Oxygen Analyzer Manual Model 2010BR

Oxygen Analyzer Manual Model 2010BR
AMI
Oxygen Analyzer Manual
Model 2010BR
AMI, Huntington Beach.
Contents
Preface
Thank you!
1
Caution
1
Address
1
Model 2010BR Oxygen Analyzer
2
Introduction
2
Features:
2
Oxygen sensor:
3
Sensor Warranty:
3
Instrument Warranty:
3
Revision Notes:
3
Installation and Operation
AMI Analyzer Manual
1
4
Receiving the analyzer
4
Installation.
Location:
Safety Considerations:
Installation Procedure
Basic Calibration procedure:
Gas and power lines:
4
4
4
5
5
6
Interconnections:
Alarm connections:
Output connections:
Output Selection:
Serial connections:
Set up options:
Sample Handling:
Gas pressures:
Sensor Installation:
Hydrogen Sulfide:
8
9
9
10
10
11
12
12
12
13
Operation
14
Contents • i
General Description:
Security:
Front Panel Controls:
14
14
14
Output Ranges
View Output Range
Change Output Range
15
15
15
Alarm Set Points
View Alarm Set Points
Change Alarm Set Points
15
15
15
Alarm Hold Off
15
Calibration (Spanning)
16
Verify Span Factor:
16
Read the Temperature:
16
Alarm Functionality:
16
Communications
RS-232 communication:
Communication program:
Analyzer Section:
Alarms Section:
Data Logging
Advanced Calibration:
Maintenance and troubleshooting
18
19
19
20
20
21
22
Maintenance:
Periodic Calibration:
Sensor Replacement:
Sensor replacement cautions:
Sensor replacement procedure:
Bleeding a regulator
O rings
22
22
22
23
24
24
25
Troubleshooting
All oxygen applications
26
26
Specifications and Disclaimer
29
Specifications:
29
Disclaimer
30
Material safety data sheets (MSDS)
Sensor type P2, T1
Product Identification
AMI Analyzer Manual
18
31
31
31
Contents • ii
Physical and chemical data
Fire and explosion hazard data
Reactivity data
Health hazard data
Emergency and first aid procedures
Handling information
31
32
32
33
34
34
Sensor type T2
Product Identification
Physical and chemical data
Physical hazards
Health hazard data
Emergency and first aid procedures
Handling information
35
35
35
36
37
37
38
Glossary of Terms
39
Index
41
AMI Analyzer Manual
Contents • iii
Preface
Thank you!
We would like to thank you for purchasing the most advanced trace oxygen analyzer available. We have gone to great
lengths to make this analyzer as simple, and complete, as possible. It includes our patented cell block, (patent numbers
5,728,289 and 6,675,629), and our patent-pending sensor. It uses the most sophisticated 24 bit electronics with complete
microprocessor control to provide extreme ease of use as well as built in data logging to make record keeping easier.
With the optional liquid rejection probe accessory and cooling coil it provides a complete system for monitoring natural
gas gathering systems and many other trace gas applications.
Please verify that the analyzer was not damaged in transit. If so please contact the shipper as well as AMI.
Trace Oxygen measurement is difficult because the air contains high levels (209,000ppm) of oxygen, and it will get into
the smallest leaks. Oxygen molecules will enter through a leak, no matter the pressure or what is in the line.
Caution
Read and understand this manual fully before attempting to use the instrument. In particular understand the hazards
associated with using flammable or poisonous gases, and associated with the contents of the sensor used.
Address
Advanced Micro Instruments.
18926 Gothard St
Huntington Beach, CA 92648
(714) 848-5533
www.amio2.com
Rev C 10/18/2006
AMI Analyzer Manual
Preface •
1
Model 2010BR Oxygen Analyzer
Introduction
The Advanced Micro Instrument Trace Oxygen Analyzer Model 2010BR provides the latest in high precision oxygen
measurement. It is specifically designed for use with flammable gases in hazardous areas, and includes a number of
features that make it particularly suitable for this application.
As of this writing, approval is pending for Class 1 Div 1 Group BCD.
This manual covers software version 1.0 though v2.3
Features:
•
Compact size
•
Bi-directional serial output with simple protocol
•
Unique patented cell block
•
Backed by a two year warranty (excluding sensor)
•
9 Selectable output ranges
•
•
Auto-ranging display with user-selectable output
range
Choice of analog outputs: a current output of 420mA or a voltage output of 1-5V, both isolated
•
Three levels of security access settable via the
RS232 interface: no front panel settings allowed,
span only allowed and complete access allowed.
Two fully adjustable alarm relay contact closures
24VDC/110VAC 5A.
•
Optional alarm delay-on activation with
programmable delay
•
Front panel sensor access
•
•
Optional air or span gas calibration, no zero gases
required
Front panel alarm hold off/bypass with
programmable delay
•
Virtually unaffected by hydrocarbons or other
oxidizable gases
Optional pulse drivers for latching-type solenoid
valves
•
Built-in data logging with real time clock
•
Integrated sample system
•
•
Metering valve flow control
Optional heated sensor compartment for standalone operation in inclement weather
•
Integrated H2S scrubber optional
•
Designed for Class 1 Div 1 Group BCD
•
High accuracy and fast response
•
Optional 117 VAC/24VDC operation
•
Large liquid crystal display
•
•
AMI Analyzer Manual
Model 2010BR Oxygen Analyzer •
2
Oxygen sensor:
AMI manufactures its own electrochemical sensor. This measures the concentration of oxygen in a gas stream, using an
oxygen specific chemistry. It generates an output current in proportion to the amount of oxygen present, and has zero
output in the absence of oxygen, thus avoiding any requirement to zero the analyzer. The cell is linear throughout its
range. The span calibration may be performed using standard span gases or ambient air. Unlike competitive sensors, the
AMI sensor is made using a high capacity metallic body that provides long life with about twice the active ingredients of
conventional sensors, but without the extended come-down time.
Sensor Warranty:
The sensor is warranted to operate for a period determined by its class. If the sensor ceases to operate correctly before
this time has elapsed, contact AMI for a return authorization for evaluation. If there is any evidence of defective material
or workmanship the sensor will be replaced free of charge.
NOTE: Any evidence of abuse or physical damage, such as a torn membrane, will void the warranty.
Instrument Warranty:
Any failure of material or workmanship will be repaired free of charge for a period of two years from the original
purchase (shipping date) of the instrument. AMI will also pay for one way shipment (back to the user).
This warranty does not cover the sensor, which is covered by its own warranty (see above).
Any indication of abuse or tampering will void the warranty.
Revision Notes:
In October 2006 the hydrogen sulfide scrubber was removed, and the orifices were replaced with an integral flow-control
needle valve.
Various software improvements were made, particularly to the interface to the PC; a rare bug that resulted in the PC
sometimes corrupting internal variables was eliminated; and the data logging was improved.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Model 2010BR Oxygen Analyzer •
3
Installation and Operation
Receiving the analyzer
When you receive the instrument, check the package for evidence of damage and if any is found, contact the shipper.
Do not install the sensor until the analyzer is completely installed, the gas lines are plumbed and the electrical
connections are all made; and sample or zero gas is ready to flow into it.
Installation.
Location:
The unit is designed to be mounted on a wall or on a pipe in a general purpose, Class 1 Division 1 or Class 1 division 2
Group B,C,D area. When equipped with the optional heater it may be mounted outdoors, though it should be given a sun
shield if in direct sunlight. It should be mounted at a suitable viewing level. Refer to the drawing (figure 1) showing the
analyzer dimensions. SEALS ARE REQUIRED ON THE POWER AND SIGNAL CONDULET ENTRIES,
whether the area classification is Division 1 or Division 2.
Although the unit is RFI protected, do not to mount it close to sources of electrical interference such as large
transformers, motor start contactors, relays etc. Also avoid subjecting it to significant vibration.
Mount the unit at a suitable eye level (so you can easily read the LCD and adjust the controls), not so close to a wall on
the right side that you will have a hard time connecting the gas lines.
Safety Considerations:
The unit is designed for installation in either a general purpose or a Class 1 Div 1 or Div 2 Group B,C,D area, but it is
also designed so that a hazardous gas may be introduced into its main compartment. This gas may be any group B,C or D
gas.
