Unit 1: The UK Aviation Industry - Edexcel

Unit 1: The UK Aviation Industry - Edexcel
Unit 1:
The UK Aviation Industry
Unit code:
T/504/2278
QCF Level 3:
BTEC Nationals
Credit value:
10
Guided learning hours: 60
Aim and purpose
The aim of this unit is to give learners knowledge and understanding of the scale of UK aviation and the role
of organisations within the industry.
Unit introduction
This unit is an invaluable and interesting starting point in a learner’s study of the aviation industry, as it enables
them to investigate the industry holistically.
Learners start by examining the scale of the industry, which will put the industry into context and emphasise its
relative importance to the UK.
The diverse nature of airlines is explored next and how their different services serve different markets.
Airports are investigated by examining their location, their facilities and their ownership before looking in detail
at their different characteristics.
The aviation industry is governed and supported by a strict regulatory regime covering safety and security
issues, and these regulatory organisations are backed-up by a number of trade associations that co-ordinate
activities in these and other areas to serve the best interests of the different industry sectors.
The industry would not function without a vast array of ancillary organisations that supply vital products
and services in a number of specialist areas from aircraft manufacturing for airlines to tax-free shopping for
passengers.
Nine out of every ten flights in the UK are general aviation (GA) flights. However, GA is a sector of the
industry that most learners give very little thought to. An exploration of the organisations that make up this
hugely important sector concludes the unit.
Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should:
1
Know the scale of the UK aviation industry and how it contributes to the UK economy
2
Understand the operating characteristics of commercial airlines
3
Understand the different types of UK airport, their ownership and characteristics
4
Understand the contribution of general aviation operations to the UK aviation industry
5
Understand how regulatory bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations support the aviation
industry.
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
1
Unit content
1 Know the scale of the UK aviation industry and how it contributes to the UK
economy
Scale of the UK aviation industry:
●
million passengers per annum (mppa) (UK total, by UK airport, by UK airline, domestic and
international total, international destinations to and from the UK by country – leading five by CAA
statistics)
●
non-passenger indicators (number of air transport movements (ATMs), cargo tonnes uplifted)
●
major changes and trends over the last ten years
●
financial scale, e.g. major airline operating revenues, major airline operating expenses, major airline
operating profit or loss, changes and trends
●
employment figures, e.g. airports, airlines
●
contribution to UK gross domestic product (GDP)
2 Understand the operating characteristics of commercial airlines
Types of commercial airlines:
●
full service scheduled
●
low-cost scheduled
●
charter
●
cargo, e.g. scheduled, charter, integrated
Operating characteristics:
●
aircraft types, e.g. manufacturers, characteristics, crew and ground handling requirements
●
route networks, e.g. long/short haul, hub and spoke, point to point, international/domestic
●
fares and conditions of travel, e.g. flexibility, seat selection, baggage allowances
●
class options and service levels
●
timetables
●
distribution, e.g. bookings
3 Understand the different types of UK airport, their ownership and characteristics
UK airports:
●
geographical location
●
major, e.g. London Heathrow
●
regional, e.g. Newcastle
●
local, e.g. Blackpool
●
ownership (public, private, public/private partnership, group)
2
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
UK airport characteristics:
●
route network
●
number and type of airlines
●
number of passengers
●
cargo tonnes
●
passenger facilities and services, e.g. car parks, shops, restaurants, executive lounges, hotels
●
operational facilities and services (runways, passenger terminals, cargo terminals, handling agents)
●
scale and location of general aviation operations
4 Understand the contribution of general aviation operations to the UK aviation
industry
Types of general aviation organisations:
●
aircraft operator, e.g. flight school, club, executive transport, air taxi, oil industry support, emergency
service
●
airfield operator, e.g. private strip, GA terminal at regional airport
●
management and control, e.g. Air Traffic Control, Border Control, Airfield management
Aircraft types used by general aviation organisations:
●
●
●
manufacturers, e.g. Cessna, Piper, Bell, Boeing, Gulfstream
characteristics, e.g. fixed wing, rotary, passenger capacity, cargo capacity range, take-off/landing
performance
requirements, e.g. crew number, qualifications, ground handling
General aviation operations:
●
ownership types, e.g. private (business, pleasure), club, corporate, fractional
●
pilot training, e.g. school, private, commercial
●
recreational, e.g. flying club, gliding, parachute, aerobatics, microlight
●
commercial operation, e.g. business, air taxi, charter, survey, agricultural,
●
emergency services, e.g. police, ambulance
●
oil industry support, e.g. fixed wing, rotary
