Junior Coaching Program - Motorcycling Australia

Junior Coaching Program - Motorcycling Australia
Motorcycling Australia
PO Box 134
South Melbourne, VIC, 3205
t: 03 9684 0500 f: 03 9684 0555
Email: mail@ma.org.au
Motorcycle Sport – Junior Coaching Program
Coaches Lesson Plan
Off –Road – Motocross, Enduro, Dirt Track
Introduction
The Junior Coaching Program (JCP) lesson plan is an aid for coaches in the delivery of the JCP modules. The lesson
plan is aimed to assist the coach in teaching junior riders basic riding skills and techniques for the safety of all riders.
There are 12 coaching modules as part of the JCP. Each JCP module is covered in this lesson plan. It is strongly
recommended that the coaching modules are conducted in the order as set out in this lesson plan.
The coach
To conduct the JCP the instructor must:
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Have a Club Coach (previously Level 0) Motorcycle Sport accreditation or higher (i.e. Level 1 or 2)
Be a coach in the process of accumulating the required 30 hours to obtain their Level 1 Coaching accreditation after
attending a Level 1 motorcycle coaching course. Running the JCP will contribute to the required 30 hours.
Be able to demonstrate the skills throughout this lesson plan or have a coaching aid to perform the demonstrations
on their behalf during their coaching.
It is recommended that a parent or legal guardian is present throughout the coaching so that they become more informed
on the various riding and safety principles.
Rider Ability
This lesson needs to be tailored to the ability level of the rider/s in the coaching session.
There is no set time limit for a rider to complete the JCP; however it must take a minimum of 5 hours. A rider can do
the JCP over a number of days or weeks and can have any number of coaches; however the coach that takes a rider
through a module must sign-off on that module.
Assessment Kick Start – Getting Started in Motorcycle Sport booklet
The new Kick Start booklet contains a record log (assessment 1: coaching and riding test – page 23) which lists the
coaching modules that need to be undertaken.
Once a rider has completed a module, the coach signs the respective row. This confirms that the rider has undertaken
the coaching module and is competent for their age.
Junior Coaching Program – Coaching Lesson Plan
The time shown for each coaching module is the recommended minimum.
1.
Basic Rules and Personal Safety Equipment
20 min
Club Riding Rules:
Explain to the rider the rules that are specific to the club they have joined and their importance. Examples include:
ƒ Where permitted to ride
ƒ Pit area speed limitations
ƒ Signs to be obeyed
ƒ Example club flag use/meaning
General Rules:
Below are riding practices that the coach should inform the rider whilst in the coaching session.
ƒ Basic signals (i.e. hand and arms)
ƒ The importance of obeying directions and instruction of the coach
ƒ Keep riding speeds down – i.e to ensure safety and to assist learning
ƒ Entry and exit points of the track
ƒ Riders pull over to the side of the track (off the racing line) if they want stop
ƒ When restarting always check behind for other motorcycles on the track/course/section
ƒ Maintain safe distance from riders in front
Junior Coaching Program – Coaches Lesson Plan
Page 1 of 5
Motorcycling Australia
PO Box 134
South Melbourne, VIC, 3205
t: 03 9684 0500 f: 03 9684 0555
Email: mail@ma.org.au
Personal Safety Equipment:
It is important that the rider is made aware of the safety equipment required for their discipline and the correct use
of it, refer to the GCRs for the list of safety items for a given discipline. Explain the importance of the following:
ƒ Helmet must be worn at all times whilst on bike and be of Australian Standards
ƒ Helmet is correct fitting – i.e. snug against cheeks & a gap of 2 fingers horizontally between strap & chin
ƒ Always wear long sleeves and pants of a durable material
ƒ Always wear gloves and goggles
ƒ Must wear dirt bike boots i.e. boots that rise to just up below the knees
ƒ Body armour where required
2.
Scrutineering and Maintenance of Motorcycle
20min
Ensure that the rider is aware that their bike needs to comply with the General Competition Rules contained in the
Manual of Motorcycle Sport in order for it to pass scrutineering.
Scrutineering Considerations:
ƒ Throttle return
ƒ Kill switch is operational
ƒ Brakes operational
ƒ Motorcycle noise
ƒ Bar pad (where required)
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Spokes not loose
Wheel bearings
Helmet (as per GCRs)
Safety riding gear
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Head set bearings
Swing arm bearings
Footpeg spring
Brake pedal return
Maintenance Consideration:
Provide the rider with general bike maintenance tips such as:
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Air Filter
Gear Oil
Tyre pressure
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Control Cable Lubing
Chain tension
General nuts and bolts tension
Brake wear
Associated Scrutineering items
Pick-up Motorcycle
10min
Demonstrate to the rider the correct way to pick-up a motorcycle and then have the rider demonstrate that they can:
ƒ Place their bike on the ground gently
ƒ Pick the bike up from the laid down position
4.