The unit consists of two enclosures mounted on a back panel. The smaller enclosure is explosion-proof and contains the
electrical connections for the user, and also the power supply and safety components for the other enclosure.
The larger enclosure contains the analytical circuitry, the sample handling components and the oxygen sensor. This
circuitry is designed for intrinsic safety and meets requirements for Class 1 Div 1 Group B,C,D.
There is an RS-232 connection available from the explosion-proof section. This may be wired up permanently, or may
be used occasionally by removing the explosion-proof cap. If so, the area MUST be declassified prior to this.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
4
Installation Procedure
Don’t open the Sensor bag until you are finished with this procedure!!!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Mount analyzer in a shelter if possible, at a convenient eye level, not too close to the right wall.
Connect the sample line with ¼” ss tubing.
Cap the vent of the analyzer with a ¼” plug.
Turn Sample/Bypass valve to the Sample position.
Open the Flow control valve.
Pressurize analyzer to 20psig.
Leak check every conceivable leak possibility with Snoop or equivalent.
Remove pressure.
Remove exhaust cap.
Adjust sample flow to 1 SCFH with the Flow control valve.
Connect vent line to outside, running slightly downhill all the way.
Leave the valve on the analyzer pointing to SAMPLE and allow the sample gas to purge the unit while you wire
it up.
Connect the analyzer ground to an 8 ft ground rod (or similar high quality ground).
Install electrical seals.
Connect power and other electrical connections
Power up analyzer.
Connect laptop and verify all alarm, output and security settings.
Set the analyzer clock time, and click on “Clear Data Log”.
Verify output calibration.
Test the entire system, including shut down and flow computer operation using the cell simulator.
Seal the electrical seals.
Screw on the explosion-proof cap.
Turn valve to OFF.
Unscrew cell cap, and install oxygen sensor.
Stabilize for 45 seconds ONLY, adjust span to 20.9%.
IMMEDIATELY turn valve to SAMPLE.
Purge with sample gas for 2 hours, or until the oxygen reading has fallen to low ppm levels.
If desired, span with known calibration gas.
Basic Calibration procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Connect regulator (with Stainless Steel diaphragm ONLY) to span gas tank.
Bleed high side of regulator 7 times. (See “Bleeding a regulator” below.)
Bleed low side of regulator 7 times.
Shut off regulator outlet valve and leak check all fittings, gauges and packing glands with Snoop.
Flow calibration gas through a length of Ralston tubing WHILE you are connecting the tubing to the span gas
fitting. Allow the gas to purge through the fitting for about 20 seconds before you tighten it.
Tighten fitting on the span gas inlet.
Press the ALARM HOLD OFF button, and adjust the time displayed suitably (typically 10 minutes).
Turn the analyzer flow valve to the SPAN position.
Allow to stabilize for 5 minutes.
Verify that the analyzer reads within about 15% of the span gas value.
If so, adjust the analyzer span (see below) until it reads the span gas value.
Let it go back to normal operation (the “SPAN” flag goes out on the LCD display), then press the UP arrow and
note the number displayed (the “Calibration factor”). You can use this to get an idea of the remaining cell life in
the future.
Rotate the valve back to the Sample position.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
5
If the span gas reads worse than 15% wrong, something is wrong either with the gas, or with the plumbing (you have a
leak). See the troubleshooting section for some ideas about curing this.
The following sections describe each of the above sections in more detail.
Figure 1. Outline Drawing
Gas and power lines:
Do not install the sensor until the gas lines have been connected and the electrical connections made.
Install the unit, and connect the gas and power lines. Connect the sample gas line to the fitting on the coalescing filter;
the span gas (if any) to the span gas inlet, and the exhaust line to a suitable vent. All fittings are ¼” compression fittings.
Sample gas:
The sample gas pressure must be below 125psig. The connection is a ¼” compression fitting. We recommend that you
use an “Analyzer Guardian” (a liquid rejection device) on the sample if there is any possibility of water or entrained
liquids in the sample. Don’t allow liquid water to enter the analyzer! This may mean that you have to cool the
sample and drop out water before it gets into the analyzer.
Span gas:
The span gas should be set to about 10 psig. Do not leave the gas cylinder on when you are not spanning the analyzer.
Any leak will contaminate the span gas bottle, or alternatively drain it. Turn the bottle off with the cylinder valve.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
6
Exhaust:
The exhaust must be arranged in such a way that it will not plug under any circumstances. A typical means of ensuring
this is to run the exhaust line next to the (warm) gas lines so that it always remains above freezing. The exhaust is
typically a flammable gas, so it must be vented in a safe area. The exhaust line should run downhill, so that pockets of
condensate do not collect at the low point. A “Back diffusion assembly” may be used to prevent diffusion of air back
into the sensor should flow be lost.
Power connections:
The unit is available in two versions, an AC powered one and a DC powered version.
The AC version operates off nominal 117VAC at about 25 watts if the heater is installed, less than 5 watts without it. The
DC unit is designed to operate off a nominal 12 -24V DC supply. The Absolute Maximum Voltage is 28VDC, and the
minimum is 9.5V. The heater if provided will work at a power proportional to the supply voltage, so if one is used it is
best to use either AC or 24VDC power.
Make absolutely sure that you are using the correct power supply! The AC unit has a black interconnection panel, with
white lettering, while the DC unit has a white panel with black lettering. Use of the wrong power supply will not allow
the unit to work, and may create serious problems.
Connect the power wires to the terminals marked “Power Input”. If using DC, the positive supply line connects to the
terminal marked “+”, and the negative line to the terminal marked “-“. If using AC, the hot line is connected to the
terminal marked “H”, and the neutral to the terminal marked “N”. In either case, the ground terminal MUST be
connected to a low impedance ground connection. Current draw for the DC unit is typically about 40mA at 24VDC. If
you are using the heater with a DC supply, the power output of the heater will depend on the power supply voltage, so
that 12V will provide much less heating than 24V. The current draw with heater may be as high as 2.5A.
The alarm contacts are rated at 24VDC or (nominally)110VAC at 5A. Only two terminals are available from each relay,
but they can be programmed for normally open or normally closed operation.
The ground stud on the main panel MUST be made to a good earth, with a resistance to ground of less than 1
Ohm.
An external circuit breaker or switch MUST be provided to allow disconnection of the AC power, in close
proximity to the analyzer and within easy reach of the operator!
117VAC version is to be installed only in installation (overvoltage) category I or II.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
7
Interconnections:
RS 232
RS 232
WARNING!
Disconnect
power before
removing this cover
12-24VDC
1A fuse
1-5V
or
4-20mA
+ -
+ -
WARNING!
Disconnect
power before
removing this cover
Alarm
1
Alarm
2
117 VAC 50/60Hz
1A
H
N
DC connections
1-5V
or
4-20mA
Alarm
1
Alarm
2
+ -
AC Connections
Figure 2. Interconnection panels
Figure 3. Interconnections
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
8
Alarm connections:
The alarm connections are special single pole relays that may be programmed to be either “normally open”, or “normally
closed” – that is, set so as to close on alarm or to open on alarm. They may also be programmed to go into alarm mode
either above or below a set point, and to either latch or not latch, that is, go back out of alarm when the oxygen level does
or else wait until the operator presses the “Alarm hold off” button on the front panel. The contacts can handle AC or DC
voltages, and can carry up to 5A of current for a resistive load. Inductive loads such as solenoid valves should be
“snubbed” – they should have diodes or Zener diodes or “Transzorbs” connected across them to absorb the inductive
spike. You can select any of the above options using a laptop computer with an RS-232 cable and the special software
that AMI can provide.
Output connections:
This unit is equipped with a selectable output. It may be either 1-5V or 4-20mA, selectable via a switch on the output
PCB (the board directly under the cover plate in the explosion proof housing – see Fig. 3 above). The positioning of the
switch is indicated on the PCB itself – put switch on the left-hand position for 4-20mA, and put it on the right hand
position for 1-5V. The 4-20mA option will increase the current draw to some degree, if the unit is powered from DC and
the heater is not used.
The output 4-20mA circuit is capable of driving a 600 Ohm load, while the voltage output needs at least a 10,000 Ohm
load. Either will saturate at more than 125% of the nominal full scale range.