●
ground support, e.g. airfield management, aircraft management, GA terminals at major airports
●
●
relationships with regulatory and statutory bodies, e.g. Air Traffic Control, Border Control, CAA,
EASA
links with other aviation organisations, e.g. airfield operators, commercial airlines
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
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5 Understand how regulatory bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations
support the aviation industry
Role of regulatory bodies, in relation to aviation:
●
role of regulatory bodies (to establish the rules and regulations that govern the industry, to promulgate
rules and regulations and to ensure compliance with rules and regulations)
●
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
●
European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)
●
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)
●
UK Border Agency
●
National Air Traffic Service (NATS)
●
police
●
Department for Transport – security (TRANSEC)
Role of trade associations:
●
role of trade associations (to promote and support the interests of industry)
●
International Air Transport Association (IATA)
●
Airports Council International (ACI)
●
European Regional Airlines Association (ERA)
●
British Air Transport Association (BATA)
●
British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA)
Role of ancillary organisations in relation to supporting the aviation industry:
●
role of ancillary organisations (to provide goods and services to the aviation industry)
●
aircraft manufacturers
●
engine manufacturers
●
airline engineering and maintenance companies
●
in-flight catering companies
●
fuel suppliers
●
cleaning companies
●
handling agents
●
retail operations, e.g. shops and restaurants in airport, currency exchange
●
onward travel, e.g. car rental, taxi, public transport
●
car parking operators (on site, off site)
●
tour operators, travel agents
●
freight forwarders
4
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Assessment and grading criteria
In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that
they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the
level of achievement required to pass this unit.
Assessment and grading criteria
To achieve a pass grade the
evidence must show that the
learner is able to:
To achieve a merit grade the
evidence must show that, in
addition to the pass criteria,
the learner is able to:
P1
Describe the scale of the UK M1 Explain major aviation
industry changes and trends
aviation industry, including
in relation to scale and
passenger, cargo, financial and
contribution to UK economy
employment data [IE]
P2
Identify major UK aviation
industry changes and trends
P3
Describe different types of
commercial airlines
P4
Compare the operating
characteristics of different
commercial airlines
P5
Describe different types
of UK airports and their
ownership
P6
Compare the operating
characteristics of different
types of airports
P7
Explain how general aviation
organisations operate
To achieve a distinction grade
the evidence must show that,
in addition to the pass and
merit criteria, the learner is
able to:
D1
Discuss the scale of the
industry commenting
on trends, operating
characteristics and the
organisations within it
M2 Discuss why an airline might
base its operation from a
particular airport
M3 Analyse the role of three
different types of general
aviation organisations,
highlighting their links with
other aviation sectors
P8
Analyse the role of regulatory M4 Evaluate the roles of
bodies
regulatory bodies, trade
associations and ancillary
P9 Analyse the role of trade
organisations in the aviation
associations
industry
P10 Analyse the role of ancillary
organisations
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
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PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal,
learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate
effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.
Key
6
IE – independent enquirers
RL – reflective learners
SM – self-managers
CT – creative thinkers
TW – team workers
EP – effective participators
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Essential guidance for tutors
Delivery
This unit explores the organisations that make up the aviation industry and the scale of their operations.
The unit could be delivered as a stand-alone unit or as an introduction to the industry before other, more
specialist, units are delivered.
Learning outcome 1 deals with the scale of the aviation industry. To do justice to this outcome it is important
that learners are ‘taught’ how to research the information needed and use ‘IT skills’ to produce the graphs and
tables to display this information. Learners may need to be given support to ensure they develop the research
and IT skills needed to work at this level. Information on the scale of the industry is available on the CAA
website. Once the information has been obtained it can be displayed graphically over a variety of different
media. For example, displaying a bar chart indicating on a yearly basis ten years in air transport movements
(ATMs) will enable learners to clearly identify the impact of economic recession. Information on the impact
of aviation on the UK economy is available on a number of websites, for example, the Airport Operators
Association (AOA).