Motorcycle Controls and Start/Stop Motorcycle
10min
This module is designed to teach the rider the functions and location of all bike controls and ensure they can start
and stop the bike safely and competently. The coach should instruct and supervise the rider to be able to adjust
their own controls to a position that suits them.
Motorcycle Controls (where applicable):
ƒ Kill switch
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ƒ Throttle
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ƒ Kick stand
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ƒ Fuel tap
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Brakes
Gears
On/off switch
Choke
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Clutch
Foot pegs
Ignition switch
Start and Stop Engine:
Demonstrate how to start and stop a motorcycle safely. Before starting the motorcycle have the riders perform:
ƒ Applying the front brake when instructed
ƒ Applying the rear brake when instructed
ƒ Releasing the clutch and applying the throttle in sequence
The rider should be able to perform the following to a competent level:
ƒ Start the engine on command
ƒ Stop the engine on command
ƒ Start and stop in combination – i.e. pull clutch, start bike, engaged clutch, place in gear, feel clutch
friction, take bike out of gear and turn off bike.
ƒ Without the engine running, have the rider walk the bike and apply the front brake (beside or straddling).
Junior Coaching Program – Coaches Lesson Plan
Page 2 of 5
Motorcycling Australia
PO Box 134
South Melbourne, VIC, 3205
t: 03 9684 0500 f: 03 9684 0555
Email: mail@ma.org.au
5.
Riding Position and Weight Distribution
40min
Instruct why the rider needs to apply the correct body position and weight distribution whilst riding in a straight
line, cornering (flat and berms or those appropriate to discipline being taught), on rough ground and jumping;
demonstrate, actively and statically, the correct weight distribution and body position for each of these. Have the
rider perform the following body positions on a static motorcycle.
Seated
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Seat position on the bike should be as forward on the seat as comfortably possible
Place feet on foot pegs and close to the motor
Explain boot placement on foot pegs – relative to weight distribution, gear shift and rear brake
Grip the bike with the knees
Elbows bent and in an upward position – i.e elbows above hands when on handlebars
Eyes always looking ahead – chin up
Two fingers over each lever (where appropriate)
Explain that the seated position a rider chooses is based on terrain conditions
Standing
ƒ Standing on the foot pegs with feet in close to the motor
ƒ Explain boot placement on foot pegs – relative to weight distribution, gear shift and rear brake
ƒ Bend the legs slightly to absorb bumps
ƒ Grip the bike with the knees
ƒ Elbows bent and in an upward position – i.e elbows above hands when on handlebars
ƒ Riders chin to be approximately over the front bar pad (back slightly bent forward)
ƒ Eyes always looking ahead – chin up
ƒ Two fingers over each lever (where appropriate)
ƒ Explain that the standing position a rider chooses is based on terrain conditions
6.
Starts and Riding Slowly in a Straight Line
40min
This module teaches the rider good throttle and clutch technique for controlled starting (without stalling) and the
ability to ride slowly in a straight line. Being able to start smoothly and ride slow develops the riders balance and
fine tunes their use of all motorcycle controls.
Starts (slowly and controlled):
The aim here is to teach the rider to be able move the motorcycle short distances from a stationary position.
ƒ Have the rider move the bike in first gears 1-2 metres in a slow and controlled manner and then have them
stop using the clutch, front and rear brakes, use left foot for balance, repeat several times.
Slow Riding:
ƒ After a controlled start have the rider move at walking pace in a straight line and stop every 5-10 metres
while keeping the feet on the foot pegs. The rider needs to use the front and rear brakes, clutch and
throttle to maintain control throughout this exercise. For coaching variation conduct a slow ride
competition – i.e. the last to cover a set distance without touching the ground with the feet.
Zig Zag:
ƒ Once the rider can perform slow riding with correct body position have them practice zig zags through
witches hats in both the seated and standing positions.
Race Starts:
Explain to the rider the various starting procedures which include:
ƒ Start gates (Motocross)
ƒ Rubber band (Motocross)
ƒ Tape start (Speedway)
ƒ 10 second countdown (Enduro)
ƒ Flag starts
Have the rider practice the following exercises to improve their race starts, also reiterate clutch and throttle control:
ƒ Practice various starting scenarios
ƒ Practice starts with multiple riders into different types of corners marked with cones or different tracks
Junior Coaching Program – Coaches Lesson Plan
Page 3 of 5
Motorcycling Australia
PO Box 134
South Melbourne, VIC, 3205
t: 03 9684 0500 f: 03 9684 0555
Email: mail@ma.org.au
7.
Throttle and Clutch Control
30min
The aim of this module is to refine the rider’s throttle and clutch control so that they are competent at controlling
speed and traction. Practice throttle, clutch and brake use on a number of surfaces:
Full Lock Turns
ƒ Have the rider travel in as small a circle as they can. Then instruct the rider to reduce the size of the circle
as their clutch, brakes, throttle control and balance improves. Aim to have the rider achieve a full
handlebar lock circle in first gear on a smooth flat surface.