Using AMI software you can set the output to 4mA, 12mA and 20mA(or 1V, 3V and 5V), and adjust the internal settings
to calibrate these values so as to get the most accurate possible transfer of information to a recording or computing
device. If you forget to reset them the unit will automatically return to its normal operation after ten minutes.
Switch on left
for 4-20mA
Switch on right
for 1-5V
Figure 4. Output selection switch positions
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
9
Output Selection:
To change from 4-20mA to 1-5V output, or vice versa, swap around the switch as shown in the figure above. It is in the
left hand position for 4-20mA, and the right hand position for 1-5V. If you switch between the two options the internal
calibration will be fairly close but not perfect, so it may be necessary to use the AMI User Interface to make the output
exact.
Serial connections:
An RS-232 port is provided, using a 4 pin Mini-DIN connector. This allows connection through a serial cable to a PC or
similar device. The circuitry used is protected against static shocks and general abuse, but certain precautions should be
taken when using this.
•
If you are not using an AMI-supplied cable, use only a shielded cable, and make sure the shield is grounded at
one end only.
•
Don’t run the cable more than about 50 feet.
•
Make absolutely sure that the connections are correct per the diagram below.
AMI can provide a program that can be used to configure the alarm settings, alarm delays, and all the other internal
settings, as well as download the logged data.
1
2
3 4
6 7
8
5
9
Note: Shield MUST
be connected
4 pin Mini-DIN
9 pin D-sub
Both connectors viewed from the wiring side
Figure 5. RS-232 connection wiring
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
10
Set up options:
The RS232 connection can be used to set up a lot of the functionality of the analyzer. See the communications section
below for details, but in brief the AMI program can be used to select a number of important parameters.
For example: It is often desirable to have the analyzer configured to shut down a compressor if the oxygen level is too
high – either very high for a short period, or rather high for a long period. However you don’t want to shut the
compressor down if the oxygen spikes for a short time due to some valve opening and closing somewhere, but not due to
a long term problem. Typical numbers are: if the oxygen level is over 10ppm for 20 minutes, or if it is over 20ppm for 5
minutes, the relay contact should close, otherwise it should be open.
Solution:
Connect both alarm contacts in parallel to the shut down device.
Set output range to 100ppm (or 50ppm, depending on flow computer input)
Set alarm 1 to alarm at 10ppm.
Set alarm 1 delay time to 20 minutes.
Set alarm 1 to high alarm (alarm above set point).
Set alarm 1 to close on alarm.
Set alarm 1 to non-latching.
Set pulse time to 0.
Set alarm 2 to 20ppm.
Set alarm 2 delay time to 5 minutes
Set alarm 2 to high alarm (alarm above set point).
Set alarm 2 to Close on alarm.
Set alarm 2 to non-latching.
Other alternatives include special settings for latching solenoid valves (typically set pulse time to 15 secs). Or it may be
that you need to have the contacts work in the opposite way – opening on alarm instead of closing. If you want the
compressor to remain shut down until an operator resets it, select latching alarms instead of non-latching ones. In this
case, once it goes into an alarm, it won’t come out of it until an operator presses the “Alarm Hold-off” button.
Once you have set everything up, you can select from three levels of security. If unauthorized fiddling is a problem, set
the security level so that no front panel access is allowed. This will let an operator see the span alarm and output range
settings, but not change any of them; alternatively you could allow him only to adjust the span, so that at least he can’t
mess up the alarm settings.
Finally, you can calibrate the connection between the analyzer and flow computer (or other monitor). Although we set up
the output very accurately in the factory, your computer may not be set up the same, or you may have changed the output
selection. If you press the button on the AMI user interface called “Advanced Calibration”, you can adjust the output of
the AMI unit so that it exactly matches the input of the flow computer.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
11
Sample Handling:
Figure 6 Flow Schematic
The sample is brought into the sample/span selection valve which contains an integral flow control needle valve.
The sample (or span gas) passes through the sensor compartment and exhausts through the flow meter.
The exhaust must be vented in such a fashion that the line will not freeze up, but on the other hand the flammable gas will
not pose a hazard. If there is a possibility of losing flow, a back-diffusion assembly should be used to safeguard the
sensor against high oxygen levels from air saturating it.
NOTE: Never allow the vent to become restricted, thus back-pressuring the sensor. Doing so will cause
inaccurate readings and may damage the sensor
Gas pressures:
The gas pressure must be at least 0.5psig, and less than 125 psig. If the sample gas is at a higher pressure than that, a
regulator should be used to reduce it to about 20 psig. This will allow the needle valve to give a good degree of control .
Sensor Installation:
The sensor is supplied sealed in a barrier bag. When you are ready to place it in the analyzer, open the bag and rapidly
place the sensor in its compartment, sensing side down. If desired, rapidly calibrate it on air, and then flow zero or
sample gas over the sensor until it has come down to its operating range.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
12
Hydrogen Sulfide:
AMI sensors have been upgraded and they are no longer particularly sensitive to low levels of hydrogen sulfide. The
standard sensor is good up to 10ppm H2S with no bad effects. There are two other versions for higher H2S levels: please
contact the factory. See below for a sensor table.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
13
Operation
General Description:
This series of analyzers is designed to be as simple to operate as possible. The analyzer displays the oxygen level in
appropriate units on the LCD, automatically adjusting its sensitivity as required. Meanwhile the analog output and the
alarms are set on a single (user selectable) range.
For example, you can set the analog output to correspond to 0-100ppm, and the alarms to be say 40% and 50% of range
(i.e. 40ppm and 50ppm), activating above set point. If the oxygen level actually is 25ppm, the display will show
25.0ppm, and the output signal will be at 25% of full scale. If the oxygen level becomes 200ppm, the display will show
200ppm, but the output will be saturated, and the alarms will both be on.
If you now manually change the output range to 0-1000ppm, the output will go to 20% of scale, and the alarms will go
off, since they now correspond to 400ppm and 500ppm, i.e. still 40% and 50% of scale.
The unit provides a number of adjustments and controls through the front panel, and many more are available through the
user interface program.
The analyzer is actually made with two processors which communicate to each other over a one-wire protocol internally.
This simplifies the intrinsic safety design. The analysis unit uses a very high definition ADC to measure the oxygen
signal as well as a temperature signal. Since it is so precise, it measures the full range of oxygen values with only one
gain change required. This takes place at around 400ppm, and is not normally noticeable in practice.
Security:
Through the user interface, three levels of security can be set. These are: No security (all front panel controls work),
Span (only the span control and the alarm hold off button are allowed to operate), and Full security (only the Alarm hold
off button performs a function, though other buttons will show settings but won’t allow them to be changed). If the front
panel controls don’t seem to work, use the AMI User Interface to change the security settings.
Front Panel Controls:
The controls all work the same way. You press the function you
want for a second, and let go, and the display will show the
value corresponding to that function, for about 3 seconds. For
example, if you press the OUTPUT RANGE button for a
second, the display will show the full scale output range. You
can change this value (if the security setting allows) by then
pressing the UP or DOWN arrow button. You can either press
this once for a small change, or you can hold it down , in which
case the number will change slowly at first, and then faster. If
you overshoot your target, press the other button to go back, and
the display will again start moving slowly.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
14
Output Ranges
The output range is the range to which the analog output signal and the alarm settings correspond.
Output ranges for
2010BR
0-10ppm, 0-50ppm, 0-100ppm, 0-500ppm, 0-1000ppm, 0-5000ppm, 0-1%, 0-5%, 0-25%.
Output ranges for
210BR
0-1%, 0-5%, 0-10%, 0-25%.; 0-1000ppm and 0-5000ppm are one option, and 0-100% is a
separate option.
View Output Range
Press the OUTPUT RANGE button on the front panel for a second, and let go. The display will show the full scale value
of the output range for about three seconds, and then change back to the oxygen reading.
Change Output Range
Press the OUTPUT RANGE button for a second and let go. While the output range value is displayed, press the UP or
DOWN arrow buttons to change it. The output range will change to whatever you want. Simply leave it or select another
function and the range will be stored and the system updated. You will note that if this results in an alarm change, the
alarms will change as soon as the unit starts showing the reading again. If the output range does not change, the security
level must be set to full or span only security. In this case change the security level with the laptop and the AMI User
Interface program.