If learners are new to the study of the aviation industry it might be beneficial to start by examining learning
outcomes 2 and 3. Most learners will have travelled by air or visited an airport and an ideal starting point
would be to ask learners to share their experiences. These experiences can be used as the building blocks
for a more detailed study of the first three learning outcomes. At this point, it is worth spending time stressing
the importance of areas of the industry that learners will probably be less familiar with, e.g. scheduled airlines,
business passengers, cargo operations, airport ownership. An ideal way of supporting this learning is to
arrange a visit to an airport where facilities and operations can be viewed first hand, although it is accepted
that a tighter security regime means that access airside is not always possible and a visit might need to be
supplemented by viewing a DVD or internet videos that explore the airside areas of an airport, for example
the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), the Airport Airside Induction video (www.youtube.
com/watch?v=p_q0CyCo3zg&feature=player_embedded).
Learning outcomes 4 and 5 will require learners to research organisations that they will probably be
unfamiliar with and it is important that they are given guidance on the relative importance of the organisations
mentioned. As part of the United Nations and the international regulator of the air, ICAO is the most
important, but all the regulatory bodies mentioned play an integral part in either the safety or economic
prosperity of the industry. Learners would benefit from developing a diagram indicating the flow of information
and the responsibilities of the various regulatory bodies.
Exploring trade associations, general aviation and ancillary organisations will complete the study of the
organisations involved in the aviation industry, and understanding how these organisations fit together will
help learners understand their function. A simple diagram, such as the one below should aid learning and
understanding.
Aviation Industry
Airports
Commercial
Airlines
General
Aviation
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Regulatory and
Trade Bodies
Ancillary
Organisations
7
It is easy to spend a considerable amount of time on commercial airlines and airports and brush over the
other sectors, but they should all be treated with equal importance. General aviation (GA) accounts for nine
out of every ten flights in the UK and its importance and role should not be overlooked. Learners would
benefit from a visit to a GA terminal or visits to local flying clubs, police and air ambulance units or private
strips will provide invaluable input and the opportunity to view GA in all its many forms. The CAA report may
provide some background to GA (http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/1739/StatusReportGAReview20081016.pdf)
and the British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) is a useful reference site for learners to find
the information they need. GA frequently operates very differently from main-stream commercial aviation.
Because of their specialisms, business models vary depending on the markets they serve. Investigating the
types of aircraft and airfield used together with licensing and handling requirements of at least two different
operators would provide an insight into part of this significant but largely unknown sector. Delivery should
explore links that exist between GA organisations, regulators, other statutory bodies and other aviation
organisations – some of these relationships are similar to those found with main-stream airlines (e.g. DfT,
CAA, ATC) whilst others are unique to GA (e.g. types of self-regulation, reduced licence requirements,
non-regulated airfields). Occasionally, GA organisations support commercial operations by providing crew
transport or delivery of urgent spare parts. A visiting speaker from a flight school or GA airfield would be able
to detail the links very clearly.
There are very few textbooks that deal with the content of this unit and those that are available are usually
aimed at graduate level. If textbooks are used, tutors may need to distil the information to enable learners to
fully understand the issues. In contrast, there is a myriad of websites containing the information learners will
need. Airports, airlines, trade associations, regulatory bodies and ancillary organisations all have information
that will be invaluable to learners. Tutors may wish to point out some obvious sites, along with allowing ample
time for learners to complete their research.
The development of communication skills are critical in achieving this unit. Learners will be expected to
produce a range of written materials and they should be presented to appropriate standard for the industry.
All learners should be prepared and encouraged to achieve the higher grades. Teaching should, therefore,
not just focus on a description of research undertaken. Learners should be encouraged to interpret the
information they have researched and consider how this may have affected the organisation or the industry.
They should be asked challenging and stimulating questions about the data obtained through research.
8
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Outline learning plan
The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the
programme of suggested assignments.
The outline learning plan demonstrates one way of planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.
Topic and suggested assignments/activities and/assessment
Introduction and overview of the unit and its five learning outcomes.
A review of the unit assessment methods, along with timescales and hand-out and hand-in dates.
Investigation into the scale of the industry, e.g. mppa, passenger growth levels, cargo tonnes uplifted,
employment.
Practical workshop on researching the CAA website and gaining access to airport and airline statistics.
