Frozen Desserts - Kendall Farms Creme Fraiche

Frozen Desserts - Kendall Farms Creme Fraiche
Frozen Desserts
Churned Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Ice Cream
Frozen Soufles
CREME FRAICHE ICE CREAM
There is no ice cream that compares to creme fraiche ice cream. Gelato is a
poor second. Ice cream made from 40 percent butterfat cream is simply not
available commercially. You will have to make it yourself. You have your
choice of texture with creme fraiche ice cream. If you like dense, exquisitely
creamy ice cream, churn the creme fraiche without prior whipping. If you like
lighter ice cream, whip the creme fraiche before churning. If you don’t want to
take the time to churn ice cream, make still-frozen ice cream.
Churned Ice Cream
Old-Fashioned Chocolate Ice Cream, I
Old-Fashioned Chocolate Ice Cream, II
Old-Fashioned Vanilla Ice Cream
Mint Chocolate-Chip Ice Cream
Chocolate Chocolate-Chip Ice Cream
Lemon Ice Cream
OF CONCUPISCENT CURDS
Wallace Stevens, in his poem “The Emperor of Ice-Cream,” refers to ice
cream as “concupiscent curds.” ‘Concupiscent’ may be defined as “lustful,
carnal, sensual.” To those who have made homemade, salt and ice, hand-crank
ice cream, this word seems singularly appropriate. But it must be made in a salt
and ice, hand-crank ice cream freezer. The new-fangled, refrigerant encased
models will not do.* But enough said. Try it, be receptive, you’ll see.
*On physics and phase changes
The new refrigerent-encased ice cream makers do not make ice cream; they
make soft serve. The truly divine feature of homemade ice cream is its texture. I
have never experienced anything that equals its perfect creaminess. The texture
of the product from the refrigerant encased machine is that of soft
serve) reminiscent of tooth paste. I cannot abide soft serve; I love homemade ice
cream.
To explain the defects in the refrigerant-encased machines requires a short
lesson in physics.
Converting a liquid to a solid (or a liquid to a gas) is called a phase change
(a change in physical state). The amount of energy required to bring about a
phase change is very large compared to the energy required merely to change
temperature. In making ice cream, we are converting a liquid (cream) to a solid
(ice cream). In order to bring about this phase change, we need a large source
of energy such as is made available in another phase change. In the salt and ice,
hand crank machine we have such a source. We are converting ice (a solid) to a
liquid (water). Voila! A phase change. (The salt is used to delay the phase
change and make it occur at a lower temperature.) The energy released by this
ice-to-water phase change is taken up by the cream. The temperature of the
cream is lowered sufficiently to convert the cream to a solid, ice cream.
Although the refrigerant encased machine actually gets colder than the ice
in the salt and ice machine, it never goes through a phase change. So it cannot
release its coldness to the cream. Therefore, the cream never has enough energy
to go through its phase change. Voila! Soft serve. And it’s just not ice cream.
If you have never made real homemade ice cream, I suggest you do. Get a
bag of rock salt, a bag of ice cubes, pack according to the instructions above,
and commence to crank. It will take 15 to 20 minutes, start to finish, and you
will have, well, concupiscent curds.
TO FREEZE ICE CREAM IN A SALT AND ICE CHURN
1. Prepare ice cream mix. (See the following ice cream recipes.) If it is custard
based, allow to age overnight.
2. Fill the ice cream drum no more than 3/4 full. Put on the cover and position
the drum in the churn.
3. Place a piece of newspaper on the floor and the churn on the paper.
4. Fill 1/3 the height of the barrel with ice; sprinkle a heavy layer of rock salt
and then alternate layers of salt and ice around the drum until the barrel is
full. Let the churn sit for 5 minutes.
5. Commence turning the crank. Begin at a slow speed; increase gradually.
(Remember, you are constructing a crystal; so crank slowly and evenly at
first.) When pressure can be felt on the crank, triple the speed. The
churning will become progressively harder. All of a sudden, the churn will
break free and the crank will turn freely. The ice cream is done. All this
will take about 15 to 20 minutes, start to finish.
6. Carefully wipe the top of the barrel so that neither salt nor ice will fall in.
Remove the top, grab a spoon and experience perfection.
OLD-FASHIONED CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM, I
SERVES 4
This ice cream recipe gives a very low overrun ice cream: very little air is
incorporated. The ice cream is dense and rich. For a lighter ice cream, use
recipe II.
