT to Underlay checkbox on the
Fuel UI as shown below. Also provide the interface that needs to be used on the compute nodes as an uplink
interface after enabling PAT to Underlay feature. The default value for the uplink interface to be used will be set
by the plugin to “br-mgmt” as seen below:
Fig. 5.13: Enabling PAT to Underlay
14. After we set all the above Fuel UI parameters; we run a Network Verification test under the Networks tab
(recommended by Fuel) before we begin the final deployment. If the Network Verification goes fine; we are
good to start the deployment:
Fig. 5.14: Verify the network
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If the Nuage VSP and Mirantis Openstack Integration via the Nuage Fuel plugin was successful, we will see a
deployment success message on the Fuel UI:
Fig. 5.15: Deployment success message
Note:
Due to architecture and plugin implementation decisions, deploying a Nuage Networks VSP as the SDN
solution alongside Mirantis OpenStack means that some health checks are expected to fail (absent default
networks and pacemaker)
5.1. Configuring the Nuage Plugin
21
CHAPTER
SIX
USING MIRANTIS FUEL WITH VSP AND OPENSTACK
This section provides provides instructions for using Mirantis Fuel with Nuage VSP and OpenStack. This section
includes the following topics:
• Nuage VSP and Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration Testing (page 22)
6.1 Nuage VSP and Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration Testing
As a part of testing the Integration of Nuage VSP and Mirantis Openstack; we create multiple tenant networks and
subnets. 1 VM is spawned on each of the hypervisor node and attached to a private subnet. After VMs are successfully
spawned across the 2 compute nodes as shown in the topology; we verify that each of the tenant VM gets assigned an
IP address as seen below:
Here we verify tenant VM 1 and tenant VM 2 get assigned an IP address from their respective private subnets
192.168.10.0/24 & 192.168.20.0/24.
Fig. 6.1: Verifying tenant VM1
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Fig. 6.2: Verifying tenant VM2
Now we verify that both tenant VMs can ping each other as seen below:
Fig. 6.3: Verify ping tenant VM1
Fig. 6.4: Verify ping tenant VM2
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We also verify that metadata requests from each of the above tenant VMs get a response from the metadata server as
seen below. This verifies the Nuage metadata agent service setup on the compute nodes:
Fig. 6.5: Verify Metadata requests from each tenant
All tenant networks and VMs that were created as a part of the Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration testing can also be seen
on the VSD dashboard as pasted below:
Fig. 6.6: Verify all tenant networks and VMs that were created
If the user enabled PAT to underlay on the Fuel UI prior to the deployment; the setup can be validated for the PAT to
underlay feature wherein tenant VMs can reach the public network without VRS-G and floating IP configuration for
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tenant VMs.
As a part of testing the PAT to Underlay feature; user needs to create domains, networks and subnets on the Nuage
VSD using the neutron API calls.
In order to enable PAT to Underlay feature for the configured domain on the VSD:
1. Create an external network:
neutron net-create <external-network name> --router:external
2. Create external subnet:
neutron subnet-create --name <external-subnet name> <external-network
name> <external-subnet/subnet-mask>
3. Set external network’s ID as the gateway for the configured domain on the VSD:
neutron router-gateway-set <VSD domain name> <external network ID from
step 1 above>
The above configuration steps will enable PAT settings on the Nuage VSD for the configured domains and tenant VMs
should be able to reach the external world as seen below:
Fig. 6.7: Verifying VM1 connectivity
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Fig. 6.8: Verifying VM2 connectivity
To verify NIC bonding works on Fuel deployed setup; two VMs were spawned across the compute nodes and pings
were tested across tenant VMs using the slave interfaces of the bonded interface on the compute nodes.
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As seen below; initially eth2 interface appears as a Active slave interface under the bonded interface:
Fig. 6.9: Verify NIC Bonding
Pings across tenant VMs were running through the active slave interface under the bonded interface:
Fig. 6.10: Ping through the active slave under the bonded interface
Now, we bring down the active slave interface “eth2” as seen in the image above and see that “eth3” becomes the new
active slave interface as seen in the screen shot below:
6.1. Nuage VSP and Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration Testing
27
VSP Mirantis Fuel Plugin Guide, Release 3.0-3.2.7000
Fig. 6.11: Bring down active slave interface, check new slave interface activation
We confirm that pings between tenant VMs continue to work even if the active slave interface went down and the
standby slave interface took over. This provides fault tolerance in your deployed Fuel environment.
Fig. 6.12: Confirm operation with pings between tenant VMs
6.1. Nuage VSP and Nuage Fuel Plugin Integration Testing
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CHAPTER
SEVEN
TROUBLESHOOTING
This section provides instructions on troubleshooting Mirantis Fuel with Nuage VSP and OpenStack.
In the case of issues with the deployment and depending on the specific issue, below are some troubleshooting tips:
1. Nuage Fuel plugin has been implemented using puppet and for puppet issues; refer to astute logs under
/var/log/docker-logs/astute/astute.log on the Fuel node.
2. For any issues pertaining to Nuage Neutron service; refer to /var/log/neutron/server.log on the
OpenStack controller.
3. For issues related to the Nuage Networks VRS, refer to nova-scheduler.log, nova-conductor.log
and nova-compute.log under /var/log/nova on the OpenStack compute nodes to troubleshoot.
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