ƒ Once a full lock circle can be performed have the rider attempt a “figure 8”.
Rear brake skids
ƒ Whilst the rider is traveling in first or second gear, have them engage the clutch and apply the rear brake
so that the rear wheel skids and slides to one side approximately 90 degrees.
ƒ Once the rear wheel has slid to one side the rider then needs to combine clutch disengagement and throttle
control to ride away in a controlled manner.
ƒ Have the rider perform this drill in both the standing and seated position.
Slow Front Wheel Lift
ƒ At walking pace use the throttle and clutch more abruptly to loft the front wheel slightly off the ground.
8.
Braking
60min
Explain and demonstrate the functions and relative stopping power of the front, rear and engine brakes. In an open
flat area set up a stop box (tyres, witches hats) and have the rider practice at controlled speeds the following skills:
ƒ Stopping inside box with rear brake only
ƒ Stopping inside box with front brake only – teach rider to squeeze brake slowly, not grab at it abruptly
ƒ Stopping inside box using both brakes
ƒ Stopping using both brakes while changing gears
ƒ Create on track exercise to combine all braking methods
9.
Cornering
40min
Explain and demonstrate to the rider the techniques for entering, executing and exiting a corner appropriate to the
discipline being taught:
ƒ Discuss line selection for a given corner – consider corner entry, execution and exit and surface conditions
ƒ Approach corner in correct body position
ƒ Discuss braking options on entry and throughout the corner
ƒ Select the appropriate gear for the corner and track conditions
ƒ Discuss throttle control for a variety of corners and surface conditions
ƒ Discuss the appropriate body position to suit a variety of corners and surface conditions
ƒ Discuss eye line on entry, execution and exit of a corner
ƒ Consider weight distribution to the outside footpeg
ƒ Keep elbows out
ƒ Discuss corner exit with reference to next obstacles i.e. track line, eye line, surface conditions
10. Role of Officials
10min
Explain briefly the roles of the officials at a race meeting. Below are some officials:
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Steward Referee (Speedway)
Clerk of Course
Race Secretary
11. Rules of Motorcycle Racing
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Flag Marshals
Track Marshal
Time Keeper
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Judge
Starter
Scrutineer
10min
Explain the meaning and use of the flags and the general competition rules of Motorcycle Sport. Display and make
reference to the Manual of Motorcycle Sport and Kick Start – Getting Started In Motorcycle Sport booklet. Flags:
Junior Coaching Program – Coaches Lesson Plan
Page 4 of 5
Motorcycling Australia
PO Box 134
South Melbourne, VIC, 3205
t: 03 9684 0500 f: 03 9684 0555
Email: mail@ma.org.au
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Yellow
Red
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Green
Black
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Checked
Yellow and Orange
12. Discipline Specific Skills
60min
This module is designed to provide skills that are specific to the discipline that the rider is involved in. Some of
the areas that can be covered are:
Riding in Mud:
Explain and demonstrate to the rider the steps involved in riding in muddy conditions:
ƒ Discuss the correct body position for various surface conditions
ƒ Use smooth throttle and brake control and correct gear selection
ƒ Look ahead and remain in the correct body position
ƒ Discuss traction in varying mud conditions
ƒ Discuss riding gear and potential bike set-up for wet conditions
Riding in Sand:
Explain and demonstrate to the rider the steps involved in riding in sandy conditions:
ƒ Discuss the correct body position for various surface conditions
ƒ Use smooth throttle and brake control and correct gear selection
ƒ Look ahead and remain in the correct body position
ƒ Discuss traction in varying sands conditions
ƒ Keep good momentum using the throttle and gear selection
ƒ Less braking is required to control the bike due to the drag from the sand
ƒ Discuss riding gear and potential bike set-up for wet conditions
Drop Off’s / Hill Climb / Descents
Drop offs:
ƒ Be aware of surface conditions when descending
ƒ Approach in correct body position
ƒ Scan ahead for obstacles and select appropriate gear
ƒ Move body weight to rear of the bike as starting to descend obstacle/s
ƒ Control speed using brakes and throttle control
Hill Climb:
ƒ Approach in correct body position
ƒ Scan ahead for obstacles and select appropriate gear
ƒ Move body weight to the appropriate position for the given hill
ƒ Discuss appropriate throttle control and the use of momentum – consider options at the crest of the hill
Jumping:
Explain and demonstrate to the rider the steps involved in jumping which include:
ƒ Approach
ƒ Take-Off
ƒ Airtime
ƒ Correction Techniques
ƒ Landing
Have the rider practice the following skills:
ƒ Discuss the take off and landing area’s and jumping distance
ƒ Approach jump in standing position
ƒ Scan ahead for obstacles before the jump
ƒ Control approaching speed and discuss line selection
ƒ Keep in central standing position
ƒ Use appropriate throttle control on the up ramp
ƒ Discuss possible airtime correction techniques
ƒ Discuss the throttle use during landing
Junior Coaching Program – Coaches Lesson Plan
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