Guest speaker on airport planning and statistics to speak about how passenger statistics are collated and used.
Practical workshop on producing graphs and tables to display airport and airline statistics identifying trends.
Preparing presentation skills.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 1: The importance of aviation to the UK (P1, P2, M1)
Feedback on assignment
Investigation into airline types.
Learner research on scheduled, low-cost scheduled, charter and cargo airlines and their operating characteristics.
Class discussion on the characteristics of commercial airlines.
Assignment workshop to research P3 and P4.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 2: UK airlines (P3, P4)
Feedback on assignment
Investigation into airport location, facilities and ownership.
Airports in the Nineties: ‘Manchester’ Aviation DVD.
Class discussion on the different types of airports and their characteristics.
Visit to a nearby airport to view facilities.
Investigation into why an airline may base its operation from a particular airport.
Assignment workshop to research P5, P6, M2.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 3: UK airports (P5, P6, M2)
Feedback on assignment
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
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Topic and suggested assignments/activities and/assessment
Investigation into GA and the organisations within the industry.
Visit to a GA terminal or GA airfield to view facilities and witness first hand the role of GA.
Class discussion on how GA organisations link with other aviation sectors.
Assignment workshop to research P7, M3.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 4: How general aviation (GA) organisations operate (P7, M3)
Feedback on assignment
Investigation into the role of regulatory bodies.
Learner research into the role of regulatory bodies.
Guest speaker from the UK Border Agency to deal with the practical application of border control.
Investigation into how trade associations support and represent the aviation industry.
Class discussion on the role of regulatory bodies and trade associations.
An examination into the different types of ancillary organisations and their role in the aviation industry.
Guest speaker from a handling agent to talk about their role and how they support other sectors of the industry.
Class discussion on how regulatory bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations work together to create
a safe and secure effective system.
Assignment workshop to research P8, P9, P10 and M3.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 5: The aviation regulatory bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations
(P8, P9, P10, M3)
Feedback on assignment
Review of the unit bringing it all together to investigate the scale of the UK aviation industry – considering trends,
operating characteristics and the organisations that make up the overall industry.
Assignment workshop to research D1.
Preparation for assignment
Assignment 6: The scale of the UK aviation industry (D1)
Feedback on assignment
10
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Assessment
A variety of assessment methods could be used although it is envisaged that the evidence required to support
this unit will primarily be by assignment and presentation (group or individual learner).
P1 – P2 – M1
To achieve P1, learners must outline the scale of the UK aviation industry. This can be achieved by the
production of a series of graphs and tables, with a description of what each graph or table demonstrates.
Learners will need to ensure that all items listed in the content are covered in the description.
To achieve P2, learners will need to identify major changes and trends and anomalies that can be identified
from the information provided in P1. For example, an examination of a graph of mppa at UK airports will
reveal an overall trend upwards with a few year-on-year reductions in mppa. To achieve M1, learners will
need to explain the changes and trends they have identified linking this to P1, i.e. for the example given above
learners will explain this cyclical pattern and the underlying reasons for major changes in mppa.
P3 – P4
To achieve P3, learners need to set the scene by describing the different types of commercial airlines.
Learners must include in their descriptions all the items listed in the unit content. A checklist may be beneficial
to ensure full coverage of this range. P4 leads on from P3, and learners need to compare the operating
characteristics of the different types of airlines and comment on their main differences, for example a cargo
charter and a passenger charter will operate in much the same way but the cargo will not return and their
destinations are likely to be very different. Learners will be expected to compare characteristics in full, for
example, the flexible nature of some of the tickets available on a full service scheduled airline will need to be
compared. Wherever possible, learners need to use examples and a description of a service could be based
on British Airways (BA). Some airlines, such as Virgin Atlantic, are not good examples of full service scheduled
airlines as they offer only long-haul routes, but they could be used as an example if their shortfalls in service
levels are identified.
P5 – P6 – M2
For P5, learners will need to indicate on a map of the UK the location of all the major airports and at least five
regional and five local airports. Learners need to describe the different types of airport including who owns
them and their ownership structure.
Airport operating characteristics must be compared to achieve P6. The comparisons should be based on one
airport from each of the three categories (major, regional and local). Learners must compare the operating
characteristics of the different types of airports and comment on their main differences. For example, a
comparison of Manchester Airport (major) and East Midlands Airport (regional) would reveal that one has
significantly more passengers and the other has significantly more cargo.