Alarm Set Points
The alarm set points can be viewed and changed (if security allows) from the front panel. All the other alarm
configuration settings can only be changed with the AMI User Interface program.
View Alarm Set Points
Press either of the ALARM SET POINT buttons and let go. The alarm set point will be displayed for about 3 seconds,
and the then the display will revert to the oxygen reading. The set point shown relates to the current output range. If you
change the output range, the alarm set point will change to a new value which is the same percentage of the new output
range. For example, if the output range is 25%, you can set an alarm set point to be half way up, i.e. 12.5% of oxygen. If
you then change the output range to 10%, the alarm set point will remain half way up the new range, and be displayed as
5% oxygen
Change Alarm Set Points
Press one or the other ALARM SET POINT button for a second, and let go. While the alarm set point is showing, press
either the UP or DOWN arrow button and hold it until the value is what you want. The numbers will scroll slowly at first
and then speed up: if you press the other button, or release and re-press the one you are using, the number will start going
slowly again. If security is set, nothing will happen. IN this case use the AMI User Interface program to change the
security level, or directly change the alarm set point.
Alarm Hold Off
Press the ALARM HOLD OFF button and release it. The display will show the alarm hold off time in minutes, and if any
relays are fired, they will be turned off and held off for the period of the alarm hold off time. If the relays are
programmed to latch, pressing this button will also unlatch them (and stop them from alarming again for the hold off
period).
If the security setting allows it, the alarm hold off time can be adjusted by pressing the UP or DOWN arrow buttons.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
15
Calibration (Spanning)
The model 2010BR may be calibrated using air as the span gas, or else using a lower level gas closer to the measurement
range. It is not necessary to zero the analyzer. Spanning is normally performed somewhere between once a month and
once every three months, depending on the level of accuracy required.
Do not attempt to span with a gas less than 20% of the range to be used, as the span errors multiply in this case and your
results will be less accurate. Make sure that the flow rate of span gas is the same as that of the process gas, unless you
use air as the span gas by opening the cell compartment. Adjust this with the regulator on the span gas bottle (which
should be set to about 10psig).
WARNING: Do not leave the sensor exposed to air for more than one minute. Doing so will shorten the life of
the sensor, and may make it take a long time to come back down to being able to read low levels of oxygen.
1.
Plumb the span gas cylinder into the analyzer span port.
2.
MAKE SURE THE REGULATOR IS BLED (see below), AND THE GAS LINES PURGED!
3.
Using the Sample/Span 3-way valve on the front panel, introduce span gas into the analyzer.
4.
If calibrating on air, rotate the gas selection valve to the Off position, and open the cell housing cap. Waft some air
into the cavity with your hand – don’t blow on it!
5.
Press the span button (so that the unit shows its “SPAN” flag) and let it go, and then press and hold the UP or
DOWN button until the reading is right.
6.
If using a calibration gas, read the value on the gas bottle label. Allow the span gas to flow and the reading to
stabilize. This takes about a minute for air, but it may take several minutes for span gas.
7.
Press the span button for one second (so that the unit shows its “SPAN” flag) and let it go, and then press and hold
the UP or DOWN button until the reading matches the span gas value, or if using air, 20.9%.
8.
Turn the valve back to Sample so that process gas is flowing again. You may have to press the ALARM HOLD OFF
button for long enough to avoid nuisance alarms while the sensor is purging.
Verify Span Factor:
The model 2010BR features a “Span Factor” display to help you determine the state of the sensor. As the sensor ages, its
output decreases gradually, and therefore the span factor has to be turned up during calibration to compensate.
Press and release the UP button while the unit is showing its reading to view the span factor. The factor corresponds to
the setting of a traditional ten turn span pot with a turns counter dial on it.
The setting should be between 300 and 600 for a new sensor. When you calibrate the analyzer, check this value before
and after the calibration. You should see that the value goes up slowly over the life of the sensor. When the value has
gotten up to 1000, the sensor has reached the end of its life and should be replaced. Also, if the value suddenly jumps, it
indicates that the sensor is getting close to the end of its life.
Read the Temperature:
Press the DOWN arrow button. The display will show the temperature of the cell block in degrees Fahrenheit. The value
is limited to 25F at the lowest, and about 120F at the highest. Values outside this range will damage the sensor! If the
unit is equipped with a heater, the temperature will of course be higher than ambient once the ambient temperature has
dropped below 50F.
Alarm Functionality:
The model 2010BR has two alarms, with two associated relays. As shipped, these are set to operate as high alarms (they
go into alarm if the oxygen level goes above the set point), and to close their associated relays upon alarm. Their time
delay is set to zero, and they do not latch. An Alarm state is indicated by the word “ALARM” appearing on the display.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
16
Using the analyzer front panel you can change the alarm set points (if security allows), but you cannot change any of the
other settings.
If you want to change how they work, you must use the AMI user interface to configure them.
In the analyzer we can assign how it generates an alarm, and what it does with it once it’s got one.
To generate an alarm, decide the following:
What oxygen level should be considered the alarm limit? You can set two levels, one for alarm 1 and the other for
alarm 2.
Should it alarm above a given oxygen level, or below it? If above, when the oxygen reading is higher than this alarm
level, an alarm will be generated.
How long should it wait before going into alarm? You may want it to make sure that the reading is going to stay
above the alarm level before it panics and shuts everything down. Set the “On delay” to some time in minutes for each
alarm.
When it does go into alarm, should the relay contacts open or close? You have to figure out what your target device
needs. For example, some “telltales” require a line to be shorted to ground to indicate an alarm, so in this case you want
to make the relay close on alarm.
Do you want the unit to drop out of alarm by itself, or to latch into an alarm state until someone goes out to it and
presses a button? If so, set the unit to “Latching”.
Are you using a latching slam valve to shut down gas flow? Often people will use a valve that requires a pulse of
power into one terminal to open it, and another pulse into another terminal to close it. Such a valve does not require
continuous current flow to hold it open or closed. You can set up the relays to operate this kind of valve by setting the
“Pulse time” to some suitable value, typically 15 seconds. (If you leave it set to zero, this feature is disabled).
If the pulse time is set to some number of seconds, when the unit goes into alarm, alarm 1 relay will change state (to the
alarm state – open or closed - as programmed) for that number of seconds, and then change back again. When the unit
goes out of alarm, either because the oxygen level has dropped out of the alarm region or someone has pressed the
ALARM HOLD OFF button, alarm 2 relay will change state to its alarm position (open or closed) for the same time, and
then it will drop out.
Do you want to temporarily disable the alarms? For example, when you calibrate the analyzer you don’t want to shut
down the pipeline. You can disable the alarms by pressing the ALARM HOLD OFF button, and then you can set the
time it will hold them off by adjusting the number displayed on the analyzer LCD.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Installation and Operation •
17
Communications
RS-232 communication:
1
2
3 4
6 7
8
5
9
Note: Shield MUST
be connected
4 pin Mini-DIN
9 pin D-sub
Both connectors viewed from the wiring side
Figure 7. RS-232 connection wiring
The RS-232 port is located on the cover panel in the explosion proof enclosure, and is provided as a 4 pin Mini-DIN
connector. The physical connection is described in the “Installation” section of this manual. You can purchase made-up
cables from AMI, and we recommend this as it avoids a series of possible errors.
Through the RS-232 interface you can operate the analyzer from your PC, and you can set up its internal parameters to
your liking.
•
We recommend that you use the AMI communication program for reading from and setting up the analyzer.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Communications •
18
Communication program:
Figure 8. User interface
The program will come up, and assuming the PC is connected to the analyzer, automatically fill in all the boxes and
buttons with values taken from the analyzer.
You can change values by writing in the new value and pressing ENTER (on the keyboard), or by clicking the
appropriate button or scroll button. The program will send the values down to the analyzer, and after a little, read the
value back to make sure it “took”. If it didn’t for some reason, the value will change back to whatever the analyzer
actually has.
Analyzer Section:
The current oxygen reading will be shown in the “Reading” text box. The output range will be shown beneath it, and this
can be changed by clicking on the scroll buttons.