2 oz sweetened chocolate
2 oz unsweetened chocolate
3 egg yolks
4 tbs sugar
1/8 tsp salt
1 cup milk
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs instant coffee
1 tbs hot water
1.
2.
3.
4.
Cut the chocolate into 1/2 inch cubes and melt in the top of a double boiler.
Mix together the sugar, salt and egg yolks. Pour on the milk.
Cook in a double boiler until the custard coats a spoon.
Add the creme fraiche. Stir to mix well.
5.
6.
8.
9.
Dissolve the coffee in hot water, and add to the custard. Mix well.
Add the chocolate to the custard mixture. Mix well.
Refrigerate overnight.
Churn in a hand-crank freezer.
OLD-FASHIONED CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM, II
SERVES 4
2 oz sweet chocolate
2 oz unsweetened chocolate
3 egg yolks
4 tbs sugar
1/8 tsp salt
1 cup milk
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs instant coffee
1 tbs hot water
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Cut the chocolate into 1/2 inch cubes and melt in the top of a double boiler.
Mix together the sugar, salt and egg yolks. Pour on the milk.
Cook in a double boiler until the custard coats a spoon.
Dissolve the coffee in hot water and add to the custard. Mix well.
Add the chocolate to the custard. Mix well.
Let the custard mixture cool to room temperature.
Whip the creme fraiche until stiff.
Fold the creme fraiche into the cooled custard. Refrigerate overnight.
Churn in a hand-crank freezer.
OLD-FASHIONED VANILLA ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
2 cups creme fraiche
3 egg yolks
3/4 cup sugar
2 tbs vanilla extract
1/2 vanilla bean
1. Combine the creme fraiche, egg yolks and sugar. Cook until custard is just
starting to thicken.
2. Cool the custard, and add the vanilla extract and scrapings from the inside
of the vanilla bean to the custard.
3. Refrigerate overnight.
4. Churn in a hand-crank freezer.
MINT CHOCOLATE-CHIP ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
This recipe also works well as a still-frozen ice cream. See the next section for
instructions on still freezing.
1 cup creme fraiche
3 tbs green creme de menthe
1 tbs sugar
2 oz chocolate, coarsely chopped
1. Mix the creme de menthe and sugar with the creme fraiche. Refrigerate for
at least 1 hour to let the flavors blend.
2. Churn in a hand-crank freezer. When the cream has just started to freeze,
remove the lid and add the chopped chocolate. Replace the lid and finish
freezing.
CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE-CHIP ICE CREAM
Serves 4
2 oz sweet chocolate
2 oz unsweetened chocolate
3 egg yolks
4 tbs sugar
1/8 tsp salt
1 cup milk
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs instant coffee
1 tbs hot water
2 oz chocolate, chopped
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Cut the chocolate into 1/2 inch cubes and melt in the top of a double boiler.
Mix together the sugar, salt and egg yolks. Pour on the milk.
Cook in a double boiler until the mixture coats a spoon.
Dissolve the coffee in the hot water and add to the custard. Mix well.
Add the chocolate to the custard. Mix well.
Let the custard mixture cool to room temperature.
Whip the creme fraiche until stiff.
Fold the creme fraiche into the cooled custard. Refrigerate overnight.
Churn in a hand-crank freezer. When the ice cream is just starting to
freeze, remove the lid and add the chopped chocolate. Finish freezing.
LEMON ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
The evening my husband and I tested this recipe, a German friend, Horst,
stopped by. We handed him a spoon and awaited his judgment. “I,” said he,
“have eaten ice cream in Germany, in France, Belgium, Austria, Mexico, and
Italy; this is the best ice cream I’ve ever had.” “Concupiscent,” said I. It’s my
all time favorite.
2 cups creme fraiche
3 egg yolks
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1. Combine the creme fraiche, egg yolks and sugar. Cook until the custard is
just starting to thicken.
2. Cool and refrigerate overnight.
3. Put into a hand-crank freezer. Churn for 5 minutes until the mix is cold.
4. Add the lemon juice.
5. Reclose and churn until frozen.
Still-Frozen Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Coconut Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Coffee Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Lavender Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Maple Walnut Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Peach Ice Cream
Still-Frozen Vanilla Ice Cream
Still-frozen ice cream is the quickest, easiest ice cream to prepare. These
ice creams do not have the rich, dense texture of churn frozen ice creams but
are a great improvement over store-bought ice cream. I especially like stillfrozen fresh fruit ice cream. Creme fraiche paired with perfectly ripe fruit,
whipped and frozen, is a summer delight!