To achieve M2, learners need to discuss why an airline might base its operation at a particular airport, for
example BA at London Heathrow (LHR), Jet2.com at Leeds Bradford Airport (LBA). Access to a particular
market would be an obvious answer, but there are many other factors, e.g. airport facilities, no competition.
Learners are expected to consider and comment on a range of different reasons.
P7 – M3
To achieve P7, learners must explain how general aviation (GA) organisations operate. Learners should cover
the range of operations listed in the content using examples of organisations from the three different types
(aircraft operator, airfield operator, management and control).
For M3, learners should expand on P7 to focus on three different types of GA organisation to analyse their
role and highlight links between them and other aviation sectors.
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
11
P8 – P9 – P10 – M4
To achieve P8 and P9, the learner will have to analyse the role of regulatory bodies and trade associations to
the UK aviation industry. The organisations that need to be covered are listed in the unit content. The natural
conclusion is that regulatory bodies produce rules that are mandatory and trade associations produce useful
guidance and advice, but in what fields are these rules and guidance set and why do some need to be strictly
enforced. An important role of trade associations is to lobby governments and learners need to understand
how this works and why it is necessary.
To achieve P10, learners need to analyse the role of ancillary organisations in relation to aviation. There
are a large number of organisations involved in P10 and learners can group them together (e.g. aircraft
manufacturers, handling agents) to analyse their role in supporting the industry. Whilse frequent travellers will
be aware of terminal retail operations, tutors might like to emphasise the important role of organisations such
as Rolls Royce; one of the three main global suppliers of aircraft engines. Learners should ensure that they
cover the full range as listed in the unit content.
M4 needs to take the analysis of regulatory bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations further by
evaluating how they all fit together to provide a supportive framework which keeps the industry safe and
secure. Learners may benefit from drawing a diagram of this framework and explaining how it all fits together
to provide a seamless safety system.
D1
In D1, learners will need to use the information obtained through the pass and merit criteria to discuss
the scale of the UK aviation industry. Learners will need to comment on trends for the industry and the
organisations that operate within it and how they link. Learners should consider the operating characteristics
perhaps commenting on contrasting characteristics, such as airlines employ more staff than airports, where
the main airports and airlines are located and how they might compare financially.
Programme of suggested assignments
The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction
criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either
write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.
Criteria covered
Assignment title
Scenario
P1, P2, M1
Assignment 1: The
importance of aviation
to the UK
Presentation
Working as a
consultant to the UK
government you are
required to give a
presentation on the
scale of the aviation
industry in the UK and
identify any specific
trends and anomalies.
P3, P4
Assignment 2: UK
airlines
As an employee of a
UK airport you are
required to write a
series of guides to UK
aviation.
A leaflet covering commercial airlines
P5, P6, M2
Assignment 3: UK
airports
As an employee of a
UK airport you are
required to write a
series of guides to UK
aviation.
A leaflet covering UK airports
12
Assessment method
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Criteria covered
Assignment title
Scenario
Assessment method
P7, M3
Assignment 4: How
general aviation (GA)
organisations operate
Working for a
transport trade
journal, you are
to write an article
investigating the
way the GA sector
operates highlighting
links from three
different types of
organisation to other
aviation sectors.
Investigation/report
P8, P9, P10, M4
Assignment 5: The
aviation regulatory
bodies, trade
associations and
ancillary organisations
As an employee of a
UK airport you are
required to write a
series of guides to
UK aviation.
Two leaflets, one covering regulatory
bodies and trade associations
and another covering ancillary
organisations
D1
Assignment 6: The
scale of the UK
aviation industry
Working for a
transport trade
journal, you are
to write an article
investigating the UK
aviation industry.
Investigation/report
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
13
Links to other BTEC units
This unit forms part of the BTEC aviation sector suite. This unit has particular links with the following unit titles
in the aviation suite.
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
n/a
Unit 4: Inter-relationships Within
the UK Aviation Industry
Unit 18: Researching Current Issues
in Aviation
Unit 5: Development of the UK
Aviation Industry Since 1945
Unit 14: Airport and Airline
Commercial Operations
Essential resources
Learners must have access to relevant published resources and the internet.