The security setting can be selected by clicking on one of the three option buttons. The first one allows no user
adjustments through the front panel. Select this if you are concerned with unauthorized tampering of the analyzer. The
middle one allows an operator to span the unit, but it won’t let him adjust the alarms or the output range, or the alarm
hold off time. The last one allows complete control of the analyzer through the front panel.
Finally, the current cell block temperature can be read.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Communications •
19
Alarms Section:
First, set the desired output range. The alarms are referenced to the output range, so if you set them first, and then set
the range, you will have to reset the alarms.
Set the alarm set points for each alarm in the text boxes provided. The program converts the values from the analyzer
(which are percent of range) into absolute values. Over-write them with the value you want, and press ENTER on the
keyboard to send it down to the analyzer. For example, if you expect the oxygen values to vary between 0 and 10% of
oxygen, set the Output Range to 10%. If the alarm set point should be 5% oxygen, write into one of the alarm Set Point
boxes “10.0%” and press Enter.
Set the On Delay to the delay time you want. This is in minutes, and is independent for the two alarms.
Set the relay to open or close on alarm, and the alarm to occur above or below the set point. If above the set point, the
alarm will be triggered when the oxygen value becomes higher than the set point, whereas if below it will be out of alarm
above the set point and in alarm below it.
The remaining settings are common to both alarms.
If set to “Latching:, the alarms will stay triggered until someone presses the ALARM HOLD OFF button on the analyzer.
If set to “non-latching”, they will reset themselves when the oxygen level has gone back to the non-alarm state, above or
below set point (and hysteresis) as appropriate.
The “Alarm Pulse Time” should be set to zero if you don’t want to use the pulse feature. If you do, set this to a suitable
number in seconds – 6 seconds is normally OK – to drive a latching solenoid valve. When going into alarm, alarm relay
1 will pulse closed (or open) for six seconds, and when coming out of alarm, alarm relay 2 will pulse for six seconds.
This is true no matter whether it is alarm 1 or alarm 2 that goes into alarm: but both alarm 1 and alarm 2 have to be out
of alarm for the alarm relay 2 to pulse.
The “Alarm Hold Off Time” is the time in minutes that the analyzer will bypass its alarm once the ALARM HOLD OFF
button is pressed. The least value for this setting is 0, but in fact the analyzer will hold the alarms off for a minimum of
ten seconds.
Data Logging
The program shows the current time and date, and allows you to send this to the analyzer.
The analyzer logs data at a rate set by the “Logging Interval” box. If this is set to zero, logging will be disabled.
Typically this interval will be set to 1 minute. The unit is capable of storing 22000 data points, corresponding in this case
to 22000 minutes, or rather more than 14 days. Setting the interval to 4 minutes will allow it to store over two months of
data. The oxygen reading is averaged for the logging period, and stored as a percentage of the current output range, with
a resolution of 1% of the output range. Every 32 data points, various internal parameters including the time and date are
stored as well. If the memory capacity is exceeded, the unit will overwrite the oldest data and keep on storing data in a
circular fashion so that always the most recent set of data points can be retrieved.
You can download the stored data by pressing the “Download Data” button. It may take a couple of minutes to get it all,
and the progress of this process is shown in a color bar, in traditional Windows style, though unlike most Windows
programs the length of the bar does in fact correspond with the amount of data already retrieved.
Once the data is retrieved, it can be displayed either in tabular form or else as a graph, by pressing the appropriate button.
It may also be saved as an Excel™ compatible “CSV” format for subsequent analysis. In the graph display you can zoom
into data by left clicking the mouse, and zoom out by right clicking.
The analyzer can be left to overwrite the old data by itself, or else it can be told to start again at the beginning. Early
units will not erase any data except by overwriting it with new data: units shipped after about 1/1/2005 will delete all old
data if told to “Clear data log”.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Communications •
20
Figure 9. User interface Advanced Calibration Screen
Advanced Calibration:
The Advanced Calibration screen allows you to calibrate the analog output, as well as see the internal gain values for the
main oxygen algorithm. It does not allow you to change these latter.
To calibrate the analog output, you will need to have a meter set up for measuring current or voltage (depending on what
you have chosen its output to be).
1. Select “Zero” by clicking in the appropriate radio button.
2. Measure the output you actually get, and adjust the number that appears in the “Adjustment” box until it is
correct – either 4mA or 1V respectively. You can either click on the UP or DOWN arrows, or else write a
whole new value into the box, pressing Enter on the keyboard when you are done. This value is normally about
680.
3. Select “Fullscale” by clicking on that radio button.
4. Measure the output you actually get, and adjust the number that appears in the “Adjustment” box until the output
is indeed full scale, either 20mA or 5V. This number will be somewhat over 10,000.
5. Select “Zero” again and verify that the zero is still OK, and if not adjust the adjustment value again.
6. If you have changed the zero, recheck the full scale value again.
7. Keep doing this until both ends are correct. Normally only one adjustment is needed.
8. Select the Mid scale radio button, and verify that you either have 12mA or 3V.
9. Select “Oxygen reading” to go back to the natural output of the analyzer. If you forget to do this it will go back
to the oxygen reading anyway after ten minutes.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Communications •
21
Maintenance and troubleshooting
Maintenance:
The model 2010BR is virtually maintenance free other than for periodic calibration and occasional sensor and scrubber
replacement.
Periodic Calibration:
The analyzer should be calibrated about once every month to obtain the best accuracy. The sensor typically declines in
sensitivity by about 1% per month, so a monthly calibration is usually satisfactory. Use in a particularly aggressive
environment may degrade the sensor faster: in this case calibrate more often.
Sensor Replacement:
This should be done based on the Span Factor feature, rather than as a response to a dead sensor. See the chart below for
recommended sensor replacement.
Sensor
Part
number
Description
Warrantied life
T1
4SEN06-1
Trace oxygen - inert gas
6 months
T2
4SEN09-1
Trace oxygen - CO2 background, up to
10ppm H2S
6 months
T3
4SEN17
Trace oxygen - CO2 background, up to
50ppm H2S
6 months
T4
4SEN18
Trace oxygen - CO2 background, up to
500ppm H2S
6 months
P2
4SEN03
Percent oxygen 0-25% - inert gas
9 months
P3
4SEN04
Percent oxygen – 0-25% CO2 background
6 months
P4
4SEN08
Percent oxygen – 0-100% - inert gas
6 months
Table 1. AMI sensor types
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
22
Sensor replacement cautions:
CAUTION: The sensor contains a caustic or acid liquid. If there is any sign of a
liquid in the cell compartment, do not allow it to come into contact with your
skin. If it does, immediately flush the affected area with water for a period of at
least 15 minutes. Refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet provided.
Dispose of leaking or used sensors in accordance with local regulations. Sensors
usually contain lead which is toxic, and should generally not be thrown into
ordinary trash. Refer to the MSDS to learn about potential hazards and
corrective actions in case of any accident.
O ring
Cell block
Electrodes
Sensor
Electrodes
Cell block front
Sensor
TAB
Membrane
Down
Figure 10. Inserting sensor in cell block
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
23
Sensor replacement procedure:
The sensor is provided in a special sealed bag. Do not open this until you are immediately ready to install the sensor.
Before installing sensor, make sure the power is ON. Don’t let the sensor be exposed to air for more than about 1
minute! It will take a long time to come down if you do, and may be completely unusable.
1.
Unscrew the cell block cap, being careful not to lose the O ring.
2.
Carefully remove old cell by pulling the tab on the label.
3.
Inspect the cell block cavity, and if any sign of moisture clean it out with a Q tip or similar. Make sure that the
contact springs inside the block are intact. Be careful not to snag them with the Q tip.
4.
Carefully open the bag using a pair of scissors or a knife. Make sure you don’t cut yourself or stab the sensor! In the
rare event that the sensor has leaked there will be liquid in the bag. If so do not proceed - you need a new sensor.
Be careful that you don’t poke anything such as a fingernail through the membrane.
5.
Remove the label on the back of the sensor that acts as a shorting clip. This may be found on the connection plate
on the back of the sensor.
6.
Holding the sensor by its tab, membrane side down, slide it into the cell block (gold plated contact side of sensor
should be facing up touching the cell block contacts. The membrane side is covered by a stainless steel disk.