The secret to enjoying still-frozen ice cream is to let it soften ever so
slightly before eating. This lets any water crystals dissolve and greatly enhances
mouth feel. The optimal temperature for dipping and eating ice cream (of all
kinds) is 46.5 degrees F.
STILL-FROZEN COCONUT ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
I remember having wonderfully rich coconut ice cream in Mexico. The
richness of the creme fraiche is perfect with the subtle sweetness of the coconut.
1 cup creme fraiche
3 tbs minced sweetened coconut
2 tsp vanilla extract
1. Add the coconut and vanilla to the creme fraiche.
2. Whip to soft peaks. Do not over-whip. If the creme fraiche is over-whipped,
the ice cream will have an unpleasant buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in a freezer for 6 to 8 hours.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
STILL-FROZEN COFFEE ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
1 tbs instant coffee dissolved in 2 tbs hot water
1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar
1/8 tsp fresh, finely ground coffee
1. Add the coffee solution, sugar and fresh gound coffee to the creme fraiche.
2. Whip to soft peaks. Do not over-whip. If the creme fraiche is over-whipped,
the ice cream will have an unpleasant, buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in a freezer for 6 to 8 hours.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
STILL-FROZEN LAVENDER ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
1 tbs lavender blossoms
1/4 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 tsp minced lemon zest
1. Mix the lavender and creme fraiche. Refrigerate for 24 hours to allow the
lavender to scent the creme fraiche. Strain the cream through a tea strainer
to remove the lavender.
2. Add the sugar, vanilla and lemon zest. Whip to soft peaks. Do not overwhip. If the creme fraiche is over-whipped, the ice cream will have an
unpleasant, buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in a freezer for 6 to 8 hours.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
STILL-FROZEN MAPLE WALNUT ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
2 cups creme fraiche
1/4 cup superfine sugar
1/4 cup real maple syrup
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1. Add the sugar and maple syrup to the creme fraiche.
2. Whip to soft peaks. Do not over-whip. If the creme fraiche is over-whipped,
the ice cream will have an unpleasant, buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in freezer. When the ice cream is partially frozen (about 3 hours),
fold in the walnuts. Finish freezing. It will take about 6 more hours,
depending upon the temperature of your freezer.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
STILL-FROZEN PEACH ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
1/4 cup sugar
4 tbs peach schnappes
1 large, ripe peach
1. Mix together the creme fraiche, sugar and schnappes. Refrigerate for
several hours, preferably overnight, to allow the alcohol to dissipate.
2. Whip the creme fraiche mixture to soft peaks. Do not over-whip. If the
creme fraiche is over-whipped, the ice cream will have an unpleasant,
buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in a freezer. When the ice cream is partially frozen (about 3 hours),
grind the peach in a food processor or blender and fold it into the cream.
Finish freezing. It will take about 6 hours more to freeze, depending upon
the temperature of your freezer.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
STILL-FROZEN VANILLA ICE CREAM
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
5 tbs superfine sugar
2 tbs vanilla extract
1/2 vanilla bean
1. Add the sugar, vanilla extract and scrapings from the inside of the vanilla
bean to the creme fraiche.
2. Whip to soft peaks. Do not over-whip. If the creme fraiche is over-whipped,
the ice cream will have an unpleasant, buttery mouth feel.
3. Place in a freezer for 6 to 8 hours.
4. Allow the ice cream to soften slightly before serving. If served directly from
the freezer, the texture will be icy.
Frozen Souffles
Frozen Fresh Fruit Souffles
APRICOT, PEACH AND PLUM
Frozen Chocolate Souffle
Frozen Grand Marnier Souffle with Orange Marmelade
Frozen Lemon Souffle
Frozen Mint Souffle
Souffle Glace aux Fraises
FROZEN FRESH FRUIT SOUFFLES
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
1 tbs sugar
3 egg whites
1 tsp sugar
4 one-half cup souffle dishes
For apricot souffle:
4 ripe apricots
1 tbs apricot preserves*
For peach souffle:
2 ripe peaches
1 tbs peach preserves*
For plum souffle:
3 to 4 ripe plums (enough to make 1 cup of pulp)
1 tbs plum preserves*
1. Add 1 tablespoon of sugar to the creme fraiche. Mix well. Whip until stiff.
2. Peel the fruit. Puree half of it and add the preserves to the pureed fruit. Mix
well.