Employer engagement and vocational contexts
There is ample opportunity to visit aviation organisations and invite guest speakers from industry to talk to
learners.
Indicative reading for learners
Textbooks
Doganis R – The Airline Business, 2nd Edition (Routledge, 2006) ISBN 978-0415346153
Fecker A and Könemann L – The Complete Book of Flight (Parragon, 2010) ISBN 978-1445404424
Journals
Flight International – Reed Business Publishing
Flyer – Seager Publishing
Pilot – Archant Specialist
Websites
www.airbus.com
Airbus – aircraft manufacturer
www.airports.org
The International Airport Council
www.aoa.org.uk
Airport Operators Association
www.aopa.co.uk
The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
www.baa.com
BAA Airports – airport operator
www.bbga.aero
British Business and General Aviation Association
www.britishairways.com
British Airways – airline
www.caa.co.uk
Civil Aviation Authority – UK aviation regulator
www.ebanmagazine.com
European Business Air News
www.flightglobal.com
Flight Global – online flight magazine
14
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
www.flyer.co.uk
Flyer – general aviation magazine
www.gasco.org.uk
General Aviation Safety Council – flight safety charity
www.icao.int
International Civil Aviation Organization
www.iosh.co.uk
Institution of Occupational Safety and Health
www.manchesterairport.co.uk
Manchester Airports Group (MAG) – airport operator
www.pilotweb.aero
Pilot – general aviation magazine
www.ryanair.com
Ryanair – airline
DVD
Airports in the Nineties – Manchester – Avion
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
15
Delivery of personal, learning and thinking skills
The table below identifies the opportunities for personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) that have been
included within the pass assessment criteria of this unit.
Skill
When learners are …
Independent enquirers
exploring the scale of the UK aviation industry; assessing the value
based on research and data.
Although PLTS are identified within this unit as an inherent part of the assessment criteria, there are further
opportunities to develop a range of PLTS through various approaches to teaching and learning.
Skill
When learners are …
Creative thinkers
comparing the operating characteristics of different commercial airlines
and types of airports
Self-managers
managing the assessment of the unit.
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Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
Functional Skills — Level 2
Skill
When learners are …
ICT — Use ICT systems
Select, interact with and use ICT systems
independently for a complex task to meet a variety of
needs
investigating the scale of UK aviation and presenting
data on passengers, cargo, financial information and
employment
Use ICT to effectively plan work and evaluate the
effectiveness of the ICT system they have used
planning and producing the assessment
Manage information storage to enable efficient retrieval storing and retrieving passenger, cargo, financial and
employment data in order to describe the scale of UK
aviation
Follow and understand the need for safety and security
practices
ongoingı
Troubleshoot
as required.
ICT — Find and select information
Select and use a variety of sources of information
independently for a complex task
investigating the scale of UK aviation
Access, search for, select and use ICT-based
information and evaluate its fitness for purpose
investigating the scale of UK aviation and presenting
data on passengers, cargo, financial information and
employment.
ICT — Develop, present and communicate
information
Enter, develop and format information independently
to suit its meaning and purpose including:
●
text and tables
●
images
●
numbers
●
records
Bring together information to suit content and purpose
presenting information on the scale of the UK aviation
industry
presenting information on the scale of the UK aviation
industry
Present information in ways that are fit for purpose and presenting information on the scale of the UK aviation
audience
industry
Evaluate the selection and use of ICT tools and facilities throughout assessment.
used to present information
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
17
Skill
When learners are …
Mathematics
Draw conclusions and provide mathematical
justifications
interpreting passenger, cargo, financial and employment
data to describe the scale of the UK aviation industry
and identify recent changes and trends.
English
Speaking and listening – make a range of contributions
to discussions and make effective presentations in a
wide range of contexts
discussing the operating characteristics of different
commercial airlines and different types of airports
Reading – compare, select, read and understand texts
and use them to gather information, ideas, arguments
and opinions
investigating the scale of UK aviation and identifying
recent changes and trends
Writing – write documents, including extended writing writing a report to analyse the role of regulatory
pieces, communicating information, ideas and opinions, bodies, trade associations and ancillary organisations.
effectively and persuasively
18
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Aviation Operations
– Issue 1 – October 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012
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