7.
Verify that the sealing O ring is in place in the cell cap groove. Verify that the O ring and the cap are clean and free
of any particulate deposits (such as dirt).
8.
Carefully replace the cap, making sure that you do not cross thread it, and tighten firmly by hand. Do not overtighten.
9.
Immediately flow a low level gas such as sample, zero or low level calibration gas through the system to purge it.
Once the reading has stabilized, flow span gas and calibrate the sensor. If air is used for this, it is acceptable to
stabilize it on air at first for the calibration, and once this is accomplished, flow sample or zero gas to stabilize it at
its normal low level.
Bleeding a regulator
A newly installed regulator on a bottle of span gas is of course filled with air, at 210,000 ppm of Oxygen. Until this air is
removed, the apparent oxygen concentration in the span gas will be much higher than it should be. While simply flowing
the span gas will eventually accomplish this, it is much quicker and more reliable to “Bleed” the regulator first.
1.
Install the regulator on the span gas bottle, but do not open the bottle valve yet.
2.
Close the regulator exit valve.
3.
Close the regulator to what would be no pressure on the outlet.
4.
Briefly open the bottle valve, and close it again.
5.
Loosen the nut connecting the regulator to the bottle and allow the pressure to bleed off, and then tighten it again.
6.
Open the regulator to half its maximum pressure.
7.
Repeat steps 4 and 5.
8.
Open the regulator to its maximum exhaust pressure.
9.
Repeat steps 4 and 5.
10. Set the regulator to its correct output pressure (typically 10 psig).
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
24
O rings
The O rings used are all Buna N type. Replacements are available from AMI . The following lists all the O rings used in
the model 2010BR.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Position
O ring number
Valve circumference
1ORG09
Valve face
1ORG012
Cell cap
1ORG01
Flow meter seal
1ORG07
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
25
Troubleshooting
All oxygen applications
Analyzer does not power up.
1. Check that the power is connected correctly, and that you have the appropriate version for your power supply.
2.
Check that the power supply voltage is between 10V and 28VDC, or else it is 110VAC.
3.
Verify that the power plug is seated in its socket all the way, and that no whiskers of wires are shorting to each other
or to the cover.
4.
Unplug the power plug, and also the output one, and remove the cover. Carefully feel the two resettable fuses, small
yellow devices next to the power socket on the left side of the connector board. If they are hot, something is shorted.
You can try letting it cool down and plugging the power in again, but probably something serious has happened and
the unit will have to be serviced.
Analyzer reads too low
1. Sensor is not calibrated. Flow span gas through it and span the analyzer until the analyzer reads appropriately.
2.
If you cannot adjust the span enough to accomplish this, replace the sensor.
3.
If the new sensor still reads too low, check its calibration with air and read the span gas - the span gas may be
incorrect.
4.
If the sensor seems to die quickly, it may be getting poisoned by acid or sulfur bearing gases such as H2S. If so, use
a higher H2S rated sensor such as a T-4.
5.
Verify that the cell block connectors are in fact making contact with the cell. Clean them gently with a Q tip, and
bend them slightly straighter so that they make a good contact. Once this is done the cell should have some
resistance to being removed from the block.
6.
Water may have shorted out the contacts on the back of the sensor. If so, use a Liquid Rejection Probe with a
cooling coil or coalescing filter to make sure that condensation does not occur within th eanalyzer.
Analyzer reads too high
1. Verify that there is no flow restriction in the vent line of the analyzer.
2.
Increase the flow rate through analyzer by increasing the sample pressure - if the reading goes down it indicates a
leak in the incoming sample line or the cell block. Use “Snoop” or equivalent to check all the fittings back to the
gas source.
3.
Leak test all external fittings with “Snoop” soap solution or equivalent.
4.
Verify that the gas flow rate is correct. (0.1 to 2 SCFH)
5.
Oxygen diffusion can be a serious problem. Verify that no plastic tubing or other plastic components are used in a
trace gas system, including diaphragms of pressure regulators, packing of valves etc. For percent applications,
similar problems may be experienced with silicone tubing. Use Teflon or Tygon or similar high quality tubing.
6.
Verify the analyzer calibration using air as the span gas.
7.
Flow zero gas through the analyzer for a while until the reading is stable: shut off the incoming flow with the
sample/span valve and then immediately seal the vent tightly with a tube plug or equivalent (don’t pressurize the
cell!). Monitor the reading and see if it increases significantly over a 5 minute period. Such an increase indicates a
leak in the cell block or internal sample system.
8.
Remove the cell (and short it out!) and verify that the analyzer reads zero in all the ranges - if not, there is moisture
or corrosion between the sensor contacts in the cell block; clean the contacts and the area around them with isopropyl
alcohol, dry with dry compressed air or nitrogen, then replace the cap on the cell block again. Pressurize the system
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
26
to no more than 10 psig and leak check all the fittings and tubing including the sensor block penetrations such as the
sensor wire seals (nylon plugs and epoxy seals on the top of the cell block).
NOTE: Be careful not to get soap solution on the PC boards!
NOTE: Almost always, high oxygen readings are due to leaks. Oxygen in the air is under a partial pressure of about 5
psia at sea level, and thus will force its way into minute leaks, no matter what the internal pressure of any other gas may
be. 3000 psig nitrogen or other gas lines look like a vacuum to oxygen! This always surprises people who have not
experienced it.
Analyzer reads zero
1. Verify that the sensor is in the correct position, not upside down. If it is upside down, verify that the membrane has
not been punctured - i.e. there is no sign of electrolyte on the surface, and if not, put it back the right way up. If you
have left it this way for a while, it may take several hours to recover to a low reading.
2.
Verify that the cell block contacts are touching the sensor. Pull the sensor tab, and the contact should hold the sensor
with a gentle force. If not, the contacts may be bent. If they have been bent too much, remove the sensor and gently
bend them back so that they can again make contact.
3.
Make sure that the gold plated contact wires are clean. If not, gently clean them with a Q tip or an eraser. Do not
use an abrasive cleaner, as it will remove the gold plating.
4.
Check the output of the sensor with a DVM configured to measure current. Connect its leads to the two gold rings
on the back of the sensor - the center is ground. The output should be around 150 to 750 micro Amps in air. This
will take a few minutes to stabilize as the sensor consumes oxygen dissolved in its electrolyte. Replace the sensor if
it does not read this amount. See sensor replacement instructions under Maintenance.
No voltage or current output to recording device
1. Verify that the output wires are properly stripped and connected.
2.
Verify the connections on the output terminal block.
3.
Verify that the output connections are not shorted all the way back to the recording device. Disconnect the wires
from the analyzer and use an ohmmeter to check for shorts or opens.
4.
Verify that the unit is set to the correct output. Remove the output board cover and verify that the jumpers are in the
correct positions (on the left for current output, on the right for voltage output). If not, place them correctly.
No output alarm indication
1. Verify the alarm set points are correct - press the appropriate switch on the front panel, and check the displayed
reading on the LCD for correct setting.
2.
Verify that the connections on the terminal block are properly stripped and correct.
3.
Verify that the alarms are configured correctly, using a PC or similar communication device.
4.
Verify the alarm delay time with the PC.
5.
Verify that the output connections are not shorted all the way back to the recording device. Disconnect the wires
from the analyzer and use an ohmmeter to check for shorts or opens.
Incorrect readings
1. Verify that there are no leaks in the system.
2.
Verify that the span gas bottle is correctly marked by comparing its reading when the analyzer has been spanned on
air to what it actually says.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
27
3.
If spanning on air, verify that the air source is free of water vapor (humid air will contain about 3% less oxygen than
expected, depending on temperature), and that bottle air does actually contain 20.9% oxygen. Manufactured air
often does not!
Analyzer refuses to accept front panel settings
1. Using the RS-232 interface, verify that the security is set the way you want it.
Still no correct operation
1. Call AMI at 714 848 5533, and ask for Technical assistance.
2.