3. Coarsely mash the remaining fruit.
4. Beat the egg whites with 1 teaspoon of sugar until stiff.
5. Add the pureed fruit mixture to the creme fraiche; whip until stiff.
6. Fold the mashed fruit into the creme fraiche mixture and then fold in the
stiffly beaten egg whites.
7. Put waxed-paper collars around the souffle dishes so that the collars extend
about 1-1/2 inches above the rims.
8. Divide the souffle mixture evenly amongst the souffle dishes. Place in a
freezer until frozen, about 6 hours.
9. Remove the collars; garnish with a slice of the fresh fruit.
*An equal volume of sugar may be substituted for the fruit preserves.
FROZEN CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs sugar
1 tbs instant coffee
1 tbs hot water
2 oz chocolate
3 egg whites
1 tsp sugar
4 one-half cup souffle dishes
1. Dissolve the instant coffee in the 1 tablespoon of hot water.
2. Add the coffee solution to chocolate and melt the chocolate in the top of a
double boiler.
3. Whip the cold creme fraiche, adding sugar 1 tablespoon at a time. Whip
until stiff.
4. Add 2 tablespoons of whipped creme fraiche to the melted chocolate to
cool. When the chocolate is cool, add the remainder of the creme fraiche.
5. Whip the creme fraiche to blend in the chocolate.
6. Beat the egg whites with 1 teaspoon of sugar until stiff. Fold the egg whites
into the chocolate-creme fraiche mixture.
7. Put waxed-paper collars around souffle dishes so that the collars extend
about 1-1/2 inches above the rims.
8. Place in a freezer until frozen, about 6 hours.
9. Remove the collars; garnish with chocolate curls.
FROZEN GRAND MARNIER SOUFFLE WITH ORANGE
MARMELADE
SERVE 4
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs Seville orange marmelade
2 tbs Grand Marnier
3 egg whites
1 tsp sugar
4 one-half cup souffle dishes
1. Add the Seville orange marmelade and Grand Marnier to the creme
fraiche. Mix well. Whip until stiff.
2. Beat the egg whites with 1 teaspoon of sugar until stiff.
3. Fold the egg whites into the creme fraiche mixture.
4. Put waxed paper collars around the souffle dishes so that the collars extend
1-1/2 inches above rims.
5. Divide the mixture evenly amongst souffle cups. Place in a freezer until
frozen, about 6 hours.
6. Remove the collars; garnish with a sliver of orange rind.
FROZEN LEMON SOUFFLE
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
2 tbs frozen lemon concentrate
1 tbs sugar
zest of one lemon
3 egg whites
1 tsp sugar
4 one-half cup souffle dishes
mint leaves
1. Add the lemon concentrate, sugar and zest to the creme fraiche. Mix well.
Whip until stiff.
2. Beat the egg whites with 1 teaspoon of sugar until stiff.
3. Fold the egg whites into the creme fraiche mixture.
4. Put waxed paper collars around the souffle dishes so that collars extend 11/2 inches above rims.
5. Divide the mixture evenly amongst the souffle cups. Place in a freezer until
frozen, about 6 hours.
6. Remove the collars; garnish with mint leaves.
FROZEN MINT SOUFFLE
SERVES 4
1 cup creme fraiche
4 tbs creme de menthe, green
1 tbs sugar
3 egg whites
1 tsp sugar
4 one-half cup souffle dishes
mint leaves
1. Add the creme de menthe and sugar to the creme fraiche. Mix well. Whip
until stiff.
2. Beat the egg whites with 1 teaspoon of sugar until stiff.
3. Fold the egg whites into the creme fraiche mixture.
4. Put waxed paper collars around the souffle dishes so that collars extend 11/2 inches above rims.
5. Divide the mixture evenly amongst the souffle cups. Place in a freezer until
frozen, about 6 hours.
6. Remove the collars; garnish with a mint leave.
SOUFFLE GLACE AUX FRAISES
SERVES 6
2-1/4 cups sugar
1 cup water
8 egg whites
2 cups strawberry puree
3 cups creme fraiche
1. Cook the sugar in the cup of water until the temperature reaches 236
degrees F (soft ball stage).
2. Beat the egg whites until stiff, and slowly pour the hot syrup over them
while beating; beat until the mixture reaches room temperature.
3. Add the strawberry puree.
4. Whip the creme fraiche and fold into the strawberry mixture; avoid
overmixing.
5. Pour into a souffle dish to which you have affixed a waxed-paper collar.
The collar should extend 3 inches above the dish.
6. Place in the freezer for at least 3 hours.
7. Remove the collar, and serve.
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