Or contact us by email at skirchnavy@amio2.com.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Maintenance and troubleshooting •
28
Specifications and Disclaimer
Specifications:
2010BR Standard ranges:
0 – 10 ppm, 0 – 50ppm, 0 –100 ppm, 0 – 500 ppm, 0 – 1000ppm, 0 – 5000 ppm, 0 – 1%, 0 – 5%, 0 – 10%,
0 –25%
Sensitivity: 0.5% of full scale
Repeatability: +/- 1% of full scale at constant temperature
Operating temperature: 5°C - 45°C (41°F - 113°F); -25°C - 45°C (-13°F - 113°F) with optional heater
Humidity: < 85%, non-condensing
Operational conditions: Pollution degree 2, Installation category I I.
Drift: +/- 1% of full scale in 4 weeks at constant temperature (dependent on sensor)
Expected cell life: 9 months to 2 years.
Response times:
90% of full scale in less than:
0 –5 ppm 50 sec
0 – 10 ppm 25 sec
0 – 100 ppm 10 sec
0 – 1000 ppm 10 sec
Outputs: 1-5V or 4-20mA isolated.
Alarm contacts: 117VAC @ 5A, or 28VDC @ 5A, resistive
Power requirements: 12-24VDC, <80mA, or 117VAC <1W; power increases to ~25W with optional heater
Absolute Maximum Power voltage 28V DC or 128VAC 60Hz
Overall dimensions: 15” w x 10” h x 6¼” d
Mounting hole dimensions: 2.8” w x 9.3” h
Weight 15 lbs
117VAC version is to be installed only in installation (overvoltage) category I or II.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Specifications and Disclaimer •
29
Disclaimer
Although every effort has been made to assure that the AMI analyzers meet all their performance specifications, AMI
takes no responsibility for any losses incurred by reason of the failure of its analyzers or associated components. AMI’s
obligation is expressly limited to the analyzer itself.
The AMI analyzer is not designed as a primary safety device, that is to say it is not to be used as the primary means of
assuring personnel safety. In particular it is not designed to act as a medical instrument, monitoring breathing air for
correct oxygen concentration, and should not be used as such when it is the only safety device on the gas system.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Specifications and Disclaimer •
30
Material safety data sheets (MSDS)
Sensor type P2, T1
Product Identification
Product name:
Oxygen sensor, class P1, P2, T1
Manufacturer:
Advanced Micro Instruments
Address:
Phone:
Date of last revision:
Emergency phone number:
(714) 848-5533
11/08/2004
(714) 848-5533
Physical and chemical data
Composition:
The sensor body is made of metal and glass-epoxy GR4 circuit board material, with a Mylar covering.
It contains the following substances:
Common name
Potassium hydroxide
solution 15%
Formula
KOH
Concentration
15%; 1-5ml
CAS number
1310-58-3
Lead
Pb
pure, 3-20 g
7439-92-1
AMI Analyzer Manual
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
31
Character of individual components:
KOH (pure)
Pb (pure)
Melting point/range
360°C
328°C
Boiling point/range
1320°C
1744°C
Specific gravity
2.04
11.34
pH
N/A
N/A
Infinite
Insoluble
Odorless white or yellowish
crystals
odorless gray metal
Component
Solubility in water
Appearance and odor
Fire and explosion hazard data
Flash point:
N/A
Flammable limit
N/A
Extinguishing media:
Special fire fighting equipment:
Unusual fire and explosion hazards:
LEL:
N/A
UEL
N/A
No special agents recommended.
Wear NIOSH/OSHA approved self-contained breathing
apparatus and protective clothing to prevent contact with skin
and eyes.
Emits toxic fumes under fire conditions.
Reactivity data
Stability:
Incompatibilities:
Hazardous decomposition byproducts:
Hazardous polymerization:
AMI Analyzer Manual
Stable
Aluminum, organic materials, acid chlorides, acid
anhydrides, magnesium, copper. Avoid contact with acids
and hydrogen peroxide > 52%
Toxic fumes
Will not occur
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
32
Health hazard data
Primary route of entry:
Exposure limits:
Ingestion, eye/skin contact
OSHA PEL: 0.05 mg/cu. M. (Pb)
ACG1H: 0.15 mg/m3 Pb; 2 mg/m3 KOH
Effect of overexposure: Ingestion:
Effect of overexposure: Eye:
May be fatal if swallowed. The electrolyte will cause a
burning sensation; the lead will lead to symptoms such as
loss of sleep, loss of appetite, metallic taste and fatigue.
The electrolyte is corrosive: it will produce a burning,
soapy sensation, irritation or severe chemical burns.
Effect of overexposure: Dermal:
The electrolyte will cause a soapy, slippery feel, and
eventually a burning sensation. It may cause irritation and
chemical burns.
Effect of overexposure: Inhalation:
Inhalation of the electrolyte will cause severe irritation and
chemical burns.
Signs/symptoms of exposure:
The electrolyte is harmful if swallowed, inhaled or
absorbed through the skin. It is extremely destructive to
the mucous membranes, stomach, mouth, upper respiratory
tract, eyes and skin.
The lead will lead to symptoms such as loss of sleep, loss
of appetite, metallic taste and fatigue.
Medical conditions aggravated by exposure:
Persons with pre-existing skin disorders, eye conditions or
impaired respiratory function may be more susceptible to
these substances. Lead exposure may aggravate disease of
the blood and blood forming organs, hypertension, kidney
damage, nervous and possibly reproductive damage.
Carcinogenity:
IARC: lead is classified as a class 2B carcinogen - possibly
carcinogenic to humans.
Other health hazards:
AMI Analyzer Manual
Lead is a chemical known to the state of California to
cause birth defects or other reproductive harm.
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
33
Emergency and first aid procedures
Eye contact:
Flush eyes with water for at least 15 minutes and get
immediate medical attention.
Skin contact:
Wash affected area with plenty of water and remove
contaminated clothing.
Ingestion:
Inhalation:
Give large amounts of cold water. Do not induce vomiting.
Seek medical attention. Do not administer liquids to an
unconscious person.
Liquid inhalation is unlikely. If it occurs, remove to fresh
air and seek immediate medical attention.
Handling information
NOTE: Oxygen sensors are sealed and under normal circumstances their contents do not present a health hazard. The
following information is given as a guide in the event of a leak.
Hygienic practices:
Wash hands after handling
Protective clothing:
Rubber gloves, chemical splash goggles.
Clean up procedures:
Wipe down the area several times with a wet paper towel,
using a fresh towel each time.
Protective measures during cell replacement:
Before opening the bag containing the sensor, check the
sensor for leakage. If any is found, do not open the bag. If
there is liquid around the sensor installed in the instrument,
put on gloves and eye protection before removing it.
Disposal:
Must be in accordance with all applicable federal, state and
local regulations.
Both lead and potassium hydroxide are considered
poisonous substances and are regulated under TSCA and
SARA title III.
EPA waste number:
California waste number:
DOT information:
D008
181
RQ Hazardous Waste Solid N.O.S. (lead), 9, UN3077, PG
III
NOTE: The above information is derived from the supplier's MSDS. This information is believed to be correct, but is
not necessarily inclusive and should be used only as a guide. Advanced Micro Instruments. shall not be held liable for
any damage arising out of using or abusing this product.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
34
Sensor type T2
Product Identification
Product name:
Oxygen sensor, class T2
Manufacturer:
Advanced Micro Instruments
Address:
Phone:
Date of last revision:
Emergency phone number:
(714) 848-5533
11/08/2004
(714) 848-5533
Physical and chemical data
Composition:
The sensor body is made of metal and glass-epoxy GR4 circuit board material, with a Mylar covering.
It contains the following substances:
Common name
Acetic acid
Formula
HC2H3O2
Concentration
5% w/v
CAS number
64-19-7
Potassium acetate
KC2H3O2
5% w/v
127-08-2
Lead
Pb
Pure
7439-92-1
AMI Analyzer Manual
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
35
Character of individual components:
HC2H3O2 (99%+)
Pb (pure)
KC2H3O2 (97%)
Melting point/range
16.6°C
328°C
292°C
Boiling point/range
118°C
1744°C
N/A
Specific gravity
1.05
11.34
1.57
pH
N/A
N/A
N/A
Infinite
Insoluble
72% @ 25°C
Clear colorless solution
with a strong vinegar-like
odor
odorless gray metal
Odorless, large white
melting crystal
40°C
N/A
N/A
427°C
N/A
N/A
Component
Solubility in water
Appearance and odor
Flash point
Auto ignition
temperature:
Physical hazards
Potential for fire and explosion:
The contents of the sensor are not flammable. There are no fire or explosion hazards associated with the sensor.
Potential for reactivity:
The sensor is stable under normal conditions of use. Avoid contact between the sensor electrolyte and strong acids and
oxidizing agents.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
36
Health hazard data
Primary route of entry:
Exposure limits:
Ingestion, eye/skin contact
OSHA PEL: 0.05 mg/cu. M. (Pb)
ACGIH TLV: 0.15 mg/cu.m. (Pb)
OSHA PEL: 10ppm (TWA) (Acetic acid)
ACGIH TLV: 10ppm (TWA), 15 ppm (STEL) (Acetic
acid)
Effect of overexposure: Ingestion:
The electrolyte could be harmful or fatal if swallowed
Acetic acid Oral LD50 (RAT) = 3310 mg/kg
Potassium acetate Oral LD50 (RAT) = 3.25 g/kg
Effect of overexposure: Eye:
Effect of overexposure: Dermal:
Effect of overexposure: Inhalation:
Signs/symptoms of exposure:
Medical conditions aggravated by exposure:
Carcinogenity:
Other health hazards:
The electrolyte is corrosive. Eye contact may lead to
permanent loss of vision.
The electrolyte is corrosive. Skin contact may lead to a
chemical burn.
Unlikely, but avoid it anyway. Vapors are very irritating to
eyes and nose.
Contact with skin or eyes will cause a burning sensation.
Persons with pre-existing skin disorders, eye conditions or
impaired respiratory function may be more susceptible to
these substances.
IARC: lead is classified as a class 2B carcinogen - possibly
carcinogenic to humans.
Lead is a chemical known to the State of California to
cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. As the
sensor is used, lead acetate is formed. Lead acetate is
know to the State of California to cause cancer.
Emergency and first aid procedures
AMI Analyzer Manual
Eye contact:
Flush eyes with water for at least 15 minutes and get
immediate medical attention.
Skin contact:
Wash affected area with plenty of water and remove
contaminated clothing.
Ingestion:
Give plenty of cold water. Do not induce vomiting. Seek
medical attention. Do not administer liquids to an
unconscious person.
Inhalation:
Liquid inhalation is unlikely. If it occurs, move to fresh air
and seek immediate medical attention.
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
37
Handling information
NOTE: Oxygen sensors are sealed and under normal circumstances their contents do not present a health hazard. The
following information is given as a guide in the event of a leak.
Hygienic practices:
Wash hands after handling
Protective clothing:
Rubber gloves, chemical splash goggles.
Clean up procedures:
Wipe down the area several times with a wet paper towel,
using a fresh towel each time.
Protective measures during cell replacement:
Before opening the bag containing the sensor, check the
sensor for leakage. If any is found, do not open the bag. If
there is liquid around the sensor installed in the instrument,
put on gloves and eye protection before removing it.
Disposal:
Must be in accordance with all applicable federal, state and
local regulations.
EPA waste number:
California waste number:
DOT information:
D008
181
RQ Hazardous Waste Solid N.O.S. (lead), 9, UN3077, PG
III
NOTE: The above information is derived from the supplier's MSDS. This information is believed to be correct, but is
not necessarily inclusive and should be used only as a guide. Advanced Micro Instruments. shall not be held liable for
any damage arising out of using or abusing this product.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Material safety data sheets (MSDS) •
38
Glossary of Terms
Accuracy
A loose term. In general with analyzers when we use the word "accuracy" we really mean "repeatability", the
degree to which an analyzer can repeat the same measurement reading on the same gas. All analyzers really
compare the measured gas against a known standard, and the accuracy of their measurement is therefore
dependent upon this standard.
Bulkhead
Refers to a method of mounting an analyzer where the back of the analyzer is mounted flush against a panel or
wall, while the body of the analyzer extends out in front of it, like a box hung on a wall's surface rather than
inset.
Come-down
A term referring to the operation of an analyzer reducing its reading from a high level to a low or zero level. For
trace analyzers this can be quite long, as it can take a long time for the final traces of oxygen to diffuse out of the
gas sampling system.
Electrochemical
A type of chemical reaction which produces an electrical current as part of the reaction. In this case, the oxygen
sensors produce an electrical current in proportion to the amount of oxygen present at their membrane surface.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display - a form of digital display suitable for reading in bright light conditions. The display
degrades below about -20C and above about 60C.
Membrane
A thin layer of permeable material (normally Teflon or a similar flouro-carbon) that controls the rate of diffusion
of oxygen into the electrochemical sensor. It also controls the rate of diffusion of electrolyte out of the sensor.
If the membrane is torn the sensor must be discarded.
Output - voltage or current
An analog voltage or current proportional to the oxygen measurement as a percentage of range, suitable for
driving a chart recorder or computer input. A current output is preferred as it is less subject to interference than
a voltage signal.
Panel
A type of mounting where the analyzer is inserted into a vertical panel so that the face plate is visible on the
panel, while the body of the analyzer extends behind it.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Glossary of Terms •
39
Process
Refers to the sample that is supposed to be analyzed. Typically an analyzer measures the product of a chemical
or physical process, and this is generally referred to as the "Process"
Range
The operational range of measurement of the analyzer. This is set by its amplifier sensitivity. Oxygen levels
higher than the range full-scale will not be measured accurately. Normally the analyzer should be measuring
oxygen concentrations between 20 and 80 percent of its range. In the case of the microprocessor based
2001/201 analyzers, normally refers to the range to which the analog output corresponds.
Response
The response time of an analyzer is defined as the time taken to go from the beginning of a noticeable change to
90% of the final level. The beginning is often defined as 10% of the final level. This is also called the "t90"
time. The transit time of the gas is not included in this measurement.
RFI
Radio Frequency Interference. All analog circuits are prone to interference from high level radio frequencies,
and special precautions must be taken to prevent this. The quality of such design is referred to by the acronym
EMC, or electromagnetic compatibility - the property of being compatible with any practical electromagnetic
environment.
RS-232
“Recommended Standard (no.) 232” – a rather non-standard description of the simplest way of allowing two
computers or a computer and another device such as a printer, to talk to each other.
Span
To calibrate the upper end of the range of measurement, as opposed to the bottom end or zero. Generally this is
done by exposing the sensor to a gas of known concentration, and making the analyzer read that value.
Trace
Low levels of, in this case, oxygen. This term is used to describe unwanted levels of oxygen as a contaminant,
typically in the low ppm levels.
AMI Analyzer Manual
Glossary of Terms •
40
Index
Address of AMI, 1
Advanced Calibration, 21
Alarm connections, 9
Alarm functionality, 16
Alarm set points, 15
Alarms Section, 20
Analyzer does not power up, 26
Analyzer reads too high, 26
Analyzer reads too low, 26
Analyzer reads zero, 27
Analyzer Section, 19
Basic Calibration Procedure, 5
Bleeding a regulator, 24
Calibration, 16
Caution, 1
Change Alarm set points, 15
Change Output Range, 15
Communication program, 19
Data logging, 20
Disclaimer, 30
Features, 2
Front Panel Controls, 14
Gas and Power Lines, 6
Gas pressures, 12
General Description (Operation), 14
Incorrect readings, 27
Installation location, 4
Installation Procedure, 5
Instrument Warranty, 3
Interconnections, 8
AMI Analyzer Manual
Introduction, 2
Maintenance, 22
MSDS, 31
No output alarm indication, 27
No voltage or current output to recording device, 27
O rings, 25
Output connections, 9
Output Ranges, 15
Output Selection, 10
Oxygen sensor, 3
Periodic Calibration, 22
Receiving the analyzer, 4
Revision Notes, 3
RS-232 communication, 18
Safety Considerations, 4
Sample Handling, 12
Security, 14
Sensor Installation, 12
Sensor Replacement, 22
Sensor replacement procedure, 24
Sensor Warranty, 3
Serial connections, 10
Service phone number, 28
Set Up Options, 11
Specifications, 29
Troubleshooting, 26
Verify Span Setting, 16
View alarm set points, 15
View Output range, 15
Index • 41
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